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J408:  Demystifying  Media  

School  of  Journalism  and  Communication,  University  of  Oregon  
2  credit  workshop,  Winter  2018  
 

Key  information  
 
Instructor:                    Damian  Radcliffe,  Carolyn  S.  Chambers  Professor  in  Journalism  
Office     201  Allen  Hall    
Email:     damianr@uoregon.edu  -­‐  you  can  also  DM  me  on  Twitter,  or  text  me  on  541-­‐972-­‐5531.  
Office  Hours:   1pm-­‐2pm  Monday,  3pm-­‐4pm  on  Wednesday.  
CRN:                                        27537  
Time:                                      16.00  –  17.50,  Thursday,  141  Allen  Hall  
Prereqs:                              J  205,  206,  &  207  w/mid-­‐C  or  better  
Credits:                                2  
Website:   http://journalism.uoregon.edu/demystifyingmedia/    
 
   
Course  Background  
 
The  way  we  consume  and  create  media  and  content  continue  to  evolve  at  a  rapid  pace.  The  
Demystifying  Media  seminar  series,  which  the  SOJC  launched  in  January  2016,  explores  the  impact  of  
these  changes  across  the  communications  landscape  and  finds  new  ways  to  move  forward.  
   
Each  term,  leading  media  practitioners,  academics,  and  researchers—working  on  the  cutting  edge  of  
these  global  changes  –  come  to  campus  to  discuss  the  impact  of  the  21st-­‐century  media  revolution  with  
students,  faculty,  and  staff.  
   
See  the  archive  of  lectures,  podcasts,  interviews  and  more:  
http://journalism.uoregon.edu/demystifyingmedia/    
 
What’s  new  for  Winter  2017-­‐18?  
 
The  Demystifying  Media  speaker  series  has  been  expanded  to  include  an  associated  2-­‐credit  
workshop,  allowing  for  further  exploration  of  the  themes  and  ideas  to  emerge  from  these  guest  
lectures,  as  well  as  other  important  industry  issues.    
 
Talks  remain  open  to  all,  but  more  detailed  discussions  –  and  additional  networking  opportunities  
with  our  guest  speakers  –  are  only  available  to  workshop  participants.  
   
Guest  Speakers  for  Winter  2017  
 
These  are  always  subject  to  change,  but  in-­‐person  speakers  (with  one  more  to  be  scheduled)  are:    
   
•   James  T.  Hamilton,  Hearst  Professor  of  Communication  and  the  Director  of  the  Journalism  
Program  at  Stanford  University,  will  talk  about  his  new  book:  Democracy’s  Detectives:  The  
Economics  of  Investigative  Journalism.    

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•   Jason  Wambsgans,  of  the  Chicago  Tribune,  who  won  the  2017  Pulitzer  Prize  for  Feature  
Photography,  will  discuss  his  work  covering  gun  violence  in  Chicago.    
 
 

 

•   John  Capouya,  Associate  Professor,  Journalism  at  the  University  of  Tampa  will  discuss  how  
journalists  cover  race/racial  issues,  through  the  lens  of  his  new  book:  Florida  Soul:  From  Ray  
Charles  to  KC  and  the  Sunshine  Band.  
 

 
Other  topics  for  Winter  2017  
Alongside  prepping  –  and  reflecting  on  these  talks  -­‐  other  subjects  we  are  likely  to  explore  include:  
   
•   Digital  Disruption  (Week  One)  
•   Social  Video  
•   Changing  dialogue  about  the  impact  of  tech  (Uber,  Google,  Facebook  et  al),  and;  
•   Emerging  platforms  such  as  Augmented  Reality,  Virtual  Reality  and  global  platforms  –  which  are  
popular  in  SE  Asia  -­‐  like  WeChat  and  Line.  
   
You  can  find  out  more  about  this  in  the  detailed  class  schedule  outlined  on  the  following  pages.  
 
Learning  outcomes  
 
The  class  will  look  at  the  rapidly  changing  media  landscape,  exploring  market  trends,  strategies  and  
changes  in  both  content  consumption  and  content  creation.  In  doing  this,  the  class  will  equip  students  
with  a  rich  understanding  of  the  journalistic,  media  and  business  job  market  they  are  about  to  join.  
 
These  trends  are  applicable  to  students  across  the  SOJC  and  beyond.    
 
Whatever  your  major  (Journalism,  Advertising,  Public  Relations  or  Media  Studies)  you’ll  learn  up  to  date  
market  knowledge  which  will  inform  your  wider  studies  and  career  goals.  
   
By  the  end  of  term,  you  will  be  able  to:  
   
1.   Understand  and  describe  some  of  the  major  strategic  challenges  being  faced  by  news  and  
other  media  outlets,  particularly  related  to:  business  models,  audience  behaviours,  distribution  
and  content  Innovation,  and  the  changing  media  industry.  
 
2.   Demonstrate  examples  of  your  own  written  research  and  analysis  in  this  space.  
 
3.   Have  a  working  knowledge  of  current  industry  “hot”  topics  that  will  allow  you  to  sound  smart  
at  interviews  for  job  and  internships.  
 
