WRA 110 – Writing: Science and Technology Tuesday and Thursday: 10:20-12:10 Ernst Bessey Hall 214 Michigan State

University Fall 2010
Instructor: Office: Phone: Email: Office Hours: Dr. Christie L. Daniels 251 Bessey Hall 355-2400 (messages only) cdaniels@msu.edu Tuesday and Thursday 9:00 – 10:00 and 1:30 - 2:30 Additionally by appointment.

Course Description:
As part of the general education requirement, First-Year Writing contributes to the Michigan State University mission by focusing on inquiry-based teaching and learning that encourages students to begin to understand themselves as: • • • contributing members of MSU’s community of scholars committed to asking important questions and to seeking rich responses to those questions developing skills, knowledge, and attitudes that improve the quality of life for self and others through scholarly, social, and professional activities.

In pursuit of these goals, Tier I Writing and Preparation for College Writing courses engage students in writing and reflection activities that make overt the ways that invention, arrangement, revision, style and delivery literacy activities: • • can be engaged across inquiry situations (scholarly, social, and professional) require the development of knowledge about the importance of contextual factors that affect the application of these methods of inquiry

Our shared learning outcomes support inquiry-based learning that transfers across writing situations in relation to three major issues: writing, reading, and researching.

Our Course Section:
Our section of WRA 110 will focus on the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that successfully enhance writing, reading, and researching in higher education in America. Some course materials have been pre-selected to support this goal and focus us on the shared learning outcomes for the Firs-Year Writing Program at MSU. Specifically, we will be looking at issues and concepts dealing with digital technology and visual rhetoric to think about what we know about literacy, how we know what we know, and how we can engage and enhance our literacies through deep explorations of what things mean. I look forward to working with you this semester. We all have some shared and some different literacy experiences, strengths and weaknesses; please remember to be respectful of the other members of this class as we support one another this semester. Specific learning objectives for each assignment appear on individual assignments sheet.

DANIELS

WRA 110

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Required Texts:
Ballenger, Bruce. The Curious Researcher. New York: Pearson/Longman. 2009. Craig, Collin, Nancy C. DeJoy and Steven T. Lessner. Reading and Writing Literacies. Pearson-Longman, 2010. Gee, James Paul. What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. 2007. Maimon, Elaine. The Brief McGraw-Hill Handbook. New York: McGraw-Hill. 2009. McLuhan, Marsall. The Medium is the Massage. Berkeley, CA: Gingko Press. 2005. Please note: The Ballenger text is in a new edition that include the 2009 MLA updates. This is the version I have ordered for class. If you choose to get an older version, you will need to be responsible for using the latest versions of MLA style when you use sources. Also, be aware that if you get the older versions of these books the bookstores will not buy them back at the end of the semester.

Policies and Procedures: Attendance:
All courses in the Tier I Writing Program are interactive and require high levels of student participation. Attendance at all class sessions is expected. You may miss one week of class (i.e. two classes) without affecting your grade. You should reserve these absences to address the observance of religious holidays not acknowledged by the University calendar, family events, serious illness, etc. If you miss more than one week of class, your final grade for the course will be lowered .3 for each additional individual absence. Coming to class late (more than 5 minutes after we begin) 3 times will equal one absence. Sleeping in class or engaging in activities not related to class will also be counted as absences.

Late Assignments:
Late assignments will be lowered one full letter grade for each day past the due date (the first reduction occurs at the start of the class in which the assignment is due).

Completion of Assignments:
The First-Year Writing Program requires that students produce a significant amount of writing to fulfill their requirement. You must complete all major assignments to fulfill this requirement and receive a passing grade in First-Year Writing courses.

DANIELS

WRA 110

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Academic Honesty
Michigan State University has adopted the following statement about academic policy: GENERAL STUDENT REGULATIONS 1.00 PROTECTION OF SCHOLARSHIP AND GRADES The principles of truth and honesty are fundamental to the educational process and the academic integrity of the University; therefore, no student shall: • 1.01 claim or submit the academic work of another as one’s own. • 1.02 procure, provide, accept or use any materials containing questions or answers to any examination or assignment without proper authorization. • 1.03 complete or attempt to complete any assignment or examination for another individual without proper authorization. • 1.04 allow any examination or assignment to be completed for oneself, in part or in total, by another without proper authorization. • 1.05 alter, tamper with, appropriate, destroy or otherwise interfere with the research, resources, or other academic work of another person. • 1.06 fabricate or falsify data or results.

Procedures for responding to cases of academic honesty and possible repercussions are outlined in Spartan Life: Student Handbook and Resource Guide. They can also be found on the web at: http://www.msu.edu/unit/ombud/honestylinks.html. Note: the new procedures require that instances of academic dishonesty be reported through the registrar’s office and forwarded to the Dean of the College in which the student’s major resides. Major Assignments:
There are five major projects in this course: four essays and one alternative form of presentation. The schedule at the end of this syllabus outlines the due dates for these major projects. Grade distribution occurs as follows: Lived Literacies Paper: Cultural Literacy Paper: Disciplinary Literacy Paper: Multimedia Remix Project: Multimodal Final Project: Peer critique responses, participation and informal writing assignments: 10% 15% 20% 20% 25% 10%

University Resources for Writers: The Writing Center, the Library, The Learning Resource Center, and the English Language Center all offer support services for First-Year Writing students. You should consult these centers’ web sites for information about their specific resources.

