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The LVEMP II Civil Society Watch E-bulletin

A Monthly from the East African Sustainability Watch Network comprising: Uganda Coalition for
Sustainable Development (UCSD), Tanzania Coalition for Sustainable Development (TCSD) and Sustainable
Environmental Development Watch Network (SusWatch Kenya)

November 2017

Southern CSOs at COP23 in Bonn Call for Stronger NDCs, LEDs and ‘Paris
Rulebook’ for Poverty Reduction and Local Village Development

PIPA Partners at their Bonn Zone exhibition stall at COP23; Gunnar (INFORSE Network) launches the ‘Eco Village Development
Solutions’ book in South Asia during the PIPA Side event; COP23 President Frank Bainimarama with Barbara Anne Hendricks -
German Minister of Environment & Patricia Espinosa (UNFCCC head) at a Civil society event in Bonn zone.

East African CSOs working under a Project to ‘Promote Implementation of the Paris Agreement (PIPA) in
East Africa with those from South Asia, and the INFORSE Network, jointly organised a side event on
November 9, 2017 as part of the recently concluded UNFCCC Conference of Parties (COP23) held in Bonn
(Germany).

The key message from the side event was the need for stronger NDCs & LEDS that include local low
emission solutions to increase energy access and improve livelihoods to reduce poverty. Village based
solutions from South Asia and East Africa were highlighted, for NDCs & LEDS as well as for a good Paris
Rulebook. However, it was noted that there are challenges to realization of this. Mr. Stephen Kigunyu
(Kenyan negotiator) noted that inadequate resources, technical staff turnover, lack of alignment with national
development goals, lack of ownership, policy and legislative gaps stand to draw back this intention.

At this occasion, PIPA partners launched a policy brief titled: ‘The importance of a poverty reduction focus in
the NDCs, transparency framework and global stocktake’ that emphasized the importance of a “Paris Rule book”, that
set “rules” that result in NDCs and climate actions that mitigate climate change, build climate resilience,
enhance sustainable development and reduce poverty in developing countries. Partners strongly believe that
this will increase popular support for the climate actions, and thereby the likelihood of their success.

Also, INFORSE South Asia Members launched their book titled: ‘Greenhouse Emission reduction potential of
Eco-village Development (EVD) solutions in South Asia’. This report analyses climate change mitigation
effects of EVD solutions that are being implemented and promoted by a number of grassroots organizations to
help villages in South Asia achieve climate resilient, sustainable development. Of the 12 main solutions
promoted within the EVD concept and projects, this report presents an analysis of 5: improved cook stoves for
household use, household biogas plants, solar home systems, solar mini and micro grids and solar drying. The
result of the analysis is that for a sample village of 100 households taking up the selected EVD solutions,
emissions can be reduced by 500 - 600 tons of CO2 compared with a baseline with continued traditional
cooking and light, electricity from kerosene, diesel or Indian central power grid.

Read more about the PIPA project’s global policy brief and INFORSE South Asia Report:
 ‘The importance of a poverty reduction focus in the NDCs, transparency framework and global
stocktake’: https://www.scribd.com/document/363463388/PIPA-Project-Policy-Brief
 ‘GreenHouse Emission reduction potential of Eco-village Development (EVD) solutions in South Asia’
https://t.co/AnLg7tjDTU

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The LVEMP II Civil Society Watch E-bulletin
A Monthly from the East African Sustainability Watch Network comprising: Uganda Coalition for
Sustainable Development (UCSD), Tanzania Coalition for Sustainable Development (TCSD) and Sustainable
Environmental Development Watch Network (SusWatch Kenya)

In a Nutshell: Outcome From the UNFCCC COP23
The UNFCCC COP23 was held November 6 – 17 in Bonn, Germany under the Fiji
Presidency. The Conference included the 13th session of the Conference of the Parties serving
as the Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (CMP 13) and the 47 th sessions of the
Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA 47) and the Subsidiary
Body for Implementation (SBI 47). The main negotiations were held in the Bula zone parallel
to the side events that took place in the Bonn zone at the World Conference Center Bonn.
The Conference also included the fourth part of the first session of the Ad Hoc Working Group on the Paris
Agreement (APA 1-4) and the second part of the first session of the Conference of the Parties serving as the
meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement (CMA 1-2). In addition to the negotiation proceedings, the
Conference provided a platform for the hosting of side events and exhibits by admitted observer organizations and
UN agencies. These are meant for knowledge sharing, capacity building, networking and exploring actionable
options for meeting the climate challenge.