4.   Know  where  to  look  for  relevant  industry  information/data/analysis.  
 
5.   Have  networked,  in-­‐person,  with  leading  industry  thinkers.  
 
 

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Learning  Methods  
 
These  will  include:  
 
•   Class  lectures  and  guest  speakers  
•   Listening  to  –  and  critically  evaluating  –  the  content  of  these  guest  lectures  
•   In-­‐class  assignments  and  tasks  (writing,  reading,  listening,  discussions,  pitching  etc.)  
•   Out  of  class  assignments  (reading/listening,  content  creation,  content  review  and  analysis)  
•   Writing-­‐up  key  lessons  learnt  from  our  classes  on  your  personal  blog.    
 
   
Estimated  student  workload    
 
The  2-­‐credit  workshop  includes  one  class  a  week  +  assignments  to  be  completed  outside  of  class.  
 
Assignments  to  be  completed  outside  of  class  will  include:  reading,  identification  of  questions  for  guest  
speakers,  preparation  of  in-­‐class  presentation  materials  and  papers,  keep  a  blog  to  track  your  learning  
and  analysis  from  the  workshop,  as  well  as  an  end  of  term  assignment;  reflecting  on  a  big  industry  issue  
of  particular  interest  to  you.    
 
Some  of  this  work  will  run  concurrent  with  other  tasks,  so  you  will  need  to  manage  your  time  accordingly  
to  balance  competing  workloads  from  this  class  and  others.    
 
Undergraduate  Courses  
Under  the  UO  quarter  system,  each  undergraduate  credit  reflects  approximately  thirty  hours  of  student  
engagement.  Therefore,  this  2-­‐credit  course  is  akin  to  approximately  60  hours  total  of  student  time.    
 
With  20  hours  of  class  time  (10  weeks  at  2  hours  per  week),  readings  and  assignments  will  account  for  
another  c.  40  hours  of  your  time  this  term.    
 
Graduate  Courses  
Graduate  students  are  expected  to  perform  work  of  higher  quality  and  quantity,  typically  with  forty  
hours  of  student  engagement  for  each  student  credit  hour.  Therefore,  a  2-­‐credit  graduate  course  would  
typically  engage  students  approximately  80  hours.    
 
For  graduate  students,  with  20  hours  of  class  time  (10  weeks  at  2  hours  per  week),  readings  and  
assignments  will  account  for  another  c.60  hours  of  your  time  this  term.  
 
 
How  this  class  works      
 
Attendance  
This  workshop  is  designed  to  give  you  a  foundation  in  some  of  the  key  developments  impacting  on  the  
media  and  communications  landscape  today.  Attendance  of  classes,  and  completion  of  assignments  -­‐  on  
time  -­‐  is  essential.  Miss  the  first  and/or  second  class  of  the  term,  and  you  will  be  asked  to  withdraw.      
 

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Non-­‐attendance  and/or  failure  to  complete  work  on  time,  will  result  in  an  F  for  that  task.  
 
Please  notify  me,  in  writing  and  with  as  much  prior  notice  as  possible,  if  you  must  miss  a  class  or  if  work  
will  be  delivered  late.  If  you  miss  a  class  and  you  haven’t  notified  me  beforehand,  then  I  expect  you  to  
get  in  contact  with  me  ASAP  to  explain  your  absence  and  to  agree  the  best  way  to  catch-­‐up  on  what  you  
missed.  You  should  treat  attendance  in  class  like  you  would  a  job  –  you  wouldn’t  miss  a  shift  without  
telling  your  supervisor.  Please  treat  this  class  –  and  your  classmates  –  with  the  same  level  of  respect.
 
Office  Hours  
My  office  hours  each  week  are  1pm-­‐2pm  Monday,  3pm-­‐4pm  on  Wednesday.  We  can  always  meet  at  
other  times  by  appointment.  
 
Do  use  those  times  to  drop  by  to  talk  to  me  about  assignments,  ideas  for  improving  the  class,  feedback  
on  the  things  you  like,  or  anything  else  you  want  to  discuss.    
 
The  workshop  may  well  challenge  some  of  your  assumptions  and  ideas  about  your  future  career,  so  by  
all  means  come  and  talk  these  through  with  me.    
 
Outside  of  my  regular  office  hours,  I’m  always  happy  to  schedule  additional  meetings  with  students.  
Email  me,  or  pop  by  my  office,  so  that  we  can  arrange  a  time  to  talk.  
 
Participation  
Class  meetings  will  focus  on  introductions  to  topics,  sharing  lessons  and  learning  from  your  own  reading,  
collective  feedback  on  assignments,  reflections  on  previous  talks  and  more.    
 
We  are  a  small  group  (15)  which  is  a  perfect  size  for  meaningful,  valuable,  discussion  with  your  peers.    
As  a  result,  active  participation  is  vital  and  expected.  
 
Our  classroom  is  an  active  learning  space.  It  is  an  arena  for  the  exchange  of  ideas  and  knowledge.    

This  means  that  you  need  to  be  comfortable  pitching  ideas,  sharing  your  growing  expertise,  receiving  –  
and  giving  –  feedback,  and  treating  everyone  in  the  room  with  due  respect.    

