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2010 | IMAGESPUEBLO.

COM
®

PUEBLO, COLORADO

CATCH A WAVE
Whitewater Park is state’s
premier river-surfing spot

Culture
Comes Alive
Two festivals add
spice to community

SPONSORED BY THE GREATER PUEBLO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


2010 EDITION | VOLUME 16
®

PUEBLO, COLORADO

CO NTE NT S

F E AT U R E S PUEBLO BUSINESS
30 Green Growth
10 HIGH-PROFILE CREATIVITY Pueblo is home to serious green-energy
Arts organizations work to promote innovation and practices.
city’s various cultural endeavors. 34 Biz Briefs
36 Chamber Report
14 SURF ON HIS TURF
Chamber president Rod Slyhoff
37 Economic Profile
guides visitors through five
delicious Pueblo meals.

D E PA R TM E NT S
18 CULTURE COMES ALIVE
Two lively festivals add spice to Pueblo.
8 Almanac: a colorful sampling
of Pueblo culture
22 CATCH A WAVE, PUEBLO STYLE
Whitewater Park makes waves as 27 Portfolio: people, places
Colorado’s premier river-surfing spot. and events that define Pueblo
39 Health & Wellness
26 ALL IN THE FAMILY DINER 41 Arts & Culture
The Pantry is one of Pueblo’s 43 Sports & Recreation
most popular restaurants.
44 Education
47 Community Profile: facts, stats
and important numbers to know

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Native American dancing at the Chile Festival

PU E B LO I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M 3
®

PUEBLO, COLOR ADO

MANAGING EDITOR KIM MADLOM


COPY EDITOR JOYCE CARUTHERS
ASSOCIATE EDITORS LISA BATTLES, JESSY YANCEY
STAFF WRITERS CAROL COWAN, KEVIN LITWIN
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS JOE MORRIS,
KATHRYN ROYSTER, BETSY WILLIAMS
DATA MANAGER CHANDRA BRADSHAW
INTEGRATED MEDIA MANAGER ELIZABETH WEST
SALES SUPPORT MANAGER CINDY HALL
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STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS JEFF ADKINS,
TODD BENNETT, ANTONY BOSHIER, J. KYLE KEENER
PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECT MANAGER ANNE WHITLOW
CREATIVE DIRECTOR KEITH HARRIS
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MELISSA BRACEWELL, KATIE MIDDENDORF, JILL WYATT
SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS KRIS SEXTON,
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GRAPHIC DESIGN ERICA HINES, JESSICA MANNER,
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ULTUR
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TU JANINE MARYLAND, MARCUS SNYDER
WEB IMPLEMENTATION DIRECTOR ANDY HARTLEY
HEALTH
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WEB CONTENT MANAGER JOHN HOOD

BUSINESSES
WEB PROJECT MANAGER YAMEL RUIZ
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AD TRAFFIC MARCIA MILLAR,

SENIOR LIVING
PATRICIA MOISAN, RAVEN PETTY

CHAIRMAN GREG THURMAN


PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER BOB SCHWARTZMAN

RECREATION SALARY EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT RAY LANGEN


SR. V.P./CLIENT DEVELOPMENT JEFF HEEFNER
SR. V.P./SALES CARLA H. THURMAN

VOLUNTEERING SR. V.P./OPERATIONS CASEY E. HESTER


V.P./SALES HERB HARPER
V.P./SALES TODD POTTER

MOVING SCHOOLS V.P./VISUAL CONTENT MARK FORESTER


V.P./EDITORIAL DIRECTOR TEREE CARUTHERS
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MEDIA
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UTILITIES MANAGING EDITOR/BUSINESS BILL McMEEKIN


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POPULATION PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR JEFFREY S. OTTO


CONTROLLER CHRIS DUDLEY
ACCOUNTING MORIAH DOMBY, DIANA GUZMAN,

INDUSTRY
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EXECUTIVE SECRETARY/SALES SUPPORT KRISTY DUNCAN
OFFICE MANAGER SHELLY GRISSOM
RECEPTIONIST LINDA BISHOP

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4 I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M PU E B LO
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RELOCATION
Considering a move to this
community? We can help. Use our
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including how to make your move
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VIDEOS
In our Interactive section,
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FACTS & STATS


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LOCAL FLAVOR
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ABOUT THIS MAGAZINE


Images gives readers a taste of what makes Pueblo tick – from business
and education to sports, health care and the arts.
“Find the good – and praise it.” – Alex Haley (1921-1992), Journal Communications co-founder

PU E B LO I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M 5
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Sit back and enjoy a preview


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Explore its landscapes, cultural offerings,
food and fun.
See its downtown, neighborhoods, parks
and attractions.

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Pueblo, CO 81008
Pueblo is rated L for Livability
(719) 586-9000
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6 I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M PU E B LO
Turn the pages of our
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PU E B LO I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M 7
Almanac

Affordable Amenities
Looking for an affordable city with plenty of cultural,
recreational and educational opportunities? Pueblo
is perfect.
The 2009 ACCRA Cost of Living Index ranks Pueblo
second on the list of least expensive urban areas. Pueblo is
tied with Fort Smith, Ark., while Pryor Creek, Okla. earned
the top ranking.
The composite index is based on six components –
housing, utilities, grocery items, transportation, health care
and miscellaneous goods and services.

Honoring Heroes
Here’s a salute to William J. Crawford,
Drew D. Dix, Raymond G. “Jerry” Murphy
and Carl L. Sitter.
These four native sons of Pueblo are all
recipients of the Medal of Honor. It is the
highest award for valor in action against
an enemy force that can be bestowed by
Congress on an individual serving in the
U.S. armed forces.
In 1993, the U.S. Congress proclaimed
Pueblo “America’s Home of Heroes,” and
a memorial was erected in 2000 to honor
the recipients. The memorial consists of
four 8-foot bronze sculptures and is located
outside the Pueblo Convention Center.

Right on Course
Instead of plowing up the arroyos or filling in their dried creek beds, Walking Stick Golf Course
integrated the arroyos into its design.
The par-72 municipal golf course provides golfers with challenging play, beautiful views of
the mountains and ideal vantage points to see across the plains.
Arroyo, which means ‘brook’ in Spanish, is a dry creek bed or gulch that
temporarily fills with water following a heavy rain. There are very few trees on
the course because Pueblo is in the plains, so having the arroyos here makes
the course interesting.

8 I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M PU E B LO
Let the Good Times Flow
Water sports and boating enthusiasts, welcome to paradise.
By all accounts, Pueblo bubbles over with assets, from its
energetic nightlife to its rich culture and heritage. But perhaps
the city’s most attractive qualities can be found in its beautiful
lakes and rivers, which offer endless recreation opportunities
under year-round sunny skies.
Fishing on the Arkansas River is a satisfying challenge, and
Lake Pueblo State Park is the most visited state park in Colorado
for good reason. The lake features more than 60 miles of
shoreline and 4,500 acres of surface water.
For a leisurely day on the water, the Historic Arkansas
Riverwalk of Pueblo is a scenic place to stroll along the riverfront
or take a relaxing pontoon boat ride.

Pueblo At A Glance Fast Facts


Q Founded in 1872,
POPULATION (2008 ESTIMATE) FOR MORE INFORMATION the Colorado State
Pueblo: 106,079 Greater Pueblo Chamber of Commerce Fair is held in Pueblo
Pueblo County: 156,737 302 N. Santa Fe Ave. each year at the
Pueblo, CO 81003 102-acre Colorado
LOCATION Phone: (719) 542-1704, (800) 233-3446 State Fairgrounds.
Pueblo is situated beside the Arkansas Fax: (719) 542-1624
River in southeastern Colorado, www.pueblochamber.org Q Lake Pueblo State
110 miles south of Denver.
Park, an 11-mile-long
water reservoir,
BEGINNINGS
The El Pueblo Training Post was
What’s Online
e boasts 60 miles of
Take a virtual tour of Pueblo, courtesy of our award- shoreline and is one
established in 1842, and the city of
winning photographers, at imagespueblo.com. of the top recreation
Pueblo was incorporated in 1870.
spots in the state.

