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Public Enemy Number One

Written by
Randy "Rocket" Cody

Based on a true story

Copyright 2016 R Cody FIRST DRAFT December/2017
Randy "Rocket" Cody
Fort Worth, TX
The following words appear in white over a black screen:

"I’ve been accused of every death except the casualty list
of the World War." - Al Capone

FADE IN
EXT. MARSHALL FIELD’S STORE - CHICAGO, IL - DAY - 1928
A young woman steps out of a 1928 Ford Model A that has
pulled to a stop at the curb. She waves, says goodbye to the
driver and then approaches the front of the store. Her name
is ROSELLA GREENBERG, 19, and she is a pretty little thing.
MAN’S VOICE (V.O.)
My grandma Rosella Greenberg was a
petite spark plug. She first worked
at the legendary Marshall Field’s
department store in Chicago as an
elevator operator at age eighteen
in 1927.

Following her all the way to the entrance, the DOORMAN
offers her a big smile as he holds the door open for her.
MAN’S VOICE (V.O.)(CONT’D)
The next year, she was promoted to
the cosmetics counter. One other
thing to note. She also just so
happened to be connected to the
Chicago Outfit, led by the most
famous gangster in American
history, Alphonse Gabriel Capone.

Rosella enters the store, waving to the doorman with a
friendly look. FREEZE FRAME. HOLD ON THIS.
MAN’S VOICE (V.O.)(CONT’D)
Yes, the man they would call
"Public Enemy Number One", she
called a friend.
CUT TO:
MAIN TITLES AND OPENING CREDITS - "Public Enemy Number One"

FADE BACK IN
2.

INT. MARSHALL FIELD’S STORE - DAY
Rosella is now standing behind the makeup counter,
demonstrating a new beauty product to a woman and her
husband.

MAN’S VOICE (V.O.)
It was estimated Al Capone’s
"Outfit" earned one hundred million
dollars in 1927. That’s equal to
one billion today.

The husband nods his approval and pulls out his wallet.
MAN’S VOICE (V.O.)(CONT’D)
My grandma told me Capone was a man
that looked out for a lot of other
people in a very difficult time...
but that’s not the story the
historians want you to know.

EXT. CHICAGO HEIGHTS - DAY

A Cadillac can be seen driving along the boulevard.
INT. CAPONE CADDY - CONTINUOUS ACTION
In the backseat, AL CAPONE, 29, wears a white fedora hat,
riding in his bullet proof Cadillac limo on the way to his
headquarters at the Lexington Hotel. Seated in the front
passenger seat is his brother and partner, RALPH "BOTTLES"
CAPONE, late 30s.
AL CAPONE
Why would I sell something that
people did not want? All I do is
provide them beer and hard liquor,
right? And now all anyone wants to
do is blame me for every bad thing
that happens!
RALPH
Don’t let it get you down, Al.
These people don’t know how bad
they could have it.

CUT TO:
3.

EXT. THE LEXINGTON HOTEL - DAY
Pulling up to the curb of The Lexington Hotel, Al gets out
of the vehicle and is immediately swarmed by fans/press
asking him for a favor, to pose for a picture or sign a
quick autograph as he makes his way to the front entrance.

Al’s bodyguards move him past the crowd. Despite the chaos,
he waves to the people, smiling. FREEZE FRAME. HOLD ON THIS.
MAN’S VOICE (V.O.)
By 1928, Al Capone had become the
Babe Ruth of organized crime. Not
one man wielded more power in the
windy city than him. He was also
the country’s first equal
opportunity employer at a time when
racism was at its worst in America.

EXT. MARSHALL FIELD’S STORE - LATE DAY
Rosella is waiting patiently in front of the store when her
ride suddenly pulls up.
She gets inside and the vehicle pulls away from the curb.
INT. FORD MODEL A - MOVING

The driver is OLIVER JAMES "OJ" ELLIS, Rosella’s step
father. He is in his early 40s and looks very serious.
OJ
How are you doing, Rosie? Did you
have a good day at work?

ROSELLA
It was fine. Why were you so late
picking me up?
OJ
Oh - I had some business to take
care of. Nothing really I need to
talk about... but what about you?
ROSELLA
It’s work, what can I say? We had a
lot of customers. Some more
irritating and rude than others,
but you know me... I never let
anyone steal my joy.
4.

INT. THE LEXINGTON HOTEL - LATE DAY
Al Capone is in the middle of a meeting with EDWARD J. "EASY
EDDIE" O’HARE SR., late 30s, lawyer for the Outfit.
Each man holds a glass filled with Templeton Rye.

AL CAPONE
Eddie, I don’t know what I’d do
without you... besides hard time in
a prison cell!

Both men let out a big laugh. Each salutes drinks and then
take individual sips.
Eddie, dressed in an even more expensive suit than Al is
wearing, now caresses his drink with a twinkle in his eyes.

EDDIE
Al, you know when it comes to
anything ’Outfit’ related, that I
am your man.

AL CAPONE
Excellent, Eddie. That’s music to
my ears, my friend.
EDDIE
These are crazy times we are living
in, I tell yah. But you no doubt
are the big boss of Chicago.
AL CAPONE
I give them what they want, Eddie.

EDDIE
You sure do, Al. You and your
brother, Ralph, are two of the most
genius business minds around. You
really do know your way around a
bottle of booze!
Both men let out even bigger laughs.
Then suddenly there is a knock at the door of Al’s office.

AL CAPONE (CONT’D)
Yeah, come in!
The door opens and FRANK RIO, 33, walks in holding a
Thompson submachine gun. A lit cigarette dangles from his
lips.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 5.

FRANK
Sorry to bother you, boss. There’s
someone here from the paper.
AL CAPONE
Who is it? Can’t you see I’m in a
meeting?
FRANK
It’s a photographer from the
Chicago Evening American. Remember,
you have an appointment to get your
photo taken for the next edition?
This kid has his camera and
everything.
AL CAPONE
(looks to Eddie)
Eddie, I apologize. I forgot about
this thing. We’re going to have to
end this visit for now.
Eddie stands and finishes his drink.

EDDIE
No problem, Al. Always great to see
you. Say hello to your wife for me.
Eddie leaves and a twenty something year old photographer
from the Chicago Evening American walks in with his camera.
His name is TONY BERARDI. He looks very intimidated.
Frank Rio stands nearby ready for any funny business.

Al walks over and shakes hands with Tony.
AL CAPONE
You know this will be the first
time one of your kind has taken my
photo with my permission?
Al walks back over to his desk and falls into his chair. He
lights up a cigar, tokes, his face becoming more friendly.
The young photographer aims his camera... then stops.

TONY
Did you want to strike a pose
first?

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 6.

AL CAPONE
Okay, kid. But whatever you do,
just don’t shoot the scars. If I
see you did shoot them, you know
what I am going to do?
Tony, now looking concerned, stands up more straight.
TONY
No... but I bet you’d be pretty
upset with me.
AL CAPONE
You look at me like you’re afraid.
Are you afraid of me?

TONY
I’m not afraid, Mr. Capone. I’m
just here to do my job.
AL CAPONE
Good. Stay away from the scars.
That’s all I’m saying to you,
alright?
TONY
Stay away from the scars. Got it!

INT. RESTAURANT - ROGERS, ARKANSAS - AFTERNOON (1987)
Rosella, now in her late 70s, is seated at a table across
from her redheaded grandson, RANDALL CODY, 17.

A waiter walks over and sets down their meals.
RANDALL (V.O.)
In the year 1987, when I was
seventeen, I visited my grandma
Rosella at her home in Rogers,
Arkansas. She first told me about
her friendship with Al Capone
during lunch one day.

Rosella looks up from her meal at her grandson.
ROSELLA
How is your steak, Randall? Does it
taste good?

RANDALL
Yes, grandma. It’s very good. Thank
you. How is your food?

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 7.

ROSELLA
It’s wonderful. Randall, did your
mother tell you much about your
birthplace in Chicago? I know you
haven’t lived there since you were
a baby and moved out to California.
What has she told you?
RANDALL
No, she hasn’t told me anything.

ROSELLA
She never told you about my friend
Al Capone?
RANDALL
You mean "Scarface"?

ROSELLA
Yes, that’s right.
RANDALL
No. Was Capone really as bad of a
person that everyone makes him out
to be?
ROSELLA
Let me just put it to you this way.
Don’t always believe everything you
read in the press.
RANDALL
He was a gangster after all,
grandma. I imagine he did kill a
lot of people in his line of work,
right?
ROSELLA
Yes, people died. I will not
dispute that. There were many bad
characters after Al Capone and the
Outfit. It was a very dark and
uncertain time in our history. The
Stock Market Crash and the Great
Depression hit in 1929. A lot of
people were starving in Chicago...
and all throughout the rest of the
country. People I knew as friends
were being forced to live on the
streets.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 8.

RANDALL
I bet it was real tough times back
then.
ROSELLA
Nobody else really did much of
anything to help them out. Except
my friend Al Capone. No, he was
certainly not an angel, but he
wasn’t the monster they make him
out to be either. In fact, most of
the stories you read or movies you
see about Al are complete works of
fiction. The real sonofabitch of it
all was that Bugs Moran.

EXT. PARKWAY HOTEL - DAY - 1928
BUGS MORAN, late 30s, powerfully built, head of The North
Side Gang, stands in front of the mirror adjusting his tie.
In the background a WHITE PROSTITUTE is sleeping in his bed.

ROSELLA (V.O.)
Moran was leader of The North Side
Gang. He was in a war with Capone
over the Old Log Cabin bourbon
whiskey shipments sent by the
Detroit Purple Gang. He had been
hijacking Capone supply trucks and
causing a lot of headaches when the
West Side gang, assisted by corrupt
policeman, started stealing from
Bugs themselves. These crooked
badges were motivated by nothing
more than money and they were
totally ruthless.
CUT TO:

INT. STREET CORNER - DAY
The West Side gang’s BILLY SKIDMORE, 20s, is hijacking a
Moran Gang supply truck in broad daylight. At a stopped red
light the DRIVER is knocked out on the spot and the
gangsters jump from the car into the truck, throwing the
unconscious body out and driving off.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Billy Skidmore, of the West Side
gang, had a track record for
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 9.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D) (cont’d)
working with law breaking
policeman. In 1917, he was indicted
with seven others, including Chief
of Police Charles Healey, for
operating a graft ring between
police and gamblers. They were all
convicted and Healey was terminated
from his job, although Chicago,
being what it was at that time, the
most corrupt city in America,
neither Healey nor Skidmore
actually served any prison time.
A police squad car is tailing closely behind Billy in the
truck.

INT. MORAN GANG TRUCK - CONTINUOUS ACTION
Billy yells out, pounding his fist on the steering wheel.
BILLY
I love free booze!

EXT. MORAN GANG TRUCK - CONTINUOUS ACTION
Billy continues driving the vehicle at a high rate of speed.

ROSELLA (V.O.)
Once Skidmore and the cops pulled
off the brazen hijacking, Bugs was
so mad that he stopped paying
protection money to his Chicago
police contacts. It would prove to
be a really bad move for Moran. But
even worse for Al Capone.
CUT TO:

EXT. RESTAURANT - 1987 - DAY
Randall walks his grandma Rosella to her Cadillac in the
parking lot.

RANDALL
Grandma, Bugs Moran sounded like a
real pain in the butt.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 10.

ROSELLA
Oh, he was, honey. Al hated him.
And then when the corrupt cops got
involved, well... that’s why
everything went so wrong for Al and
the Outfit.
Randall opens the driver’s side door for his grandma.
RANDALL
What about Eliot Ness, grandma? The
history books make him out to be
the good guy who helped bring down
Capone.
ROSELLA
Eliot Ness had nothing to do with
Al being taken down in the end. He
was a boozer. Again, don’t always
believe everything you read, son.
That jackass Eliot Ness had an even
bigger ego problem than Bugs Moran!

INT. SLEAZY HOTEL ROOM IN COOK COUNTY - 1928 - NIGHT
ELIOT NESS, 27, is sloppy drunk and trying to have sex with
a BLACK PROSTITUTE. He has obviously had too much to drink
and cannot sexually perform. He keeps trying anyway.

ROSELLA (V.O.)
Ness was was a prohibition agent. A
married man and full time
womanizer. He wanted to be in the
limelight like some kind of wannabe
celebrity. The man was a hypocrite
and a raging alcoholic that has
been portrayed as a saint, when the
truth is Eliot Ness was one screwed
up puppy. That book he put out was
nothing but a complete fabrication,
designed to cover up who he really
was.
Eliot Ness stops suddenly. The hooker looks at him,
concerned.

BLACK PROSTITUTE
What’s wrong, baby?
NESS
I-I-I’m not feeling so good.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 11.

BLACK PROSTITUTE
There ain’t no refunds.
NESS
You need to leave.

BLACK PROSTITUTE
Okay. But you still gotta pay me.
NESS
Just take the money, and get the
hell out of here.
The hooker puts on her clothes and leaves.
Ness leans over and grabs a cigarette from the side table
and lights it with a match. He exhales a big cloud of smoke.

He looks down at the floor and sees a newspaper on the
ground with the bold headlines of the day spilled across the
front page, the biggest being: CAPONE MOB RULES CHICAGO.
CUT TO:

EXT. CHICAGO HEIGHTS - LATER THAT NIGHT
Ness parks behind a darkened car.

INT. CAR - SAME
Ness take a big gulp from his liquor flask.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
By this point Capone paid off the
Chief of Police of Cicero, the
county Sheriff, the mayor, the
state’s attorney and governor. All
of them were on Capone’s payroll.

He gets out and walks over to the mystery vehicle. He gets
inside via the passenger side.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
This allowed all of the gambling,
prostitution and booze sales to get
as big as they did.
12.

INT. LINGLE’S CAR - SAME
Chicago Tribune news reporter JAKE LINGLE, 30s, looks over
at Ness, who is taking another big gulp from his flask.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Eliot Ness was only a pawn. He was
being put into motion by the bigger
powers that be so as to divert Al’s
attention from the IRS’
investigation into whether or not
they could prove Al did not report
on a large amount of money he
earned ’illegally’.

JAKE
Dammit, Eliot. You smell like a
corpse. When was the last time you
showered?
NESS
It’s been a few days.
JAKE
(Points)
That house over there, do you see
it?

NESS
The one over there? Yeah, I see it.
Why? What yah got going on here?
You know newspaper journalists
aren’t supposed to be doing police
work.
JAKE
It’s a gambling house that is run
by a key member of Capone’s Outfit.
They got dozens of slot machines, a
ton of booze and a lot of money
inside is what I been told. The
Outfit generates enormous profits
from spots like this.

CUT TO:

EXT. THE CHICAGO COTTON CLUB - NIGHT
Al Capone’s Cadillac pulls up to the curb. There is a LARGE
DOORMAN at the entrance who welcomes the legendary gangster
and his associates FRED "KILLER" BURKE, mid-30s and JAKE
GUZIK, 40s.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 13.

ROSELLA (V.O.)
Al’s brother Ralph "Bottles" Capone
ran The Chicago version of Harlem’s
Cotton Club for The Outfit located
in Cicero and it was a real popular
spot. It was a favorite of
Chicago’s top politicians, despite
the fact they were selling booze
there.

INT. THE CHICAGO COTTON CLUB - CONTINUOUS ACTION
Duke Ellington performs "The Mooche" with his jazz band on
the stage. There are cute FEMALE SERVERS walking around in
skimpy uniforms, and Al Capone and his men enter and walk
toward a booth located in the center that’s been reserved
for them.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
It was one of the only places where
whites could go to see the top
black Jazz performers of the day,
like Duke Ellington. Al paid the
black musicians the same exact
amount as the whites.
Ralph Capone is walking over from the bar area toward his
younger brother, Al, who is now seated with Fred Burke.

ROSELLA (V.O.)
Fred "Killer" Burke was an
associate of the Capone brothers.
He was a very notorious man. He
would have murdered his own mother
if somebody paid him to do it.
KILLER BURKE
This place is really hopping, Al.

AL CAPONE
Yeah, this is definitely one of our
best moneymakers, Killer. Glad you
approve.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
Jake Guzik served as the mob’s
principle bagman in payoffs to
police and politicians. He was
given the nickname "Greasy Thumb".
Ralph sets down some drinks onto the table.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 14.

Guzik goes to pick up his drink and spills it all over
himself.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
Ralph got his nickname "Bottles"
not from being part of the Capone
bootlegging empire, but from his
non-alcoholic beverage business in
Chicago. As a kid, "Bottles" would
go sell his beverages at the World
Fair.

Al toasts his drink to his brother, Ralph, Jake and Killer.
JAKE GUZIK
(lifts empty glass)
Salut!

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Undoubtedly, the Cotton Club in
Chicago made Al one of the most
important figures in the
development of jazz in the windy
city.
Al lets out a big laugh, then enjoys more of his drink.
FREEZE FRAME. HOLD ON THIS.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Most people think it was Al Capone
who was the biggest menace to
society during the roaring
twenties. What you need to know is
that most liquor back then was made
from industrial alcohol, used in
paints and fuel. Bootleggers stole
millions of gallons a year and then
redistilled the swill to make it
drinkable.

CUT TO:

INSERT - A SERIES OF SHOTS
An old man drinks from his bottle of whiskey. Then after a
beat, he grasps at his throat, choking, foaming at the
mouth...
ROSELLA (V.O.)
The Treasury Department, however,
started poisoning industrial hooch
with methyl alcohol. And when
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 15.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (cont’d)
bootleggers kept stealing it, the
poisoned booze started to make the
citizens get sick.