There  are  no  wrong  answers  or  bad  ideas,  only  answers  and  ideas  which  collectively  everyone  will  work  
towards  improving  and  refining.    

A  key  feature  of  the  class  will  be  our  regular  “Info-­‐share”  sessions,  where  each  student  will  share  two  
key  stories/developments  with  the  group  that  they  have  come  across  through  their  own  reading.  Each  
student  will  be  assigned  a  different  industry  source  to  track  and  follow,  so  through  this  exercise  you  will  
be  responsible  for  helping  your  peers  to  improve  their  knowledge  of  the  latest  industry  developments.  

Assignments    
These  will  require  original  research,  analysis,  reporting  and  writing.  This  may  involve  additional  reading,  
conversations/interviews,  and  information-­‐gathering  that  takes  place  off  campus  and  a  different  days  
and  times.    
 

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Like  all  media  professionals,  you’ll  find  some  tasks  easier  –  and  more  enjoyable  –  than  others.  This  will  
ebb  and  flow  throughout  the  term.  That’s  normal!  Sometimes,  ideas  and  concepts  might  take  some  
getting  used  to.  Other  times,  they  won’t.  Plan  your  time,  energies  and  resources  accordingly.  
 
Assignments  
 
You’ll  be  given  a  brief  for  each  assignment  with  clear  directions  of  what’s  expected  and  by  when.    
However,  an  overview  of  the  key  tasks  can  be  found  below:  
 
Personal  Blog:   Each  week  you  will  write  a  reflection  on  what  you  have  learned  that  week.  
 
To  do  this,  you  will  need  to  set  up  a  blog  on  WordPress,  Tumblr,  Medium  or  another  
publishing  platform  of  your  choosing.    
     
Entries  will  be  submitted  by  11.59PM  on  Wednesday  each  week,  via  Canvas  (you  just  
need  to  provide  the  URL.  Reflections  should  be  400-­‐800  words  (undergrads)  or  500  -­‐  
1,000  words  (grads).  You  are,  of  course,  welcome  to  write  more  J    
 
Your  reflections  should  include:  
 
§   Your  takeaways  from  conversations  in  class  that  week.  
§   What  you’ve  learned  that  week  from  your  own  reading  (with  links).    
 
End  reflection:   At  the  end  of  term,  you  will  publish  an  extended  reflection  (800-­‐1,200  words)  expanding  
on  a  topic,  theme  or  idea  that  we  discussed  during  term.    
 
This  may  be  an  idea  you’ve  not  previously  written  about,  or  one  that  you  have  –  but  
which  you  add  to  -­‐  showing  how  your  thinking  and  reading  has  developed.  You  will  also  
publish  this  to  your  blog.    
 
Graduate  students  will  be  expected  to  include  a  new  interview/s  (with  subject  matter  
experts)  as  part  of  this  submission.  
 
Note:  although  I’m  using  the  term  “blog”  here,  you  should  write  your  reflections  on  the  
assumption  that  they’re  pieces  which  will  be  published.  (Indeed,  I’ll  try  and  get  the  best  
pieces  featured  on  sites  like  MediaShift,  journalism.co.uk,  the  BBC  Academy  etc.)  
 
Examples  of  previously  published  reflections  by  my  former  students  can  be  found  here:  
 
o   Stop  and  listen:  A  beginner’s  guide  to  planning  and  recording  an  audio  
story,  Kenzie  White,  journalism.co.uk,  March  2017.  
 
o   How  Twitter,  Facebook,  and  Instagram  Measure  Engagement,  Kira  Hoffelmeyer,  
MediaShift,  June  2016  
 
o   A  global  tragedy  on  a  journalist’s  doorstep,  Ruben  Garcia  Jr,  BBC  Online,  January  
2016.  

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“Info-­‐Share”     Each  student  will  be  allocated  an  industry  source  to  review  and  monitor  throughout  the  
term.    
 
These  websites  –  and  newsletters  -­‐  will  be  assigned  during  Week  One  (either  at  random,  
or  by  area  of  subject  matter  expertise/interest,  we’ll  agree  which  approach  we  will  take  
together).    
 
Each  week  you’ll  include  three  takeaways  from  your  reading  as  part  of  your  Personal  
blog  reflections.  This  might  be  a  key  part  of  your  entry  for  that  week,  or  a  “here’s  what  
else  you  need  to  know”  type  entry.  
 
I’ll  be  tweeting  out  your  recommendations  during  the  week,  so  make  them  good!  
 
In  addition  to  sharing  these  on  your  blog,  and  –  via  me  on  Twitter  -­‐  (you’re  welcome  to  
share  them  yourselves  too  if  you’re  active  on  social)  we  will  also  have  time  factored  into  
the  schedule  for  each  student  to  share  two  stories  /  developments  with  the  group;  
which  we  will  then  discuss  accordingly.  
 
NB:  in  weeks  with  guest  speakers,  we  may  not  have  time  to  do  this,  but  you  should  come  
prepared  anyway.  In  weeks  without  speakers  (which  will  be  6-­‐7  of  the  10  classes)  this  is  
how  we  will  typically  kick  off  each  week.    
 