115
15 Q The 3.5-mile-long
To Colorado
olo Springs
Pueblo Levee Mural
25
Project is listed in
Ca
añon City
ty
the Guinness Book
of World Records
50 as the longest mural
67 in the world.
Boone
Wetmore
e 96
Pueblo 96 Q Area kayakers are
96 50 rejoicing, as a new
78 whitewater park
165
6 Beulah opened in downtown
P U E B LO Pueblo in May 2005
and covers a half-
Rye mile stretch with
>cSPZ]
10 eight different
water features.

PU E B LO I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M 9
High-Profile
Creativity ARTS ORGANIZATIONS WORK TO PROMOTE
CITY’S VARIOUS CULTURAL ENDEAVORS

STORY BY JOE MORRIS | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF ADKINS

S
ome wield a paintbrush while others take to the The business community joins the city’s residents in
stage, but no matter how they express their talent, supporting the arts and was a major impetus behind the
artists and performers have an enthusiastic and formation of the Pueblo Performing Arts Guild, says Susan
supportive home in Pueblo. Fries, executive director.
The city is justifiably known for its museums and major “They saw the need for an organization that could
arts organizations, but its support of the arts trickles down to represent a lot of the others and get their message out,” Fries
individual artists and smaller groups as well. Even better, says. “Marketing and fundraising are things many groups
organizations such as the Visual Artists of Pueblo and Pueblo don’t have time for, and we allow them to have more impact
Performing Arts Guild market and raise awareness of art and because we can do those things for them while they focus
artists here, making sure that each gets a chance to be seen, on their art.”
heard and experienced. An early member and ongoing beneficiary of PPAG’s

Pueblo artist Radeaux, who specializes in life-sized birds and animal paintings, works in his Pueblo gallery.

10 I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M PU E B LO
PU E B LO I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M 11
efforts is Christina Anderson, executive director
Artistic Assets
of the Pueblo Children’s Chorale. Involving
A sampling of some children from the second through eighth
of the arts organizations grades, the chorale manages to produce four
in Pueblo. programs and a school tour every year on a
$35,000 budget, so any and all help is vital.
Broadway “PPAG promotes our concerts through their
Theatre League weekly e-mail blast,” Anderson says. “But they
Colorado Music Fest also promote our auditions and arrange
performance opportunities for us.”
Damon Runyon More importantly, she says, PPAG allows her to
Repertory Theatre meet with other groups to network and brainstorm
on ways they can perform separately and
Festival Fridays together for even greater community impact.
Impossible Players
“Pueblo is really rich in the arts, and people
may not know about everything there is,”
Pueblo Choral Society Anderson says. “PPAG gets the word out to
anyone who wants to be involved, from
Pueblo Symphony organizations to audience members.”
Sangre de Cristo After more than 25 years of painting his
Ballet Theatre
native Colorado, 20 of those from the John
Deaux Art Gallery, one-named artist Radeaux
Sangre de can take the long view. Having watched Pueblo’s
Cristo Dancerz arts community grow and thrive has not only
been beneficial for his work, but for the city
Southern Col. itself, he says.
Theatre Company “Artists come here for the low cost of living,
the climate, the landscape – everything that
Town & Gown
Pueblo has to offer,” Radeaux says. “But the
Performing
community is also very supportive of the arts.
Arts Series
The various organizations really liven things up
and get a lot of interest going. We do a First
Friday Art Walk each month, and when PPAG
gets people involved with that, it really adds to
the atmosphere.”
The city’s artistic successes also help its
economic development, Fries adds, so in the
end everybody wins.
“Art events sell tickets, and they drive
business,” she says. “We promote the arts,
which brings people to the area, which drives
tourism. There’s a lot of energy here, and we’re
good at focusing that.”

Clockwise from top left: Pueblo


artist Radeaux; Paige Cipperly at a
dress rehearsal for an upcoming Michael
Jackson Celebration at the Sangre de
Cristo Arts & Conference Center; Festival
Fridays; Sangre de Cristo Ballet Theatre

12 I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M PU E B LO
PU E B LO
I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M
PHOTO COURTESY OF NICOLE HART, SANGRE DE CRISTO ARTS CENTER PHOTO COURTESY OF SANGRE DE CRISTO ARTS CENTER

13
14 I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M PU E B LO
Surf on
His
Turf CHAMBER PREZ SUGGESTS
FIVE GREAT PUEBLO MEALS

STORY BY KEVIN LITWIN


PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF ADKINS

Y
ou have 36 hours in Pueblo, After dinner enjoy an evening at one
and you’re hungry. Where do of Pueblo’s many nightspots.
you eat? The next morning, Rod suggests a
Rod Slyhoff has visit to his favorite coffee shop – Solar
suggestions. The president and CEO Roast on Main Street – to wake up with
of the Greater Pueblo Chamber of a rich, dark coffee.
Commerce enjoys good food and the “I always get a toasted bagel
occasional martini, and can recommend topped with ham, cheese and egg to
some of the best places for both. complement Solar Roast’s excellent
After a day of traveling to Pueblo, coffee.” After breakfast visitors can
Restaurant Fifteen Twentyone is the work up an appetite strolling the
perfect place to relax with a martini. Riverwalk. Then, it’s lunchtime.
Rod recommends starting a meal at “You can’t come to Pueblo without
Restaurant Fifteen Twentyone with getting a plate of Mexican food, and
mussels steamed in garlic and white one of the places I always rave about is
wine broth, followed with a tomato Mexi-Deli,” he says. “They have good
salad with baby spinach, olive oil and chips and salsa and cold Mexican beer
balsamic vinaigrette. while you look over the menu, and their
“For the entrée, I’d go with the house specialty is the taco Azteca. It’s a
grilled salmon served with corn ragout flat taco shell layered with frijoles and
and roasted red onion relish. It’s your choice of meat, topped with sour
incredible.” cream, guacamole, lettuce, tomato and

Clockwise from top: Steamed mussels, a favorite appetizer at Restaurant


Fifteen Twentyone; Steve Pagano, owner of Pass Key Restaurant; Rod Slyhoff,
Greater Pueblo Chamber of Commerce president

PU E B LO I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M 15
Feast on This PUEBLO DINING IN 36 HOURS

BREAKFAST Solar Roast Coffee is a LUNCH For excellent authentic Mexican DINNER Fifteen Twentyone serves many
great place to refuel in the mornings. This food try the taco Azteca or any menu item French-inspired dishes prepared by its
eco-friendly coffeehouse founded by two at the Mexi-Deli. Eat where the locals have classically trained chef. Park East is
brothers uses sunlight to roast its coffee dined for decades – check out the iconic well-known for its excellent steaks,
beans. Traditional breakfast fare includes Pass Key Restaurant and sample seafood, appetizers and salads.
bagels and croissants, and regional the Italian sausage sandwich. Restaurant Fifteen Twentyone
favorites including burritos. Mexi-Deli, 215 E. Abriendo Avenue 123 N. Main St.
226 N. Main St. Pass Key, 518 E. Abriendo Avenue Park East, 720 Goodnight Avenue

cheese, and then smothered with green


chili. It’s the best.”
Spend the afternoon visiting the
galleries and museums Pueblo has to
offer. That night for dinner, Rod points
to Park East Restaurant. He likes to sit at
the bar because it offers a lively
atmosphere, with bands performing
several nights a week.
“For my dinner, I like to order off
the Tapas menu although they have a
full dinner menu as well. I enjoy the
garlic spicy shrimp followed by some
prosciutto-wrapped asparagus, then
a steak brochette topped with blue
cheese,” he says. “Plus, I can never pass
up the calamari at Park East. I also
enjoy a glass of Toasted Head merlot
to accompany my meal.”
The next morning, Rod says it’s
okay to grab a cup of coffee and do
some shopping until time for lunch
at Pueblo’s iconic Pass Key.
“Try an Italian sausage sandwich
they call the Pass Key Special,” he says.
“The owners buy their sausage from
the same market they’ve used for
decades, then mix in their own secret
spices before grilling it to perfection.”
The sausage is then topped with
American, Swiss and provolone cheese
and it all goes on a toasted bun.
“That is one of the most outstanding
sandwiches you could ever imagine,”
Rod says. “It’s the perfect way to wrap
up 36 hours of culinary adventure
in Pueblo.”
Next time you’re in town, give Rod a
call; he might join you for a meal.