A lifeless MARRIED COUPLE is seated at the dining table
after having drank the poisoned liquor. They have been dead
and undiscovered for days.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
By 1928, most of the liquor
circulating in New York City alone
was toxic. And good people started
to die. Despite increased illness
and actual deaths occurring, the
Treasury didn’t stop tainting
industrial supplies until the 18th
amendment would later be repealed
in 1933. The plan was to scare
people into giving up illicit
drinking. Instead, by the time the
Prohibition law ended, the feds had
killed at least ten thousand
people.
CUT TO:

NEW YORK CITY MORGUE - DAY
A MORGUE WORKER wheels another body bag into the facility
via a stretcher.
EXT. MORGUE - CONTINUOUS

New York City’s medical examiner CHARLES NORRIS, 50s, speaks
to a small assembled crowd of media and onlookers.
NORRIS
The government knows it is not
stopping drinking by putting poison
in alcohol. Yet it continues its
poisoning processes, heedless of
the fact that people determined to
drink are daily absorbing that
poison. Knowing this to be true,
the United States government must
be charged with the moral
responsibility for the deaths that
poisoned liquor causes, although it
cannot be held legally responsible.

DISSOLVE TO:
16.

EXT. COMISKEY PARK - SOUTH SIDE OF CHICAGO - NEXT DAY
The afternoon game between the White Sox and the New York
Yankees is in the top of the third inning. The score is 2-0
Chicago in the lead. The roar of the crowd picks up with
each exciting moment as a player for the bronx bombers is
thrown out at second base trying to steal.
Presidential candidate, HERBERT HOOVER, mid 50s, is seen
with his entourage seated in the front row on the 1st base
side.

HOOVER
It sure is a beautiful day at the
ball park. Look at all these
wonderful people.

Hoover’s assistant, MARY CLARK, mid-30s, smiles at him.
MARY
Yes, it is, Mr. Hoover. Let’s just
hope most the folks in the crowd
vote for you to become the next
President of the United States.
HOOVER
Yes, indeed. And nobody can match
my love for baseball. Next to
religion, baseball has furnished a
greater impact on American life
than any other institution.
Over the stadium PA system a voice crackles to life:
ANNOUNCER (OS)
Let’s give a big welcome to US
Presidential candidate, Herbert
Hoover, ladies and gentleman, who
is taking in the game with us
today...

A smattering of applause mixed with booing can be heard
throughout the stadium that’s filled to max capacity.
Then the greatest baseball player that ever lived, BABE
RUTH, begins walking up to the plate with his bat in hand.

ANNOUNCER (OS)
Now up to bat for the Yankees,
outfielder, Babe Ruth!
The stadium erupts in loud, raucous cheers.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 17.

Ruth stands in the batter’s box and faces down the first
pitch... which lands a little outside... ball one.
Then the next pitch finds itself dead center in the fattest
part of Ruth’s barrel and the baseball is crushed over 400
feet into the center field stands.

As Ruth trots around the bases, the crowd is in a frenzy.
When Ruth is rounding third he waves at a man in the first
row on the third base side. That man is Al Capone.

Al Capone is seated with his son, SONNY, 11, and his
bodyguards.
In the row directly behind them sits OJ and Rosella.

Looking through binoculars, Rosella watches the legendary
ball player now approaching home plate.
ROSELLA
Woo hoo! Way to go, Bambino!

Ruth crosses home and on his way to the dugout looks back at
Capone and salutes him.
Capone’s boy looks at him in amazement.
SONNY
Do you know Babe Ruth, father?
AL CAPONE
Yes, I consider him a friend.
SONNY
Wow! My dad got a salute from The
Sultan of Swat after he hit a home
run in the deepest part of
Comiskey!

AL CAPONE
He sure hit the heck out of that
ball, didn’t he? Did anyone ever
see it land?
Other people seated around Al let out laughs.

Then the announcer comes back on, blurting out:
ANNOUNCER (OS)
That was a big shot, ladies and
gentleman. Now for another big
shot. Let’s put our hands together
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 18.

ANNOUNCER (OS) (cont’d)
and give a warm welcome to the King
of Chicago himself, Al Capone!
The crowd explodes in cheers and loud applause for Capone.
Many actually stand to their feet for a standing ovation he
is that popular.
Al looks at his boy with a tense smile and then decides to
stand and wave to the crowd. They go even crazier for him.

In his seat, Herbert Hoover is taking it all in through his
binoculars. He looks extremely aggravated.
HOOVER
Al Capone got more cheers than I
did. There’s something terribly
wrong with that, Mary.
MARY
Al Capone is a very famous and
powerful man here in Chicago, Mr.
Hoover - um, well I mean to say
he’s like you a lot of people know
who he is, that’s all.
HOOVER
He’s a no good gangster, Mary, who
pedals illegal booze, gambling and
whores. There’s nothing honorable
about Al Capone. I am honorable!
The laws of this great game and
country we live in are honorable.
Capone is a menace, a bully that’s
out of control, and I plan to take
him down when I am sworn in as
President of the United States of
America.
CUT TO:

EXT. AL CAPONE’S MANSION - MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA - NEXT DAY
This is a glamorous oceanfront island property that the
mobster boss has just purchased.

Al Capone is holding a new set of house keys walking the
grounds with his wife Mae.
MAE
Oh, Al. It is just magnificent,
isn’t it?

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 19.

AL CAPONE
It’s amazing, Mae. Finally
someplace away from the windy city
where we can relax and live in
luxury. Look at that pool! It’s
salt water!
Mae watches as Al walks over to the edge of the pool, kneels
down and dips his hand in the water.
AL CAPONE (CONT’D)
The main house has got seven
bedrooms and then there’s a
two-story cabana house, a private
sandy beach for us to enjoy along
with this fantastic aqua-colored
pool that believe it or not is
sixty feet long.
MAE
It’s just all so lovely, Al.
AL CAPONE
I am told it’s bigger than even the
Biltmore hotel’s pool, baby. Isn’t
that something?
MAE
It’s something alright, Mr. Capone.
And you are just the most amazing
man.
AL CAPONE
I have my moments, don’t I?

Al stands and walks over to Mae. They embrace into a tight
kiss.
CUT TO:

EXT. LEXINGTON HOTEL - EARLY EVENING
Al’s Cadillac pulls up. Al and his bodyguards get out and
enter the building.
INT. AL’S OFFICE - MOMENTS LATER

Al stands before the room filled with seated mobsters. It
looks like a literal who’s who of infamous 20th century
gangsters. FRANK "THE ENFORCER" NITTI, 40, polishes his gun.
"MACHINE GUN" JACK MCGURN, 30s, is seen in a dapper suit and
looks like he could star in the movies. PHIL D’ANDREA, 40,
next to McGurn, is Al’s most trusted bodyguard.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 20.

THE MURDER TWINS, comprised of JOHN SCALISE & ALBERT
ANSELMI, 40s, are seated across from him and look like they
would rather be killing someone than listening to another
speech from the boss. "Bottles" Capone is going over the
books at a nearby desk.
AL CAPONE
This Bugs Moran has become a real
pain.

MACHINE GUN
He is a serious pain in the ass.
AL CAPONE
Now I gotta go back to Florida. So
I need all of you to keep an eye on
him, understand?
PHIL
Sure thing, boss.

MACHINE GUN
That low life scumbag is up to
nothing no good I am hearing. He
really thinks he’s gonna do some
damage to us.

AL CAPONE
Word on the street is he’s put out
a contract on yours truly.
RALPH
Yeah, so the idea is for us to hit
him before he hits my brother or
any of us, got it? If we wait
around and play games this thing
could get real ugly.

AL CAPONE
My brother is right. It’s time we
put Bugs down once and for all.
MACHINE GUN
Now we’re talking.

AL CAPONE
But it’s got to be discreet,
understand? I don’t want to hear
about innocent people getting
slaughtered, hear me? Whichever one
of you takes him out and does not
get caught gets a bonus and trust
me, this is gonna be a big time
bonus!

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 21.

MACHINE GUN
Count me the winner, because I hate
losing. That man is a walking damn
corpse!

McGurn poses now with his Tommy gun as the others erupt into
laughter.
PHIL
Look at the big shot! He thinks
he’s gonna win the bonus, boys!

MACHINE GUN
You got that right, Phil. Bugs
Moran is as good as dead!
ROSELLA (V.O.)
On the night of March 7, 1928 it
would be Moran’s gang who next put
a hit out on the Outfit’s Machine
Gun McGurn, a former boxer turned
contract killer who had twenty-five
murders to his name.

CUT TO:

EXT. THE MCCORMICK HOTEL - MARCH 7, 1928 - NIGHT

Machine Gun McGurn exits the hotel and gets into his Ford.
Another car can be seen parked across the street.
INT. MACHINE GUN’S FORD - CONTINUOUS ACTION
Just as Machine Gun starts the car up, the mystery car also
starts up in the background, headlights beaming powerfully
in his direction.
He lights up a cigarette and drags with an irritated look.
Begins to drive down the street.

MACHINE GUN
(Squints, shouting)
What the hell is your problem, pal?
You trying to blind me?

EXT. MACHINE GUN’S FORD - SAME
Coming to an abrupt halt, the mystery vehicle pulls up
alongside Machine Gun’s car and stops.
Two men, the GUSENBERG BROTHERS, both wearing trench coats
step out from the passenger side.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 22.

One is holding a Tommy gun, the other a .45, and without
another moment wasted, both begin to shoot wildly at
McGurn’s car. GLASS SHATTERS.
Bullets ZING and RICOCHET all over the body of the Ford.

Sparks fly and blood splatters the windshield.
The SCREAMS of Machine Gun intensify as he is riddled with
bullets in the front seat while trying to duck for cover.

CUT TO:
INT. MACHINE GUN’S FORD - LATER THAT NIGHT
Police squad cars and an ambulance are at the scene of the
shooting. The destroyed Ford belonging to Machine Gun can be
seen and after another moment, his MOANS can be heard.
An AMBULANCE MEDIC has pulled the gangster from his car and
begun to administer first aid. There is blood everywhere.
Machine Gun looks up at the medic.

MACHINE GUN
Bugs Moran did this to me -
MEDIC
- Sir, please don’t talk. You’re
pulse is very weak.
MACHINE GUN
Make sure and tell them it was
Bugs.

MEDIC
We need to hurry and transport you
to the hospital. You can tell the
police all of that after we get you
stabilized.

MACHINE GUN
My boss... is gonna be pissed.
MEDIC
Who is your boss?

MACHINE GUN
Your worst nightmare.
Next he vomits the contents of his stomach. His eyes roll
back in his head. McGurn passes out on his way to being
carried to an awaiting ambulance.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 23.

CUT TO:
EXT. CAPONE MANSION - MIAMI, FLORIDA - NEXT DAY
Al Capone is seated on a chair near the pool, reading the
newspaper. Phil D’Andrea approaches him.

PHIL
We got a problem.
AL CAPONE
What kind of problem is that, Phil?
PHIL
McGurn got shot up last night
outside of the McCormick hotel by
Bugs Moran’s gang.

AL CAPONE
Why am I always the last one to
find out about this stuff? Huh? Is
he alive? Did they kill him?

PHIL
No, but they came damn close. He’s
gonna be out of commission for a
little bit. What do you want me to
do?

AL CAPONE
Well, first things first, I need
you and the boys to get back to
Chicago and make sure my caddy is
ready for me.

PHIL
Sure thing, boss.
AL CAPONE
If Bugs Moran wants a fight, I’m
gonna give that sonofabitch a war!
CUT TO:

EXT. THE LEXINGTON HOTEL - NEXT DAY

Al Capone’s black 1928 Cadillac V8 Model 341 Town Sedan is
parked in front with the engine running. This vehicle serves
as Capone’s battle tank that can out run anything on the
road.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 24.

The bulletproof windows are being raised by Frank Nitti who
is seated inside, which is to reveal holes through which
machine guns can be fired, while the rear window is dropped
by another henchman to prepare for firing guns against those
who will be chasing them.

ROSELLA (V.O.)
Al’s 1928 caddy was fitted with
three thousand pounds of armored
plating after it was purchased by
the Outfit for the boss of all
bosses. Equipped with armor in the
doors and sides and five-layer
laminated glass windshield and
windows.
Al Capone, wearing a black trenchcoat and carrying a Tommy
gun, emerges from the hotel entrance.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Despite its great weight the door
windows, which have round gun ports
cut in them, rolled down into the
doors. There was even a police
radio to monitor the other guys’
activities and allowed Al to stay
one step ahead of the opposition.
Capone walks quickly toward the caddy where the back door is
held open for him by his driver, Phil D’Andrea.
Capone climbs into the rear of the caddy.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
On this day, Al got a tip that Bugs
Moran would be in his car traveling
to an appointment he had with
another bootlegger.
CUT TO:

EXT. WEST CERMAK ROAD - DAY
Bugs Moran can be seen in his car driving along the street.
He is not aware that he is being followed. Then, he suddenly
looks up into his rear view mirror in shock.
MORAN’S P.O.V. - CAPONE’S CADDY
Capone’s Caddy is in hot pursuit of Moran’s vehicle,
accelerating to over fifty mph. Al Capone now pulls to
within two feet of Moran’s car rear bumper.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 25.

INT. CAPONE’S CADDY - CONTINUOUS ACTION
Al Capone has placed his weapon through the window port and
now begins to unload his Tommy gun on Moran’s car.
RAT-A-TAT-TAT!!! RAT-A-TAT-TAT!!!

INT. MORAN’S CAR - CONTINUOUS ACTION
Moran ducks down as GLASS SHATTERS and bullets rip through
the interior of the vehicle. He desperately turns the car
right into an alleyway as his car continues to take a hail
of bullets.
EXT. NARROW ALLEYWAY - CONTINUOUS ACTION
Capone’s caddy tears down the narrow alley littered with
trash and vagrants in pursuit of Moran.

VAGRANT #1 - in total amazement - looks up from an opened
can of cold chili that he is eating from as the cars zip
past.
VAGRANT #1
There goes the King of Chicago!
INT. CAPONE’S CADDY - CONTINUOUS ACTION
Al takes aim on the back tires of Moran’s vehicle.

RAT-A-TAT-TAT!!! RAT-A-TAT-TAT!!! Shots from Capone’s Tommy
gun ring out.
Absolute chaos has erupted on the street. Pedestrians are
running for cover and screaming as Moran and the caddy near
the end of the alleyway.

EXT. MORAN’S CAR - CONTINUOUS ACTION
The left side rear tire is SHOT OUT, sending the vehicle
into a tailspin that Moran fights to keep control of.

INT. MORAN’s CAR - SAME
MORAN
Capone, you son of a bitch!!

EXT. THE ALLEYWAY - CONTINUOUS ACTION
Moran’s car suddenly flips as it tries to turn left out of
the alleyway onto the busy boulevard that is jammed with
mid-day traffic.
26.

The vehicle catches fire and flames begin shooting out
as Moran’s tumbling vehicle comes to a crashing halt,
flipped upside down and now resting on its roof.

EXT. STREET - SAME
Al Capone steps out of his parked caddy. He walks towards
the smoking car crash, ready for more action with his Tommy
gun.

Moran is climbing out of his car, bleeding on his forehead
and looking pretty banged up. The flames around him grow as
gas leaks onto the ground.
Al Capone watches as Moran crawls on his knees away from the
fiery wreck, crying out:

MORAN
I’m going to kill you, Capone!! Do
you hear me? You’re as good as
buried six feet deep!

Al Capone walks up to Moran who is now stopped staring up at
him from his knees. Moran puts his hands together as if he’s
going to say a prayer.
Capone points the gun inches away from Moran’s face.

AL CAPONE
I been wanting to do this myself
for a very long time, Bugs.
(laughs)
I never thought it was going to be
this much excitement!
MORAN
Go ahead! Kill me, Capone! Just
fucking get it over with!!

Capone goes to pull the trigger and the gun JAMS.
Moran’s eyes widen to the size of half dollars.
Capone tries to un-jam the weapon but gets no results. The
SOUNDS of POLICE SIRENS can now be heard growing in the
distance.
From the caddy, Frank Nitti yells out to Capone.
FRANK
Come on, boss!! Let’s get outta
here!! The coppers are coming!!

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 27.

Moran makes a move for Capone’s gun, attempting to wrestle
it out of his clutches. Capone is hit a couple times as
Moran throws wild punches at him.
Capone next kicks Moran and sends him flying backwards into
a row of trash cans.
As Moran spits up blood and some of his teeth, Capone runs
up to him and grabs him by the throat, lifting him off the
ground in a display of brute strength.

Moran is nearly unconscious at this point as the POLICE
SIRENS GROW LOUDER.
Capone drops Moran to the ground. He bends down and punches
him in the face several times and then points at Moran.

AL CAPONE
Today is your lucky day, Bugs! You
get to live! But don’t make me come
back after you again, hear? Stay
away from my whiskey and stop
shooting at my men or else I’m
gonna end your life once and for
all!!
Capone turns and runs to his caddy.
Bugs slips into unconsciousness as the POLICE SIRENS GROW
LOUDER AND LOUDER.
Capone and his henchmen SCREECH AWAY.
CUT TO:

EXT. MIAMI KENNEL CLUB - MIAMI, FLORIDA - DAY
Greyhound dogs are racing around an oval track.

The races are made up of eight greyhounds chasing a
mechanical rabbit around the half-mile track.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
Al Capone got involved in the dog
races thanks to his lawyer Easy
Eddie. Eddie owned the patent on
the mechanical rabbit that the dogs
chased around the track. The dogs
were trained to break from a
starting gate that was a line of
eight kennels that opened the
moment the rabbit began to run.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 28.

One of the dogs suddenly charges into the lead.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
If you give each of the dogs some
hamburger ten minutes before a
race, it’s a sure thing that the
eighth dog who is unfed will win
the race. Both "Easy Eddie" O’Hare
and Al Capone made enormous
profits.