Hot  Topic:   Based  on  your  reading,  and  our  conversations  in  class,  you  will  write  an  extended  
analysis  piece  (800-­‐1,200  words  for  undergrads,  1,000  –  1,500  words  for  grads)  
exploring  a  single  issue  in  detail.  
 
  You  will  pitch  two  ideas  in  Week  7;  and  the  group  will  commission  you  to  write  one  of  
these.  (This  replicates  the  way  that  research  in  an  agency,  or  stories  in  a  newsroom  
would  typically  work.  You  should  never  go  to  a  creative  meeting  with  just  one  idea,  and  
you  should  expect  to  have  your  idea  challenged  and  questioned  by  your  peers  +  boss!)  
 
Your  analysis  should  include  at  least  two  of  the  following:  
 
§   Relevant  market  information  (sourced  from  credible  authorities  e.g.  IAB,  
comScore,  Nielsen,  Pew  Research  Center  etc.).    
 

§   Insights  derived  from  your  own  interviews  with  an  expert  /  experts.    
 

§   Analysis  –  in  the  form  of  quotes  and  potential  critiques  –  from  other  analysts  
(i.e.  people  writing  in  the  publications  you  and  the  class  are  monitoring).  
 
Also  acceptable  would  be  a  TL;DR  (Too  Long,  Didn’t  Read)  version  of  a  major  report  /  
study  where  you  are  providing  additional  analysis  –  and  not  just  simply  a  synthesis  –  to  
help  readers  make  sense  of  complex  data  and  issues.  Your  analysis  is  the  value  added.  
 
Pro  Tip  
In  the  digital  era,  formatting  matters  more  than  ever!  

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Because  you’re  writing  –  and  submitting  -­‐  your  content  (for  both  this  assignment  and  all  
others  in  this  class)  digitally  you  should  also  consider  how  to  use  this  format  to  best  tell  
your  story.    
 
Therefore,  you  should  look  to  include  relevant  images,  charts,  sub-­‐headings  and  other  
tools,  which  enable  readers  to  understand  your  story.    
 
Some  recent  examples  of  my  own  work  producing  this  type  of  extended  analysis:  
 
o   TheMediaBriefing:  Study:  Why  publishers  need  to  approach  native  advertising  with  
caution,  24  April  2017  
 
o   MediaShift:  Digital  News  Report:  U.S.  Audiences  More  Willing  to  Pay  for  News;  
Voice-­‐Activated  Services  the  Next  Frontier,  22  June  2017  
 
o   Digital  Content  Next:  Five  things  you  need  to  know  about  millennial  media  habits,  
22  September  2017  
 
o   IJNet  (International  Journalists’  Network):  Understanding  social  media  in  
China  (with  Kristin  Peixotto),  29  November  2017    
 
Participation:   This  includes  a  number  of  components:  
 
§   Questions,  comments  and  observations  during  in-­‐class  discussions.  
§   Ideas  –  based  on  your  industry  reading  –  that  you  share  with  the  class.  
§   Content  shared  on  social  media  during  guest  lectures.  
 
Grading   Tasks/Weighting  (subject  to  revision/changes)  
 
Activity   Tasks   %  of   Points  
Grade  
Writing,   1.   Personal  blog  reflections  (Weekly  x9,  submitted  Weeks  2-­‐10)     45%   4500  
Analysis   (Worth  5%  each,  lose  5%  for  any  missing  entries)      
and        
Critical   2.   Extended  end  of  term  reflection  (Submitted  by  end  Week  11)   15%   150  
Thinking     60%   600  
 

Research     3.   “Hot  Topic”  analysis   20%   200  
  20%   200  
 
 
Other   4.   Attendance     5%   50  
5.   Class  participation  (questions  and  general  engagement)   5%   50  
6.   Industry  Reading  +  “Info-­‐Share”     10%   100  
  20%   200  
 
 
TOTAL     100%   1,000  

  7  
How  Grades  Will  Be  Determined  
 
Category     A     B   C   D     F  

Strong  lead:   Vivid,  telling   Provides   Essential   Not  a  direct   Factual  
Informative   detail.   essential   information   lead  and/or   error(s).    
hard   information.     but  lacking   important  
(summary)   clarity,   information  
news  lead  or   conciseness     missing.  
compelling   and/or  detail.    
anecdotal  
opening.  

Essential   Who,  what,   5  Ws  covered   Essential   Essential   Does  not  tell  a  
information   where,  when  and   but  story  not   information   information   story.    
covered.     why     organized   provided  but   missing  and/or  
  answered.       clearly  with   disorganized.   disorganized.    
Story  /   most  
Analysis   important  
logically   information  
organized.     at  the  top.    

Appropriate   Strong  use  of   Appropriate   Quotes  and   Quotes  or   Quotes  and  
use  of  quotes   quotes,  with  best   use  of  quotes   attribution   attribution   attribution  
and   quote  high  in   and   provided.   missing   missing  
attribution.   story.  Attribution   attribution.  
provided  when  
needed.  