The Bacon Eye-Opener at Solar


Roast Coffee Right: Customers enjoy
lunch at Pass Key Restaurant.

16 I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M PU E B LO
What’s Online
e
Learn more about Pueblo’s cuisine in our
quick online videos at imagespueblo.com.

PU E B LO I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M 17
What’s Online
e
Check out the Chile Festival and the
rodeo event in our quick online videos
at imagespueblo.com.

18 I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M PU E B LO
Peppers
&Pardners TWO LIVELY FESTIVALS ADD SPICE TO PUEBLO

STORY BY KEVIN LITWIN

M
ore than 100 million
viewers around the
world annually watch
Professional Bull Riders
events on TV, and 1 million people
actually attend PBR events each year.
So what does that have to do with
Pueblo?
Pueblo is home to the Professional
Bull Riders Association, which
relocated here in July 2007 and has
opened a four-story headquarters
building along the Arkansas River.
In May 2009, PBR officials wanted to
become more involved with the Pueblo
community, so they organized an
inaugural Wild Wild West Festival.
The event was well received, so the

American Indian dancing is a cultural


highlight at annual The Chile and
Frijoles Festival. PHOTOS BY ANTONY BOSHIER

PU E B LO I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M 19
20 I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M PU E B LO
The jalapeno pepper eating contest is always exciting at the Loaf ’N Jug Chile & Frijoles Festival. PHOTOS BY ANTONY BOSHIER

Left: Bull riding is one of several events at the Wild Wild West Festival. PHOTO COURTESY OF ANDY WATSON

second annual festival will take place said, the ultimate goal is to make Wild chile crop throughout the region and
May 13-16, 2010. Wild West Festival one of the premier state, thus increasing the demand.”
“It’s going to take a few years, but attractions for Pueblo and this entire The chamber, in partnership with
I’m hoping that Wild Wild West Festival region each year.” El Pueblo History Museum, started the
will someday reach the popularity of festival in 1994 to salute the impact that
other such renowned western icon Chile Festival Is Hot Event chile peppers have in the city and
gatherings as the Calgary Stampede in One attraction in Pueblo that already county. Pueblo, nestled in the Arkansas
Canada and Frontier Days in Wyoming,” holds such a lofty distinction is the Loaf ’N River Valley, has cool nights, hot days
says Randy Bernard, CEO of the Jug Chile & Frijoles Festival, which occurs and frigid river water that runs fresh
Professional Bull Riders Association. every September on the third weekend from the Rockies – all of which create
“We aren’t taking shortcuts in growing following Labor Day. Approximately a large, flavorful chile that is thick
Wild Wild West Festival and will always 100,000 spectators pack Union Avenue to skinned and easy to peel.
strive to keep it first class. So every celebrate the wide array of chile peppers Festival activities include live music,
mid-May from now on, we want to help that are grown in the Pueblo area. cooking competitions, a 5K run, ethnic
make Pueblo a destination for many, “Each year the farmers plant nearly dancers, performing and visual arts,
many tourists.” 300 acres of chiles and close to 500 and a children’s zone.
The festival is staged at the Colorado acres of frijoles,” says Juls Bayci, “Lots of great Pueblo restaurants
State Fairgrounds and on Union communications director for the Greater and caterers are represented, and one of
Avenue, with attractions that run the Pueblo Chamber of Commerce. “While the competitions allows anyone in town
gamut of entertainment. it’s hard to say if the advent of the Chile to enter their best salsa,” Bayci says.
“Bull riding is one event, yet a juried & Frijoles Festival has caused farmers “The festival continues to attract
art show is another,” Bernard says. to increase that acreage, one thing is visitors from throughout Colorado and
“We will continue to add interesting for sure – the festival has definitely neighboring states as the trend toward
attractions as we progress, but like I increased the awareness of Pueblo’s heritage tourism grows.”

PU E B LO I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M 21
Catch a
WAVE,
Pueblo Style
WHITEWATER PARK MAKES WAVES AS
COLORADO’S PREMIER RIVER-SURFING SPOT
STORY BY KATHRYN ROYSTER | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF ADKINS

A
s summer snowmelt runs
down the Rockies to
Pueblo, water-sports
enthusiasts flood the
Arkansas River with activity. The area
teems with kayakers, boaters, water-
skiers, and – surfers? Yes, surfers.
Lured by the waves at downtown
Pueblo’s Whitewater Park, river surfers
are quickly turning the city into
Colorado’s top surfing destination.
“Pueblo is the surfing capital of
Colorado,” says Chad Parson, an
experienced river surfer and founder of
the Colorado River Surfing Association,
or CRSA. “Whitewater Park has a lot of
great waves and eddies, all in one place.
They’re all different and very fun to surf.”
River surfing is similar to ocean

The Edge owner, Bob Walker, stocks


surf boards in his Pueblo store.

22 I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M PU E B LO
What’s Online
e
Watch the action at the Whitewater
Park in our quick online videos at
imagespueblo.com.

Alex Mauer surfs on a short board at the Pueblo Whitewater Park on the Arkansas River.

PU E B LO I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M 23
surfing, but with one key difference: Whitewater Park. The uptick is due surprised that more and more people
hang times are out of this world. in part to the CRSA’s efforts to show- are showing interest.
“The waves never close out, never case Pueblo’s surfing scene. The “It’s a great sport for both men and
get to shore – it really is an endless organization hosted its International women. Even kids as young as 10 or
ride,” says The Edge’s Bob Walker, Surfing Day celebration in Pueblo in 12 can start out on a body board if the
whose shop has been outfitting Pueblo’s 2009 and plans to do the same again in water’s not too high,” she says. “Anyone
outdoor and recreation enthusiasts for 2010. Parson would also like to add a who wants to learn can go to The Edge
more than 15 years. high-flow contest to the calendar, to and talk to Bob or just come on down to
After several years of sparse interest give surfers a chance to try their skill the river – anyone there is willing to
in river surfing, Walker has recently at riding peak waves. help anytime.”
seen a dramatic increase in the number Tina Sotelo, a Pueblo resident who That openness is part of what makes
of surfers and body-boarders visiting regularly surfs Whitewater Park, is not Pueblo’s surf scene so appealing.

24 I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M PU E B LO
Before You Go
Water flow is usually best for river surfing in May and June. Call The
Edge (719) 583-2021 or toll-free (877) 273-5065 for information
about water levels. You can also check the U. S. Geological Survey’s
Arkansas River gauge at waterwatch.usgs.gov to find out if water
flow is sufficient for a day of surfing. Walker recommends a flow
rate of 1,500-4,000 cubic feet per second for surfing, with body-
boarding possible at flow rates down to 800 cubic feet per second.
The higher the flow rate, the greater the skill required to surf safely.
Minimum equipment includes surf or body board, helmet and
life jacket. Ocean boards are usually fine for river surfing, but
specialty river boards are also available. The river can be quite cold,
especially in spring, so surfers may also want to wear a wet suit.

Henry Mauer, left, rides a wave on his boogie board while Peter
Lynch, above, waits for an opening at the Pueblo Whitewater Park.