Al Capone seated in the stands watching the dog races with
Frank Rio, Easy Eddie, OJ Ellis, and Rosella.
AL CAPONE
What a great day for the races!

FRANK
It sure is, boss. Nothing like
winning easy money.
Al and Eddie both let out laughs.

EDDIE
That’s right! Nothing better in the
world than easy money! Nothing at
all!!
AL CAPONE
Hey, Rosella. You enjoying
yourself?
ROSELLA
Yes, Al, I am enjoying it very
much. Thanks for flying us out here
to the track.
AL CAPONE
You’re welcome, Rosella.

Al notices the large purse Rosella is carrying with her.
AL
That sure is a big purse you
brought with you today.

ROSELLA
Oh, yes it is. It’s filled with one
hundred pairs of knockoff Foster
Grant sunglasses I bought in bulk
for a real cheap price the other
day. I am going to sell all of them
today here at the track.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 29.

Rosella opens her bag and begins to pull out a handful of
black color framed sunglasses.
AL
How much do you charge for one
pair?

ROSELLA
Two dollars.
OJ
I told her nobody was gonna buy
those things, but she brought them
with her anyway.
ROSELLA
OJ, I told you I am going to sell
all of them. Is the sun not out? Do
you not see that big bright thing
hanging up above us in all its
glory?
AL
Where did you get them from?
ROSELLA
I purchased them for one quarter
each from a friend of OJ’s.

OJ
Not a friend of mine. Some two-bit
hood I know that peddles in this
sort of thing.

ROSELLA
I plan on selling them easily at
eight times my investment. I figure
I’m gonna make a killing!
CUT TO:

EXT. MIAMI KENNEL CLUB - PARKING LOT - LATER
Rosella is now standing in the middle of a small crowd. She
pulls out a handful of sunglasses from her large handbag.

ROSELLA
Sunglasses! Two dollars each!
ROSELLA (V.O.)
When I went out to the parking lot
to sell those shades there was an
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 30.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (cont’d)
immediate swarm of men and women. I
sold out all of them under one
hour. Mass market sunglasses had
only become available to the
general public just a few months
before.

In the distance, Al Capone watches Rosella taking money from
strangers who now proudly wear their high fashion sun
blockers.
Al’S P.O.V. - ROSELLA

is taking cash from one MAN IN A SUIT for multiple pairs of
sunglasses that he’s purchased.
BACK TO SCENE

Al seems taken aback by how enterprising the young lady is.
He has an impressed look on his face.
CUT TO:

INT. THE CHICAGO COTTON CLUB - DAY
Al Capone and Rosella eating lunch together at a table in
the center of the club. There are no other patrons allowed
near them. Only Capone’s bodyguards stand nearby.

ROSELLA (V.O.)
I remember having lunch alone with
my friend Al Capone for the first
time. My step father OJ had
expressed to me earlier Al’s
interest in getting to know me
better as a person. What was I
going to say "no" to the head of
the Chicago Outfit?
Al looks up from his plate of food.

AL CAPONE
Rosella, can I ask you a question?
ROSELLA
As long as you’re not going to ask
me if I will kill someone for you.
Al laughs.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 31.

AL CAPONE
You have a sharp wit. I like that
about you.

ROSELLA
Thanks. I was voted class clown in
high school.
AL CAPONE
You need a good sense of humor to
be in the mob, let me tell you.
Rosella laughs.
AL CAPONE
Rosella, I know a lot of people got
me pegged for some big bully that
just puts people down like old
dogs, but I got a heart beating in
this here chest of mine. I’m not
the worst guy you’re ever gonna
meet, know what I’m saying to you?
ROSELLA
Sure. I understand.
AL CAPONE
You seem like a very trustworthy
person. Can I trust you?
ROSELLA
Yes.

AL CAPONE
There ain’t nothing worse than a
rat. Someone that you trust and
bring into your inner circle and
then they turn on you. Somebody
walking away from a friendship when
all that person ever showed them
was honor and loyalty... only to
repay them by sticking a knife in
yer back.

ROSELLA
Nothing worse than a rat.
AL CAPONE
Loyalty above all else is what
makes ’this thing of ours’ work.
That is the main lesson I want you
to learn from me. Say that word for
me, Rosella.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 32.

ROSELLA
Loyalty.
AL CAPONE
Beautiful. Say it again. But say it
like you really mean it.

Rosella stops to think for a moment. Then she sits up more
straight with an extremely proud look on her face.
ROSELLA
Loyalty.
AL CAPONE
Rosella, if there is one thing I
expect from a friend in this life,
it’s ’loyalty’. Above all else.
Okay?
ROSELLA
Okay.
Al pulls out his wallet and grabs out a hundred dollar bill
that he slides to her across the table.
AL CAPONE
Here’s a little something to help
you with your business.

ROSELLA
Thanks very much.
AL CAPONE
You’re welcome. Just always be
honest with me, Rosella. Pinky
promise?
Al Capone holds out his right pinky that has a sparkling 11
carat diamond ring on it and flashes a big smile to her.
Rosella reaches out her pinky and touches his.

ROSELLA
Pinky promise.
CUT TO:
33.

A SERIES OF SHOTS - MONTAGE
Eliot Ness is parked outside The Subway speakeasy in Cicero
where there are beer barrels stacked up outside the
building. He takes contemplative drags off his cigarette,
patiently waiting.

Al Capone shopping for jewelry with his wife. Mae tries on a
diamond studded necklace.
Next a truck picks up the barrels at The Subway speakeasy
and Ness starts his car and follows it.
Al Capone counting through a stack of hundred dollar bills
that is about a foot thick.
Ness follows the truck to one of Capone’s barrel-cleaning
plants. He pulls out his binoculars to get a better look of
the operation.
Al Capone is dancing with his wife Mae at the Cotton Club
and having a great time.

Eliot Ness follows another Capone beer truck as it returns
the barrels to one of the breweries.
CUT TO:

INT. LEXINGTON HOTEL - DAY
In the lobby, Rosella walks up to Frank Rio. She holds a
large bag that is stuffed full.
ROSELLA
Hi, Frank.
FRANK RIO
Hello, Rosella.
Rosella sets down the bag and pulls out a handful of
beautiful silk scarves.
ROSELLA
Want to buy some scarves?

FRANK RIO
I don’t wear scarves.
ROSELLA
You don’t? As cold as it is? Every
well dressed man should wear a
scarf to protect themselves from
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 34.

ROSELLA (cont’d)
getting the chills. Here, at least
try one on. It will keep your neck
warm!

She hands him one to try on.
Frank is hesitant at first. Then he puts it around his neck.
ROSELLA
So? What do you think. Feels good,
doesn’t it?
FRANK RIO
It don’t feel so bad. How do I
look?

ROSELLA
Like a movie star!
FRANK RIO
No kidding?

ROSELLA
Oh, the women are going to fall
over themselves when they see you.
FRANK RIO
Alright, I’m sold. How much?

ROSELLA
Five bucks.
Frank reaches for his wallet. He pulls out a five dollar
bill and hands it to Rosella.
CUT TO:

A SERIES OF SHOTS - MONTAGE

Al Capone watches Rosella selling her scarves to a small
crowd in the lobby of the Lexington hotel.
Rosella purchases two dozen pairs of leather gloves from a
HOOD behind the Cotton club.

Now standing in front of a movie theater, Rosella sells the
leather gloves to people who are walking to their vehicles.
Rosella counts a large stack of cash in her bedroom.
Afterward, she puts it into a paper bag and hides it under
her bed mattress.
35.

CUT TO:

EXT. HOME OF LEROY GILBERT - SOUTH SIDE OF CHICAGO - NIGHT
LEROY GILBERT, late 40s, is seated in a rocking chair in the
living room of his home, reading the newspaper.
LEROY’S WIFE is nearby him on the couch, listening to the
radio.

Suddenly shotgun blasts rip into the home, instantly killing
Chief Brown. His wife survives but screams wildly in terror,
holding her bloody hand up in pain. FREEZE FRAME. HOLD ON
THIS.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
On Thursday, December 6, 1928.
Leroy Gilbert, the Chief of Police
of South Chicago Heights, was shot
to death at his home while reading
the paper.

UNFREEZE FRAME. The woman SCREAMS more. FREEZE FRAME AGAIN.
HOLD.
CUT TO:
EXT. OJ’S GAMBLING HOUSE - NEXT MORNING

The Feds and dozens of plain clothed detectives raid the
property belonging to OJ Ellis in Chicago Heights.
FEDERAL AGENT #1 is carrying out another slot machine and
dropping it into a massive pile. DETECTIVES are walking out
dozens of handcuffed men, including OJ.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
An all out war to crackdown on the
Chicago mob followed. On January 7,
1929, the feds raided the gambling
house operated by my step father,
OJ Ellis. They seized over four
hundred slot machines and four
hundred thousand dollars in
canceled checks. He confessed to it
all being his. OJ was loyal and did
not rat out the Outfit and Al
Capone.
CUT TO:

INT. NEWS OFFICE - DAY

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 36.

A NEWS REPORTER types away at a feverish pace. Super words
over screen:
Hundreds of thousands are taken in honeycomb of liquor, slot
machine and murder syndicate.

These words are replaced by:
The stormy suburb of Cicero where thirty killings have taken
place in the past three years was overtaken by federal
agents today.

These words are replaced by:
Records of booze and slot machines profits were found. Sawed
off shotguns, revolvers, and other weapons were confiscated.

These words are replaced by:
Twenty five men were arrested, one of them being Oliver
James Ellis, who said the records represented profits he
took in operating his own booze and slot rackets. He would
not say who his partner was.

"Their silence smacks of the mafia," complained one of the
agents.
CUT TO:

EXT. BEAUTY SHOP - CICERO - DAY - 1929
Rosella and her mother, GRACIE, 30s, are seen through the
window. Rosella is getting her hair cut by a FEMALE STYLIST.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
My mother and I were getting our
hair done down the street when the
raid happened.
INT. BEAUTY SHOP - CONTINUOUS ACTION

Rosella is observing the other women waiting to get their
hair done.
FEMALE STYLIST
So where do you work?
ROSELLA
I work at Marshall Field’s.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 37.

FEMALE STYLIST
Is that so? I go in there all the
time and I have never seen you.
ROSELLA
Well I am in the cosmetics
department... before that I
operated the elevator.

A SERIES OF SHOTS - MONTAGE

Eliot Ness busting down Capone’s breweries by crashing an
armored truck fitted with a battering ram to the front -
into one of the gangster’s secret breweries.
Ness is posing for newspaper photos taken of him next to the
shattered barrels.
CUT TO:

INT. CAPONE BREWERY - NIGHT

Ness hands a bottle of Capone whiskey to photographer Tony
Berardi.
NESS
Here. Take it. Drink up Capone’s
whiskey!
TONY
Thanks for calling me down here,
Mr. Ness.

NESS
No sweat off my back. There’s
plenty more where this came from,
trust me.

TONY
You don’t like Capone, do you?
NESS
Like him? I love him. He keeps me
drunk as a skunk!

Both men break out into uproarious laughter as they take
turns drinking off the bottle.
CUT TO:
38.

INT. COTTON CLUB - DAY
The band is setting up for rehearsal on the stage.

One of the black musicians walks up to Rosella.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
Al asked me to help out at the
Cotton Club. I assisted
the manager. I was to make sure
the band had whatever they needed
to get up on the stage and perform.
JIMMY JONES
Miss Rosella. I need to ask you
something?
ROSELLA
Sure, what is it, Jimmy?
Holding up his empty saxophone case, he becomes very
emotional.
JIMMY JONES
Do you have any idea who took my
saxophone? This is my livelihood,
maam. I don’t know what to do!

ROSELLA
Oh my Lord. Let me get Al. You sure
you didn’t set it down someplace
and forget by mistake?

JIMMY JONES
No, I went to the bathroom to wash
my hands after the first song in
rehearsal and when I came back it
wasn’t in its case no more.

CUT TO:

EXT. COTTON CLUB - SOON

Al Capone stands next to Rosella, helping her look through
some trash bins.
AL CAPONE
It’s just not right. Stealing a
man’s musical instrument!

Suddenly out of the corner of his eye, Al spots a shadow on
the ground of a MAN hiding behind an automobile located
across the street.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 39.

Al quickly walks over to the vehicle, pulling out a handgun.
Rosella watches him with a confused expression.
EXT. DUMPSTER - CONTINUOUS ACTION

Al points his pistol at a HOMELESS THIEF who holds the
stolen saxophone in his hands.
AL CAPONE
Well, well, well. That wasn’t too
difficult. What’s your name, pal?
THEIF
Mr. Capone, I’m sorry. My name is
Harlan. I-I-I --

AL CAPONE
--Shut up! I’m gonna give you a
severe beating for what you did,
you waste of skin! Stand up and
bring that instrument to me! You
some kind of pro thief, huh? I bet
you hit all the clubs! Get over
here! I got a bunch of people
waiting to hear some damn
saxophone!
The white transient man stands and cowardly walks slowly
over to Capone, who still has his gun trained on him.
THIEF
What’s the big deal? It only
belongs to a nigger.

Al Capone grabs the saxophone and then hands it off to
Rosella, who is standing close by.
AL
You take this and go back inside
the club, Rosella.
ROSELLA
What are you going to do to him,
Al? Please. Don’t hurt him... the
saxophone is not damaged or
anything.
Next Capone starts to pistol whip the man multiple times,
splitting his forehead open.
The thief drops to the ground and writhes around in pain on
the hard pavement.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 40.

Capone begins to kick the man who desperately tries to cover
up from the powerful blows to his body. Ribs are broken.
Blood sprays the sidewalk.
Rosella grabs at Al’s arm, yelling.

ROSELLA
Al, stop it! You’re going to kill
him!
After a few more punishing kicks, Al finally stops the
assault.
The man is now unconscious and not moving.
Al locks an intense stare with Rosella.

She nervously clears her throat.
ROSELLA
Thank you -- for stopping.
The gangland boss next takes the instrument from her hands
and they begin walking back toward the club.
CUT TO:

INT. LEXINGTON HOTEL - CAPONE’S OFFICE - DAY

Machine Gun McGurn enters Al’s office. He takes a seat
across from Al who is reading the newspaper.
McGurn still has bandages all over his body from getting
shot at.

AL CAPONE
I don’t want you doing anything
nuts, understand? I know you want
revenge on Bugs. I already put the
fear of God into the man when I
chased him down myself. It came
real damn close... me killing him -
it just wasn’t in the cards.
MACHINE GUN
Bugs is going to pay with his life,
Al. Do you see what this asshole
did to me?
AL CAPONE
Don’t get excited.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 41.

MACHINE GUN
Don’t get excited? They almost
killed me!
AL CAPONE
Shut up! It’s too goddamn obvious
if we make another move to
eliminate him right now!
CUT TO:

INT. MARSHALL FIELD’S STORE - DAY
Rosella is working behind the counter. A few customers
mingle around looking at the products on display.

Suddenly The Murder Twins enter the store.
Now busy talking with her MANAGER, Rosella does not see the
men watching her.
Next a female SALES ASSOCIATE walks up to The Murder Twins.

SALES ASSOCIATE
Hello. Is there anything I can help
you two with today? Let me guess.
You are both out shopping for your
wives, am I correct?

The hitmen do not answer the woman. They just keep staring
at Rosella.
After several drawn out moments, The Murder Twins leave.

CUT TO:

EXT. CLARK STREET GARAGE - NEXT MORNING - FEBRUARY 14, 1929

It is a cold and dreary day with low pedestrian activity in
front of the building. A light snow powders the sidewalk.

INT. CLARK STREET GARAGE - CONTINUOUS ACTION

PETER GUSENBERG, a frontline enforcer for the Moran
organization stands among the gang.
FRANK GUSENBERG, the brother of Peter Gusenberg and also an
enforcer for Bugs Moran is nearby, smoking a cigarette.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 42.

Next to Frank stands ALBERT KACHELLEK, who is locked in
random conversation with ADAM HEYER, the bookkeeper and
business manager of the Moran gang.
REINHARDT SCHWIMMER can be seen standing next to Kachellek.
His resemblance to Moran, including the clothes he is
wearing is uncanny.
REINHARDT
Bugs should be here any damn minute
now.

ALBERT
I hope so. Christ, I got other
places to be.
A man is working under the hood of a vehicle. His name is
JOHN MAY, early 30s.
May uses a wrench to loosen up a part.
CUT TO:

EXT. CLARK STREET GARAGE - CONTINUOUS ACTION
Bugs Moran is walking on the street toward the building. He
gets stopped by a red light.

Suddenly a cadillac comes roaring up to the garage. Four men
step out and approach the rear entrance.
INT. CLARK STREET GARAGE - CONTINUOUS ACTION
Moran’s gang are caught by surprise. They all are
immediately rounded up with hands in the air by the two
officers, and lined up facing a brick wall.
Cop #1 signals to the pair in civilian clothes. Both men
brandish Tommy guns.

JOHN MAY
Hey, what’s this all about? I
didn’t do nothing wrong. Please let
me go home to my wife and kids.

REINHARDT
Yeah, please put down the guns.
There is no reason to be pointing
those things at us!

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 43.

ALBERT
What do you men want with us?
OFFICER #1
You’re under arrest. Don’t worry
why we’re here. Just turn around
and face the wall!
JOHN MAY
Please don’t kill me! I don’t want
to die here in this garage!!

Cop #2, upon a closer look is indeed none other than "Killer
Burke. He suddenly opens fire with his shotgun. BOOM! BOOM!
BOOM!
The two civilian gunmen (one of which we recognize to be
Billy Skidmore) open fire with their submachine guns.
Blood and brain matter spray the wall as the gun blasts
grows to a deafening roar. Then the shooting abruptly stops
and it becomes silent.

