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SAVING

THE
FAMILY
(A guide in implementing the Family
Drug Abuse Prevention Program)

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Table of Contents

Message i
Foreword ii
Introduction 3

PART ONE:
FDAPP Frequently Asked Questions 5

“Bulawanon nga Barangay”


HOTSPOT TO TOPSPOT
An FDAPP Story
Punta Taytay, Bacolod City 10

PART TWO:
The FDAPP Implementation Process
(The FDAPP PROGRAM MANAGEMENT CYCLE) 13

PART THREE:
OTHER USEFUL INFORMATION 27

APPENDICES
APPENDIX A
Implementing Guidelines 34

APPENDIX B
MODULE ON
COMMUNITY-BASED EDUCATION
ON DRUG ABUSE PREVENTION
FOR PARENTS AND FAMILY MEMBERS 44

APPENDIX C
FDAPP FORMS 51

APPENDIX D
HANDOUTS ON
FAMILY DRUG ABUSE PREVENTION
PROGRAM 57

APPENDIX E
DIRECTORY OF NATIONAL
DRUG REHABILITATION CENTERS 80

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Everyone agrees that when a family cracks, a
community breaks; when it flourishes, society blooms;
when it disintegrates, humanity dies, when it gains
strength, it effects development.

Drugs and substance use and abuse pose as


one of the greatest threat to the family’s
survival.

The Family Drug Abuse Prevention


Programme seeks to save the family.

Dear FDAPP Implementer;

Hello and thank you very much for taking interest in implementing the Family
Drug Abuse Prevention Programme or FDAPP!

As a local government official, social worker, NGO worker or community based


volunteer, we know that you run many other programs. However, we know also that you
are one of those who greatly believe in the family. That is why we thank you for sharing
this belief with us. This guide, which came from the rich experiences of people like you
is written to help you implement the FDAPP.

Yes, our experiences in implementing the FDAPP in the cities of Bacolod and
Davao influenced the contents of this guide. Here, we shall tell you what we did and
how we did it, which may provide ways for you to adopt in your own locality.

A Community Based Program

Before you begin to read through and use this guide, we encourage you to always
keep in mind the most important key word: THE FAMILY. This of course refers to the
basic unit of society, composed of people (who may or may not be biologically related)
living together under one roof. This program is about every individual under those roofs,
assuming and playing different social roles (Father, Mother, and Child) and relationships
(Grand/ Parent-grand/ child, Siblings, Aunt/Uncle, Nephew/Niece). Yes, FDAPP is
about each one of them.

They who build social groups called peers and they who build communities.
Thus, FDAPP in its purest form is a community based program and being so; it is in
every Barangay, Purok, Zone and Street that FDAPP really happens.

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About the Guide

We have already mentioned that this guide springs from the FDAPP
implementation experiences in Bacolod and Davao. The initial FDAPP was pilot-tested
in these two cities at the barangay level. The experiences of both cities were reviewed
and the results of ‘writeshops’, were then put together to build what you are reading right
now.

Objectives of the Guide

As FDAPP is a program, this guide aims to bring you through every step of the
programme management cycle, namely: a) situation analysis, b) planning, c)
implementation, d) monitoring and evaluation or SAPIME. This way, we figured it
would be easier to help you go through every step of the FDAPP way.

Specifically this guide aims to:

a) Present the pilot FDAPP experiences in Bacolod and Davao as practical


examples of how the programme can work in your community; and

b) Describe the FDAPP implementation components based on these practical


examples;

c) Provide tools and instruments that can help you implement your own FDAPP

Using the Guide

This guide comes in three major parts.

Part one (1) offers the over-all background of FDAPP, what it is and why we
implement it.

Part two (2) brings you through FDAPP’s programme management cycle; and

Part three (3) contains other useful information for your reference

At the end of every part, you will encounter worksheets for you to accomplish.
These worksheets are designed to make this guide more interactive as well as concretize
your reading experience, and eventually help you implement your own FDAPP.

We hope that you will enjoy using this guide as much as we enjoyed putting them
together for you.

The FDAPP writing team

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PART
ONE:
FDAPP
FAQ
(Frequently Asked Questions or
What every implementer must know about FDAPP)

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1. What is FDAPP?

The Family Drug Abuse Prevention Programme or FDAPP is a community based


prevention program designed to educate and prepare families in particular and
communities in general about the adverse effects of drug abuse.

2. What does FDAPP entail?

FDAPP entails the promotion of family life enrichment activities that


enhance relationships between and among its members.

3. What are FDAPP’S objectives?

FDAPP aims to:

3.1 Create awareness and educate families on the underlying causes of drug
abuse problems and its ill effects;
3.2 Develop capacities of families especially on parenting and life skills
towards the promotion of a drug- free home and community;
3.3 Organize and mobilize families to consolidate efforts in support of the
programme and of families-at-risk;
3.4 Promote and strengthen Filipino family values which uphold the
importance of family ties, unity and growth; and
3.5 Provide support services to families for it to be able to cope with their
needs through linkages and referral with other agencies / organizations.

4. Are there legal grounds to implement FDAPP?

Yes, there are.

Aside from the 1987 Constitution (of course!), the Family Code (EO 209)
mandates the State to recognize the family as the foundation of the country and
accordingly strengthen its solidarity and actively promote its development; the
FDAPP finds itself firmly anchored on Section 41 Article IV of RA 9165
(Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002) stating the involvement of the family and tasking the
same as primarily responsible for education and awareness (of its members) on Drug
Abuse Prevention.