“The people who are in the park River,” Walker says. “If you get washed an activity like kayaking.
surfing are so nice, so approachable,” off, you could end up half a mile For Sotelo, the growing surf culture
Walker says, and Parson concurs. downstream, bouncing around in is an exciting addition to the mosaic of
“The Pueblo surf locals are some of the rocks. Here, if you fall off, it’s just Pueblo life.
the best and friendliest surfers in a big pond behind you. The recovery “It brings a different vibe and a
Colorado,” he says. “It’s always fun to is much easier.” different energy to the area,” she says.
hang by the river with them.” But the biggest draw, he says, Parson sees it as a model for other
Pueblo surfing is also noteworthy is convenience. Whitewater Park’s river cities around the globe.
for its relative safety. downtown location makes it an easy “Pueblo is a great town,” he says.
“There is a surfable wave just stop on the way to or from work, “They’re showing the world what can be
outside Glenwood Springs, but it’s a and the sport requires less done with our rivers to make them
really big wave across the Colorado equipment – and expense – than enjoyable for all.”

PU E B LO I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M 25
Local Flavor

All in the Family Diner


THE PANTRY IS ONE OF PUEBLO’S MOST POPULAR RESTAURANTS

T he Pantry remains one of the most popular restaurants


in Pueblo, just as it has been throughout its entire
37-year history.
older neighborhood of Pueblo that used to be called Mesa
Junction. This kind of family diner doesn’t really exist much
more in America, but it does here in Pueblo.”
Martin Valdez started the eatery in 1972, and his children The Pantry specializes in home cooking, with many items
Shawna and Kenny have always worked there. Now, Shawna prepared from scratch.
and Kenny own the business. “My father long ago invented a special green chile recipe
“Kenny and I have been with our family diner since day one. that is delicious, and to this day it remains one of the most
In fact, we used to stand on buckets just so that we could wash popular dishes at the restaurant,” Shawna says. “We feature
the dishes when we were kids,” Shawna says. “We would work a large menu with Mexican dishes along with quite a few
after school, on holidays and weekends. My father eventually comfort food offerings such as chicken fried steak, meatloaf
sold the business to us in 2006, but he still works here on and large hamburgers.”
occasion. It remains a close-knit, family-run restaurant.” The Pantry is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Hours are
The Valdez family actually opened a second restaurant in 6 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Friday, and 6 a.m.-2 p.m. on Saturdays.
the 1980s called The Pantry Too, then purchased a couple of “We have loyal customers, many of whom stop in every
other adjacent buildings to continue expanding the business. day for one or two meals,” Shawna says. “We’re not only
“Ultimately, we closed the original restaurant in 1986 and a restaurant, but a place where people gather to visit
then consolidated everything to our current larger location one another.”
on East Abriendo Avenue,” Shawna says. “We’re in a quaint, – Kevin Litwin

JEFF ADKINS

The Pantry is known for its green chile and diner-style food.

26 I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M PU E B LO
Portfolio

What’s Online
e
Visit My Pueblo at imagespueblo.com
and tell us your favorite family activity.

Linkin Williamson at the Buell Children’s Museum and Arts Center in Pueblo PHOTO BY ANTONY BOSHIER

You’re Kidding!
BUELL CHILDREN’S MUSEUM INSPIRES IMAGINATIONS AND LEARNING

W ow, children having fun and


learning at the same time.
The $3 million Buell Children’s
country. Sangre de Cristo officials say
the goal at Buell is to give children the
tools to think and act creatively, and
create personal masterpieces using
paper, ribbon, Mylar and other sparkly,
gooey materials.
Museum is now open on the campus of stimulate their interests through At an exhibit called 3-D Chalk
Sangre de Cristo Arts and Conference interactive and educational activities. Pictures, kids draw western landscapes
Center. The two-level, 12,000-square- One of the many exhibits at the with special chalk and then wear
foot museum features a variety of children’s museum is called Buell Baby 3-D glasses to make the pictures even
hands-on exhibits that focus on the Barn, which offers a variety of infant more dramatic.
arts, science and history. activities in a fun barnyard theme. Buell Children’s Museum is named
“This is the finest children’s museum Another exhibit is called Colorado Gold, in honor of the late Temple Hoyne Buell,
in this state and possibly in the region,” where children actually pan for real gold a Denver architect and philanthropist
says Maggie Divelbiss, Sangre de Cristo and other treasures in a mining trough. whose foundation contributed $1
Arts Center executive director. “We are Another exhibit is called How the million to launch the project. Divelbiss
enlarging a world where the arts are West was Worn, with kids encouraged says the long-term goal of the museum
cherished, nurtured and celebrated.” to dress up in cowboy hats, shirts, is to be an ultimate resource, helping to
Child Magazine has ranked Buell as spurs, chaps and boots. In an exhibit strengthen arts education offered in
the No. 2 children’s art museum in the called Artrageous Studio, children can schools throughout Southern Colorado.

PU E B LO I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M 27
Portfolio

Walk This Way

A long-term project that began in


1996 is only halfway done in
2010, but it sure looks good so far.
The Historic Arkansas Riverwalk
ANTONY BOSHIER

of Pueblo is a 32-acre downtown


waterfront experience that includes
a scenic walkway along the edge of
the Arkansas River. It features an
outdoor amphitheater, nature center,
small shops, cafes and artworks, and
Welcome to Colorado East Country the Riverwalk has arguably become
the best outdoor water attraction
in Colorado.
Construction of the $12.5 million
Riverwalk began in 1995 to restore the
Arkansas River to its historic channel
that flows through the center of
downtown Pueblo. The entire project
will be built in six phases, with the
third phase having been completed in
late 2009.

PUEBLO PROUD –
The Riverwalk has become a source
of pride and confidence for the citizens
of Pueblo, showing that the community
Helping to Build is vibrant, alive and visionary. It is located
in a segment of downtown Pueblo that
the Financial Future had fallen into disrepair and had
become unsightly by the early 1990s.
of our Community Today, the Riverwalk hosts a
farmer’s market on Thursdays from late
June through mid-September. It also
hosts a Kansas City BBQ Society
sanctioned competition, 4th of July and
holiday lighting celebrations.
But many residents who frequent the
Riverwalk do so for exercise, with a
variety of pathways available of varying
lengths. In fact, the district has become
one of the most visited attraction
destinations in Pueblo, largely for the
exercise option.
Also for outdoor enthusiasts, a
detailed Pueblo River Trail System
P UEBLO NORTH P UEBLO WEST P UEBLO SOUTH
stretches along the Arkansas River as
1515 Fortino Blvd. 94 S. Tiffany Dr. 1219 S. Prairie Ave.
well as along Fountain Creek, in various
(719) 584-2000 (719) 547-4488 (719) 561-5000
locations throughout Pueblo.
Visit us online at www.coloeast.com Pedestrians and bicyclists are welcome
to use the River Trail System paths,
while the water that fronts much of
Chartered 1905 the acreage is ideal for boat rides
and canoeing.

28 I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M PU E B LO
To Thursday Market We Go
F armers’ markets have convened in
the Midtown area of Pueblo on
Tuesday and Friday mornings for
area to make it a festival-like
atmosphere,” she says. “There is a
cookie shop, coffee shop, barbecue
homemade tamales,” Regrutto says.
“Another lady sold fresh-caught
salmon.”
several years. place and a hot dog stand near the Officials with the Pueblo City-
Now, there is also a Thursday Riverwalk Boathouse, and the farmers’ County Health Department and Live
evening market – but in a different part market just adds to the energy.” Well Pueblo are also on hand to give
of town. Besides produce, shoppers can also pedestrians free fruits and vegetables
Farmers’ Market at the Riverwalk purchase items such as flowers, fresh along with a variety of interesting
takes place every Thursday evening breads and more. recipe cards.
during the summer months, with “We had a goat cheese and goat milk “The market will only get bigger and
vendors selling their wares adjacent to vendor in 2009, and one lady sold better as we go along,” Regrutto says.
the Riverwalk Boathouse. The market
began operating in 2008 and has done
quite well during its short history.
The market occurs from the last
Thursday in June until the third
Thursday in September, so the 2010
dates will be June 24 through Sept. 16,
according to Erin Regrutto, director of
marketing for the Historic Arkansas
Riverwalk of Pueblo. The times are
4-8 p.m., and there are usually 1,000
to 1,500 people in attendance every
Thursday evening, proving that it is
turning into a successful weekly
summertime event.
Regrutto says the market also
features live musical entertainment
with popular local acts, while happy

JEFF ADKINS
hour boat rides along the river are also
available to the public.
“We also wanted to combine the Families shop for fresh, locally grown produce at the Musso Farms booth at
market with existing businesses in the the Farmers’ Market at the Riverwalk.