Clear  and   Clear  and  concise   Basically  clear   Thorough   Writing  style  is   Unintelligible.  
concise   writing.   and  concise.   editing   inappropriate  
writing.     Appropriate   needed  to   for  a  news  
  writing  style  (i.e.,   meet   story.      
Appropriate   short  paragraphs,   standards.    
writing  and/or   descriptive  detail,  
analytical   active  verbs,  no  
style.   first-­‐person).  

Factually   Mechanically   1-­‐2  minor   1  major  error   2  major  errors   Fatal  flaws:  
accurate.   sound,  no  errors.     errors.  Style   such  as  a   and  multiple   Factual  errors,  
Correct   inconsistent.     fragment,   minor  issues.   misspelling  of  
grammar,   run-­‐on,   proper  names,  
spelling  and   comma  splice,     multiple  
punctuation.   or  more  than   grammar,  
two  minor   spelling  errors.  
errors.    
 
Other  factors  which  also  come  into  the  mix:  
•   Layout,  formatting,  for  digital  submissions.  Have  you  used  this  to  your  advantage?  
•   Are  you  telling  a  story  I’ve  not  heard  before?  
•   Does  your  story  have  the  X-­‐Factor  (it  can  be  solid,  but  does  it  zing?)  

  8  
Course  Schedule  and  Assignments    
This  schedule  remains    subject  to  amendment.  
 
Week   Date   Activities  

1   Thursday   Introductions.  Expectations.  Why  this  matters.  
11  Jan    
  Presentation  &  Class  Discussion:  Understanding  digital  disruption.  
   
  Homework:  
  Industry  Reading  +  feature  3  key  takeaways  from  today  on  your  weekly  blog  
  entry  +  class  reflection  (400-­‐1,000  words)  submitted  by  11.59PM  next  Weds.    
   
  Plus  Reading  and  prep  for  James  Hamilton  talk  in  Week  2:  
 
1.   Book  Review:  Democracy’s  Detectives:  The  Economics  of  Investigative  
Journalism,  by  James  T.  Hamilton  by  Philip  M.  Napoli  
 

2.   James  Hamilton,  Nieman  Reports:  Accountability  Journalism:  A  Cost-­‐
Benefit  Analysis  
 

3.   Saving  Community  Journalism:  Five  questions  with  James  T.  Hamilton  
 

4.   American  Press  Institute:  Measuring  investigative  journalism’s  impact  on  
society:  8  good  questions  with  James  T.  Hamilton  
 

5.   Columbia  Journalism  Review:  Book  aims  to  pin  down  economic  return  on  
investigative  reporting  (Grads,  optional  for  undergrads)  
 
Submit  3  Q’s,  based  on  your  pre-­‐reading,  to  Canvas  by  11.59PM  next  Weds.  
Questions  may  be  selected  at  random  for  Professor  Hamilton  on  Thursday.  
 
  Thursday   James  T.  Hamilton,  Hearst  Professor  of  Communication  and  the  Director  of  the  
2   18  Jan   Journalism  Program  at  Stanford  University,  will  talk  about  his  new  
  book:  Democracy’s  Detectives:  The  Economics  of  Investigative  Journalism.    
 
Follow  on  discussion  with  Professor  Hamilton  (class  only  from  5pm-­‐5.45pm).  
 
Homework:  
Industry  Reading  +  feature  3  key  takeaways  from  this  on  your  weekly  blog  entry.  
Blog  entry/class  reflection  (400-­‐1,000  words)  submitted  by  11.59PM  next  Weds.    
 
3   Thursday   In-­‐class  reflection  on  discussions  with  Professor  Hamilton  (Week  2).  
25  Jan    
  Takeaways  from  Industry  Reading  (Weeks  1-­‐3).  2  examples  per  student.    
 
Look  ahead  to  Week  3  speaker.  
 
Homework:  
Industry  Reading  +  feature  3  key  takeaways  from  this  on  your  weekly  blog  entry.  

  9  
Blog  entry/class  reflection  (400-­‐1,000  words)  submitted  by  11.59PM  next  Weds.    
 
Plus  Reading  and  prep  for  Jason  Wambsgans  talk  in  Week  4:  
 
1.   Pulitzer  Prize  Winning  Portfolio:  http://www.pulitzer.org/winners/e-­‐
jason-­‐wambsgans    
 
 

Features  by  Jason  
 

2.   Kindness  for  Tyshawn  
 

3.   A  shooter,  a  4-­‐year-­‐old,  a  mom  and  blood-­‐soaked  jeans  
 

4.   'We  got  a  beautiful  city,  but  it  has  some  evil  people'  
 
Other  (grads  only,  optional  for  undergrads)    
 

5.   What  Bullets  Do  to  Bodies  -­‐  Highline  
6.   What  Really  Happens  When  You  Get  Shot  |  WIRED  
 
Submit  3  Q’s,  based  on  your  pre-­‐reading,  to  Canvas  by  11.59PM  next  Weds.  
Questions  may  be  selected  at  random  for  Jason  Wambsgans  on  Thursday.  
 