There is also Chapter 3, Article 46 of the Child and Youth Welfare Code
(PD 603), which states the right of every child to a wholesome family life that will
provide him / her with love, care and understanding, guidance and national security.

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5. So who leads the implementation of FDAPP?

There are two more specific mandates that FDAPP rests on. A Letter of
Instruction (LOI #1) signed by President Macapagal-Arroyo on July 4, 2001
mandated the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) to lead the
implementation of the Family Solidarity Development Programme in the Prevention
of Drug Abuse. DSWD consequently released Administrative Order No 16 Series
of 2004 (April 14, 2004) issuing a set of guidelines in the implementation of the
FDAPP.

6. How can the DSWD do its job when social services are found in the local
governments?

The Department of Social Welfare and Development admittedly cannot do it


on its own. The DSWD through its field offices need to coordinate with the local
social welfare and development offices (province, city and municipal) who in turn
need to coordinate with local government officials in the Barangay.

7. Ok, so who exactly are the FDAPP’s targets?

Well, everyone (every Filipino family that is) must have the benefit of being
educated against the perils of drug abuse. Nevertheless, the FDAPP aims to reach:
(but the list is endless!)

 Families whose members feel inadequate in their respective family


roles and need help to function e.g. first time parents;

 Families whose members are not meeting their needs and whose
members are discontented in their current situations i.e.
dysfunctional families;

 Families who are experiencing a stressful life situation due to


substance use and abuse

 Families who are vulnerable to and potentially at risk for drug and
substance use and abuse

 Families residing in the barangay, sitio or purok that has a high


incidence of drug abuse

 Families with history of involvement in drug abuse

 Families with members who are interested to know about drug


abuse

 Families with young members who have problems in school

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Families who are causing peace and order problems in the
community
8. Where exactly is FDAPP implemented and who implements it?

FDAPP happens where the target families are- in the community!

The community leaders i.e., the Barangay Council through the relevant
barangay based institutions such the Barangay Intelligence Network (BIN)
implements the FDAPP. However, it does not mean that the Barangay Council alone
does the job. Drug abuse prevention in the family is everybody’s concern. Families
must be directly involved. Church, school, civic and non-government organizations
(NGOs), children and young people’s groups must be engaged. Practically everyone
must join.

9. Does that mean all these organizations need to create new programs?

Yes and No.

YES, if there are none available; NO, if there are already existing
programmes that directly or indirectly benefit each member of the family.
Remember that FDAPP is about educating family members and increasing their
awareness on drug and substance use and abuse. In so doing, it would be good to
make an inventory of existing services, i.e. parenting education, day care service,
health and nutrition, etc., and find out which among these existing services can drug
abuse awareness and prevention can be infused or integrated. The implementer may
also conduct other creative activities that seek to educate the families on the issue.

10. So, is FDAPP a combination of services and activities?

Correct!

With the end goal of helping the family prevent and fight drug abuse in the
home, the FDAPP wishes to make every family member aware of Drug Abuse and
how its presence in the home poses a threat to the family’s survival. FDAPP,
however, also recognizes the range of reasons for a family member to succumb to
drug use and abuse. That is why FDAPP includes (aside from education) economic
and recreational services and activities, all aimed at easing the family’s stress factors.

11. If that is the case what difference does FDAPP make since there are already
other existing programs?

A lot!

Since FDAPP has a single focus, which is preventing drug abuse in the
family, it tackles drug abuse issues wherever and whenever possible in any or all the
programs. Through the FDAPP, drug use and abuse prevention is discussed at every
opportunity that involves any or all family members. Parents’ associations, children’s
organizations, town fiestas and celebrations, sports festivals and the likes are

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maximized under the FDAPP in order to educate people i.e. family members about
drug abuse.

12. What are the distinct activities of FDAPP?

The FDAPP has quite a number of distinct features, among these is the
involvement of relevant barangay based institutions such as the Barangay Intelligence
Network (BIN) in order to identify and establish the range of the substance/drug use
and abuse problem in the community. The formation of a Barangay Drug Abuse
Council or BADAC, and the organization of Family Councils in the barangay make
the distinct characteristics of this programme.

13. How is everyone prepared to implement FDAPP?

One of FDAPP’s components is that of building the capacities of everyone


and others who are involved in the programme. Basic training and orientation on
drug use and abuse is the primary training requisite for FDAPP. Counseling skills,
parenting skills, core life skills are also included to enhance the capacities of parents
and children. Lastly, the community is organized into clusters and receives other
capability building experiences to address particular needs, e.g. livelihood, referral to
rehabilitation, paralegal training and the likes.

14. Where does FDAPP figure in case the family is already in the situation of
Drug Abuse in the home?

Within FDAPP, networking and linkages play important roles. FDAPP also
ensures a systematic referral system for either institution and / or community based
rehabilitation and reintegration.

