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Works Cited

"Allied Occupation Zones of Germany." The Map Archives, www.themaparchive.com/allied-

occupation-zones-of-germany-may-1945.html. Accessed 23 Dec. 2017. This website

provides a map of the Allied Occupation Zones of Germany.

Black, Conrad. "The Yalta Myth." The National Interest, Sept.-Oct. 2006, pp. 93-99. JSTOR,

www.jstor.org/stable/42897770?Search=yes&resultItemClick=true&searchText=yalta&s

earchText=conference&searchUri=%2Faction%2FdoBasicSearch%3Floggedin%3Dtrue

%26amp%3BQuery%3Dyalta%2Bconference&seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents.

Accessed 14 Oct. 2017. This magazine article summarized the previous conference at

Tehran, saying the only achievements with any relevance to Eastern Europe were the

selection of where the second front would occur and the agreement to move the borders

of Poland. This article gives a very good description of the views of the British and the

Americans at the Yalta conference. It stated the British did not want a cross-channel

invasion because of horrible encounters with the Germans at Dunkirk and Dieppe. The

Americans, specifically President Roosevelt, feared that if the Western Allies did not

show an effort in defeating Nazi Germany, then Stalin would either make an alliance with

Hitler, or Stalin would take over all of Germany, Scandinavia, obtaining influence over

all of Europe. Finally, the source talked about the compromise in which Roosevelt got

Stalin's support for the UN and an agreement to enter the war against Japan three months

after the end of the European War, while Stalin would get minor territories in Japan and

China in exchange. Information from this source helped to develop the Conflict and

Compromise at Tehran section and the Conflict and Compromise at Yalta section.
Chamberlain, William Henry. "American-Soviet Relations Since Yalta." The Russian Review,

vol. 8, no. 2, Apr. 1949, pp. 95-101. JSTOR,

www.jstor.org/stable/125178?Search=yes&resultItemClick=true&searchText=American-

Soviet&searchText=Relations&searchText=Since&searchText=Yalta&searchUri=%2Fac

tion%2FdoBasicSearch%3FQuery%3DAmerican-

Soviet%2BRelations%2BSince%2BYalta&seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents. Accessed 15

Oct. 2017. This source mainly talks about how the cold war started and how it would

most likely play out. It says that the intolerance of the cold war did not come because of a

different type of political, economic, or social organization, but rather the aspects of

Soviet policy like refusing the allow access to information, disregarding treaties,

and flouting with the authority of the UN that builds up distrust. The source also says that

what is most probable in American-Soviet relationships is neither directly a peace treaty

nor directly a war. Neither government is interested in an early trial of strength by arms.

It is probably going to be a continuous struggle by non-violent methods. This source

helped to develop the conclusion section.

Charles River Editors. Interview. 16 Nov. 2017. This is an email interview that I conducted with

Charles River Editors, the authors of the three books called The Tehran Conference, The

Yalta Conference, and The Potsdam Conference. The interview helped me further

understand information on the difference between Roosevelt and Truman and the

delineation of the Polish border. They also provided a very useful analogy about the

Polish border issue: It would kind of be like making Canada give Toronto to America and

then receiving part of Greenland in return.


Ellis, Carmella. Origins of the Cold War. This book provided me with an image of the different

partition plans that were proposed at the Yalta Conference. This image was useful to

show the differing views of how the Allies would divide Germany after the war.

FDR Presidential Library and Museum. E-mail interview. 20 Nov. 2017. This is an email

interview that I conducted with the FDR Presidential Library and Museum. They

provided a very good explanation of the different styles in which FDR and Truman dealt

with Stalin. It also provides an image of American soldiers struggling ashore the Omaha

Beach during the Normandy Landings and an image of the Big Three with their staff at

the Yalta Conference.

Ghere, David. "Stimulating the Cold War: The Yalta Conference." Organization Of Amerian

Historians, vol. 24, no. 4, Oct. 2010, pp. 46-51. JSTOR,

www.jstor.org/stable/23210201?Search=yes&resultItemClick=true&searchText=yalta&s

earchText=conference&searchUri=%2Faction%2FdoBasicSearch%3Floggedin%3Dtrue

%26amp%3BQuery%3Dyalta%2Bconference&seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents.