4   Thursday   Jason  Wambsgans,  of  the  Chicago  Tribune,  who  won  the  2017  Pulitzer  Prize  for  
1  Feb   Feature  Photography,  will  discuss  his  work  covering  gun  violence  in  Chicago.    
   
  Follow  on  discussion  with  Jason  Wambsgans  (class  only  from  5pm-­‐5.45pm).  
   
Homework  
Industry  Reading+  feature  3  key  takeaways  from  this  on  your  weekly  blog  entry.  
Blog  entry/class  reflection  (400-­‐1,000  words)  submitted  by  11.59PM  next  Weds.    
 
Plus  reading  and  prep  for  John  Capouya  talk  in  Week  5:  
 
1.   Chapter  2  of  his  book,  Florida  Soul:  From  Ray  Charles  to  KC  and  the  
Sunshine  Band,  “Ernie  Calhoun,  Tampa”  (17  pages)  
 

2.   Short  book  review:  http://blackgrooves.org/florida-­‐soul-­‐from-­‐ray-­‐
charles-­‐to-­‐kc-­‐and-­‐the-­‐sunshine-­‐band/    
 

3.   Biography  http://www.ut.edu/JohnCapouya/  and  website  
http://johncapouya.com/    
 

4.   Article  by  John  for  Nieman  Storyboard  (grads,  optional  for  undergrads):  
http://niemanstoryboard.org/stories/want-­‐to-­‐write-­‐great-­‐narrative-­‐
study-­‐screenwritin/    
 
Submit  3  Q’s,  based  on  your  pre-­‐reading,  to  Canvas  by  11.59PM  next  Weds.  
Questions  may  be  selected  at  random  for  Professor  Capouya  on  Thursday.  
 

  10  
5   Thursday   John  Capouya,  Associate  Professor,  Journalism  at  the  University  of  Tampa  will  
8  Feb   discuss  how  journalists  cover  race/racial  issues,  through  the  lens  of  his  new  
  book:  Florida  Soul:  From  Ray  Charles  to  KC  and  the  Sunshine  Band.  
   
  Follow  on  discussion  with  Professor  Capouya  (class  only  from  5pm-­‐5.45pm).  
 
Homework:  
Industry  Reading+  feature  3  key  takeaways  from  this  on  your  weekly  blog  entry.  
Blog  entry/class  reflection  (400-­‐1,000  words)  submitted  by  11.59PM  next  Weds.    
 
 
6   Thursday   In-­‐class  reflection  on  discussions  with  Jason  Wambsgans  (Week  4)  and  
15  Feb   Professor  John  Capouya  (Week  5).  
   
  Takeaways  from  Industry  Reading  (Weeks  4-­‐6).  2  examples  per  student.    
   
In-­‐class  discussion  about  social  video.  
 
Homework  
Industry  Reading  +  feature  3  key  takeaways  from  this  on  your  weekly  blog  entry.  
Blog  entry/class  reflection  (400-­‐1,000  words)  submitted  by  11.59PM  next  Weds.    
 
Plus    
 

1.   Prep  for  “Hot  Topic”  pitches.  
 

2.   Reading,  TBD,  on  social  video.    
 

3.   Group  prep  (5  x  groups  of  3)  on  Social  Video.  Identification  of  case  
studies  to  share  with  class  next  week.  
 
7   Thursday   “Hot  Topic”  pitches.    (2  ideas  in  2  minutes)  
22  Feb    
  Social  Video  case  studies  –  showcase  by  each  group  (2  videos  each).    
  Discussion  of  case  studies.  
   
Homework  
Industry  Reading  +  feature  3  key  takeaways  from  this  on  your  weekly  blog  entry.  
 
Short  group  write-­‐up  of  your  Social  Video  case  studies  and  lessons  learned,  in  
lieu  of  usual  blog  entry/class  reflection.  Same  length  (400-­‐1,000  words)  and  still  
to  be  submitted  by  11.59PM  next  Weds.    
NB:  This  week,  submit  your  takeaways  as  a  separate  blog  entry.  
 
Begin  work  on  “Hot  Topic”  assignments.  
 
Prep  for  Week  8  class,  TBD  depending  on  topic  covered.  
 
 

  11  
8   Thursday   Guest  Speaker    
1  Mar   or    
  Discussion  about  the  changing  conversation  related  to  the  impact  /  benefits  of  
  the  tech  industry  (Uber,  Google,  Facebook  et  al.).  
   
Takeaways  from  Industry  Reading  (Weeks  7-­‐8).  2  examples  per  student.    
 
Homework  
Industry  Reading+  feature  3  key  takeaways  from  this  on  your  weekly  blog  entry.  
Blog  entry/class  reflection  (400-­‐1,000  words)  submitted  by  11.59PM  next  Weds.    
 
Continue  work  on  “Hot  Topic”  assignment.  
 
Prep  for  Week  9  class,  TBD  depending  on  topic  covered.  
 
9   Thursday   Guest  Speaker    
8  Mar   or    
  Discussion  about  emerging  platforms  such  as  Augmented  Reality,  Virtual  
  Reality  and  global  networks  like  WeChat,  WhatsApp  and  Line;  which  have  a  
huge  reach  outside  of  the  US,  but  are  relatively  unknown  within  it.  
 