15. When FDAPP is present in the community, what benefits does a community
gain?

There are a number of gains acquired by a community which has an FDAPP


among these are:

 An increased level of awareness on drug related issues among the


residents

 A dramatic decrease in petty crimes committed by substance users


especially Out –of – School Youth sector;

 An increased level of enthusiasm on sports activities versus


involving in illegal activities manifested by jam-packed sports
events with known substance users and offenders actively
participating leaving behind their once miserable yet pitiful lives

 An increased number in parents’ attendance in daily livelihood


activities

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 A visibly marked people’s active participation to good governance
in almost all government sponsored projects especially community
projects;
 A more cooperative and active constituent participating in
Barangay Information Intelligence Network being the silent
operator of the continuing program of BPOC/BADAC efforts;

 A decline in actual barangay records of cases filed related to


illegal drugs;

 An increase in family income due to lively local tourism industry


commensurate to a peaceful community brought about by local
tourist confidence

16. Has any LGU implemented FDAPP?

Yes! And with very good results too! Next page you will read the story of
Punta Taytay in Bacolod City, Negros Occidental.

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“Bulawanon nga Barangay”
FROM HOTSPOT TO TOP SPOT
An FDAPP Story of Punta Taytay, Bacolod City

One Proud Community

Barangay Punta Taytay is a bustling fishing community gifted with beautiful


coastlines, diverse marine resources and blessed with closely-knit residents. These
factors contributed to its success when it gained prominence as “Bulawanon nga
Barangay” (loosely translated as Noble Community) and eventually earned its spot in
the tourism map of then Ministry of Tourism during the early 1970’s.

The People are God-fearing and have high moral values. They nurture God given
resources by taking are of their surroundings.

A Drastic Change

As the years changed, so did the good customs, beliefs and traditions of the one
proud community. Blame it on the evils of illegal drugs that have slowly crawled into
unsuspecting younger generations. For these young people the lure of its temporary
pleasure from the use of illegal drugs was difficult to resist even finding its way to the
most sacred foundation of society – the FAMILY.

The drug menace gained strength and control over the majority of the hearts and
minds of its people. The negligence of the former Barangay leaders has earned
Barangay Punta Taytay the infamous title of being one of the Illegal Drugs Hotspot of
Bacolod City. This moniker for the Barangay remained until the end of 2002.

A Change of leadership

The Synchronized Barangay and SK Elections in 2002 opened the opportunity for
Barangay Punta Taytay to substantially change and begin a victorious battle against
illegal drugs. When Punong Barangay Rufino G. Alcala officially assumed office at high
noon on August 15, 2002 he vowed together with the new elected Barangay Council to
minimize if not curb out the menace. Punta Taytay’s new leadership began;
1. Re-organizing, Revitalizing and Strengthening the Barangay Based Institutions (BBI’s)
particularly the Barangay Anti – Drug Abuse Council (BADAC) and subsequently mobilizing
Barangay Intelligence Networks (BIN)

2. Conducting pulong – in the puroks (small zonal meetings) through a composite team headed by
Kagawad Gilberto R. Guillena together with Church based organizations, the PNP-PCR, DSSD,
School (Day Care & Elementary), Purok Officials & Barangay Health Station Staff.

3. Forming family clusters with a minimum of ten heads of family, with a team leader selected from
among cluster heads. Many members of these clusters have either one or more family members
involved in drug related offense and violence.

4. Organizing the BADAC Auxiliary Team (BADACAT) composed of the Cluster Team Leaders;

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5. Spearheading a massive Information, Education & Advocacy Campaign which led to the
successful launching of the “Martsa Kontra Droga” in Barangay Punta Taytay last 2003.

FDAPP: Making A Difference

As all these activities progressed, Mrs. Basilisa De Paula (DSSD – SWO III) the
Social Worker in charge of the barangay introduced the PROGRAM with the
cooperation of the Bacolod City Government.
Mrs. De Paula identified Punta Taytay as the probable pilot project area for FDAPP
stressing that;

1) Barangay Punta Taytay is an Illegal drugs hotspot


2) Barangay Punta Taytay Council (specifically the Punong Barangay) is
receptive and supportive of the Program
3) Majority of Substance Abusers in the Barangay are young adults and worse
some as young as ten (10) years old and are involved in petty crimes, and
street wars, among others;
4) Possible FDAPP beneficiaries were already identified based on the
information & records of the BADAC, BADACAT & Composite Team.

On June 30, 2005 FDAPP was finally launched in Barangay Punta Taytay
thereby officially making the barangay as a FDAPP Pilot Project Area in Region VI. The
launching was attended by DSWD Region VI, OIC – TAD Mrs. Lucita Villanueva, Mr.
Eduardo “Che” Guevarra – SWO III, DSWD Region VI, SP Member Jocelle Batapa-
Sigue – Bacolod City, Local Police Officers, Church & academes. Bacolod City First
Lady – Mrs. Elsa Leonardia was the Inducting Officer of FDAPP Core Group Council on
behalf of the City Mayor.

Soon after the FDAPP launching DSWD– Region VI through Social Worker De
Paula constantly monitored and supported the Program’s activities in accordance with
the approved plan of action.

The Dramatic Change

After barely four (4) years of selfless endeavor, (including the Pre – FDAPP
implementation period covering the period 2003 through the second (2nd) quarter of 2005
up to the present) the FDAPP has been accepted by the people of Punta Taytay. Their
apprehensions about FDAPP changed after a series of public information and advocacy
campaign. As a result, the FDAPP as a program in the Barangay brought the people
closer to other tangible programs, projects and activities initiated by the Barangay aside
from the livelihood opportunities offered to them.