Math, Hasan School of Business, and the College of


Enrolling Right Along Education, Engineering and Professional Studies.
Meanwhile, the university has also been making
headlines in recent times. The CSU-Pueblo Thunderwolves
I t has a student population of 5,000 – and that number
seems to be growing every year.
And no wonder. Colorado State University-Pueblo is a
football team returned to the gridiron in 2008 following
a hiatus from the sport since 1984. Besides football, the
beautiful campus nestled in the southern part of the state men’s sports on campus are baseball, basketball, golf,
near the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, just a short soccer, tennis and wrestling, and the women’s sports are
drive to both Denver and Colorado Springs. In fact, the basketball, cross country, golf, soccer, softball, tennis,
beauty of the outdoors is one of the reasons why students track and volleyball.
are attracted to the campus, with 300 days of sunshine In addition, a brand new, multimillion-dollar “The
in the Pikes Peak region that allow students to enjoy University Library @ CSU-Pueblo” is currently under
extracurricular outdoor activities. construction on campus and slated to open in May 2011.
As for academics, the campus is known for its students The spacious, impressive facility will be able to house
being allowed to thrive in small classes that are taught by 188,000 books, 247,000 government documents, and
accomplished professors, with an average student-teacher 13,000 CDs, DVDs and videocassettes.
ratio of only 18:1. There are a total of 26 undergraduate The library will also offer access to 20,000 print and
degree programs along with six graduate degree programs online journals, and 100 online databases. It will also be
within the university’s four main schools – the College of home to university archives and special collections.
Humanities and Social Sciences, College of Science and – Stories by Kevin Litwin

PU E B LO I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M 29
Green
Growth

30 I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M PU E B LO
Business

PUEBLO IS HOME TO
SERIOUS GREEN-ENERGY
INNOVATION, PRACTICES

STORY BY JOE MORRIS


PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF ADKINS

P
ueblo’s always been known for its environmentally
proactive culture, but it’s getting greener by the
minute as new ventures and existing entities ramp
up their eco-friendly efforts.
The move to be clean as well as lean can bring a business
some welcome attention. Take cement manufacturer GCC of
America, which opened in 2008 and is now only the second
Colorado company to earn a Peak Award from Colorado
Performance Excellence.
Then there’s The Water Company, a homegrown
enterprise that is expanding its presence here by at least
140 employees over the next three to four years, as well as
building a new facility for its research, production and
marketing operations. The company’s wastewater-treatment
system includes a material and process invented by native
Brian Elson, who sold the patent to the company and leads
its research operation.
“Our founder is fourth-generation Pueblo, and the desire
to keep the latest, greatest and cutting-edge technology here
continues to be a strong push for our company,” says Victoria
Hauser, chief financial officer. “Everything is going just great

Dave Hartkop sits next to a large solar array that he built


with his brother, Michael, to generate heat from sunlight
to roast coffee at Solar Roast.

PU E B LO I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M 31
for us, and we hope to continue to bring in more business.”
Clean is even on the logo at Giovanni Clean, a commercial
cleaning and janitorial firm that is growing throughout
Pueblo and northern Colorado. The company uses
environmentally friendly supplies on its industrial and
commercial jobs.
And should anyone need a boost while saving the planet,
enjoy a cup of Solar Roast Coffee. Brothers David and Michael
Hartkop use the Helios 4, swapping fuel for sunlight on sunny
days to roast their coffee beans.
Meanwhile, Colorado State University-Pueblo is making
news these days for an on-campus solar power system, a fleet
of hybrid vehicles and just about everything in between.
“Our solar installation is the largest of any university west
of the Mississippi,” says Craig Cason, director of facilities
management. “It’s been up and running since mid-2008,
and powers about a tenth of the campus.”
The three electric cars are the building blocks of a more
economical fleet, in that they offer truck capabilities with
much smaller operating costs. Like the 1.2-megawatt solar
array, they are the result of an energy performance audit done
on campus about five years ago that led to a green cleaning-
supplies program, campuswide recycling effort and more.
“There was significant investment up front, but the
payback, which will come over the next 10 to 15 years, will
be substantial,” Cason says. “And we’ll be going back to the
performance audit and updating that so we can continue to
add programs and develop the ones we have.
“Everyone has gotten behind this, and with an enrollment
now of over 5,000 students, green power is really important,”
Cason says. “We’re looking at it as a way to keep costs down
even as we have more people on campus.”

New all-electric cars are being used by maintenance


employees on the campus of Colorado State University-
Pueblo. Above: CSU-Pueblo’s new solar panel field

PU E B LO I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M 33
Business

Biz Briefs
BUSINESSES – BOTH LARGE AND SMALL – THAT HELP DEFINE
PUEBLO’S ECONOMIC CLIMATE

Scorecard
BUSINESS AT
A GLANCE

$1,144,120
Retail Sales

$9,708
Retail Sales
Per Capita

$175,891
Hotel/Food

10,032
Total Firms
Source: U.S. Census
QuickFacts

HOBBS FAMILY FARM


Biz: organic farm
Buzz: To become certified organic in 2001,
Hobbs Family Farm had to be free of chemical
fertilizers and pesticides for three years. The
business produces vegetables and organic
seeds. The primary crop is garlic. The farm
also serves as a teaching site for interns from
Colorado College who want to learn about
organic farming.
www.coloradogarlic.com

34 I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M PU E B LO
YMCA
Biz: fitness, youth development, health
Buzz: The YMCA of Pueblo has moved to a
new facility that offers even more services
to its growing membership. The Pueblo
Y’s mission is still outreach. Thanks to
the Strong Kids Campaign, more lower-
income youth, teens, seniors and
families throughout the community are
provided the opportunity to participate
in YMCA programs than ever before.
www.puebloymca.org

RED CREEK LAND


Biz: land sales
Buzz: Established in 1994, Red Creek
Land is a wholesale land company that
specializes in purchasing, developing
and marketing large acreage. Parcels in
the inventory range from 5 to 80 acres
of land, perfect for keeping horses or
residential development. Since its
inception, the company has marketed
more than 100,000 acres of land.
www.redcreekland.com

OCTOPUS EXPRESS
CAR WASH
Biz: car wash
Buzz: Octopus Car Washes have been in
business since the late 1950s, providing
brushless technology. Low-touch vehicle
washing was pioneered by Octopus,
which now has locations in Arizona,
Colorado, Florida, Illinois, New Mexico,
Wisconsin and Texas. The Pueblo car
wash is a ride-through express detailing
facility with free self vacuums.
www.octopuscarwash.com

COOKIE LADIES
Biz: bakery
Buzz: Cookie Ladies Riverwalk Bake
Shoppe began as a mother-daughter
team baking a small variety of cookies in
a rented kitchen. Now, the business has a
commercial kitchen in a storefront
overlooking the Riverwalk and has
added premium ice cream and more.
www.cookieladies.com

PU E B LO I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M 35
Business | Chamber Report