Below are some of the key highlights of the outcome from COP23:
 Resurgence of the pre-2020 climate action as a major issue with developing countries with concern that
developed countries had not done enough to meet their commitments made for the period up to 2020 that are
separate to the Paris Agreement.
 On the APA agenda items 3-6, negotiations progressed with development of informal notes that will be basis
for the following negotiation in May 2018, while it was decided to have extra negotiation session(s) in the fall
of 2018 in order to meet the 2018 deadline for agreements on these items.
 The Loss and Damage Discussions pushed by Tuvalu among others that was referred to an expert group
meeting ahead of COP24
 The Facilitative (Talanoa) dialogue was included as a four-page Annex to the main COP23 outcome decision.
It will be structured around three questions: Where are we?; Where do we want to go?; How do we get there?.
In addition, A decision to include inputs from non-party stakeholders as well as parties, a decision to set up an
online platform to receive inputs, and a new emphasis on efforts being made in the pre-2020 period are new
issues from COP23 that provide wide opportunity for CSOs and other actors to contribute to this process.
 Paris Agreement’s Article 9.5, with Africa Group, G77 and LMDC/China negotiators and other developing
countries asking developed countries to report on their flows of climate finance to developing countries, caused
some tensions in the last hours of the negotiations.
 The Adaptation Fund received new pledges of more than $90m (including $50m from Germany) during
COP23. The same amount was also pledged to the Least Developed Countries Fund (LDCF).
 French President Emmanuel Macron pledged to COP23 that Europe will cover any shortfall in funding
for the IPCC (arising from a funding gap left by US withdrawal from the Paris Agreement
 Launch of the “Powering Past Coal Alliance”, led by the UK and Canada.
 Agreement on the Gender Action Plan, which highlights the role of women in climate action and promotes
gender equality in the process was adopted.
 Agreement on the Local Communities and Indigenous Peoples Platform to support the exchange of
experience and sharing of best practices on mitigation and adaptation was adopted
 Fiji launched the Ocean Pathway Partnership, which aims to strengthen the inclusion of oceans within the
UNFCCC process.
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The LVEMP II Civil Society Watch E-bulletin
A Monthly from the East African Sustainability Watch Network comprising: Uganda Coalition for
Sustainable Development (UCSD), Tanzania Coalition for Sustainable Development (TCSD) and Sustainable
Environmental Development Watch Network (SusWatch Kenya)

CSOs Validate Second Draft of the Uganda National Climate Change Bill, raise
concerns
The Uganda Government released the second draft of the Climate change bill last month that was subjected to
a validation workshop organised by the climate change department and Feed the Future (USAID) support at
Ridar hotel (Seeta) on November 29, 2017.

The main part of the second draft of the Bill include institutional arrangements; national climate change
response measures and actions; climate change mechanisms; measuring, reporting and verification; and
financial provisions

One of the progressive areas noted relates to litigation on climate change (Section 40) where any person may
apply to the High Court for relief against the Department, lead agency, private entity or person whose action
or omission threatens or is likely to threaten efforts towards adaptation to or mitigation of climate change.

CSOs noted progress in the draft from the initial one in terms of uptake of the recommendations made.
According to Miriam Talwisa (CAN Uganda), ‘There were a few of our recommendations that were taken on
like the institutional framework and a financing framework for Cline change’. However, Miriam also pointed
out that there was a ‘huge surprise’ in terms of a regulatory impact Assessment worked on by the consultant
team, though nothing was ever mentioned to CSOs on this task. ‘It took everyone by surprise therefore that
we were called upon to validate this’, Miriam added.

On his part, Hon. Songa - the Chairman of the Uganda Parliamentary Forum on Climate Change noted that the
purpose of Bill is not clear, and suggested that it should be to enforce responses to climate change threats
through adaptation and mitigation actions. He noted that need for clarity in the Bill on how the vulnerable
community can benefit from it.

Kamese Geoffrey (NAPE Uganda), noted that despite the numerous contributions made during the regional
meetings, the draft Bill did not reflect most of the input the participants brought up in previous meetings. For
example, while it was recommended that climate change needed a strong institutional framework, this was not
reflected in Bill.

Others CSOs expressed concern that the Bill is silent on financing climate change actions, with no clear
relationship with the National Environment Act that is under review. It was also noted that it remains silent on
the role of women and youths. It was further pointed out that the role of the district climate change committee
remains unclear.

In view of the mixed reception of this draft, UCSD still trusts that the Climate Change Department will work
with the commissioned consultants to expeditiously and unselectively address all the issues raised in the
validation meeting in order to secure a fair and equitable climate change law for Uganda. In particular, there is
need to widen membership of the proposed National Climate Change Advisory Committee with
representation of youths; cultural and traditional institutions.

Read the Second Draft of the Uganda National Climate Change Bill (November 22, 2017):
https://www.scribd.com/document/365720898/Climate-Change-Bill-22-Nov-2017-draft-for-validation-
workshop-1-pdf

Read and sign the UCSD Petition (with 67 signatures from Uganda and beyond to date ) calling
upon the Prime Minister, Speaker of Uganda Parliament and the Minister of Water and Environment
to enact a fair and equitable Climate Change Law for Uganda: https://www.change.org/p/minister-of-
water-and-environment-enact-a-fair-and-equitable-climate-law-in-uganda

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