As the old cliché goes, “Life is not a bed of roses,” there were always facilitating
and hindering factors in almost all aspects of life. Life, as we know it is full of trials.
Some are difficult but overcoming them is indeed rewarding. For instance, during the
heydays of the campaign when people were so engrossed with their virtual life full of
artificial joy; the people did not care for anything except illegal drugs. The BIN then
nearly lost their trust to accomplish anything and efforts almost rumbled. Yet they
continued diligently for the sake of their children. Illegal Drugs slowly lost its luster

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when efforts to combat its ill effects and the consequences it brings to the FAMILY
awakened the residents.

The community became receptive to the program and in effect, illegal activities
were exposed; schemes and innovations were unearthed; and prominent figures were
apprehended and charged. Two prominent figures of the trade were apprehended in one
of the barangay’s beach resorts; a big time financier (a close associate of now detained
drug lord in Western Visayas} and a supplier. Operatives of the Philippine Drug
Enforcement Agency (PDEA) of Negros Occidental caught in their possession an
estimated 100 grams of shabu after a buy-bust operation.

As a whole, the support and cooperation of the people were vital in the
transformation of Barangay Punta Taytay.

Today, Barangay Punta Taytay is once again a proud community. It is proud to


claim that it has crossed-over from being a HOTSPOT TO TOPSPOT. And it owes to
the successful implementation of the FDAPP.

WORKSHEET ONE

Checklist for your FDAPP Implementation Readiness

I have knowledge of… Yes Somewhat No


RA9165 (Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act)
DSWD AO 16 – Guidelines in the implementation of
Family Drug Abuse Prevention Program
Other Related laws and ordinances pertaining to children,
young people, parents and drug use
The extent of drug abuse in my community
The existing services in my community
I have skills in …
Advocacy
Network and linkage building
Training and Education
Counseling
Referral
I value …
The family as an important unit of society
The rights and responsibilities of children and young
people
The importance of drug abuse prevention
The efforts of collective action and partnership
Every individual’s right to life

How did you fare? Did you answer yes to every item in the checklist? If so
congratulations! It would be easy for you to implement the FDAPP. If not, it is still ok,
on the next part of this guide we shall help you go through the process.

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PART
TWO:
THE FDAPP
IMPLEMENTATION
PROCESS

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Just like any other development program, you can implement the FDAPP by
keeping the program management cycle in mind.

A. Situation Analysis
A good program begins with a good situation analysis. The Family Drug
Abuse Prevention Programme is no different from other development
programmes. As such, important information must guide you even before you
design and figure out the ingredients of the programme and how you can
implement them. Remember that the FDAPP is all about the (1) family and (2)
drug abuse, and that the FDAPP is a (3) community based programme.
Therefore, you need information on all these three.

In implementing a good FDAPP you would need the following:

1. About the family

 Number of families and family average size


 A general profile of people in the community i.e., young people
(age) out-of-school (educational attainment) gender, occupation
etc.
 Family structures , e.g. nuclear, extended, parents living together
or separated;
 Economic conditions, e.g. occupation of family members; e.g.
source of income, unemployed, under-employed, etc.

2. About Drug Abuse in the community

 Risk factors present in the community that may influence drug


and substance use such as media, high illiteracy rate, etc.
 Number of drug related incidences (petty to serious crimes)
 Potential beneficiaries of the programme, e.g. those at risk,
already using, etc.

3. About the community

 Leadership structure and functionality of existing barangay


based institutions;
 Presence or absence of policies that would support a drug abuse
prevention programme;
 Willingness and ability of local leaders to support and run the
programme

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WORKSHEET TWO:

Your Situation Analysis Worksheet:

1. Draw a spot map of your identified area on the space provided showing the
following data:
a) number households
b) streets, purok or zones
c) relevant structures, i.e. barangay hall, schools, health centers, day care
centers, chapel, playground, park etc,

2. Now color the area(s) where the heaviest concentration of drug use as / are found;

3. Fill up the table below

Common Causes of Drug Abuse in Effects of Drug Abuse in the Target


the Target Community Community
Among parents / Among children Among parents / Among children
adults and young people adults and young people

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Developing your Situation Analysis

Finding out the general picture can be easy. The Philippine National Police
usually has available data about drug related incidents in every barangay in your locality.
You can inquire and access this information. However, establishing actual data from the
community data can be difficult and may be faced with hostility. This is where the
Barangay Intelligence Network (BIN) can come in very handy. The BIN operates like so,
an intelligence body that seeks out information without harming the privacy or violating
the fundamental human rights of people in the community.

In the case of the pilot area (Punta Taytay) The Barangay Captain utilizes the
services of the Barangay Intelligence Network (BIN) to get valuable information
(valuable information includes unusual people’s activities demonstrated by
migrants / transients; isolated in specific area and number of family members
which are probably engaged in the business). Validation of information is done
by other people.

Other barangay based institutions and individuals who may be able to help you
gather data are:

a) Barangay Health Workers’ Association;


b) Youth organizations
c) Barangay Nutrition Scholars
d) Day Care Workers
e) School Teachers
f) Barangay Council for the Protection of Children (BCPC)
g) Local NGOs
h) Local faith-based organizations

Questions you might want to ask

After gathering the most important data, you may need to answer a few questions
that will help you decide to implement a FDAPP in your target community, among these
are:

1. Given the data that you’ve gathered, how important would a FDAPP be in the
community?
2. How supportive are the local leadership systems and structures to a
programme like FDAPP?
3. What resources would you need in order to implement an FDAPP?

These three main questions would then guide you in the next component of
FDAPP implementation: Planning.

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B. Planning
Surprise!

You will find out that the planning stage of FDAPP goes almost alongside
data gathering in itself, because the people themselves are involved in analyzing
the situation of drug use in their communities.