All of Moran’s men are on the ground shot to hell. There are
moans and sounds of men choking on their own blood.
On the ground one John May is writhing around in agony, half
alive, blood flowing from a dozen bullet wounds. He weeps.

JOHN MAY
Oh my... Jesus, please, n-n-no... I
want... to... live..
"Killer" Burke matter of factly walks over to John May,
stepping into his pool of blood. He points the weapon at his
head. HOLD ON THIS FOR A BEAT. Then:
BLAM! The top of John May’s head is blown off.
John May’s German Shepherd, Highball, who is leashed to a
truck, begins howling and barking as the gunmen turn and
walk off.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
Fred "Killer" Burke was
recruited by the crooked cops and
Billy Skidmore for the Valentine’s
Day Massacre. They orchestrated
mass murder together like it was a
symphony of death.
EXT. CLARK STREET GARAGE - CONTINUOUS ACTION

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 44.

Bugs observes the police walk out of the garage with guns
trained on the two civilians who have their hands up in the
air.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Bugs Moran escaped with his life
that day when he should have been
gunned down with the others. But
one of his men, Reinhardt Schwimmer
looked eerily similar to Moran, so
he was mistaken for him and his
presence at the meeting was the
signal for the killers to arrive on
the scene.

CUT TO:
EXT. CHICAGO CITY HALL - LATE DAY
Frederick D. Silloway, the local Prohibition administrator,
stands in front of a swarmed crowd of media reporters.

SILLOWAY
Ladies and gentleman, it is my
belief that the murderers were
Chicago police officers. I believe
the whole thing was an outgrowth of
a hijacking job on Indianapolis
Boulevard about six weeks ago. More
than 500 cases of booze were
hijacked from the Moran North Side
gang, by the West Side gang,
assisted by corrupt officers. The
liquor theft occurred in daylight
and was so easily accomplished that
it was apparent the hijackers had
full police protection and
assistance in doing the job. As a
consequence, it was natural the
Moran ’mob’ immediately stopped all
payments of protection money to the
policemen they had been dealing
with, and the result of this move
was the gruesome machine gun
killing. I shall release the names
of these officers very shortly.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
The next day Silloway retracted the
charge, insisting he had been
misquoted. His superiors in
Washington transferred him out of
Chicago and he was never heard from
again.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 45.

CUT TO:

INT. AL CAPONE’S MANSION - MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA - NEXT DAY
Al Capone is seated on the couch reading the newspaper with
the headline splashed in bold black letters at top:
"St. Valentine’s Day Massacre In Chicago, Capone To Blame?"
Below is a picture of the murder scene.

Frank Nitti is seated across from Al. He clears his throat.
FRANK
Who do you think did it, boss?

AL CAPONE
I dunno, Frank. All I can see is a
lot of problems coming from this...
it’s a damn nightmare.
FRANK
A total bloodbath. I never seen
nothing like it before. They even
blew one of the guys’ head off.
AL CAPONE
Can you believe they are trying to
blame me for the massacre? Anything
bad that happens and I am always
the first one they want to pin it
on!
FRANK
Hell it could have been corrupt
cops that wanted to take out the
Moran gang once and for all. They
could have totally staged it to
look like it was a hit by the
Outfit.
AL CAPONE
Something tells me McGurn may have
had something to do with this. I
told him to be discreet and this is
what he does? A bloody mass murder?
FRANK
Take it easy, boss. Don’t jump to
any conclusions before we know all
the facts.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 46.

AL CAPONE
Whoever did it, I been set up to
look like the one who planned it
all! I’m gonna have to figure out
something to get me off the streets
for a little bit until the heat of
this thing goes away.
This is the first time we have Seen Al Capone looking
worried. He lights up a cigar and puffs away.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
Al was in Florida on that St.
Valentine’s Day. He was summoned by
the Dade County solicitor to
discuss his dealings in Miami.
CUT TO:

EXT. CHICAGO CITY HALL - DAY

A CITY OFFICIAL, 50’s, stands before a large crowd of media.
CITY OFFICIAL
What has happened since the seven
murders brings the obvious result.
The lid has been clamped on the
city’s 7,000 saloons, speakeasies
and beer flats, and while there
might be a few minor violations
there certainly is no great amount
of beer, booze or alcohol being
sold. Who are the losers thereby?
The Capone gang, naturally, as well
as all other gangs. With the
extensive business Capone gang had
in the city and country towns, a
shutdown like this Saturday and
today runs into big money. Suppose
it keeps up indefinitely, a
terrific revenue is lost, and no
murder is worth that to a gang
leader, no matter what the
provocation.

INT. THE HOOVER MANSION - SAME DAY
Presidential candidate Hoover is seated in his office
reading a newspaper account about St. Valentines massacre
purportedly organized by Capone.
The pictures of the victims visibly disgust him.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 47.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Herbert Hoover won the Republican
ticket and then achieved a
landslide victory to become the
31st president of the United
States. The campaign was marked by
numerous acts of violence, mostly
in Chicago and elsewhere in Cook
County. In the six months prior to
the primary election, 62 bombings
happened in the city, and two
politicians were killed. The term
"Pineapple Primary" referenced the
hand grenades or ’pineapples’ that
were thrown.
A SERIES OF SHOTS - MONTAGE

HOODS are throwing hand grenades at the presidential primary
election. Explosions rock the voting booths.
A stack of newspapers are dropped at a corner newspaper
stand in Cicero. The headline reads: PUBLIC ENEMY #1 IS AL
CAPONE!
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
In March of 1929 Hoover was sworn
into office. The crime commission
next named Al Capone Public Enemy
#1. It was clear from that point
forward President Hoover was going
to be ridding society of ’celebrity
gangsters’ once and for all.

INT. THE LEXTINGTON HOTEL - DAY
Al is alone seated at his desk listening to a Hoover speech
on the radio:
HOOVER (V.O.)
Given the chance to go forward with
the policies of the last eight
years, we shall soon with the help
of God, be in sight of the day when
poverty will be banished from this
nation...

ROSELLA (V.O.)
But within months, the Stock Market
Crash of 1929 occurred, and the
world’s economy spiraled downward
into the Great Depression.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 48.

Al lights up a cigar and begins to puff away. There is a
TIME LAPSE as we follow the smoke rings floating in the air
IN SLOW MOTION.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
Al Capone next attended the
May/1929 Atlantic City ’Organized
Crime’ Conference. Capone arranged
to have himself jailed in
Philadelphia after the conference
in order to avoid the numerous
"murder-for-hire" rackets that were
hunting him and to take some heat
off from the St. Valentine’s
massacre.

INT. PHILLY PRISON CELL - DAY
Al continues takings puffs off a cigar, smoke billows all
around him in his cell as some free wheeling Jazz music
blasts from a nearby radio.

AL CAPONE (V.O.)
I told them there was business
enough to make us all rich and it
was time to stop all the killings
and look on our business as other
men look on theirs, as something to
work at and forge when we go home
at night. It wasn’t an easy matter
for men who had been fighting for
years to agree on a peaceful
business program. But we finally
decided to forget the past and
begin all over again. We drew up a
written agreement and each man
signed on the dotted line.
INT. CONFERENCE ROOM - FLASHBACK

Seated across from each other, Al Capone and a bandaged Bugs
Moran take turns signing the document and then they shake
hands.
CUT TO:
49.

INT. COURTROOM - DAY
McGurn sits in court, charged for the Massacre. In the
audience is LOUISE ROLFE, 20s, seated with a concerned look
for her boyfriend.

ROSELLA (V.O.)
McGurn was charged for the
massacre. But would be acquitted
after the jury bought his ’Blonde
Alibi’, a beautiful woman named
Louise Rolfe. He claimed they were
in bed together when the seven men
were executed. Louise testified to
the fact and she was very
convincing.

CUT TO:

INT. THE GREEN MILL - NIGHT
McGurn is greeting some of the customers at the entrance.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
McGurn became part owner of a
popular Chicago speakeasy called
the Green Mill, located at 4802
North Broadway.

After a few more moments, he turns and makes his way to a
nearby booth where some gangsters are seated.
DISSOLVE TO:

INT. THE LEXINGTON HOTEL - ONE YEAR LATER
Rosella is seated across from Al in his office now, sipping
from a soda, looking very interested in what he is saying.

AL CAPONE (CONT’D)
It’s time for peace, Rosella.
Business is what matters the most
to the Outfit, understand?
ROSELLA
I understand. It’s all about
managing your empire so as to
maximize your profits... and well,
heck, too much violence is most
certainly a bad thing.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 50.

AL CAPONE
Your mother raised a smart young
lady, Rosella.
ROSELLA
Thank you. She raised me to have
common sense and to never tell a
lie. I like to think I’m gonna be
as smart as her one day.
AL CAPONE
Even smarter I bet. Come on, it’s
getting late, sweety. Let me take
you home.
Al walks Rosella out of his office.

INT. CAPONE’S CADDY - SAME
Al and Rosella are riding in the backseat.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
When the Great Depression hit after
the Stock Market Crash Al showed
good faith by helping the poor.

EXT. CAPONE SOUP KITCHEN - DAY

Hundreds of the city’s most down trodden citizens are
standing in line. People of all color can be seen.
They wait for their hot soup, which is being served from two
large pots that have been placed on a table. A white sign
with black letters is taped to the table that reads:
"Compliments of Al Capone".
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Yes, Al Capone, the notorious
leader of the Outfit, established
Chicago’s first soup kitchen.
Capone served three meals a day to
make sure that everyone who had
lost a job could get a hot plate of
food.

Suddenly Capone’s caddy rolls up to the scene. Al Capone
steps out and begins handing hundred dollar bills to
everyone standing in line, adult or child, white or black,
everyone gets a helping hand from the boss of all bosses.
He holds up a bullhorn and addresses the crowd.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 51.

AL CAPONE
Hello, everybody! Isn’t this a
beautiful day in Chicago?
Loud cheers erupt from the people standing in line.

They begin to chant: "Capone, Capone, Capone!!"
AL CAPONE (CONT’D)
I wanted to give you all a little
something extra today! Don’t spend
it all in one place now!
Al hands a hundred dollar bill to a woman with dirt on her
face and red bloodshot eyes. He offers her a warm smile.
AL CAPONE (CONT’D)
Have a nice day, ma’am.
HOMELESS WOMAN
Thank you very much, Mr. Capone.
You are the only one who cares
about us!
AL CAPONE
(into bullhorn)
It’s all going to be okay, trust
me. Nobody in this city goes hungry
on my watch.
(into bullhorn)
The government can just sit by and
allow you all to starve but I
myself will not tolerate it any
longer. My parents migrated to this
country from Italy with the hopes
and dreams of a better life, a more
prosperous tomorrow.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
It was a time when governmental
unemployment relief ranged from
nonexistent to totally inadequate.
People were jobless, hungry and
scared. Nobody stood up for them
other than Al Capone.

AL CAPONE
(into bullhorn)
God bless you all and God bless the
United States of America!

A HOMELESS MAN IN TOP HAT shouts out from nearby in the
line.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 52.

HOMELESS MAN IN TOP HAT
Thank you, Al Capone!
The crowd cheers louder than before, following with the
chant: "Capone, Capone, Capone"

Al shakes his fist victoriously in the air and then turns to
climb back into his awaiting caddy. The people in line
continue cheering as Capone’s caddy drives off.
CUT TO:

EXT. MARSHALL FIELD’S STORE - DAY
Al Capone’s caddy is parked in front.

One of Capone’s Henchmen is standing outside the car.
INT. MARSHALL FIELD’S STORE - CONTINUOUS ACTION
Al Capone is standing at the makeup counter in front of
Rosella. Customers in the store are gawking at the famous
gangster.
ROSELLA
So you say you’re interested in
buying your wife makeup for her
birthday?

AL CAPONE
Yeah, sweety. I was hoping you
could pick something for me. I’m
not exactly the pro at this sort of
thing. I am always buying her furs
and jewelry and whatnot, so I
figured this time around I’d get
her hooked up on the best makeup
money can buy. What do you suggest?

ROSELLA
(points)
I have some new imported red
lipstick from France that is to die
for.

AL CAPONE
Okay, I will take a dozen of them.
Give me all the colors you got!
CUT TO:

A SERIES OF SHOTS - MONTAGE

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 53.

Al Capone dancing with his wife Mae at the Cotton club.
Rosella dealing with a line full of customers at Marshall
Field’s.
The Murder Twins executing a series of people in gruesome
fashion: VICTIM #1 gets shot at point blank range in a
telephone booth...
VICTIM #2 is thrown from an apartment rooftop.

ROSELLA (V.O.)
The vicious killing duo known as
The Murder Twins whacked any
deadbeat that owed the Outfit money
and they enjoyed every minute of
it.

VICTIM #3 is about to be shot by The Murder Twins for not
paying up on the money he was loaned. The GAMBLER begs for
his life.
GAMBLER
Don’t kill me!! I’m good for the
loan!! I just need more time to get
the money together--
BLAM! BLAM! BLAM! The gambler is shot down in his home.
Blood paints the walls as he is hit multiple times.

The Murder Twins walk up to the corpse and unload more
bullets into the bloody torso.
FREEZE FRAME ON THIS.

ROSELLA (V.O.)
The truth was that these two
psychopaths planned to take Al out
and become the new leaders of the
Chicago mob. And somehow yours
truly next found herself smack dab
in the middle of the whole fiasco.
Though The Murder Twins were not
the only ones preparing to take
down my friend.

EXT. DAY - WASHINGTON, D.C.
We sweep down in an aerial view of the nation’s capitol.
Moving downward we focus on a single building where there
are armed FEDERAL AGENTS monitoring the entrance.

Superimposed on the screen:
54.

THE BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION
WASHINGTON, D.C.

INT. OFFICE OF J. EDGAR HOOVER - DAY

Hoover, 34, is dressed in a gray suit and stands in the
center of the room.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
Predecessor to the FBI, the BOI was
led by the determined J. Edgar
Hoover. He had first been appointed
director in 1924. When Hoover took
over the Bureau of Investigation,
it had approximately 650 employees,
including 441 Special Agents. The
public enemies list in 1929 would
eventually be adapted by Hoover as
the FBI’s list of the "Most Wanted"
criminals in America.

Hoover looks over at another man that is seated in a chair.
His name is ELMER IREY, 41.
J. EDGAR HOOVER
The president wants this
sonofabitch off the streets. He’s
sick and tired of the carnage that
Capone’s Outfit is responsible for.
Now we got "Scarface" named Public
Enemy #1, the most wanted man in
the USA. The public opinion is
starting to turn against him. He’s
no longer this folk hero everyone
has made him out to be. He’s going
to prison and that’s the word from
the top.

ELMER
How exactly am I going to get my
men inside their operation?
J. EDGAR HOOVER
You’re going to have to put two of
your best men directly among The
Outfit. That’s the best way to get
to the books. That’s where we’re
gonna nail him.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 55.

ELMER
I have the two perfect men in mind
for the job.
J. EDGAR HOOVER
Excellent. I want you to keep me
updated on everything as it
happens, understand? Once you get
them inside, I want to know their
every move.

ELMER
I understand what needs to be done.
But it’s not going to be easy.
We’re talking about Al Capone here.
J. EDGAR HOOVER
He’s got a lot of firepower, I know
that. That’s why infiltrating his
gang is going to work. He won’t
know what hit him when it’s all
over.

ELMER
I sure hope so. Because if we make
one bad move on this we’re gonna
lose our chance to put him away and
we cannot have that happen. I could
lose two of my best men if their
cover is blown. So trust me, we’re
not gonna screw this up. This is
the one time we got to take him
down.

J. EDGAR HOOVER
Well then by all means... let’s get
Scarface!
Elmer stands and meets J. Edgar Hoover in the center of the
room. They shake hands, firmly. FREEZE FRAME. HOLD ON THIS.

ROSELLA (V.O.)
Elmer Irey was a US Treasury
Department official and director of
the Internal Revenue Service’s lead
investigative unit during the
federal tax evasion prosecution of
Al Capone.
CUT TO:
56.

EXT. MARSHALL FIELD’S STORE - DAY
The Murder Twins are waiting outside the entrance when
Rosella exits the building and walks past them.
She stops near the front curb, waiting for her ride.

In the background, The Murder Twins begin to walk toward
her.
CUT TO:

INT. HAWTHORNE INN - CICERO - NIGHT
A party rages with Outfit members and associates. Al Capone
walks up to Scalise and Anselmi, who are standing next to
Joseph "Hoptoad" Guinta, 40s.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
Joseph "Hoptoad" Guinta led the
Chicago Unione Siciliana in 1929.
He tried to organize a revolt among
Sicilians affiliated with Al
Capone’s Chicago Outfit.
Al has a big smile on his face.
AL CAPONE
How are you gentleman doing this
evening?
SCALISE
We’re great, Al. This is some fancy
party you got going here.

AL CAPONE
Thanks. I figured we all needed to
have a nice dinner together, you
know? It’s time we all got to know
each other better.

ANSELMI
Sure thing.
AL CAPONE
I’m really glad you three could
make it tonight.
HOPTOAD
Thanks again, Al. For having us.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 57.

AL CAPONE
One thing I will say to you men.
Don’t mistake my kindness for
weakness. I am kind to everyone,
but when someone is unkind to me,
weak is not what you are going to
remember about me.
All four men toast drinks.
HOPTOAD
Listen, we know anyone who crosses
you would have to have some serious
balls.
The men breakout into loud laughter.

SCALISE
Funny thing is... we got your girl.
AL CAPONE
My girl?