DANIELS

WRA 110

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Course Schedule
Week 1
Thursday, Sept. 2 course introduction, intro to RAIDS, intro to rhetorical appeals, introduce lived literacies assignment.

Week 2
Tuesday, Sept. 7 Thursday, Sept. 9 continue work with lived literacies assignment Reading assignment due: Gee (ch 1-2), Craig (p. 22-28) continue work with lived literacies assignment Reading assignment due: Gee (ch 3)

Rough draft of Lived Literacies assignment due Friday, Sept 10 on ANGEL

Week 3
Tuesday, Sept. 14 Thursday, Sept. 16 finish work with lived literacies assignment Reading assignment due: Gee (ch 4), Craig (p. 37-51). introduce cultural literacy assignment Reading assignment due: Gee (ch 5), Ballenger (ch 1)

Lived Literacies assignment due Friday, Sept 17 on ANGEL Week 4
Tuesday, Sept. 21 Thursday, Sept 23 continue work with cultural literacy assignment Reading assignment due: Gee (ch 6), Craig (p. 54-56) continue work with cultural literacy assignment Reading assignment due: Gee (ch 7-8)

Week 5
Tuesday, Sept. 28 continue work with cultural literacy assignment Reading assignment due: Daniel Boorstin “Technology and Democracy” (handout), Craig (p. 69-74) continue work with cultural literacy assignment Reading assignment due: Sherry Turkle “How Computers Change the Way We Think” (handout), Todd Gitlin “Supersaturation, or, the Media Torrent and Disposable Feeling” (handout)

Thursday, Sept. 30

Rough draft of Cultural Literacy assignment due in class Thursday, Sept. 30 Week 6
Tuesday, Oct. 5 finish work with cultural literacy assignment Reading assignment due: McLuhan (p. 1-39), Ellen Lupton and Abbott Miller “Subliminal Seduction” and “McPaper” (handout)

DANIELS

WRA 110

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Thursday, Oct. 7

introduce disciplinary literacy assignment Reading assignment due: McLuhan (p. 40-81), Ballenger (ch 2)

Cultural Literacy assignment due Friday, Oct. 8 on ANGEL

Week 7
Tuesday, Oct. 12 Thursday, Oct. 14 continue work with disciplinary literacy assignment Reading assignment due: McLuhan (82-121), Ballenger (ch 3) continue work with disciplinary literacy assignment Reading assignment due: McLuhan (122-end), Craig (p. 78-85)

Week 8
Tuesday, Oct. 19 Thursday, Oct 21 continue work with disciplinary literacy assignment Reading assignment due: Craig (p. 86-89), Ballenger (ch 4) continue work with disciplinary literacy assignment Reading assignment due: Gunther Kress “Multimodality, Multimedia, Genre” (handout)

Rough Draft of Disciplinary Literacy assignment due in class, Thursday, Oct. 21 Week 9
Tuesday, Oct. 26 Thursday, Oct. 28 continue work with disciplinary literacy assignment Reading assignment due: Ballenger (ch 5) finish work with disciplinary literacy assignment Reading assignment due: J. Anthony Blair “The Rhetoric of Visual Arguments” (handout)

Disciplinary Literacy assignment due Friday, Oct. 29 on ANGEL

Week 10
Tuesday, Nov. 2 Thursday, Nov. 4 introduce multimedia remix project, intro to visual rhetoric Reading assignment due: Craig (p. 92-96) proposal workshop for multimedia remix project Reading assignment due: Roland Barthes “The Rhetoric of the Image” (handout)

Proposals for Multimedia Remix project due Friday, Nov. 5 on ANGEL Week 11
Tuesday, Nov. 9 technology workshop for multimedia remix project Reading assignment due: Craig (p. 97-101)

DANIELS

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Thursday, Nov. 11

intersections of scientific discourse/literacy and popular culture, finish work with multimedia remix project introduce multimodal final project Reading assignment due: Miles Kimball and Ann Hawkins “Principles of Design” (handout) continue work with multimodal final project Reading assignment due: Miles Kimball and Ann Hawkins “Theories of Design” (handout)

Week 12
Tuesday, Nov. 16

Thursday, Nov. 18

Multimedia Remix project due Thursday, Nov. 18 on CD/DVD Week 13
Tuesday, Nov. 23 Thursday, Nov. 25 proposal workshop for multimodal final project Reading assignment due: Craig (p. 116-119) THANKSGIVING!!! YAY!!!

Proposals for Multimodal Final Project due Wednesday, Nov. 24 on ANGEL Week 14 Individual Conferences for Multimodal Final Project

(missing your individual conference constitutes two (2) absences for the week)

Week 15
Tuesday, Dec. 6 Thursday, Dec. 8 workshop day for multimodal final project Reading assignment due: Craig (p. 120-125) continue work on multimodal final project

Week 16 Multimodal Final Project due Thursday, Dec. 15th by on CD/DVD Final Exam Period: Dec. 15th from 10:00 – 12:00

DANIELS

WRA 110

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