Accessed 13 Oct. 2017. This article is actually a teacher's guide to how to teach the Yalta

Conference, pointing out some of the key points about the Yalta Conference. The Big

Three had to set aside the distrust between them in order to first defeat the Axis Powers.

Other key points include that all previous disputes that did not get resolved at the Tehran

Conference were carried on to the Yalta Conference, and all previous disputes that were

not resolved at the Yalta Conference were carried on to the Potsdam Conference. Also,

The military situation of the day gave the Soviets the advantage at the three conferences

in contrast to the United States and Great Britain. Finally, it includes a list of all of the

actual agreements at Yalta. This source helped me develop the conclusion section.
Lea, Douglas. Interview. 6 Dec. 2017. This is a personal interview I conducted with Prof.

Douglas Lea of Kutztown University. He helped guide me in the right direction to

understand the significance of these conferences. He also provided information on topics

such as Soviet security concerns, the two major advantages that the Americans would

have to bargain with, Stalin's opinion on the Yalta Conference as "Algebra", how an

ultimate compromise could not be made due to conflicting interests, and the significance

of the three conferences in keeping the "Grand Alliance" together.

Map Man USA. Cartographic Concepts, www.mapmanusa.com/cci-six-months-4.html. This

website provides two good images showing how the allies divided Berlin and the new

borders for Poland.

"Map of Western Europe 1942-1945." The National Archives,

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/education/worldwar2/theatres-of-war/western-

europe/1942/. Accessed 23 Dec. 2017. This website provides an animation of the

different stages of the war. I found this useful in showing the evolving situation of the

war in Europe. I took screenshots of different parts of the animation and used them as

pictures throughout the website. These include the result of the Compromise of the

Second Front and the situation of the war before the Tehran and Yalta Conferences.

"91. Joint Report with Allied Leaders on the Potsdam Conference." Harry S. Truman

Presidential Library and Museum, www.trumanlibrary.org/. Accessed 3 Nov. 2017. This

webpage gave a very detailed list of what was agreed on at the Potsdam Conference. This

formed the backbone of the Conflict and Compromise at Potsdam section, although it did

not contain any good quotes in it. Also, only the most important issues and the ones that

had the most compromise were chosen for the website. This source also provided an
image of the Big Three at Yalta. This source mainly helped the Conflict and Compromise

at Potsdam section.

Nolan, Mary. The Transatlantic Century. This book gave some good quotes on the need for a

second front at the Tehran Conference and how many american troops came through

Great Britain for the landings in Normandy. This was mostly useful in the Conflict and

Compromise at Tehran page.

Patterson, Robert. "The Cold War: Equity and Wise Policy as the Path to Peace." American Bar

Association, vol. 36, no. 1, Jan. 1950, pp. 1-4. JSTOR,

www.jstor.org/stable/25717103?Search=yes&resultItemClick=true&searchText=equity&

searchText=and&searchText=wise&searchText=policy&searchText=as&searchText=the

&searchText=path&searchText=to&searchText=peace&searchUri=%2Faction%2FdoBas

icSearch%3FQuery%3Dequity%2Band%2Bwise%2Bpolicy%2Bas%2Bthe%2Bpath%2B

to%2Bpeace&seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents. Accessed 16 Oct. 2017. This article

mainly describes how the cold war started. It says that there is no vagueness in the texts

of the Yalta or Potsdam Agreements that brought about the "cold war". The Yalta and

Potsdam Conferences had nothing to do with bringing on the cold war. Critics say too

much was given to the Soviet Union during the Yalta and Potsdam conferences, but these

agreements had to be made according to the military fronts at the time. Because the

Soviets had lifted more land from Nazi control at the start of the Yalta and Potsdam

Conferences, it gave the Soviets an advantage at the bargaining table. This source helped

to develop the conclusion section.