Your planning stage involves the following actions:

1. Orientation and / or meeting with community based workers and


volunteers;
2. Gathering families through community meetings and assemblies;
families may be identified through BHW as their task assignment is
per purok. Data (families involve in drugs) are gathered from every
purok.
3. Presenting your preliminary data in the community assemblies;
4. Identifying and assigning committees (Different activities may crop-
up during these community meetings)
5. Formulating action plans including support training activities that will
enhance the identified activities

Remember that planning need not be complicated but make sure that the
community plans are focused to benefit specific sectors. In FDAPP, there may be
three (3) levels of planning, namely;

 Individual – i.e., fathers, mothers, children and young people

When planning activities that aims to increase drug abuse awareness


of individuals, you need to address specific teaching and learning
issues, such as (a) age and gender appropriateness of messages and
activities; (b) availability of resources; (c) willingness and capacities
of the individual

 Family - i.e. the collective group of people

When planning activities involving families, aside from considering


the individual issues, you need to address the collective issues, such
as (a) family size and composition (b) nature of family i.e. single
headed household, nuclear or extended, etc, and (c) risk factors
including socio-economic, cultural and psycho-social dynamics of
the family;

 Community – i.e. the whole neighborhood

When planning activities on drug abuse awareness for communities ,


you need to address leadership issues, such as (a) leadership structure
and system, (b) political and logistic support from local government,
(c) organizational capabilities, (d) resources, and (e) sustainability

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All these are geared towards the family and drug abuse prevention!

Once a good plan is laid out, implementation should be a breeze. That is why,
you need to always go back to the main purpose(s) of FDAPP.

===============================================================
WORKSHEET THREE:

You activity worksheet:


Can you think of possible activities that you can conduct in order to address individual,
family and community issues based on the FDAPP main objectives?

List of Possible Activities


Individual Family Community
FDAPP main objectives
Parent Child Others General At
Risk
Creating awareness

Developing capacities

Organizing and
mobilizing

Promoting and
strengthening

Providing support
services

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C. Implementation

There are many ways to implement the FDAPP. Depending on both the
situation analysis and the formulated plans of actions, you may need to divide the
plans by episode. In any case, you might want to go over the following checklist
of actions to determine where you are as far as the actual FDAPP implementation
goes:

===============================================================
WORKSHEET FOUR:

I have….
Yes No
Identified my target areas and sectors
Gathered important data
Coordinated with the Local Government Unit and presented the data
1. Provincial Anti Drug Abuse Council
2. City / Municipal Anti Drug Abuse Council
Coordinated with the Barangay Council and other key leaders
Identified and recruited families (family members) at risk
Organized a core-group of members
Organized a Family Council in the community
1. Invited potential family leaders
2. Oriented / engaged them into situation analysis
3. Included the Barangay Official in charge, i.e. KAGAWAD
4. Prepared venue and other logistic needs for the meeting
5. Explained the purpose of the meeting and presented situation
analysis
6. Sought formal commitment
7. Made schedules for FDAPP sessions
Conduct FDAPP Sessions
1. Prepared logistic, human and materials resources
2. Conducted the sessions
3. Evaluated the sessions
Planned support activities during the FDAPP sessions
Set up and agreed systems for monitoring and evaluation

Take a look at the above checklist. Notice that you are not alone in implementing
the FDAPP. At the core of FDAPP is the Family Council. Forming such a council
composed of people in the community (especially involving those whose families are at
risk) make the FDAPP really focused as this directly benefits the programme’s targets.

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The FDAP Programme Components

1. Capacity Building
At the core of the FDAPP are training experiences that seek to increase
knowledge, skills and values of the participants to address drug abuse and drug
related problems. The core group of parents is the primary partakers of these
training experiences; they in turn pass these experiences to other parents whether
in informal or formal sessions.

Among the useful FDAPP sessions required for successful


implementation are as follows:

NO. OF TARGET RESOURCE


TRAINING
DAYS PARTICIPANTS PERSONS

1. Basic Trainer’s Training 3 days P/C/MSWDOs/P/C/M PDEA, DDB,


FDAPP Training (1st level) HOs/PNP, DSWD PNP,
a. RA 9165 – Dangerous Drugs P/C/MLGOO, DOH
Act of 2002 NGOs/POs
b. Types and ill-effects of
prohibited drugs
c. FDAPP
d. Review Basic C.O Training

2. Basic Training FDAPP 3 days Barangay Officials, PNP,


Training (2nd level) youth leaders, parent P/C/MSWD,
a. RA 9165 – Dangerous Drugs volunteers, DSWD,PDE
Act of 2002 NGOs/POs A
b. Types and ill-effects of
prohibited drugs
c. FDAPP
d. Review Basic C.O Training

3. Management of Court-related 2 days P/C/MSWDOs/P/C/M DOJ, DSWD,


cases (Basic Police and Court HOs/PNP-Womens PNP
Procedure, Referral System, and Children’s Desk,
RA 9344 – The Juvenile Justice P/C/MLGOO,
and Welfare Act) Barangay Officials,
Youth Leaders, Parent
Volunteers,
NGOs/POs