ANSELMI
Yeah, that cutie pie named Rosella.
The one you seem to have a special
hard on for. We want to take over
your position as head of the
Outfit, Al, and we figured a doll
like that must be worth a whole lot
to you.
AL CAPONE
Don’t tell me you three have harmed
Rosella.
ANSELMI
Let’s just say we took out our own
insurance policy. Rosella was
kidnapped two hours ago. She’s
being held someplace in Chicago
Heights. You see, it’s time for you
to step down, Al. We want all the
action. So from now on we will be
calling the shots, capiche?

Scalise toasts Al’s glass one more time. Clink!
SCALISE
How is that for balls?
CUT TO:
58.

EXT. WAREHOUSE - CHICAGO HEIGHTS - NIGHT
This is the spot where Rosella is being held hostage. A
couple of armed GOONS are watching the entrance.
INT. WAREHOUSE - CONTINUOUS
Rosella remains cool, despite the fact she is standing
handcuffed to a pole.

ROSELLA (V.O.)
If I said I was not scared I would
be a big liar. I was worse than
scared. I thought I was going to be
killed that night.

CUT TO:

INT. HAWTHORNE INN - NIGHT

Al Capone pulls out his pistol and points it at the three
men.
AL CAPONE
You just made the biggest mistake
of your lives.

HOPTOAD
We’re here to negotiate a peaceful
end to this matter, Al. Nobody has
to bleed over this. You give us
what we want and you get your play
toy back.
AL CAPONE
I’m not stepping down for shit!

Al snaps. He immediately grabs "Hoptoad" and sticks his gun
into his mouth. BLAM! The trigger is pulled and his brains
are shot out the back of his head and onto the wall.
The people in the room run away SCREAMING as the mayhem
erupts.

Both Scalise and Anselmi reach for their holstered guns.
BLAM! A second shot from Al’s pistol hits Scalise in the
head. His body drops to the ground spurting blood out of a
gaping wound.

Turning toward Anselmi, next Al points the pistol at him.
His face is red with pure fury.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 59.

AL CAPONE
Drop the gun!

Anselmi listens to Al. He drops his pistol to the floor.
Al steps up closer to Anselmi, sticking the gun in his face.
AL CAPONE
Are you ready to die?

SCALISE
Jesus, Al! No, don’t--
Several of Al’s body guards have run up with guns drawn to
see what is happening. They step over the two dead bodies.

FRANK RIO
Boss, what’s going on here?
AL CAPONE
These mother fuckers kidnapped
Rosella!
Anselmi, looking scared to death amid the carnage, drops to
his knees in front of Al.
ANSELMI
Don’t shoot me! I will tell you
where she is! Don’t shoot me!
CUT TO:

INT. WAREHOUSE - LATE NIGHT
Rosella is now seated on the ground, handcuffed to the pole.
The door to the warehouse is opened and a dark figure walks
toward her.
She looks up to see Al Capone standing in front of her. He
holds a small key to the handcuffs.
AL CAPONE
Rosella! Are you okay?
ROSELLA
I’ve been better.
AL CAPONE
I’m so sorry this happened to you.
He quickly opens and removes her handcuffs. He grabs her up
into a big hug.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 60.

ROSELLA
I wasn’t sure if you were ever
gonna show up to save me, Al. What
happened to those men?

AL CAPONE
Answer this for me first. Nothing
happened to you, right? They didn’t
do anything to harm you besides
leaving you here handcuffed to the
pole?

ROSELLA
Nothing else happened.
AL CAPONE
Good.

ROSELLA
What happened to those men?
AL CAPONE
All you need to know is that they
won’t be causing no more headaches
for you or me.
CUT TO:
EXT. ROAD - INDIANA - NEXT MORNING

A lone vehicle is seen parked on this dirt road.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
In the early morning of May 8th,
1929, three corpses identified as
The Murder Twins and "Hoptoad"
Guinta were found on a road near
Hammond, Indiana. The coroner said
their dead bodies had suffered the
most trauma he’d ever seen.

Moving in closer via the side rear window of the vehicle the
dead bodies of the three men are seated in the front seat
with bruises all over their faces and large bullet wounds in
their heads.

CUT TO:
61.

INT. THE LEXINGTON HOTEL - DAY
Elmer Irey is standing near the entrance, wearing a regular
suit, nothing fancy. He holds some sales pamphlets in hand.

INT. CHICAGO AIRPORT - NEXT MORNING
AGENT MICHAEL MALONE, 30’s, emerges from the arrivals with a
small suitcase in hand.

He is tall, dark haired, and although he is Irish, he
actually looks Mediterranean, and is able to speak Italian.
A WOMAN walking past him can’t help but eye the good looking
man up and down.

MALONE
Ciao!
The lady smiles, becoming literally flustered. She almost
walks into someone in the crowd.

Malone chuckles, then looks at his watch. Next he quickly
heads toward a taxi cab that he climbs inside.
CUT TO:

INT. CAPONE’S MOVIE THEATER - DAY
Located inside The Lexington hotel. Al is seated with
Rosella and Frank Rio watching the Howard Hughes produced
movie "The Racket" on a large screen mounted to the wall.

ROSELLA (V.O.)
Al loved the movies. He had a
screen and projector installed into
The Lexington Hotel and we would
watch Hollywood flicks.

Al eats popcorn and appears as excited as a little kid.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Al always made special effort to
own the actual print for any motion
pictures that depicted gangsters.
His favorite was Howard Hughes’
"The Racket", released in November
of 1928.
Al hands Rosella the popcorn. She eats a handful.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 62.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
It was one of the first films to be
nominated for the best picture
Oscar award in 1929. It was a
controversial portrayal of a
totally corrupt police force and
city government. At the time, the
film was banned from being shown in
Chicago.
On the screen Edward G. Robinson performs in a major role
playing a tough gangster in this silent feature film.
CUT TO:

INT. CAPONE’S DINING ROOM - DAY

Another private area within the hotel. Capone, Rio, and
Rosella are eating a prepared Italian lunch with other
Outfit members.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Al Capone loved to eat. It was his
favorite thing in life, to share a
meal with friends and loved ones.
It was the one time where he would
let his guard down long enough for
you to actually get to know him as
a human being.
Several waiters enter the dining room with silver trays.
Al stands and points to the center of the table.

AL CAPONE
Set it all down right here!
Al sits back down with a big smile on his face.

The meal prepared is classic spaghetti with meatballs, salad
and garlic bread.
Another waiter walks up and pours Al some red wine.
Al raises his glass.

AL CAPONE (CONT’D)
Okay! I want make a toast. I want
to dedicate this meal to the
victims of all the crooked stock
brokers that steal people’s
hard-earned money for stock they
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 63.

AL CAPONE (CONT’D) (cont’d)
know ain’t worth nothing. They
would make far better occupants of
penal institutions than someone
like me!

FRANK RIO
The dirty bastards.
AL CAPONE (CONT’D)
And do you think any of these
frauds went to jail? No! Why these
people are still our most elite
citizens. And they are just as
diabolical as the snake
politicians! I know a thing or two
about them, yah see? I help put
clothes on their kids and send them
on vacations with their mistresses!
Al stops for a moment. The room is so quiet you could hear a
pin drop.

AL CAPONE (CONT’D)
This winter I fed hundreds of
thousands of people per day here in
Chicago. And I know next winter
it’s going to be worse.
(erupts, angrily))
But I am the bad guy, huh? The
boogie man. I am to blame for every
bad thing that happens everywhere!
If something bad happens, Al Capone
did it!

ROSELLA
Sadly, I think people will never
know the real Al Capone. The media
has turned you into some kind of
crazed monster... that’s what sells
newspapers.
AL CAPONE
People can say all they want about
me. In the end I give back to the
community and I got a good family!
But If they want to box you up like
a caged animal in one of them tiny
cells bad enough... well, you’re
done, no matter what!
Al sits back down in his chair. He begins to eat his food.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 64.

ROSELLA (V.O.)
The United States had implemented
the new federal income tax via the
16th Amendment, passed by Congress
on July 2, 1909, and ratified
February 3, 1913. Many people in
1929 still did not take it very
seriously, like Al Capone, for
nobody had ever been given any kind
of significant sentence.

Next Al washes down the food with his drink.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Usually a heavy fine would be
imposed and a maximum year or two
prison sentence. So Al would not
truly look at any of this matter as
a serious threat. What Al and the
Outfit did not see coming was the
hammer that was going to drop on
them next. He was too distracted
with other things, like getting his
picture taken for the cover of Time
Magazine.
CUT TO:

INT. AL CAPONE’S MANSION - MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA - DAY
A Time Magazine photographer is waiting patiently in the
living room area for Al.

ROSELLA (V.O.)
Time magazine sent a photographer
with his camera loaded with film
and ready to shoot pictures of the
world’s most famous gangster.

Capone enters the room, looking sharp in his favorite suit.
AL CAPONE
Are we ready to do this or not?
PHOTOGRAPHER
Yes, sir. I’m ready to go. I
figured we’d have you take a seat
in that chair there.
Al takes a seat in the chair.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 65.

AL CAPONE
So tell me... who are some of the
other people that have been
selected to appear on the cover of
your prestigious magazine?

PHOTOGRAPHER
John D. Rockefeller, Winston
Churchill, Thomas Edison, Albert
Einstein, Charles Lindbergh, Calvin
Coolidge, Eugene O’Neill... off the
top of my head.
AL CAPONE
Those are some impressive names.
PHOTOGRAPHER
Yes, indeed. Would you mind turning
this way for me?
AL CAPONE
Which way?

PHOTOGRAPHER
To your left. Just kind of turn at
an angle.
AL CAPONE
Just make sure not to shoot the
scars, understand?
PHOTOGRAPHER
Well, Mr. Capone. I-I-I have
actually been instructed to make
sure and include your scars in the
photo.
AL CAPONE
Is that right?

PHOTOGRAPHER
Y-Y-Yes, sir. Orders directly from
my boss.
AL CAPONE
Your boss, huh?

PHOTOGRAPHER
That’s correct. Your full name will
be appearing on the cover as well.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 66.

AL CAPONE
My full name?
PHOTOGRAPHER
Yes, Alphonse "Scarface" Capone.

AL CAPONE
Nobody discussed any of this with
me. But I guess you people got
magazines to sell, right?

PHOTOGRAPHER
Yes, your name has become larger
than life, Mr. Capone. I would dare
to say it’s one of the most famous
on all of planet earth.

AL CAPONE
My name? Most famous? Biggest on
all of planet earth? I’m not so
sure about that, but it sounds
really good to me.

Al Capone begins to laugh, loudly. Then he assumes a pose.
AL CAPONE (CONT’D)
Okay, let’s get this thing over
with. Take my damn picture already.

POP! The camera’s flash goes off.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
Time was founded in 1923 by
American’s Briton Hadden and Henry
Luce. It became the world’s most
circulated weekly news magazine.
When Time picked Al Capone to
appear on their cover for the March
20, 1930 issue it was the very
first time a major figure in the
American mafia landed one of its
covers.
INSERT - AL CAPONE ON THE COVER OF TIME MAGAZINE
The mob boss has a big smile on his face in the photo as he
makes history yet again.
CUT TO:
67.

INT. LEXINGTON HOTEL - NEXT DAY
Michael Malone is seated in the lobby reading a newspaper.
Members of Capone’s Outfit litter the area.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Malone used the fake name
"Graziano" and wasn’t to be seen
talking with Irey. Agent Frank
Wilson was used to be the
intermediary and conduct his own
investigation of Capone as well.
Frank Wilson walks up to Malone and sits down in the empty
chair next to him. They both pretend not to know each other.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Wilson placed agent Michael Malone
inside the belly of the beast, the
Lexington Hotel, where Al
Capone operated his criminal
empire.

INT. LEXINGTON HOTEL - POKER ROOM - CONTINUOUS ACTION
Al Capone is seated at a table with other outfit members,
including Rosella - and Michael Malone.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Through contacts he had now
established within the Outfit
Wilson got them to believe Malone
aka "Graziano" was an out of town
gangster from Philadelphia who was
on the lam for violent crimes.
Al deals a hand of blackjack.
Everyone takes their cards and study, intensely.

AL CAPONE
So, Graziano, how is business in
Philly?
MALONE
Things have been real slow, to be
point blank about it. I don’t have
time to sit around for things to
happen. I need to make it happen
now.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 68.

AL CAPONE
You got any kids?
MALONE
No, sir.

AL CAPONE
What about a wife or girlfriend?
MALONE
No. It’s just me.

AL CAPONE
You do like the ladies, correct?
MALONE
Yes, I’m a ladies man all the way,
Mr. Capone.
Loud laughter erupts from everyone at the table as they
continue to play the game of blackjack.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
Malone was very smart. Funny. Sharp
as a tack. At the start, he pretty
much kept to himself during his
time at The Lexington. After time
he became friendly with Al and
other members of the Outfit.

Capone pours a drink for Malone and hand it to him across
the table.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
During a card game one day he was
grilled real good as we all played
blackjack. I was the only girl they
ever let play with them by the way.
Malone downs it in one big gulp. Smiles to Al.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
It took every bit of his moxy and
guile to grease his way in with the
Chicago Mob. He was so damn good at
his job that he was able to warn
Wilson that there was going to be
an assassination attempt on his
life.
CUT TO:
69.

INT. WILSON’S OFFICE - DAY
Malone sits across from a nervous looking Wilson.
MALONE
My contact is one of the closest to
Capone. His name is Guzik. He’s got
a big mouth. They call him "Greasy
Thumb". He handles all their
payoffs.

FRANK WILSON
What did you find out?
MALONE
Well, let me put it this way. You
are going to be a very lucky
man to make it out of this alive.
Capone has brought in his best
gunmen to turn your lights out.
FRANK WILSON
How many are there?

MALONE
Six are here in the city already.
Another six are on their way from
New York.

EXT. CHICAGO FEDERAL COURTHOUSE - DAY
"Bottles" Capone is walking up the courthouse steps with his
attorney.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
While all this was going on,
"Bottles" Capone himself was
quietly tried for tax evasion in
1930. After being convicted in a
quick two week trial, Ralph would
spend the next three years in
prison. This was only the start of
the Capone brothers fall from
grace.

THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE - JAKE LINGLE’S OFFICE - DAY
JAKE LINGLE sits behind his desk. He lights up a cigar.
Takes a drag.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 70.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
In June of 1930, Wilson sought
approval from the publisher of the
Chicago Tribune to ask questions of
staff reporter Alfred "Jake"
Lingle. Like Ness, Jake wanted to
be a big player. And like so many,
he ’talked’ about Al when he
shouldn’t have.
Lingle exhales a big cloud of smoke.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
The real kicker was he was being
paid off handsomely by the Outfit.
And he used that position to become
a wealthy man. But in the end, he
would turn on Al and be the first
to try and rat on him to the
federal government.
Jake suddenly gets up from his desk and exits the room.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Lingle was scheduled to meet with
the feds on June 10, but he learned
the hard way why it’s best not to
cross the Outfit.

ILLINOIS CENTRAL COMMUTER TRAIN STATION - DAY
Lingle is waiting for his train. Frank Nitti is in a dark
trenchcoat walking up behind him. While dozens of witnesses
stand nearby, Nitti points a handgun at the base of Lingle’s
head and pulls the trigger one time. BLAM!
CUT TO:

A SERIES OF SHOTS - MONTAGE
Malone visits the Subway speakeasy. He is served a drink at
the bar.
Malone drinks a beer while visiting the Cotton Club. Seated
alone in a booth, he inconspicuously studies his
environment.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
Malone worked the streets of
Cicero, trying to find a way to
link Capone to the big gambling
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 71.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (cont’d)
places, the dog tracks, the
brothels, and the bootleg
joints. Potential witnesses, when
subpoenaed, rarely
cooperated. Most were hostile to
government and ready to give
perjured testimony.

CUT TO:

INT. MALONE’S ROOM - LEXINGTON HOTEL - NIGHT
Malone smokes a cigarette on his bed, staring up at the
ceiling.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
To convict Capone would take
assistance from inside of his
illicit empire. One of Al’s best
friends and closest confidantes did
turn on him. That person was the
Outfit’s lawyer, Eddie O’Hare. Easy
Eddie protected his own butt thanks
to the leads he provided the
government over the course
of their two-year investigation.
CUT TO:

INT. WILSON’S OFFICE - DAY
Easy Eddie is seated in a disguise talking with Frank
Wilson.
Eddie hands over a bunch of important documents to the
Federal agent.
CUT TO:
INT. LEXINGTON HOTEL - AL’S OFFICE - DAY

Al and Easy Eddie are in the middle of a meeting.
AL CAPONE
How’s life been treating you,
Eddie?

EDDIE
I can’t complain, Al. How are
things for the Outfit?

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 72.

AL CAPONE
Things are going well. Maybe a
little bad press... but other than
that, I gotta say things are
looking up and up. I got some big
things I am working on we need to
discuss.
EDDIE
Did you buy more property?

AL CAPONE
Yeah, I picked up this chunk of
land near my new place in Miami.
It’s located farther north in the
little town of Deerfield.

EDDIE
Is that so? What are your plans?
AL CAPONE
It’s gonna be called Capone Island.
And the house I am gonna build on
this land is going to make the one
I just bought look like a shack.
EXT. DEERFIELD GAMBLING JOINT/CAPONE FISH IMPORT CO. - DAY
Al is walking the property with his brother Ralph discussing
business.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
Al Capone’s private “establishment”
was located where the Intracoastal
Waterway intersects the Hillsboro
Canal, and was setup to look like a
“fish” import business, but had
lots of gambling machines and fancy
girls around. Capone would travel
by boat from Miami Beach to visit
his Deerfield business.
CUT TO:

EXT. CAPONE LIMOSUINE - MOVING

The vehicle travels along while the sun sets in the
background.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
To the north of Capone’s gambling
joint and just across the Hillsboro
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 73.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D) (cont’d)
Canal was a 56-acre
triangular-shaped tract of land.
First designated by the Florida
Inland Navigation District as
“spoils area #702,” it was
purchased by Al in 1930 where he
planned to build an even more epic
$250,000 house.
CUT TO:

INT. OFFICE OF CAPONE’S TAX ATTORNEY - DAY
Al is seated in front of LAWRENCE MATTINGLY.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
In April 1930, Al Capone’s tax
attorney, Lawrence Mattingly,
contacted the US Treasury and
expressed the desire to have his
client meet with agents to settle
his indebtedness with the
government.
CUT TO:
INT. FEDERAL BUILDING IN CHICAGO - DAY

Frank Wilson and Revenue Agent RALPH HERRICK interview
Capone. Lawrence Mattingly is seated nearby.
FRANK WILSON
How long, Mr. Capone, have you
enjoyed a large income?
AL CAPONE
What are you asking me? If I am
rich?