Red Hot
CHAMBER KEEPS COMMUNITY SMOKIN’ WITH ACTIVITY

I f it happens in Pueblo, chances are


the Greater Pueblo Chamber of
Commerce is right in the thick of it.
the chamber’s program of work, but
Pueblo loves a party, and the chamber’s
convention and visitors bureau knows
Team Stanton Whether it’s providing business
assistance and legislative direction or
how to throw one.
The annual chamber-sponsored
Your Relocation Experts
implementing fairs and festivals, the Loaf ’N Jug Chile & Frijoles Festival
Pierce & Debi Stanton chamber is either doing it or promoting draws upwards of 100,000 people
Broker Associates it. That’s a tall order, because this is a during its three days.
busy community that reaches out to After the Professional Bull Riders
(719) 351-4762 Cell
residents and tourists alike. Inc. brought their world headquarters
(719) 583-1100 Office
(719) 583-9900 Fax “We promote anything that goes to downtown Pueblo, the chamber and
on in Pueblo,” says Phyllis Samora, PBR started the Wild Wild West
debistanton@kw.com chamber vice president. Festival (held in May each year) to
www.stantonhomesales.com Under the capable direction of Rod celebrate the Built Ford Tough Bull
Slyhoff, who has served as chamber Riding Event.
president and CEO for the past quarter The Colorado State Fair Parade,
century, the chamber focus is on planned and sponsored by the chamber,
providing tangible benefits to members draws 40,000 people into town to kick off
and creating relationships with key this popular event, while July’s National
leaders in order to facilitate policy that Little Britches Finals Rodeo guests are
is business-friendly. greeted with a chamber-sponsored
“The chamber is the true legislative welcome reception and other activities.
voice of the community,” Samora says. Growing in popularity is the Fat Tuesday
“The legislators call the chamber before celebration, which started small as a
they introduce legislation because they member-appreciation event, but has now
® want to get the pulse of the community.” grown to include the entire community.
Local city and county elected officials With all this activity, it’s only
also work well with the chamber. “We all natural that the chamber would work
want to make Pueblo a better place to to draw conventions into town, and
live and do business,” Samora says. visitors are accommodated with almost
Seminars, networking opportunities, 2,300 hotel rooms and two top-notch
governmental relations and leadership- meeting facilities that hold groups from
development programs are at the core of 10 to 1,500. – Betsy Williams

Beautify Your Kitchen


Pierce & Debi Stanton
kitchentune-up
224 S. Victoria Ave.
Pueblo, CO 81003

(719) 647-1945 Showroom


(719) 545-2129 Fax
(719) 351-4763 Cell
JEFF ADKINS

pstanton@kitchentuneup.com
www.kitchentuneup.com
Greater Pueblo Chamber of Commerce staff

36 I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M PU E B LO
Business | Economic Profile

PUEBLO
ECONOMIC OVERVIEW
Pueblo has a low cost of doing business – among the lowest in
America – which is a key reason why more than 50 companies
have located here in recent years. Pueblo serves as the southern
boundary for the state’s major business growth corridor, better
known as the Front Range of the Rockies.

ECONOMIC Colorado Office of


RESOURCES Economic Development
1625 Broadway, Suite 2700
Pueblo Economic Denver, CO 80202
Development Corporation (303) 892-3840
301 N. Main St.
Pueblo, CO 81002
(719) 544.2000 TRANSPORTATION
www.pedco.org
Pueblo Memorial Airport
Pueblo County 31201 Bryan Cir.
Economic Development Pueblo, CO 81001
TAXES 215 W. 10th St. (719) 553-2760
Pueblo, CO 81003
3.5% (719) 583-6000
Pueblo Transit
City Sales and Use Tax 123 Court St.
Southern Colorado Economic
Development District Pueblo, CO 81003
1.0% 1104 N. Main St.
Pueblo, CO 81003
(719) 553-2727
County Sales Tax
(719) 545-8680 Amtrak

2.9% www.scedd.com/pueblo www.amtrak.com

State Sales Tax

7.4%
Total Sales Tax

GOVERNMENT
OFFICES

Pueblo County
215 W. 10th St.
Pueblo, CO 81003
(719) 583-6000
www.co.pueblo.co.us

Pueblo County Veterans


Service Office
1120 Fourth St.
Pueblo, CO 81001
MORE
EOONLINE
(719) 583-4544 imagespueblo.com
City of Pueblo
1 City Hall Place More facts, stats and
Pueblo, CO 81003 community information,
(719) 553-2655 including relocation
www.pueblo.us tools and links to resources.

PU E B LO I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M 37
visit our
Belmont Lodge
advertisers
Abriendo Inn Northstar Engineering
Rehab Team www.abriendoinn.com
Parkview Medical Center
can help you Belmont Lodge
Health Care Center
www.parkviewmc.org
PEDCO
get back to the www.savasc.com
www.pedco.org
Board of Water Works
activities you enjoy! www.pueblowater.org Praise Assembly
www.pueblopraise.org
C&M Consulting LLC Pueblo City Schools
www.cmcpueblo.com www.pueblocityschools.us
CK Surgical LLC Pueblo Convention Center
If you know you will require therapy after www.ck.md
surgery or a hospital stay, include your nursing www.puebloconventioncenter.com
facility choice in your pre-planning. Colorado East Bank Pueblo County Commissioners
www.coloeast.com www.pueblo.co.us
s !T"ELMONT,ODGE OURAIMISTOMEETYOUR Colorado State Fair Pueblo School District 70
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function and quality of life! Colorado State University Regency Ridge Development
www.colostate-pueblo.edu www.rrdpueblo.net
s ,ARGE BRIGHTPRIVATEROOMSONOUR2EHAB Greater Pueblo Chamber
5NITPROVIDEPRIVACYFORSHORT TERMPATIENTS Restaurant 1521
www.pueblochamber.org www.restaurant1521.com
ANDTHEIRFAMILIES4HEROOMSFEATURECABLE46
ANDPRIVATEPHONE Harp Authority/Pueblo Riverwalk Rice Root
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Kitchen Tune Up St. Mary Corwin Medical Center
BELMONT L ODGE HEALTH C ARE CENTER www.kitchentuneup.com www.stmarycorwin.org
#ONSTITUTIONsNext to East High School Marriott Hotels & Resorts The Realty Post
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WWWSAVASCCOM Mission Foods Pueblo Wingate by Wyndham
www.missionfoods.com www.wingatehotels.com

38 I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M PU E B LO
Health & Wellness

JEFF ADKINS
The Doctors Will See You Now
FAST, ADVANCED MEDICINE SAVES LIVES AT ST. MARY-CORWIN

G erald Crispin knows firsthand the importance of


receiving cutting-edge medical care. The care he
received at St. Mary-Corwin saved his life.
“It still took me a few months before I got my head
completely straightened out, but today I enjoy 100 percent
recovery,” he says. “Stress and high cholesterol were big
Crispin suffered a massive stroke in 2007 while working on causes for my stroke, so I’ll keep working to lower those
the roof of his house. The Colorado City senior citizen says his things for the rest of my precious life.”
right arm became violently spastic. He was able to climb down
from the roof and stumble into his living room to call his wife, Top Trauma Treatment
Vera, for help. She dialed 911 and within minutes, he was Also functioning at a high level is the hospital’s Traumatic
transported to St. Mary-Corwin Medical Center – where the Brain Injury program. Brown says that with the recent
staff understood that every minute matters for stroke victims. addition of this advanced program, there have been
Crispin was asked in the ER if he wanted the hospital “extremely impressive improvements” in the mortality
to administer a powerful but risky drug to help him, but statistics associated with traumatic brain injuries.
he couldn’t answer – so his wife made the decision to go One case in point is Marcey Carlson of Pueblo, who
ahead with it. incurred extensive brain injuries in January 2007 after being
Dr. Stephen Brown, chief medical officer at St. Mary- thrown from a speeding motorcycle. Carlson was a passenger
Corwin, says an advanced clot-busting drug was used on and not wearing a helmet, and flew 100 yards before crashing
Crispin to dissolve the blood clot in his brain that caused her head into a sidewalk curb.
the stroke. The 20-year-old was transported to St. Mary-Corwin
“This drug must be administered within 3 hours of a where emergency physicians removed part of her skull to
stroke, but it has the potential to immediately relieve the allow her brain to swell without causing damage. She was
symptoms,” Brown says. “This patient was lucky to be at St. then put into a drug-induced coma for 4 1/2 weeks.
Mary-Corwin because our Primary Stroke Center is certified Today, after a long therapy process, Carlson is virtually
by The Joint Commission. Stroke care at St. Mary-Corwin back to being 100 percent.
functions at a very high level.” “The staff at St. Mary-Corwin did absolutely everything
The next morning, Crispin could actually feel his head right, from what I’ve been told,” Carlson says. “Thanks to
and body healing, and within 48 hours he was released from their incredible talent, I’m living and enjoying my life again.”
St. Mary-Corwin. – Kevin Litwin