Takeaways  from  Industry  Reading  (Weeks  7-­‐8).  2  examples  per  student.    
 
Homework  
Industry  Reading  +  feature  3  key  takeaways  from  this  on  your  weekly  blog  entry.  
Blog  entry/class  reflection  (400-­‐1,000  words)  submitted  by  11.59PM  next  Weds.    
 
Continue  work  on  “Hot  Topic”  assignment.  Due  11.59pm  on  Sunday  11  March.  
 
10   Thursday   Student  presentations  +  feedback:  “Hot  Topic”  key  findings  (3-­‐4  mins  each)  
15  Mar    
  Wash-­‐up:  lessons  learned  from  J408  Demystifying  Media.  
   
  End  of  term  evaluation.  Next  Steps.  
 
Homework  
End  of  term  reflection.  Due  11.59pm  on  Friday  23  March  2018.    
 
 
 
 
 
   

  12  
Course  policies  
 
Attendance  
All  journalism  courses  are  covered  by  the  university’s  mandatory  attendance  policy:  
 
“Academic  departments  may  require  students  to  attend  the  first  and/or  second  meetings  of  designated  
classes.  …  Students  who  do  not  attend  the  first  two  sessions  of  these  classes  may  be  directed  by  the  
academic  department  to  drop  the  course  so  that  the  seat  may  be  given  to  another  student.  Students  are  
responsible  for  dropping  the  class;  there  is  no  automatic  drop.  The  university  refund  schedule  applies.”  
 
As  outlined  above,  this  is  mandatory  for  this  class.  I  don’t  expect  to  have  to  chase  you  up  about  any  
absences.  Be  proactive.  Treat  me,  and  this  class,  as  you  would  do  a  job.  
 
Accessibility    
The  University  of  Oregon  is  working  to  create  inclusive  learning  environments.  For  more  information  or  
assistance,  you  are  also  encouraged  to  contact  the  Accessible  Education  Center,  346-­‐1155;  website:  
http://aec.uoregon.edu/  
 
Crisis  Center  
The  University  of  Oregon  Counseling  Center  provides  students  with  confidential  telephone  crisis  
intervention  24/7.    The  number  is  541-­‐346-­‐3227.            
 
Diversity  and  Inclusion  
Diversity  is  supported  and  valued  at  the  University  of  Oregon.  We  respect  the  dignity  and  essential  
worth  of  all  individuals;  reject  bigotry,  discrimination,  violence,  and  intimidation;  practice  personal  and  
academic  integrity  and  expect  it  of  others;  and  promote  a  diversity  of  ideas,  opinions,  and  backgrounds.  
 
Open  inquiry,  freedom  of  expression,  and  respect  for  differences  are  fundamental  to  a  comprehensive  
and  dynamic  education.  SOJC  is  committed  to  upholding  these  ideals  by  encouraging  the  exploration,  
engagement,  and  expression  of  divergent  perspectives  and  diverse  identities.  
 
Discrimination  of  any  kind,  disrespect  for  others,  and  inequity  in  educational  opportunity  are  not  
acceptable.  Students,  faculty,  and  staff  are  expected  at  all  times  to  maintain  the  School  of  Journalism  
and  Communication’s  high  standards  of  ethical  and  compassionate  conduct.      
 
Please  see  me  if  you  need  help  or  have  any  questions.    
 
Academic  integrity  
The  University  Student  Conduct  Code  (available  at  conduct.uoregon.edu)  defines  academic  misconduct.  
Students  are  prohibited  from  committing  or  attempting  to  commit  any  act  that  constitutes  academic  
misconduct.  By  way  of  example,  students  should  not  give  or  receive  (or  attempt  to  give  or  receive)  
unauthorized  help  on      assignments  or  examinations  without  express  permission  from  the  instructor.  
Students  should  properly  acknowledge  and  document  all  sources  of  information  (e.g.  quotations,  
paraphrases,  ideas)  and  use  only  the  sources  and  resources  authorized  by  the  instructor.  If  there  is  any  
question  about  whether  an  act  constitutes  academic  misconduct,  it  is  the  students’  obligation  to  clarify  
the  question  with  the  instructor  before  committing  or  attempting  to  commit  the  act.    
 

  13  
 
The  U  of  O  policy  on  academic  dishonesty  will  be  observed  throughout  this  course.      
 
Plagiarizing  and/or  cheating  will  result  in  an  automatic  failure  of  the  course.    
To  avoid  this,  you  should  read:  http://researchguides.uoregon.edu/citing-­‐plagiarism    
   
We  will  also  talk  about  the  importance  of  proper  attribution  of  your  sources  and  providing  credit  where  
it  is  due.  In  the  digital  arena,  this  is  more  important  than  ever,  as  the  lifting  of  quotes  or  the  creation  of  
false  content,  nevermind  plagiarism  can  all  be  easily  identified.  Careers  can  –  and  have  been  –  destroyed  
as  a  result  of  breaking  these  rules.  Don’t  be  foolish  and  make  the  same  mistakes!  
 