The Potsdam Conference; The History of the Negotiations between the Allies near the End of

World War II. Charles River Editors. This book is about the Potsdam Conference. It
describes each of the Big Three's wants for the upcoming conference. Some of the topics

mentioned include the difference between Roosevelt and Truman, the Kriegsmarine, the

delineation of the Polish border, German reparations, the question of free elections in

Poland, bringing war criminals to justice, German reparations, and German

demilitarization/denazification. This book provided most of the information and quotes

for the Potsdam Conference section and the Conflict and Compromise at Potsdam

section, as well as a good quote about how the cold war was not caused by the Potsdam

Conference used in the conclusion section.

Stars and Stripes. www.stripes.com. Accessed 27 Dec. 2017. This website provided a good

image of the front page of a newspaper that talks about the victory over the Nazis. I used

this to represent unconditional surender.

The Tehran Conference of 1943; The History of the First Meeting Between the Allies' Big Three

Leaders during World War II. Charles River Editors. This book explains the Tehran

Conference, giving a great description of each of the Big Three's goals for the Tehran

Conference. It also explains how the location for the second front found a compromise.

The book also briefly touches upon issues such as Poland, Finland, and the fate of

Germany. This book helped to develop the Tehran Conference section and Conflict and

Compromise at Tehran section.

"The 21 Best Infographics of D-day - Normandy Landings." ww2live,

ww2live.com/en/content/world-war-2-21-best-infographics-d-day-normandy-landings.

Accessed 23 Dec. 2017. This website provides a great image of where the allies landed

during the D-day invasions. I used this image as the result of the compromise for the

second front portion of the Conflict and Compromise at Tehran Section.


"War!: The Yalta Conference - Winning the War, Debating the Peace." FDR Presidential

Library and Museum, fdrlibrary.org/. Accessed 3 Nov. 2017. This site gives a general

description of the Tehran and Yalta Conferences. It points out the conflicts that arose and

the compromises that were made to solve these conflicts. For example, at Tehran, "The

Big Three" biggest achievement was agreeing to open a second front in Normandy with

Operation Overlord. Stalin wanted an invasion of north-western France, demanding a set

date and a set commander for the invasion. Churchill still favored an invasion of the

Balkans and Greece. Roosevelt sided with Stalin for the invasion of France and selected

General Eisenhower to lead. Churchill still got an invasion of Italy but on a much smaller

scale. At Yalta, Roosevelt got Stalin to agree to enter the Pacific war 3 months after the

defeat of Germany and got Stalin's agreement to enter the UN, while Stalin would get

small territories in Japan and China. There is also an image of the document signed

regarding the Soviet Union joining the war against Japan and an image of the Big Three

and their staff at the conference table at Yalta. This site helped to develop the Conflict

and Compromise at Tehran section and the Conflict and Compromise at Yalta section.

World War II Database. Peter Chen, ww2db.com/. Accessed 3 Nov. 2017. This website gives a

list of the events that happened at each of the conferences and a little explanation for

each. It also provided quite a few photos from the Tehran Conference, D-day, the Yalta

Conference, and the Potsdam Conference. This website was very useful for writing about

all three conferences. This website also provides many good images of The Big Three at

each of the three conferences.


World War 2 Today. ww2today.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/Roosevelt-and-churchill-

595x360.jpg. Accessed 23 Dec. 2017. This website provided an image of Churchill and

Roosevelt at the Yalta Conference.

The Yalta Conference; The History of the Allied Meeting That Shaped the Fate of Europe After

World War II. Charles River Editors. This book is focused on the Yalta Conference. It

provides a good description of each country at the conference's goals. Some of the

conflicts and compromises that were discussed in the book include occupation zones in

Germany, the delineation of the Polish border, the formation of the UN, involving the

Soviet Union in the Pacific War, and the idea of unconditional surrender on

Germany. The book also includes a good quote about how the cold war was inevitable.

This book provided most of the content and quotes for the Conflict and Compromise at

Yalta Section.