PU E B LO I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M 39
Health & Wellness

highly trained critical care nurses. The


Sound the Sirens hospital also is home to the region’s first
certified stroke center which earned the
coveted Gold Seal of Approval from the
PARKVIEW TO ADD 81 NEW PATIENT BEDS
Joint Commission on Accreditation of
Healthcare Organizations. Additional

O n several days during 2009,


Parkview Medical Center was at
full capacity with no more available
fifth floors are finished.
The third floor will be an
interstational area where hospital
specialties include cardiac care,
women’s services, emergency services
and neurological services.
beds for patients who might have personnel can network and discuss Parkview is the area’s only hospital
needed them. medicine, while the sixth floor will to offer a complete behavioral health
“Those kind of days always make me be for administrative offices. program to include adolescent, adult,
nervous,” says Mike Baxter, president Baxter says once the construction geriatric and chemical dependency
and CEO of Parkview Medical Center. project is completed, there will still be care. And to help heal and comfort
“Hospitals across the country are faced a limited mix of semiprivate rooms at the county’s youngest patients, PMC’s
with a lot of challenges, but not being Parkview Medical that will only be Kidsville® provides an innovative
able to admit patients who need access utilized when overcrowding becomes 12-bed pediatric department staffed
to medical services is the biggest an issue. However, most of the rooms by specially trained nurses. The newly
challenge to me.” at PMC will be private suites. renovated unit – made possible through
Help is on the way. Parkview is The new addition is the latest in the sponsorship of local businesses –
currently constructing a six-floor a pattern of consistent growth for features updated façades and rooms,
patient tower that will ultimately add 81 Parkview. A nine-bed nursery providing state-of-the-art beds, flat screen
new hospital beds to the overall medical 24-hour care to premature infants – televisions, DVD players and interactive
campus. That will increase capacity at those born as early as 30 to 32 weeks elements to make children feel at home.
PMC from its current 265 acute care in a pregnancy – opened in 2008. The The nonprofit Parkview Medical Center
beds to nearly 350 beds. nursery also specializes in treating was founded in 1923 and is governed by
The additional beds will arrive in infants with health-related issues that a board of local citizens who provide
three stages, as construction of each require careful and ongoing monitoring. support and direction to the hospital’s
floor is completed, Baxter says. The Parkview provides the region’s most administrators. PMC, with 1,500
lobby and second floor of the tower will experienced certified Level II Trauma employees, also serves as the second-
open in March 2010, adding 27 beds. Center, which is staffed 24 hours a day largest employer in Pueblo County.
The rest will be added as the fourth and by board-certified physicians and – Kevin Litwin

STAFF PHOTO

40 I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M PU E B LO
Arts & Culture

Tools used in the railroad industry


are on display at the Steelworks
Museum of Industry and Culture.

maps and drawings of the mines,


camps and community buildings. It is
an extraordinary collection,” Walden
says. “It’s just at the edge of possibilities
once they pull this all together.”
It is an intact archive, she says, one
that includes employment records and
photographs – a microcosm of Ellis
Island, because so many immigrants
settled in southern Colorado to work
in the mines and the mills.
“This is a treasure trove for people
who are doing the genealogy of their
families, because at one time there were
30,000 people working in the mines,”
Walden explains. “That gives you an
idea of how many they have records on,
and they can trace the story of the
region. In terms of cultural heritage
travel, it’s not just the notion of
bringing the regional history together
so people can get at it, but it is also
allowing people to find their own
personal history. It’s a whole
opportunity for the entire region.”
Studies show that cultural heritage
JEFF ADKINS

travelers are typically well educated,


well traveled, have a higher-than-
average income and are interested in
authenticity – which Pueblo and the
region have in spades. “It’s really
Mining for Heritage incredible that, in addition to this
fantastic mining heritage, there is
authentic food and drink from this
PUEBLO MARKETS ITS DIVERSE ETHNIC HISTORY
culturally diverse area,” Walden says.
“There are Slovenian and Mexican

P ueblo is mining its rich coal and


steel history for valuable cultural
heritage tourism opportunities.
which was started in 1880 and later
owned by John Rockefeller Jr. Once
completed, it will be the largest exhibit
and Greek taverns and churches and
grocery stores. History is still alive in
the neighborhoods.”
Working through the South Central of its kind in the United States. Add to that interesting mix the
Cultural Heritage Co-Op, Pueblo has “The best thing they have is the magnificent scenery and a prolific arts
joined forces with four neighboring most complete corporate archives of community, and you have a perfectly
counties to assess, develop and market any corporation in America,” says Judy positioned tourism effort.
their tourism strengths – and they’re Walden, president of Walden Mills “Their possibilities are so exciting,
finding that the strengths are many, Group of Denver, the firm that has been and they are working together
especially in building a program hired to work with the co-op. “It is beautifully,” Walden says of the
around the Steelworks Museum important to our regional story because coalition. “They are telling their
of Industry and Culture. the company owned the steel mill in authentic story and connecting people
The museum, a program of the Pueblo, but they also owned 62 mines to that through historic buildings,
Bessemer Historical Society, is being located through the region. taverns, food, the arts, the museums.
developed in the buildings that “With three full-time archivists, it is They are always coming up with ways
formerly served as the headquarters for expected that it will take three to five they can find they are connected.”
the Colorado Fuel and Iron Corporation, years to assess and catalog the 34,000 – Betsy Williams

PU E B LO I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M 41
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42 I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M PU E B LO
Sports & Recreation

Field of Their Dreams


NEW PARK OFFERS UP BALL FIELDS, GREEN SPACE, WALKING TRAILS AND MORE

T hanks to hard work from


community organizations and
a major gift from the Denver Broncos,
Current plans for the complex call
for up to 75 acres of grass that can be
marked out in various configurations
known for his involvement in youth
coaching in the area. City officials are
likely to officially name the park in the
a new youth sports center is taking for football, soccer and lacrosse fields. months prior to its opening.
shape near Lake Minnequa. That can yield four full-size, high Whatever it’s called, Martin says he
The idea had long been kicked school fields, according to Martin. and a lot of other people just can’t wait
around between city officials and There also will be an office building for until that first ref’s whistle is blown.
community leaders to develop an the police activity league, as well as “Our youth are our richest asset, and
unused, 320-acre parcel into a concession stand, restrooms and storage. something like this will really help to
recreation and open-space area to serve The park hasn’t been formally develop them,” Martin says. “This is
the city’s South Side. As part of this named yet, but there is talk of honoring going to be a wonderful place and make
development, the lake itself will be the late Nick Heine, a Pueblo police our community better as a whole.”
restored and stocked with fish, while officer who died in 2008 and was – Joe Morris
a walking/hiking trail will be
constructed around it. A picnic shelter,
playground and other amenities will
round out the parkland site. “We learned that the winning project
As for athletics, several playing
fields for baseball, basketball and had to be in the state of Colorado, and
football are on tap. To develop those as
well as some building infrastructure, that it was something that would be
a $250,000 matching grant has been
secured from the National Football backed by the NFL.”
League and the Denver Broncos, says
Jim Martin, a Pueblo police detective
and president of the Pueblo Police
Activities League.
“For a project of this magnitude to
move this fast is very impressive,” says
Martin, who hopes to have teams on the
fields by August 2010. “We’ve had the
backing of the city and the county, and
a lot of other partners. It’s really nice to
see the community get behind us to
further develop a project for our youth.”
Martin, who also is head coach at
Roncalli Middle School, says things
really heated up when several coaches
and volunteers got involved with the
Denver Broncos’ Youth Football
Task Force and learned of the team’s
annual grant.
“Our proposal said we’d form an
organization to run a sports complex,
and would use it to benefit the
community and provide certification
for coaches and officials,” Martin says.
“We eventually received the grant, and
everything really got moving.”