FRANK WILSON
Well the way you dress, Mr.
Capone... and that big fat diamond
ring you wear on your pinky-

AL CAPONE
- Hey, all you need to know is I
been given a lot of gifts in life!
HERRICK
I think it is only fair to say that
any statements which are made here,
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 74.

HERRICK (cont’d)
which could be used against you,
probably would be used, Mr. Capone.
MATTINGLY
So long as Mr. Capone can answer
any questions without admitting his
liability to criminal action, he is
here to cooperate with you and work
with you.

HERRICK
What records have you of your
income, Mr. Capone-do you keep any
records?
CAPONE
No, I never did. I’m not much for
records.
HERRICK
Any checking accounts?

CAPONE
No. I got plenty of other things to
check on. Trust me on this.
HERRICK
Again, we must ask you. How long,
Mr. Capone, have you enjoyed a
large income?
CAPONE
I never had much of an income. Are
you deaf?
HERRICK
I will state it a little
differently-an income that might be
taxable?

CAPONE
I would rather let my lawyer answer
these kind of questions.
MATTINGLY
Prior to 1926, John Torrio, who
happens to be a client of mine, was
the employer of Mr. Capone, and up
to that point it is my impression
that Mr. Capone’s income wasn’t
there. He was in the position of an
employee, pure and simple. That is
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 75.

MATTINGLY (cont’d)
the information I get from Mr.
Torrio and Mr. Capone.
WILSON
Have you ever filed income tax
returns, Mr. Capone?
CAPONE
No.

WILSON
What was your marital status during
the years under question-were you
married?
CAPONE
Yes. And damn proud of it!
WILSON
Any children?
CAPONE
Yes, one. Any more than that and I
got another gang on my hands,
right?
WILSON
How old?
CAPONE
Eleven.
WILSON
For the years mentioned, did you
buy or sell any real estate?
CAPONE
No.

WILSON
Did you furnish any money to
purchase real estate which was
placed in the name of others?
CAPONE
Like I said before, I would rather
let my lawyer answer these kind of
questions.
MATTINGLY
I have no objection to answering
that question. Mr. Capone bought a
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 76.

MATTINGLY (cont’d)
piece of property in Miami,
Florida, in the name of his wife in
the year 1928.

WILSON
Did you furnish the money to pay
for that property?
CAPONE
Yes.

WILSON
What was the purchase price of that
property?
CAPONE
$10,000 cash, $30,000 mortgage.
WILSON
What was the source of the money
you used to make your cash payment?

CAPONE
I would rather let my lawyer answer
that question.
WILSON
Did you purchase any securities
during these years?
CAPONE
No, I never had anything like that.

WILSON
Did you have any brokerage accounts
in your own name?
CAPONE
No.

WILSON
Did you have any brokerage accounts
under an assumed name?
CAPONE
No. Absolutely not!
WILSON
Did your wife or relatives have any
brokerage accounts, or did they
purchase any securities?

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 77.

CAPONE
I would rather not answer that
question.
WILSON
Are you interested in any way in
the Roosevelt Securities Company?
CAPONE
No.

WILSON
Roosevelt Finance Company?
CAPONE
No.

WILSON
Do you care to give us any
statement of your assets and
liabilities’ at the present time?
CAPONE
Gentleman, my lawyer is taking care
of all that.
WILSON
Have you any record of the monies
which you might have spent for
expenses during the four years
under review?
CAPONE
No. I have no records whatsoever.

WILSON
You employed several attorneys
during the four years under
review-have you any idea as to the
fees you paid them?

CAPONE
I would rather let my lawyer answer
that question.
WILSON
Were your financial transactions,
particularly disbursements, usually
handled in currency?
CAPONE
Yes.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 78.

WILSON
You have no canceled checks or
check stubs?
CAPONE
No.
WILSON
What did you do with your
money--carry it on your person?

CAPONE
Yes. Carry it on my person.
MATTINGLY
After Mr. Capone leaves and this
interview is over, I should like to
discuss this matter with you
gentlemen, probably make some
arrangement suitable to your
convenience.
HERRICK
I know you spoke of going to
Florida or somewhere. Then you mean
you can start this morning, taking
this matter up?
MATTINGLY
I should like to spend Easter with
my family in Florida, and I had
thought, gentlemen, that it might
be possible to postpone this until
next week, but that is a matter for
you to decide.
HERRICK
It is a matter that we all want
cleaned up, and, if possible, I
think it would be desirable to make
a start on it. If we have to defer
it later, there isn’t any
disposition on our part to keep you
away from your family over Easter,
but it seems to me that the quicker
we get started on it, the better it
will be.
MATTINGLY
That sounds excellent.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 79.

AL CAPONE
How’s your wife, Mr. Wilson?

WILSON
My wife? She is fine. Why do you
ask?
Al Capone stands. Puts on his fedora hat with a smile.

AL CAPONE
No reason other than to be
friendly. You take care of yourself
now, hear?
Wilson is speechless as he watches Capone and Mattingly
leave his office. Next Herrick gives him a worried look and
then exits.
Wilson takes nervous sips from his coffee.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
The first big break in the
investigation came in the summer of
1930 when Wilson found three bound
ledgers seized in an earlier 1926
raid of one of Capone’s
establishments. With the ledger
referenceing "Al" it didn’t take a
genius to figure out that the
ledger recorded the monthly income
from a gambling hall that went to
Capone and his associates. However,
the ledgers were technically
inadmissible on statute of
limitations grounds, but Capone’s
lawyers would incompetently fail to
make the necessary timely objection
in court.

CUT TO:

INT. ELMER IREY’S OFFICE - DAY

Irey is reading from a letter sent by Wilson.
FRANK WILSON (V.O.)
Dear Mr. Irey, the Capone
investigation is going steadily
ahead. Not as fast as I would like
to have it, but the evidence in the
case against Al has been
strengthened since my last letter
to you.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 80.

CUT TO:

INT. THE COTTON CLUB - AFTERNOON
Al Capone stands at the head of the table where Rosella,
Michael Malone, Easy Eddie, Frank Rio, and Phil
D’Andrea are seated awaiting their meals.
AL CAPONE
Before we are served our lunch,
there’s a few things I’d like to go
over.
Michael Malone looks nervous for the first time.
MALONE
What’s on your mind, boss?
AL CAPONE
I got quite a bit on my mind,
actually. Funny you of all people
should ask me that, Malone. That is
your real name, correct?
MALONE
Yes, it is. I already showed you my
I.D. card, remember?

AL CAPONE
It could be a fake. So when I get
done having your background checked
out, you better hope and pray all I
find out is that you’re who you say
you are.

MALONE
Sure. I understand. Check me out
all you want. I got nothing to
hide.

AL CAPONE
Uh huh. Well, something just don’t
smell right to me. I hope everyone
in this room is on the up and up
with me. With the IRS giving me
headaches now and Hoover trying to
turn everyone against me, I gotta
start asking myself, "Who are my
friends in this life?"

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 81.

ROSELLA
I’m your friend, Al.
AL CAPONE
I know you are, sweety. You and OJ
understand what the word ’loyalty’
truly means. I know I can trust
you.
ROSELLA
Thank you.

PHIL
Hey, boss. Do you trust me?
AL CAPONE
I better be able to trust you,
dummy. You’re my bodyguard!
There is tense laughter amongst everyone.
CUT TO:

EXT. THE SUBWAY SPEAKEASY - LATE NIGHT
Subway cashier, FRED RIES, 40s, is walking to his parked car
when Federal Agents swarm him with guns drawn.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
After his arrest as a material
witness, federal agents coerced
Subway cashier Fred Ries. They
threw him into a specially-made
cell in Danville, Illinois, which
was staged with an infestation of
roaches, spiders, rats, and
bedbugs. After five days in the
cell, Ries was ready to talk.

CUT TO:

INT. RIES CELL - DAY
Fred Ries looks terrified surrounded by literally hundreds
upon hundreds of bugs that are scurrying around him.
RIES
Ahhhh! Get me the hell out of
here!!

DISSOLVE TO:
82.

EXT. CAPONE LIMOSUINE - MOVING
Al Capone is riding in the backseat.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
On September 30, Mattingly met with
Wilson to discuss Capone’s tax
liability.
CUT TO:

INT. LEXINGTON HOTEL - DAY
SIX MEN IN BLACK TRENCHCOATS are standing near the front
entrance.

ROSELLA (V.O.)
IRS agent Wilson was living with
round-the-clock bodyguards upon
learning that Al Capone had brought
six New York gunmen to Chicago with
a contract to end Wilson’s life.

CUT TO:

INT. WILSON’S OFFICE - DAY

Mattingly enters the office and takes a letter from his coat
pocket and throws it over to the agent.
MATTINGLY
This is the best we can do. Mr.
Capone is willing to pay the tax on
these figures.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
The infamous "Mattingly letter"
conceded taxable income for the six
disputed years ranging from $26,000
in 1924 to $100,000 in 1928 and
1929. Wilson filed the letter away.
A year later, the letter became the
trial’s key piece of evidence.

Wilson studies the letter, closely. HOLD ON THIS.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
On June 5, 1931, the government
indicted Al Capone with twenty-two
counts of tax evasion totalling
over $200,000. A week later a
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 83.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (cont’d)
second indictment would be brought
down against him on bootlegging.
However, Al would not go to trial
for the latter.

EXT. AL CAPONE’S MANSION - MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA - NEXT DAY
Al Capone is relaxing out by the pool on this gorgeous day.

ROSELLA (V.O.)
Being the larger than life star he
most certainly was, Al drew the
spotlight now more than ever. So
what did he do? Next he sat down
for an interview with Variety.

A VARIETY REPORTER enters the scene, sitting down in a chair
across from Capone.
On the wall is a picture of George Washington (to his right)
and Abraham Lincoln (to his left).

REPORTER
Do you like the actor James Cagney?
AL CAPONE
The guy that plays gangsters? Well
he ain’t Italian, that’s for damn
sure. And that’s all I got to say
about that!
REPORTER
Have you been approached ever to
make a movie about your life?
AL CAPONE
Yes, many times. I wouldn’t go into
a picture for all the money in the
world. It doesn’t interest me. I
really haven’t ever given any much
thought. It’s foolish to talk about
it.
REPORTER
But you like movies, correct?
AL CAPONE
Sure, I like them. Who doesn’t like
a good movie? But what burns me up
is all the jokers out there
pedaling stories about me that say
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 84.

AL CAPONE (cont’d)
they know me and the inner workings
of the Outfit. I don’t know any of
them nor have I ever authorized a
movie to be made on me. Let’s make
that clear.
CUT TO:

EXT. STREET CORNER IN CICERO - NEXT MORNING

Michael Malone steps off the curb to walk across the street
when Al Capone’s caddy limo suddenly rolls up and the rear
door swings open.
Frank Rio steps out with a Tommy gun and points it at
Malone.
FRANK RIO
Get inside the car. The boss needs
to have some words with you.

Malone gets an uneasy look on his face and moves toward the
vehicle.
INT. CAPONE’S CADDY - CONTINUOUS
Malone climbs into the backseat where he finds Al Capone
looking at him with a serious glare.
Clearing his throat, nervously, Malone looks at the mob boss
with a blank expression.

MALONE
Hey, Al. What’s the story?
AL CAPONE
The story? Maybe you need to tell
me more about ’your’ story,
Graziano.
MALONE
I already told you everything.
AL CAPONE
Everything, huh?
MALONE
Yeah, like I said before, I ain’t
got nothing to hide from you.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 85.

AL CAPONE
Well then you’re not going to be
worried about this little ride
we’re taking you on.
CUT TO:

INT. OFFICE OF U. S. ATTORNEY GEORGE E. Q. JOHNSON - DAY

Mattingly is seated across from George E. Q. Johnson.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
Al’s attorneys met with U. S.
Attorney George E. Q. Johnson to
discuss a plea bargain in hopes to
get a two-and-a-half year sentence
out of the negotiations. With an
agreement for the two-and-a-half
year sentence in place, Al Capone
appeared on June 18, 1931 before
Federal Judge James H. Wilkerson
and entered a plea of guilty.
Wilkerson adjourned court until
July 30 where he ultimately
dismissed the plea and moved to
trial.

CUT TO:

INT. ELMER IREY’S OFFICE - DAY

Easy Eddie enters Irey’s office and takes a seat in front of
the Federal agent.
ELMER
Good afternoon, Mr. O’Hare. Now
what is this important information
you need to share with me?
EDDIE
I need to tell you something that
is crucial to your case against
Capone.
ELMER
Okay. What is that?
EDDIE
Capone’s organization has a
complete list of the prospective
jurors and has already begun paying
them off in the thousands.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 86.

ELMER
Is that so?
EDDIE
Yes. He is also promising political
jobs, giving out tickets to prize
fights, and he’s even been using
threats of violence to intimidate.
CUT TO:

INT. CAPONE’S CADDY - DAY
Al Capone pulls out a handgun and looks at Malone in the
backseat.

AL CAPONE
When I started in this racket I was
a bouncer in New York making $75 a
week. Now I am one of the richest
men in America. It ain’t been an
easy climb to the top is what I am
trying to tell you, Graziano. A lot
of people got in the way... and
lost their lives. But in the end, I
did what I had to do to protect
what was mine, understand?

MALONE
Sure, I understand.
AL CAPONE
Do you?

MALONE
Yeah, boss. Like I told you before,
I wanted to come to work for you
because you are the best.

AL CAPONE
I had your background totally
checked out, Graziano.
MALONE
And I have absolutely no problem
with that. I’m telling you the
truth about who I am.
AL CAPONE
Yeah, that’s what you been saying
all along.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 87.

MALONE
Exactly.
Capone opens the chamber on the weapon and pulls out a
bullet, only to place it back into the chamber.

AL CAPONE
I was fully ready to put one of
these bullets into your head today,
Graziano. I would have pulled the
damn trigger without hesitation,
got me?
MALONE
Yes.
AL CAPONE
This railroad job the feds are
hitting me with is as corrupt as it
comes. The US government can watch
its citizens starve and live on the
streets in the cold while they have
the good life on the back of the
tax payers dime. All I ever did was
try to help the people, give them
what they want, what they needed
... but I am Public Enemy #1.
MALONE
The only good fed is a dead fed,
boss. You won’t get an argument
from me on that one.
AL CAPONE
Your story checked out, Graziano.
It looks like I owe you an apology.
You ain’t one of ’them’. Anyway,
count yourself blessed and let’s
just leave it at that, okay?

A visible relief washes over Malone’s face.
CUT TO:

INT. LEXINGTON HOTEL - CAPONE’S OFFICE - LATE DAY

Al sits across from Easy Eddie. There is dead silence for
several long, drawn out moments. HOLD ON THIS. Then:
Al clears his throat.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 88.

AL CAPONE
Eddie, I’m not gonna beat around
the bush. I got some real problems
going now with this IRS heat. This
goddamn Frank Wilson won’t let up
on me. I just needed to chat with
an old friend.
EDDIE
Well, sure. No problem. Anything I
can do to help.

AL CAPONE
I am making all the moves I can to
be sure we got the jury in our back
pocket.

EDDIE
What do you need from me?
AL CAPONE
I need you to be honest with me.
Have you talked to any of them
feds? This Frank Wilson clown?
EDDIE
No, Al. I would never betray you
and The Outfit.

AL CAPONE
Are you sure about that?
EDDIE
Yes. I am on your side, Al.
Remember? We are running rackets
together are we not? Why would I
turn on you? For what?
AL CAPONE
I just hope and pray you ain’t a
rat, Eddie.
EDDIE
Rat? I would rather be shot dead
than to turn rat on an old friend
like you, Al.

AL CAPONE
I’m gonna take your word. But I
want you to know something, okay?

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 89.

EDDIE
Sure, what is that?
AL CAPONE
If you fuck me over... I’m gonna
fuck you over too, got it?

Al’s glare at Eddie gets more brutal with each moment.
Eddie looks at his watch.

EDDIE
Wow, look at that. I’ve got to be
getting on my way to some other
business across town I have, Al.
Eddie stands and offers him a big smile.

AL CAPONE
Have a wonderful night, Eddie.
Al watches Eddie walk away.

CUT TO:

EXT. CHICAGO FEDERAL COURTHOUSE - DAY
Al Capone, dressed in a mustard yellow suit, gets out of his
caddy and begins to walk toward the court entrance.
PHOTOGRAPHERS snap photos as he is walking.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
The trial of Alphonse "Scarface"
Capone began on the morning of
October 5, 1931 at the federal
courthouse in downtown Chicago.
Capone, accompanied by his
bodyguard, smiled at jurors as he
walked into court dressed in a
fancy, mustard-colored suit.
JUDGE WILKERSON takes his seat at the bench and looks out
over the packed courtroom.

He motions the BAILIFF to the bench.
JUDGE WILKERSON
It is time for somebody to impress
upon the defendant that it is
utterly impossible to bargain or
tamper with a Federal Court. Judge
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 90.