4. Orientation on the following 3 days P/C/MSWDOs/ P/C/


laws: RA 9262 (Anti-Violence P/C/MHOs/PNP- MSWDOs,
Against Women and Their Womens and DSWD, DOJ
Children Act of 2004, RA 8980 Children’s Desk,
(ECCD Act), RA 9208 (Anti- P/C/MLGOO,
Trafficking in Persons Act of Barangay Officials,
2003), RA 8972 (Solo Parents' Youth Leaders, Parent
Welfare Act of 2000) etc.) Volunteers,
NGOs/POs

21
Supporting these training experiences are other existing training
programmes and activities that include:

a. Training of Trainers in Enhancing Life Skills- A training program


that provides participants with skills to resist drugs, strengthen
personal commitment, and develop social competency in pursuing a
healthy lifestyle that is free from drugs.

b. Training of Trainers on Drug Abuse Prevention Education -A


training program that enables the participants to plan and implement
social action programs geared toward drug abuse prevention in their
respective communities.

c. Empowerment and Reaffirmation of Paternal Abilities (ERPAT) -


Involves organizing fathers as advocates in the promotion of a drug
free home. It gives importance and emphasis on the development and
expansion of knowledge, skills and appropriate attitudes of fathers in
performing their paternal roles and responsibilities.

d. Parent Effectiveness Service (PES) -Provides couples and caregivers


with parenting knowledge and skills to be able to respond to parental
duties and responsibilities, behavior management of children and
other challenges of parenting.

e. Self-Employment Assistant Program (SEAP)- A capability building


program designed to enhance the social and economic skills towards
the establishment of sustainable self-managed community based
organizations for entrepreneurial development.

2. Advocacy and Social Mobilization


Armed with the above training experiences, the FDAPP actors with your
support can now begin a number of advocacy and social mobilization activities
that meet the FDAPP objectives. ADVOVACY is the task of INFLUENCING,
people, groups, and societies in order to EFFECT a DESIRED CHANGE On
the other hand, Social Mobilization is the collective action people take in
tackling specific issues with a specific end goal in mind.

In the case of FDAPP, advocacy and social mobilization can be taken


together with actions that range from targeting the individual (through
interpersonal communications such as counseling, to the group (through family
home visits), and public announcements.

Many such actions abound nowadays that you, together with family
councils, can opt to implement. Good advocacy begins with good data, and
central to good advocacy is the formulation of strong advocacy message.

22
Note the types of advocacy messages;

1. Factual – messages that state a fact (supported by statistics)


Example: “3 SA SAMPUNG BATA DITO SA ATIN ANG NALULULONG
SA DROGA”

2. Emotional – messages that appeal to the emotions (happy,sad, afraid, angry)


Example: “HAHAYAAN BA NATIN ANG ATING ANAK SA
PANGAGALAGA NG PUSHER?”

3. Consequential – messages that present consequences


Example: “MAWAWASAK ANG PAMILYA PAG DI NATIN
NABANTAYAN ANG BATA”

4. Symbolic – messages that presents a symbol to mobilize action –


Example: X = No to Drugs

5. Invitational – messages that invite curiosity


“ALAM MO BA KUNG NASAAN ANG ANAK MO NGAYONG ORAS NA
ITO?”

===============================================================
WORKSHEET FIVE:

Have you done any of these?


YES NO
Conducting Family Home Visits
Organizing Family Assemblies
i.e. Pulong pulong (purok meetings)
Conducting Parenting Conferences
Mounting Peoples’ Theatre and other creative media
Crafting Media Drug Advocacy
Conducting information and education for young people
Organizing Family Drug Watch
Maximizing special events and celebrations
Utilizing the Barangay Public Address System to spread
information
Organizing Symposium (general held in barangay gym)
Posting posters / leaflets and flyers in strategic locations including
mobile transportations i.e., tricycles

3. Networking and Alliance Building


You and the Family Council are not alone in the fight against drug and
prevention of drug abuse in the family. Like any other social development
programs, the need to build networks and alliances becomes a necessity to ensure
programme success.

23
It is important thus, to (1) identify these groups (2) formally engage /
contact them; (3) identify concrete points of partnerships, and (4) find ways to
maintain the partnership. Refer to the Dangerous Drugs Board for specific
mandates of these organizations.

WORKSHEET SIX:

Which among these groups have you reached and build partnerships with?

Local Contact Person and


Organization RA9165 YES NO
Address

Local Student Councils and Sec 42


Campus Organizations

Department of Education, Sec 43


the CHED and TESDA

Department of Interior and Sec 46


Local Government

National Youth Commission Sec 46

Provincial Social Welfare Sec 41


and Development Office

Municipal / city Social Sec 41


Welfare and Development
Office

Department of Labor and Sec 47


Employment

Local Government Units Sec 51

Department of Health Sec 76

24
Local Contact Person and
Organization RA9165 YES NO
Address

Dangerous Drugs Board Sec 77

Philippine Drug Sec 82


Enforcement Agency

Philippine Mental Health Sec 41


Association

The Child Psychiatrist Sec 41


Association of the
Philippines

Philippine Psychiatric Sec 41


Association

Others:

D. Monitoring and Evaluation


Monitoring and evaluation are important parts of the program
management cycle. We monitor because we need to know where we are in as far
as the FDAPP is going versus our target areas and target groups. Meanwhile, we
evaluate because we want to assign values in what we have achieved based on the
set objectives of the programme. Let us show you how.

25
Monitoring is interested in knowing (seeing) where a program, project,
service or activity is going. How it runs and what entails it to run.