Technology  –  submission  of  papers  and  use  of  phones.  
All  weekly  reflections  should  be  uploaded  to  your  blog  with  the  URL  for  this  inserted  into  Canvas.  
 
For  the  two  extended  papers,  your  “Hot  Topic”  feature  and  Extended  End  of  Term  Reflection”  papers  
should  be  emailed  so  that  they  can  be  reviewed  and  graded  through  the  “Track  Changes”  function  in  
Microsoft  Word.  They  should  also  be  posted  to  your  personal  blog.    
 
Mobile  phones  should  be  turned  off  in  class.  Laptops  are  allowed,  but  there  will  be  “lids  down”  
moments  throughout  the  course.  Some  weeks  (Week  8,  9  possibly  both)  we  will  be  researching  some  
content  in  class,  which  can  be  done  on  laptops  or  phones.  I’ll  advise  nearer  the  time.  
 
Writing  Central  
I  encourage  you  take  advantage  of  of  the  opportunities  provided  by  Writing  Central:  
http://journalism.uoregon.edu/sojc-­‐writing-­‐central/    
 
Writing  coaches  can  help  you  to  think  through  your  blog  entries/reflections,  as  well  as  your  two  major  
written  assignments  for  the  term.    
 
Questions  
If  you  want  to  know  more  about  anything  mentioned  here,  or  anything  which  you  think  is  missing,  then  
please  do  not  hesitate  to  email  me!  damianr@uoregon.edu  (or  pop  by  Allen  Hall  201)  at  any  time.  
 
 
   

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Instructor  bio         http://journalism.uoregon.edu/member/radcliffe-­‐damian/  

Damian  Radcliffe  is  the  Carolyn  S.  Chambers  Professor  in  Journalism  at  the  University  of  Oregon,  a  fellow  
of  the  Tow  Center  for  Digital  Journalism  at  Columbia  University,  an  honorary  research  fellow  at  Cardiff  
University’s  School  of  Journalism,  Media  and  Culture  Studies,  and  a  fellow  of  the  Royal  Society  for  the  
Encouragement  of  Arts,  Manufactures  and  Commerce  (RSA).  
 
He  is  an  experienced  digital  analyst,  consultant,  journalist,  and  researcher  who  has  worked  in  editorial,  
research,  teaching,  and  policy  positions  for  the  past  two  decades  in  the  UK,  Middle  East,  and  USA.  
Damian  is  a  regular  contributor  to  the  BBC  Academy,  CBS  Interactive  (ZDNet),  Huffington  Post,  
MediaShift,  and  IJNet,  where  he  writes  about  digital  trends,  social  media,  technology,  the  business  of  
media,  and  the  evolution  of  journalism.  
 
His  experience  encompasses  roles  at  the  BBC,  the  NGO  Volunteering  Matters,  Ofcom  (the  UK  
communications  regulator),  and  Qatar’s  Ministry  of  Information  and  Communications  Technology  
(ictQATAR).  He  works  across  all  media  sectors  (commercial,  public,  government,  regulatory,  academic,  
and  nonprofit/civil  society)  and  platforms,  from  print  and  digital  to  TV  and  radio  broadcasting.  
 
Radcliffe  has  written,  spoken  to,  or  provided  consulting  services  for  a  wide  range  of  industry  and  
academic  organizations,  including  Abramis  Academic  Publishing,  ASDA’A  Burson-­‐Marsteller,  BBC  
Academy,  BBC  Media  Action,  BBC  Monitoring,  BBC  World  Service,  Carnegie  UK  Trust,  Cass  Business  
School,  Centre  for  Research  on  Communities  and  Culture,  City  University  London,  Cognizant,  Columbia  
Journalism  Review  (CJR),  The  Conversation,  Digital  Content  Next,  Eyewitness  Media  Hub,  FJUM  (forum  
journalism  and  media,  Vienna),  The  Guardian,  The  Huffington  Post,  IBC  Content  Everywhere,  
IJNET,  journalism.co.uk,  JustHere,  Media  Development  Investment  Fund,  MediaShift,  Middle  East  
Broadcast  Network,  NESTA,  Nieman  Lab,  Northwestern  University  in  Qatar,  nuviun,  Online  Journalism  
Blog,  Qatar  Today,  Street  Fight,  TEDx  Reset  (Turkey),  TheMediaBriefing,  The  Reuters  Institute  for  the  
Study  of  Journalism  at  Oxford  University,  Routledge  and  Your  Middle  East.  
 
He  has  chaired  sessions,  provided  training  and  spoken,  at  events  around  the  world  including:  in  the  USA  
(New  York,  Portland,  Philadelphia,  Colorado  Springs,  Chicago  and  Washington  D.C.),  the  UK  (London,  
Edinburgh,  Oxford,  Cardiff,  Belfast,  Bristol),  Europe  (Paris,  Strasbourg,  Vienna,  Barcelona,  Istanbul,  
Amsterdam,  multiple  cities  in  Germany)  and  the  Middle  East  (Doha  and  Dubai).  
 
Find  out  more  about  him  on  his  website.  Follow  him  on  Twitter  @damianradcliffe  

 

 

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