JUDGE WILKERSON (cont’d)
Edwards has another trial
commencing today. Go to his
courtroom and bring me his entire
panel of jurors; take my entire
panel to Judge Edwards.
The bailiff nods his head in understanding.
From his seat, Al Capone looks angered by the sudden switch.

The bailiff points at the jury members and gestures for them
to follow him.
The entire jury stands and walks out of the courtroom with
the bailiff.

CUT TO:

INT. COURTROOM - LATER DAY
Judge Wilkerson addresses the new jury.

JUDGE WILKERSON
Mere failure to file an income tax
does not constitute ’attempt’ to
evade or defeat the tax. Failure to
file may be one step in an attempt
to evade or defraud.
From the crowd, Rosella is intently listening.
JUDGE WILKERSON (CONT’D)
Such failure must be considered in
connection with all facts and
circumstances in the case. To
convict, you must find beyond
reasonable doubt that there was
intent to defraud. If you believe
from the evidence that the
defendant had a gross income of
$5,000 or over in the years 1924 to
1929, the mere fact that he might
have derived that income from an
illegal occupation or illegal
sources does not exempt him from
filing a return.
An uneasy look has now taken over Capone’s face as he
listens.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 91.

JUDGE WILKERSON (CONT’D)
In this case you may consider all
the facts and circumstances shown
in the evidence. You may consider
the evidence showing that the
defendant operated primarily from
the Lexington hotel. You may
consider the evidence with
reference to the money transmitted
from Chicago to the defendant in
Florida. You may consider the
evidence relating to the
expenditures of the defendant.
Finger on jowl now, Al becomes more stressed looking with
his right arm resting on the counsel table. He keeps his
lips puckered somewhat in the manner of a pissed youngster.
He does not look into the judge’s face.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
The court took the jury through the
whole list of counts in the two
indictments charging Capone with
"willfully failing to file,"
"concealing income," "attempt to
evade and defeat" and "dissipating
income" to escape payment of a
total of $215,000 in taxes on a
total income of $1,038,000 covering
a six-year period.
DISSOLVE TO:
INT. COURTROOM - DAY

Prosecutor JOHNSON speaks to the room with emotion.
JOHNSON
I have been amazed. I have been
amazed by the attempt of counsel to
put a halo of mystery and romance
around the head of this defendant.
He walks past a smiling Capone.
JOHNSON
Who is this man? Who is he?
The prosecutor turns and faces the jury. The farmer-types in
the box are all ears.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 92.

JOHNSON
Is he a Robin Hood? You remember
how Robin Hood in the days of the
barons took from the strong and the
rich to give to the poor, to the
peasants?
Al shakes his head in disgust.
JOHNSON
Was it a Robin Hood who bought a
meat bill of $6,500 in Florida? Did
that meat go to the unemployed? No!
It went to the Capone home on Palm
Island to feed the guests at
nightly poker parties.

DISSOLVE TO:

EXT. CHICAGO FEDERAL COURTHOUSE - DAY
ROSELLA (V.O.)
The day of his trial verdict, Al
smoked a cigar and chatted with a
local reporter.
Al Capone speaks with a NEWS REPORTER.

AL CAPONE
I’ve been made an issue and I’m not
complaining, but why don’t they go
after all those bankers who took
the savings of thousands of poor
people and lost them in bank
failures?
Al lights up a cigar and starts blowing smoke rings.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
The evidence now shows that the
government had to resort to illegal
coercion of a witness, misled the
jury about Capone’s alleged
willfulness, and selectively
prosecuted Capone for "tax crimes"
because he was a celebrity that
threw loud parties.
AL CAPONE
Why am I the bad guy? Can somebody
answer that for me?

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 93.

NEWS REPORTER
Everyone thinks you were behind the
St. Valentine’s Massacre, Mr.
Capone.

AL CAPONE
Listen, pal. How many times do I
need to tell you people that I had
zero to do with that horrific
event. Think about it! Why would I
risk my empire by doing something
like that?
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
The government clearly failed to
prove its case against Al. It
failed to show that Capone had
income above the "exemption
amount". Instead it brought in
witnesses to describe his allegedly
extravagant lifestyle. They also
failed to show that Capone even
knew he had a legal obligation to
file a return.
REPORTER
If you had it to do all over, would
you change anything?

AL CAPONE
Yeah. Be careful who you call your
friends. I’d rather have four
quarters than one hundred pennies.
Biggest mistake I ever made was
trusting too many people in this
life.
REPORTER
Do you think someone from your
organization has been secretly
assisting the feds in your
prosecution? Behind your back?
AL CAPONE
I dunno what’s going on. All I can
say is loose lips sinks ships!

DISSOLVE TO:
94.

INT. COURTROOM - DAY
About fifty people are in the court room at this time.
Capone tries to read the faces of the jurors, but those
faces gave no hint of the finding.

Judge Wilkerson walks to his seat and faces the jury.
JUDGE WILKERSON
Gentlemen. Have you reached a
verdict?
The FOREMAN stands to his feet.
FOREMAN
Yes, sir.

JUDGE WILKERSON
You may hand your verdict to the
clerk.
The verdict, written on a prepared form, is handed across
the bench. The clerk clears his voice in the hush and as he
begins to read his audio is cut out and replaced with:
ROSELLA (V.O.)
Al Capone was found guilty on five
of the twenty-three counts
contained in the two indictments
brought against him by the Federal
Government for income tax evasion
from 1924 to 1929.
IN SLOW MOTION Al Capone stands and is handcuffed and led
out of the courtroom.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Two of the five counts were
misdemeanors, failure to file
income tax in 1924 and 1928, each
carrying possible maximum sentence
of one year imprisonment and
$10,000 fine. The other counts on
which he was found guilty were
felonies and each carried a maximum
penalty of five years’ imprisonment
and $10,000 fine for "attempt to
evade and defeat" the income tax in
1925, 1926 and 1927.
CUT TO:
95.

INT. ELEVATOR - DAY
Al Capone, in handcuffs, is led inside where he immediately
sees Phil D’Andrea under arrest and the officer that has him
under his watch is none other than Michael Malone.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
When all was said and done, my
friend Al Capone would receive a
record sentence of eleven years in
federal prison for tax evasion.

Malone offers Capone his biggest smile.
MALONE
Howdy, boss!

Capone gives him a look of respect.
AL CAPONE
You got some balls on you, whatever
the hell your name is!

MALONE
Thank you.
AL CAPONE
You play a good wop! Hey, what are
you doing with Phil?

MALONE
We found him to be in possession of
a firearm while in the courtroom.
AL CAPONE
Nice job. I bet you make your
parents real proud.
MALONE
On most days, yeah.

AL CAPONE
You do know that none of this is
going to slow me down in the end,
right? They could lock me up under
the damn prison and I’ll still be
Al Capone!
MALONE
Honestly, Mr. Capone, all I care
about is doing my job. And now that
we got you off the streets of
Chicago for a long stretch maybe
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 96.

MALONE (cont’d)
life in this city can go back to
normal.
AL CAPONE
Normal? There ain’t nothing normal
about this city, pal. Take a good
look around. At all the hungry
people. At the corrupt cops and
government. All I ever did was give
the people what they wanted.

CUT TO:

INT. CALVIN GODDARD’S OFFICE - DAY

Forensic expert CALVIN GODDARD, 40s, is examining two
Thompson submachine guns.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
As for the massacre guns, serial
numbers 2347 and 7580, they were
found in Killer Burke’s bungalow
after he was arrested for killing a
Michigan cop. He would never be
charged for the massacre killings,
instead he got life for murdering
the police officer. The guns were
taken to the Chicago coroner’s
office. Ballistic expert Calvin
Goddard tested the weapons and
determined that both had been used
in the massacre.

Goddard puts one gun down and picks up another.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
Gun No. 2347 was originally
purchased on November 12, 1924 by
Les Farmer, a deputy sheriff in
Marion, Illinois, which was the
seat of Williamson County. Marion
and the surrounding area were then
overrun by the warring bootleg
factions. Deputy Farmer was known
to have ties with Egan’s Rats, a
gang based 100 miles away in St.
Louis that Killer Burke once was a
member of. By the start of 1927 at
the very latest, the weapon had
landed in Burke’s hands.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 97.

CUT TO:
EXT. FEDERAL COURTHOUSE - CONTINUOUS
Capone is walked to an awaiting police vehicle.

ROSELLA (V.O.)
Capone was next sent to the Cook
County Jail until arrangements were
made for his transfer to Atlanta.
On May 4, 1932, he began serving
out his federal prison sentence at
Altanta. There he was officially
diagnosed with syphilis and
gonorrhea.

EXT. ATLANTA U.S. PENITENTIARY. - DAY
SNIPERS are perched in towers with rifles.
Capone walks in shackles with half a dozen GUARDS.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Capone wasted no time in using his
influence on the inside. He was
given unlimited access to the
Warden, and maintained large
amounts of cash hidden inside his
cell. He was known to "tip" guards
who would assist him by getting him
special requests. His time spent at
Atlanta would not be as comfortable
as when he was confined in Cook,
but he still had the ability to
manipulate the system.
A SERIES OF SHOTS - MONTAGE
Capone seated inside his prison cell, sipping from a cup of
tea.
Capone tipping an ATLANTA PRISON GUARD through his cell
bars.
Capone doing push ups in his cell.

Capone eats from a big plate of lasagna.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
In 1934, Attorney General Homer
Cummings along with Sanford Bates,
the head of the Federal Prisons,
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 98.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D) (cont’d)
next made arrangements to send Al
Capone to a facility where he would
be unable to have so much control
over the system. A new federal
prison called Alcatraz was the
perfect answer.

EXT. PRISON RAILROAD CAR - DAY

The train begins to move down the tracks.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
In August of that year, without any
formal notice, my friend Al Capone,
Public Enemy #1, was placed on a
secure prison railroad car, on a
journey along with 52 other inmates
to America’s Devil Island.
EXT. ALCATRAZ FEDERAL PRISON - DAY

An utterly grim vision of concrete and steel bars that
proudly stands behind its terrifying reputation for housing
the toughest criminals in America.
A seagull can be seen flying across the damp, fogged-in San
Francisco bay.

Al is being escorted to his cell.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
The most powerful criminal in the
world was not known by his famous
name any longer. Inside ’The Rock’,
he merely became a number like the
rest of them. Al was inmate number
eighty-five.

CUT TO:

EXT. OUTSIDE CAPONE’S CELL - NEXT DAY
WARDEN JOHNSTON is standing close to the bars, staring down
the criminal mastermind with total contempt.
WARDEN
Number eighty-five, Alcatraz is
known as the "silent prison". No
prisoners are allowed to speak to
one another, sing or whistle.
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 99.

WARDEN (cont’d)
Talking is forbidden in the cells,
in the mess hall and even in the
showers. You inmates are given
ninety seconds during the morning
and afternoon recreation yard
periods and for two hours on
weekends. Let me just say that this
place is a brand new kind of hell
for you.

The warden spits on the ground and looks back up at Capone
with a cold glance.
WARDEN
Number eighty-five, I just wanted
to make sure that you know how
important it is to me that your
stay here is a quiet and peaceful
time. You might have been ’Mr. Big’
out there but in here... you are
nobody. Just a number. In fact, you
ain’t even alive when it comes
right down to it. Sure, you might
still have oxygen in your lungs.
You might be fed and have all day
to think about what life could have
been like, but in the end, you’re
just another body I gotta watch
rot.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
Not only did he usually participate
in their brief orientation... but
Warden Johnston also entertained
subsequent personal ’counseling
sessions’ he spent telling each
individual prisoner what they were
up against if they even dreamed of
trying to escape.

WARDEN
Like I said, you’re dead. So don’t
try and come back to life,
understand? Any man that tries to
escape my prison will find
themselves either shot down like a
dog or shark bait in the bay.
CUT TO:
100.

EXT. ALCATRAZ VISITORS ROOM - DAY
ROSELLA (V.O.)
Number eighty-five was allowed
visitors once a month and I recall
going out to see him several times
during his stay.
Rosella is seated looking across at the thick glass
partition when suddenly Al Capone takes a seat and picks up
the phone.

Rosella picks up the phone on her end.
ROSELLA
Hello, Al.

AL CAPONE
Hello, Rosella. How are you, my
friend?
ROSELLA
I am doing fine. You look thin.
Aren’t they feeding you in here?
AL CAPONE
Rosella...
ROSELLA
Yes, Al... what is it?
AL CAPONE
This place is driving me insane. I
couldn’t tell my wife when she came
by to visit. She can hardly handle
things as it is, got me?
ROSELLA
Yes.
AL CAPONE
I don’t know how much more I can
take.
ROSELLA
Don’t let them steal your joy.

AL CAPONE
Steal my what?
ROSELLA
Your joy.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 101.

Al Capone stops and thinks about that for a drawn out
moment.
AL CAPONE
Okay. You’re right. I gotta get
some joy going. That’s a great
idea.
ROSELLA
Yes, my friend. A little joy never
hurt anyone, right?

AL CAPONE
No.
They both exchange smiles and a fixed stare on the other.

ROSELLA
Find something constructive to do,
like play an instrument.
AL CAPONE
I always wanted to learn how to
play the banjo.
ROSELLA
Swell. Do that. Do whatever it
takes so you don’t let them steal
that which is most important to
you, understand me?
AL CAPONE
Yes. I understand.
ROSELLA
Pinky promise?
Rosella holds up her pinky to the glass. Al lifts his and a
big boyish grin bursts across his face. FREEZE FRAME. HOLD
ON THIS.

ROSELLA (V.O.)
Number eighty-five was in the
"hole" three times during his 4
1/2-year stay at Alcatraz.

INT. THE HOLE - ALCATRAZ - DAY
It is pitch black. All we can hear is Al Capone WEEPING.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 102.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
He ended up being sent to the
"hole" for two, 10-day stretches
for talking to other inmates. He
also spent a full 19 days in the
"hole" for trying to bribe a guard
for information about the outside
world. Prisoners were not allowed
newspapers or magazines that would
inform them of current events. Each
time that Capone was sent to the
"hole", he emerged in a more
fragile state.

EXT. THE HOLE - TEN DAYS LATER

Al emerges from the holding tank and looks like a ghost of a
man. The totally blank look in his eyes tells us he is not
the same person he once was.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
The inhumane prison routine had
begun to turn my friend into a mind
ravaged zombie.
Al collapses to the ground after taking a few more steps.
BANJO MUSIC comes over the screen.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Unfortunately, the nightmare would
only get worse. Next, the warden
literally put number eighty-five
under the prison.
CUT TO:

INT. THE DUNGEON OF ALCATRAZ - DAY

Located in front of A Block is a staircase that leads down
to a large steel door.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Behind the door were catacomb-like
corridors which led to the sealed
off gun ports from back in the days
when Alcatraz was a military fort.
The warden wanted to break the
spirit of number eighty-five once
and for all. So my friend was
forced to live in this dark,
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 103.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D) (cont’d)
underground dungeon located
directly underneath Alcatraz.
A nude figure is chained to the wall like an animal. This is
#85. He repeatedly screams at the top of his lungs:
AL CAPONE
My name is Alphonse Capone! My name
is Alphonse Capone!! My name is
Alphonse Capone!!!

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Number eighty-five’s screams could
not be heard in the main prison.
The only toilet they gave my friend
was a bucket, which was emptied
once each week. For food, he
received two cups of water and one
slice of bread each day. Every
third day, they would give him a
normal meal. His stay in the
dungeon would be another record...
thirty one days.
DISSOLVE TO:

EXT. AL’S CELL - DAY

Al plays his banjo and looks pale. He just sits in a
crouched position in the corner of his cell, strumming away
madly, his eyes fixed in a crazed stare at the wall.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Occasionally, guards reported they
would find him crouched down in the
corner of his cell like a wild
animal. Most of the time, he would
simply babble in baby talk or sit
on his bed and strum tunes on his
banjo.
CUT TO:

EXT. ALCATRAZ PRISON YARD - DAY
Al is alone. TIME LAPSE as he walks around the prison yard
like a Zombie.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 104.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
After more than three years on the
Rock, Al Capone was on the edge of
total insanity. He would go on to
spend the last year of his sentence
mostly in the hospital ward,
undergoing treatment for an
advanced case of syphilis. He had
picked the disease up during
his days in Chicago. Most of the
time he spent in the ward, he spent
playing his banjo.
CUT TO:

INT. BAR IN CHICAGO - DAY

A dozen men lined up at the bar are celebrating with raised
drinks.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
In 1933 state conventions ratified
the Twenty-first Amendment, which
repealed Prohibition. The Amendment
was fully ratified on December 5,
1933. Federal laws enforcing
Prohibition were then repealed.

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. AL’S CELL - DAY

Al stares up at the ceiling with a black eye and swollen
face.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
After several fights in the yard,
Al was excused from his recreation
periods and being skilled with a
banjo, joined a four-man prison
band.
CUT TO:

INT. MESS HALL - DAY
Al Capone is playing his banjo with a group of inmates.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 105.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
The drummer in the group was
"Machine-Gun" Kelly.
MACHINE GUN KELLY, 40’s, pounds away on the drums.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Although gifts were not permitted
for prisoners on the Rock, musical
instruments were and Capone’s wife
sent him a banjo shortly after he
was incarcerated.
FREEZE FRAME on Al’s pale and gaunt face. HOLD ON THIS.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
After band practice, Al always
returned immediately to his cell,
hoping to stay away from the other
convicts.
CUT TO:

INT. CICERO BOWLING ALLEY - DAY
Machine Gun McGurn is seated. After a moment, THREE GUNMEN
burst inside the etablishment and open fire on him. He is
killed instanty by MULTIPLE HEAD SHOTS.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
On February 15, 1936. Machine Gun
McGurn now broke and kicked out of
the Outfit, was assassinated by
three men using machine guns on one
day after the seventh anniversary
of the St. Valentine’s Day
massacre. He was bowling at the
second-floor Avenue Recreation
Bowling Alley, at 805 N. Milwaukee
Avenue in Chicago. The killers
tossed a Valentine card with this
poem near to his body: "You’ve lost
your job, you’ve lost your dough,
Your jewels and cars and handsome
houses, But things could still be
worse you know... At least you
haven’t lost your trousers!".
The screen is filled with the eerie death gaze of McGurn.
FREEZE FRAME. HOLD ON THIS, then we...