In the case of FDAPP, you as implementer need very simple monitoring


tools. Forms ranging from the simple attendance sheets, reporting forms and
minutes of the meetings to the more comprehensive documentation reports
(photos and written) are tools which you can use to monitor any or all activities
that you implement within the FDAPP.

Based on your work plan, you may monitor…

1. Progress and development from the date a specific activity begins through
the date it ends.

2. An increase or decrease in attendance based on attendance sheets;

3. The total number of projects, services and activities within a given period,
i.e. monthly, quarterly, semi-annually, annually

4. Increase or decrease of drug related incidences in the community

5. Strategies used in implementing the different components of FDAPP

Do note that existing programs and services, such as the PES and ERPAT
have built-in monitoring tools and you do not need to create another one for
FDAPP. Instead, use the same form and note that such specific PES or ERPAT
activity is part of your FDAPP.

Evaluation comes easy, when you are able to monitor the program’s
progress.

In evaluating a programme, we can put value in the:

1. Output or the immediate results of the activity;

These are tangible products such as reports, expressions of commitment,


contracts, plans of actions, artworks, and literary works and the likes supported
by written or photographed documents

2. Effect or the observable change in a person, place or thing resulting from the
activity;

These are marked changes in people or the environment measured


unobtrusively. People cleaning up their homes, using the garbage, stop drinking
or taking drugs are examples of effect.

3. Outcome or other remarkable results that can be attributed to the output of the
activity; or

26
These are results other than output and effect, implemented plans of
actions, and more actions that build up from the outputs and effect. These include
more organized and systematic youth groups, more cohesive parents’
participation in their children’s school activities,

4. Impact or the long term result of the activity.

These are the dramatic change in people and environment. Decrease of


drug related crimes and incidences, better economic conditions, etc.

Subsequently we can find value based on the programme’s objectives:

We could find value in the quality


We aimed to…
and quantity of

Create awareness and educate People we reached by sector, i.e.


families on the underlying causes of parents, children, other extended
drug abuse problems and its ill family
effects;

Develop capacities of families People trained


specially on parenting and life skills Increased in particular skills
towards the promotion of a drug free Desirable family relationships
home and community;

Organize and mobilize families to Action against drugs


consolidate efforts in support of the encounters and engagement with
programme and of families at risk; families at risk

Promote and strengthen Filipino Advocacy Campaigns


family values which uphold the Commitments of Support by local and
importance of family ties, unity and national agencies
growth; and Materials and resources

Provide support services to families Services designed to address family


for it to be able to cope with their needs
needs through linkages and referral Economic, political and social gains
with other agencies / organizations.

See Appendix C for the forms you’d need in implementing the FDAPP.

27
PART
THREE:
OTHER USEFUL
INFORMATION

28
A. LIST OF ACRONYMS
BADAC - Barangay Anti-Drug Abuse Council
BBI - Barangay Based Institution
BCPC - Barangay Council for the Protection of Children
BDCC - Barangay Disaster Coordinating Council
BESWMC - Barangay Ecological Solid waste Management
Council
BHW - Barangay Health Workers
BHRAC - Barangay Human Rights Action Center
BIN - Barangay Intelligence Network
BPOC - Barangay Peace and Order Council
CADAC - City Anti-Drug Abuse Council
CHED - Commission on Higher Education
CICL - Children in Conflict with the Law
CWC - Council for the Welfare of Children
DA - Department of Agriculture
DDB - Dangerous Drugs Board
DepEd - Department of Education
DILG - Department of Interior and Local Government
DOJ - Department of Justice
DOLE - Department of Labor and Employment
DOST - Department of Science and Technology
DSWD - Department of Social Welfare and Development
ECCD - Early Child Care Development
FDAPPP - Family Drug Abuse Prevention Program
LGOO - Local Government Operations Officer
LOI - Letter of Instruction
MO - Memorandum Order
MC - Memorandum Circular
NBI - National Bureau of Investigation
NGA - Non-Government Agencies
NGO - Non-Government Organization
PADAC - Provincial Anti-Drug Abuse Council
PDEA - Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency
PNP - Philippine National Police
PO - People’s Organization
PPA - Parole and Probation Administration
PSCB - Productivity Skills Capability Building
RA9165 - Republic Act 9165 Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act
of 2002
RCWC - Regional Council for the Welfare of Children
TESDA - Technical Education and Skills Development
Authority
UNICEF - United Nations Children’s Fund
VAWC - Violence Against Women and their Children

29
B. DEFINITION OF TERMS
Administer - an act of introducing any dangerous drugs into the
body of any person, with or without his/her
knowledge, by injection, inhalation, ingestion or
other means, or of committing any act of
indispensable assistance to a person in
administering a dangerous drug to himself/herself
unless administered by a duly licensed practitioner
for purposes of medication.

Dangerous drug - refer to either prohibited drugs or regulated drugs.


Prohibited drugs includes opium and its active
components an derivatives, such as heroin and
morphine; coca leaf and its derivatives, principally
cocaine; alpha and beta cocaine; hallucinogenic
drugs such as mescaline, lysergic acid diethylamide
(LSD

Drug - is a chemical substance that brings about physical,


emotional or behavioral change in a person taking
it. This includes alcohol, nicotine, etc…

Drug abuse - is the use of any chemical substance, licit or illicit,


which results in an individual’s physical, mental, or
social impairment.
Drug Dependence - state in which a person can function only in the
presence of drugs in his system due to his
periodic/continued use. A compulsive behavior
brought about by drug abuse.