PU E B LO I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M 43
Education

From a Distance
PUEBLO’S SCHOOL DISTRICT 70 REACHES STUDENTS THROUGH DISTANCE LEARNING

W ith four high schools dotted


over the county’s 1,800 square
miles – some as far as 40 miles apart --
“Our two smaller high schools have
a hard time offering some courses,
especially foreign language, so this
students, but it is something we will
continue to build upon.”
Andenucio admits that, while
in Pueblo’s School District 70 students gives them the opportunity to offer distance-learning is a money-saving
are learning from a distance. those classes,” she says. Most popular feature, it isn’t the main goal. “We
Newly installed distance-learning has been Italian, but students are also installed the system to offer students
equipment is enabling the system to able to sign up for advanced literature 3 classes they otherwise would not be
offer advanced and foreign language and 4, advanced history and Spanish 3. getting,” she says. “The opportunities
classes at all high schools, according “The response has been good,” are unlimited. Each of our high
to Ginger Andenucio, assistant says Tim Yates, director of technology. schools offers something that
superintendent of instruction. “The students have enjoyed it, but some eventually can be offered to our
of the students who never had that other high schools.”
experience before found it challenging And the concept will not be limited
at the start. They are accustomed to to high schools, Yates says. “We may
face-to-face instruction, so it is need to drop down to the middle school
different having to talk to a screen.” levels where the math teacher may be at
The screen to which he refers is the some other building in the district,” he
Promethean whiteboard, which is says, adding there is a possibility that it
present in every classroom throughout could even expand to other systems.
the system’s 22 elementary, middle and Students aren’t the only ones being
high schools. offered instruction from a distance;
“We decided to start relatively small staff development is also moving in
to work out all the issues,” Andenucio that direction, Andenucio says.
says of the $95,000 investment. “It’s Distance-learning and Promethean
a whole new concept for staff and white boards don’t represent the
system’s only foray into technology.
All high school students are assigned
laptops at the beginning of the school
year, and each middle and elementary
school has laptop carts equipped with
30 laptops, which are checked out by
teachers for various classes.
“What the principals have seen with
the laptops is that morale seems to be
better and the students are more engaged,”
Andenucio says. “We haven’t yet seen a
change in overall test scores, but we
have seen increases in subcomponents
of tests such as geometry, which we
attribute to our technology. Our whole
goal is to go from a teacher-centered
technology classroom to one that is
student-centered, focusing on what
students are doing with technology.”
– Betsy Williams

44 I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M PU E B LO
Making a Difference
STUDENT SUPPORT DIVISION PROVIDES NEEDED LEARNING TOOLS

H ard work and and a little extra money are making a


difference in the Pueblo City School System.
The system’s Division of Student Support Services and
offices, Romero stresses; they are out in the schools, helping
students and families and building partnerships with area
agencies such as the YMCA, the United Way and the
Community Services, under the direction of Kevin Romero, corporate community.
promotes student civic responsibility, health and nutrition, A newly adopted code of character is being integrated
athletics, transportation and student intervention through within all the schools, where every student, parent and
five departments serving 18,000 students. stakeholder signs off on the pledge of values. “The values of
“I believe our division is going to have the biggest impact honesty, trust, respect, diversity, responsibility, persistence,
on the school system by increasing the graduation rate, citizenship, integrity and service have been adopted by the
decreasing the drop-out rate and expulsions,” Romero says. system,” Romero says. “We are building bridges to families,
“It’s all about providing our students with the tools they need to the private sector, to non-profits. Everyone is getting on
so they can compete globally.” board in addressing the code of character.”
Romero says that in just three years with this new Almost $850,000 in additional grant funds is going
division, millions of dollars and new resources have been through the Student Intervention Department to support
added to the district, including 14 staff members in the Safe student risk programs and counselors.
and Healthy School Department funded through a $6 million Statistics show that students who are hungry do not
federal grant. function at optimum levels in class, and the nutrition
“A project director, positive behavior director and department has raised funds in excess of $300,000 to
specialists are working in the school system to support purchase fresh fruits, vegetables and new equipment and
teachers in the classroom around positive behavior,” Romero to address needs of the homeless.
says. “We have community advocates addressing drop-out “We’ve come a long way in three years,” Romero says.
prevention strategies and connecting families to the “Creating this program to make this difference was a
school system. For the first time we have mental health community vision, and it is community-driven. We have
professionals working in the system, and we have bully a cohesive division working together at different schools
prevention resources.” throughout the city. It has enhanced communication,
Romero is quick to praise the division staff. “We have great resulting in better transportation, nutrition, student
directors who come in early and work late. Through hard work intervention. There’s a lot of innovation going on here.
and dedication, the school district is a much better place.” We have a great team. It’s all about service.”
These support personnel are not in the administrative – Betsy Williams

PU E B LO I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M 45
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46 I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M PU E B LO
Community Profile

PUEBLO
COMMUNITY OVERVIEW
The air in Pueblo is so clean that residents often can see purple
mountains’ majesties from 70 miles away. That is one of the
numerous advantages of living in this city with clean water, a
nationally ranked school system and reasonable home prices.

services and facilities. And January Low Temperature


both are dedicated to providing 14 F
the Pueblo region with January High Temperature
excellence in medical care. 48 F
July Low Temperature
CLIMATE OVERVIEW 52 F
EDUCATIONAL July High Temperature
OVERVIEW The Pueblo County growing
91 F
season is 180 days, but the
county’s elevation range
Pueblo City School District
60 spends about $7,812 per
(4,400 to 12,000 feet) can HOUSING COST
influence what can be grown
student, in line with the state
average of $7,826. The
in different areas. Crops such
as alfalfa, corn, melons,
$126,562
student-teacher ratio is 17; the Average Home Price
onions, peppers and tomatoes
state ratio is 17. Pueblo County
thrive throughout Pueblo
Rural School District 70 spends
$6,237 per student, and the
County, but all require 14.17%
supplemental water. Home Turnover Percentage
student-teacher ratio is 19.

MEDICAL SERVICES
OVERVIEW MORE
E ON
O
ONLINE
Southern Colorado is blessed
with a pair of excellent not-for- imagespueblo.com
profit hospitals: Parkview and
St. Mary-Corwin medical
More facts, stats and
centers. Both offer critical-
community information,
care transport from including relocation
surrounding areas. Both have tools and links to resources.
first-rate emergency room

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PU E B LO I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M 47
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48 I M AG E S P U E B L O . C O M PU E B LO
Ad Index
48 ABRIENDO INN 3 6 K ITC H E N T U N E U P

3 8 B E L M O N T LO D G E 1 M A R R I OT T H OT E L S
H E A LT H C A R E C E N T E R & R E S O RTS

42 B OA R D O F WAT E R WO R K S 4 8 M I S S I O N FO O DS P U E B LO

4 6 C & M CO N S U LTI N G L LC 42 N O RT H S TA R E N G I N E E R I N G

3 8 C K S U RG I C A L L LC
C 3 PA R K V I E W M E D I C A L C E N T E R
2 8 CO LO R A D O E A S T BA N K
2 P E D CO
3 5 CO LO R A D O S TAT E FA I R
4 6 P R A I S E A S S E M B LY
C 4 CO LO R A D O
S TAT E U N I V E R S IT Y 47 P U E B LO C IT Y S C H O O L S

32 G R E AT E R 5 P U E B LO
P U E B LO C H A M B E R CO N V E N T I O N C E N T E R

4 6 H A R P AU T H O R IT Y/ 4 8 P U E B LO CO U N T Y
P U E B LO R I V E RWA L K CO M M I S S I O N E R S
Ad Index (cont.)
3 5 P U E B LO S C H O O L
D I S T R I C T 70

7 R EG E N C Y
R I D G E D E V E LO P M E N T

4 8 R E S TAU R A N T 1 52 1

4 8 R I C E RO OT

C 2 S T. M A RY CO RW I N
MEDICAL CENTER

42 T H E R E A LT Y P OS T

6 W I N GAT E BY W Y N D H A M