DISSOLVE TO:
106.

EXT. ALCATRAZ YARD - DAY
A tall, slender man is walking the yard. His name is JAMES
"TEX" LUCAS, 22, mean and dirty looking.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Earlier in January of 1935, Tex
Lucas and his partner in crime
Jack Hardin were transferred to
Alcatraz from Leavenworth for
closer custody. Lucas was
22-years-old. He was serving 30
years for bank robbery and auto
theft. The Texas native also had a
detainer in his home state that
totaled 128 years. Charges included
murder, robbery, and escape.

INT. ALCATRAZ BARBER SHOP - LATE DAY
Tex approaches Capone who is standing at the end of the line
of men. Tex suddenly lunges at the former mob leader with
some scissors.
AL CAPONE
Hey, what the hell-
Al drops to the floor, blood pouring out of his chest as he
rolls onto his back.
Tex stands over him with the blade and yells, madly.
TEX
You cut in front of me!

AL CAPONE
I didn’t do anything...
Tex swings the knife madly toward Al’s body on the ground a
few more times. Al puts his hands in front of his face and
lets out a hollar as he’s struck again and again. FREEZE
FRAME. HOLD ON THIS.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
On June, 23, 1936, Tex viciously
attacked number eighty-five in the
barber shop. Using half a pair of
scissors. He cut him several times.
Al survived, suffering a minor
chest wound and cuts to his hands.
107.

INT. AL’S CELL - DAY
Capone is playing Duke Ellington’s "In A Sentimental Mood"
on his banjo.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
At Alcatraz, Al’s decline became
noticebly worse as neurosyphilis
ate away his mental faculties. He
spent the last year of his sentence
in the prison hospital, totally
confused.
CUT TO:

INT. PRISON HOSPITAL - DAY

Al stares up at the ceiling like a frozen statue.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
His last day on Alcatraz was
January 6, 1939. Al Capone was then
transferred to the new Federal
prison at Terminal Island near Los
Angeles.
CUT TO:

EXT. ALCATRAZ YARD - DAY
Al, looking unkempt and wild eyed, paces back and forth like
someone who has completely lost their mind.

A PRISON OFFICIAL walks up to Al and takes him by the hand
as if he was a child.
ROSELLA V.O.)
Al would be held at FCI Terminal
Island from 1939 to 1940.

THE FEDERAL CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION, TERMINAL ISLAND - DAY
Another guard can be seen walking Al Capone to the exit of
the prison where his wife and son wait for him.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
Though he served as one of the
architects of the American
Syndicate, Al never earned full
acceptance by his Sicilian
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 108.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (cont’d)
associates. When he was released
from FCI Terminal Island due to his
illness, his once superior
intelligence was now greatly
diminished. There was no doubt his
reign as the leader of The Chicago
Outfit was over, but for Al there
was still some unfinished business
he needed to take care of on the
outside.

CUT TO:

EXT. AL CAPONE’S MANSION - MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA - DAY

Al is sitting in a chair near the pool with a fishing pole.
He casts the line into the water as if he was actually going
after big game.
Al’s wife Mae walks up to him.

MAE
Al, there is someone here to see
you.
Rosella walks up to Al and takes off her sunglasses.

ROSELLA
Hello, Al. How are you doing?
Al looks up at Rosella and offers her a smile. Mae gives
Rosella a supportive look and walks off.

AL CAPONE
I’m fine, Rosella. How are you?
ROSELLA
I am well. My mother and I are
doing really good, Al. I just
wanted to make sure and drop by to
see an old friend. You look great!
AL CAPONE
I shit my pants today.

Shocked by the statement, Rosella lets out an innocent
laugh.
AL CAPONE (CONT’D)
I shit my pants every day.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 109.

Al lets out a laugh and then reels in his line. He laughs
harder and then casts it back out, all the while Rosella
watches him with a strained look.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
Al was never the same again. After
hundreds of hours of therapy, he
was only able to get back to the
level of a sixth grader. I am
afraid the truth is ’The Rock’
broke him mentally far before the
untreated sexual disease took hold.
Together both destroyed his mind
beyond repair and he would just sit
talking to himself while he fished
in his pool.

AL CAPONE
I’m gonna have a meeting later
today with the Outfit.
ROSELLA
Oh really?

AL CAPONE
Yeah, I got a lot of stuff I need
to talk about.

ROSELLA
Well I am sure they will all be
happy to see you.
AL CAPONE
Yeah, my brother, Bottles, and the
rest of the gang. They will be here
any time now.
Rosella just nods her head, smiling.
AL CAPONE (CONT’D)
We need to put all these rats in
the ground, got me? We need to
shoot as many as we can.
ROSELLA
Okay, Al. I understand.

AL CAPONE
Do you?
ROSELLA
Yes.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 110.

AL CAPONE
I am gonna talk to the boys about
it. We’re gonna get payback for all
the trouble these rats caused!
CUT TO:

EXT. EASY EDDIE’S OFFICE - DAY, 1939

Through the window Eddie is seen sitting at his desk.
CUT TO:
INT. EDDIE’S CAR - LATE DAY

Eddie leaves his office, gets into his black 1939 Lincoln
Zephyr coupe and drives away in a roar,

EXT. OGDEN AVENUE - CONTINUOUS ACTION

Suddenly a vehicle pulls up next to Eddie’s and opens gun
fire on his car. BLAM! BLAM! BLAM! BLAM!
Easy Eddie’s Lincoln Zephyr coupe comes to a rest against
the trolley pole at Ogden Avenue and Rockwell Street in
Chicago.
Bleeding out from multiple gunshots, Eddie’s death stare is
fixed upward. FREEZE FRAME. HOLD ON THIS.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
I was told that a small group of
hitmen assembled from the Outfit,
fiercely loyal to Al and his
brother, were the ones sent to
handle the drive by hit on Easy
Eddie as revenge for being a rat.
Their identities have always been
kept a secret. Eddie never even saw
it coming it happened so fast.
CUT TO:

EXT. AL CAPONE’S MANSION - MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA - DAY
Al is seated poolside with his fishing pole in hand. He
prepares to cast out his line into the water.

He is insanely muttering something and chuckling at the same
time. After a few moments, he yells out:

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 111.

AL CAPONE
Loyalty! Loyalty! Loyalty!
Moving in closer until his face fills the entire screen,
then FREEZE FRAME. HOLD ON THIS.

ROSELLA (V.O.)
In 1943, many top Chicago Outfit
members were indicted for extorting
the Hollywood film industry.

CUT TO:

INT. CHICAGO COURTROOM - DAY
The judges gavel comes slamming down IN SLOW MOTION.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Among those prosecuted were Frank
Nitti, Phil D’Andrea, Louis "Little
New York" Campagna, Nick Circella,
Charles "Cherry Nose" Gioe, Ralph
Pierce, and John "Handsome Johnny"
Roselli.
CUT TO:

EXT. CAPONE LIMOSUINE - MOVING
Al Capone is in the backseat, smoking a cigar. He inhales
and then blows out a big ring cloud of smoke. FREEZE FRAME.
HOLD ON THIS.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
The Outfit got popped for extorting
money from some of the largest
movie studios, including Columbia
Pictures, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer,
Paramount Pictures, RKO Pictures,
and 20th Century Fox. The studios
cooperated with the Outfit to avoid
any union problems stirred up by
the mob.

UNFREEZE. The ring of smoke slowly dissipates as it rises to
the roof of the vehicle.
DISSOLVE TO:
112.

EXT. FRANK NITTI’S HOME - DAY
Johnny Roselli sits across from Frank Nitti at the dining
table in the kitchen.
ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Frank Nitti took over the Outfit
after Al went to prison. At a
meeting held at Nitti’s home,
Johnny Roselli blamed Nitti for the
indictments.

ROSELLI
Since this had been your scheme and
the FBI informant, Willie Bioff,
one of your trusted associates, you
should go to prison.

NITTI
I should go to prison? What the
hell? I’m not going back to that
place.

ROSELLA (V.O.)
A severe claustrophobe as a result
of his first prison term, Nitti
feared the idea of another prison
confinement. It was also believed
that he was suffering from terminal
cancer.
CUT TO:

EXT. ALLEYWAY - DAY, 1943

Frank Nitti is walking along, comes to a stop. He pulls out
a gun and points it at his temple. BLAM! He pulls the
trigger and blows his brains out.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
So he decided to take his own life
on March 19, 1943.
CUT TO:

EXT. AL CAPONE’S MANSION - MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA - DAY
Al is seated poolside fishing and talking to himself.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 113.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
Al Capone died on January 25, 1947
upstairs in his home while on
oxygen tank from complications of
syphilis. The final time I saw him
was at his last birthday party the
year before.
CUT TO:

EXT. AL CAPONE’S MANSION - MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA - DAY
A large crowd of family, friends and gangsters are assembled
in the backyard for Al’s birthday party.
CUT TO:

AL’S BEDROOM - DAY - JANUARY 25, 1947
Al is seated in a chair in the corner of the room hooked up
to an oxygen tank. His breathing becomes more and more
labored with each moment.
Suddenly he stops breathing... and dies. His lifeless body
slumps over. HOLD on the silence, and then we...
CUT TO:

EXT. AL CAPONE’S MANSION - MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA - DAY, 1946
Rosella walks over and sets down some tea for Al on a table
nearby his chair.

AL CAPONE
Rosella.
ROSELLA
Yes, Al. What is it?

AL CAPONE
There’s something... I need to say.
ROSELLA
Sure, what’s on your mind?
The child like Al offers her his most sincere look.
AL CAPONE
Thanks for being my friend.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 114.

ROSELLA
You’re welome, Al.
AL CAPONE
I love you, Rosella. Thank you for
always looking out for me when most
just turned a cheek.
Tears begin streaming down Rosella’s face.
ROSELLA
And I love you, my friend. Thank
you for teaching me so much. I will
never forget what we talked about.
You taught me more than you will
ever know.

Rosella holds Al’s hand in hers and continues to offer the
sick mob legend her most tender gaze of admiration.
CUT TO:

EXT. LEAVENWORTH PRISON - DAY
Show Bug Moran being being escorted by ARMED GUARDS into
Leavenworth in Kansas.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
And Bugs Moran... he died from lung
cancer inside the Leavenworth
prison hospital on February 25,
1957 where he was serving a
sentence for bank robbery. He was
buried in the prison cemetery and
was said to be worth only $100 at
the end of his life.
CUT TO:

EXT. ELIOT NESS’ HOME - COUDERSPORT, PENNSYLVANIA - DAY
A man is seated in a rocking chair on a porch. He is
drinking from a bottle hidden in a bag. This is Ness.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D)
As for Eliot Ness, he became an
even worse drinker in his later
years. In 1942, while serving as
safety director in Cleveland, Ohio
he was accused of trying to cover
up his involvement in a car
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 115.

ROSELLA (V.O.) (CONT’D) (cont’d)
accident, with some speculating
that he had been driving drunk.
Ness collapsed and died at his home
in Coudersport, Pennsylvania of a
massive heart attack on May 16,
1957. His ashes were scattered in
one of the small ponds on the
grounds of Lake View Cemetery, in
Cleveland.
The following words are supered over the screen:
On January 10, 2014, Illinois’ US Senators proposed naming
the headquarters of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms
and Explosives in Washington, DC after Eliot Ness. If
approved, it would be called the Eliot Ness ATF Building.
However, Chicago Aldermen Ed Burke (14th Ward) and James
Balcer (11th Ward) opposed the resolution in an article in
the Chicago Tribune. In a news release, Burke said, “Eliot
Ness had a checkered career after leaving the federal
government. I simply do not think his image matches the
actual reality of his legacy.”
Burke concluded by stating: "There are probably a thousand
federal law enforcement agents who are more worthy of the
honor."
The Ness name dedication was subsequently called off.
CUT TO:

EXT. APARTMENT BUILDING IN CICERO - DAY, 1948
Rosella is walking up the front steps. She sets down a bag
of groceries and fumbles around her purse for the key to the
front entrance.
ROSELLA (V.O.)
It was 1948, on the first day of
May. I had just got home from work.
My life was pretty quiet now. I was
just scraping by like anyone else
in America.
From behind her, a TALL MAN in a black trenchcoat appears at
the bottom of the steps. He is carrying a large black bag.

TALL MAN
Excuse me. Is your name Rosella?
Rosella spins around.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 116.

ROSELLA
Yes, why do you ask?
TALL MAN
I have something for you.

He walks up the steps toward Rosella and then drops the bag
at her feet.
The mysterious figure walks across the street and gets into
a vehicle and drives off.

Rosella watches him speed away, looking confused.
She bends down and opens the bag. She looks inside and pulls
out a stack of hundred dollar bills. A big smile explodes
across her face. She grabs more stacks of hundreds.

Next she pulls out a greeting card with an angel on the
cover. Rosella opens it and the inside simply reads: "Reach
for the stars. Love, Al"
RANDALL (V.O.)
Al Capone made my grandma Rosella a
very rich woman that day. As with
anyone that was truly loyal to him,
he made sure to have the Outfit
take care of them after he was
gone. The bag contained one hundred
thousand dollars which is equal to
a million dollars today.
DISSOLVE TO:
EXT. ALCATRAZ PRISON - PRESENT DAY

Randall Cody, now a 45 year old man visits Alcatraz with his
wife, Hope, early 40’s, a beautiful Texas All American.
INT. ALCATRAZ - CONTINUOUS ACTION

The couple pays a visit to Capone’s cell.
RANDALL (V.O.)
Memories of her endearing
friendship with Al Capone stayed
with Rosella until she died in
2002.
HOPE
This is his cell, baby.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 117.

RANDALL
It sure is.
HOPE
It’s so small.

CUT TO:

EXT. CLARK STREET GARAGE - MORNING - FEBRUARY 14, 1929

The dead bodies of the massacre victims are on the floor of
the garage as a DOG BARKS in the background.
Frank Gusenberg is the last person alive. He is moaning in
pain from multiple gunshots... clinging to life.

Then news photographer TONY BERARDI walks up and kneels down
nex to him.
TONY
Who did this to you?

Gusenberg chokes on his own blood.
FRANK GUSENBERG
The coppers did it. It was the
coppers.

Suddenly Gusenberg dies. FREEZE FRAME on his death gaze.
RANDALL (V.O.)
Al Capone’s name is still the first
mentioned in connection with the
massacre. My grandma said there was
nothing he could do to escape the
negative public persona after that.
There are some historians today who
now believe Capone did not have
anything to do with it. But
"Scarface" was the perfect target.
The rest they say is history.
CUT TO:

EXT. CAPONE LIMOSUINE - MOVING - 1929
The boss of all bosses is in the backseat, puffing away on a
cigar as the vehicle comes to a stop in a Cicero
neighborhood.

INT. CAPONE LIMOSUINE - CONTINUOUS

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 118.

Al rolls down his window and looks out to see:
AL’S P.O.V. - TWO LITTLE GIRLS
standing in front of a lemonade stand with a sign that reads
’2 cents’.

EXT. CICERO STREET CORNER - SAME
Al Capone steps out of the limo and begin to walk over to
the lemonade stand.

Girl #1 is a redhead. 9 years old. She offers the gangster
legend her biggest smile. GIRL #2 is dark haired. 11 years
old.
GIRL #1
You wanna buy a cup of lemonade,
sir?
AL CAPONE
Yes, I would actually like a cup
for myself, my driver and my
personal bodyguard if that isn’t
asking too much of you young
ladies.
Both the little girls smile at each other, excitedly.

GIRL #2
Why yessir, coming right up!
Al watches both girls scramble into action. They very
professionally prepare the drinks by setting out little
Dixie cup and then pour the lemondae from a large container.

GIRL #1
Okay, sir. Here are your three
lemonades!

Al’s bodyguard, Phil D’andrea, walks over now and grabs a
couple of drinks and head back to the limo.
Al takes a sip of his.
GIRL #2
What do you think?
AL CAPONE
I think this is the best damn
lemonade I ever tasted.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 119.

GIRL #1
Wow! Thank you!
AL CAPONE
How much do I owe you?

GIRL #2
Six cents.
Al Capone pulls out a wad of hundreds and peels off six
hundred dollar bills. The little girls eyes widen in shock.

He hands the money to one of the girls.
AL CAPONE
Is six hundred dollars enough to
make me a lifetime customer?

GIRL #1
Yes, sir! For six lifetimes!
Al lets out a big laugh.

AL CAPONE
It’s a deal. Are you two sisters?
GIRL #2
Yes, sir. We are sisters.

AL CAPONE
Something tells me you two are
going to make a lot of money
working in business together. My
only advice to you both is never
stop being loyal to one another.
Nothing is more important than
loyalty, especially among family.
No amount of money. Nothing. Got
it?

GIRL #1
Got it. Have a nice day, sir!
Al Capone waves to them and begins to walk off... but then
suddenly stops.

He looks back at the girls.
AL CAPONE
Please. Call me Al.

(CONTINUED)
CONTINUED: 120.

BOTH GIRLS
BYE, AL!!!
Al climbs back into the limo.
The little girls wave to him with the happiest looks on
their faces.
Al’s limo pulls away and soon disappears around a corner.
FADE OUT

ROLL END CREDITS

THE END