Drug education - is a broad range of concerted activities relating to


teaching/learning situations and experiences which
attempt to maximize opportunities for the
intellectual, emotional, psychological and
physiological development of an individual.

Drug Abuse Prevention Education - is a process of creating awareness on the


underlying causes of the drug abuse problem in
order to generate individual, group and community
involvement in formulating social actions programs
to prevent drug abuse.

Drug Free - on-going disassociation from the use of any


psychoactive substance.

Drug Intoxication - changes in physiological functioning, psychological


functioning, mood states, or cognitive processes, or
all of these, as a consequence of excessive
consumption of a drug, usually disruptive.

30
Drug Misuse - any use of a drug that varies from a socially or
medically accepted use.

Prevention - an act of hindering the development of a foreseen


problem or disease (whether drug-related or not)

Clandestine Laboratories - Any facility used for the illegal manufacture of any
dangerous drug and/or controlled precursor and
essential chemical.

Planning - the process of defining a problem, deciding the


objectives, the alternative course of actions to attain
objectives and determining the results to actions
taken.

Evaluation - systematic determination of the merit, which the


program sets out to do (its goals) using a criteria/
set of standards to measure how much of it is done.

Detoxification - a process of withdrawing a person from an


addictive substance in a safe and effective manner

Use - any act of injecting, intravenously or


intramuscularly, of consuming, either by chewing,
smoking, sniffing, eating, swallowing, drinking or
otherwise introducing into the physiological system
of the body, any of the dangerous drugs.

Family - is basic unit of society. It is a group of individuals


related by blood, marriage, or adoption; a basic
social institution which public policy cherishes and
protects.

Family Intervention - a specific form of intervention involving family


members of alcohol and drug user/dependents
designed to benefit the target patient as well as his/
her family members.

Intervention - act of interceding in behalf of an individual who is


abusing or is dependent on one or more
psychoactive drugs with the aim of overcoming
denial, interrupting drug-taking behavior, or
inducing the individual to seek help and initiate
treatment.

Overdose - the inadvertent or deliberate consumption of a


much larger dose than that is habitually used by the
individual in question and is resulting in serious
toxic reactions or death.

31
Physical Dependence - a physiological state of adaptation to a drug or
alcohol usually characterized by the development
of tolerance to drug effects and the emergence of a
withdrawal syndrome during prolonged abstinence

Polydrug Abuse - concomitant use of two or more psychoactive


substances in quantities and with frequencies that
cause the individual significant physiological,
psychological, or sociological distress or
impairment.

Primary Prevention - attempts to reduce the incidence of new cases (or


problems) in a general population.

Psychological Dependence - the emotional state of craving a drug either for its
positive effect or to avoid negative effects
associated with its absence.

RA9165 - An act instituting the Comprehensive Dangerous


Drugs Act of 2002, Repealing Republic Act No.
6425, otherwise known as the Dangerous Drugs
Act of 1972 as Amended

Recovery - process of overcoming both physiological and


psychological dependence on a drug or alcohol.

Relapse - recurrence of alcohol or drug dependent behavior in


an individual who has previously achieved and
maintained abstinence for a significant time beyond
the period of detoxification.

Sobriety - generally refers to the state of complete abstinence


from alcohol and other drugs of abuse in
conjunction with satisfactory quality of life.

Tolerance - physiological adaptation to the effect of drug so as


to dismiss effects with constant dosages or to
maintain the intensity and duration of effects
through increased dosage.

Treatment - application of planned procedures to identify and


change patterns of behavior that are maladaptive,
destructive, or health enduring, or to restore
appropriate levels of physical, psychological or
social functioning

Withdrawal - cessation of drug or alcohol use by an individual in


whom dependence is established

32
Withdrawal Syndrome - the onset of a predictable constellation of signs and
symptoms involving altered activity of the central
nervous system after the abrupt discontinuation, or
rapid decrease in dosage of a drug.

Cultivate or Culture - any act of knowingly planting, growing, raising, or


permitting the planting, growing or raising of any
plant which is a source of a dangerous drug.

Screening Test - a rapid test performed to establish potential/


presumptive positive result.

Confirmatory test - an analytical test using a device, tool or equipment


with a different chemical or physical principle that
is more specific. This will validate and confirm the
result of the screening test.

Dispense - any act of giving away, selling or distributing


medicine or any dangerous drug with or without the
use of prescription.

Family Drug Abuse Prevention


Program (FDAPP) - is a community-based prevention program to
educate and prepare families and their members as
well as the communities regarding the adverse
effects of drug abuse.

Capability Building Activities - conduct of training activities for families,


community leaders and service providers. The
training aimed at creating a community wide
awareness and understanding on the ill-effects of
drug abuse. (ex. PES Training, ERPAT, etc.)

Advocacy and Social Mobilization - involve social mobilization activities in ensuring


support and awareness in the implementation of
FDAPP (ex. Alay Lakad, Tree Planting, etc.)

Networking and Alliance Building- Involve collaboration and cooperation with the
existing anti-drug abuse councils such as the DDB,
PDEA, BADAC, PADAC.

33
C. MUST READ DOCUMENTS

DSWD Administrative Order No. 16, S. 2004

Republic Act No. 9165, S. 2002

Comprehensive Drug Act of 2002

ERPAT Manual

Survey Manual 2004

Parent Effectiveness Seminar (PES) Manual

Republic Act (RA) 7160 – Local Government Code

Presidential Decree 603 – Child and Youth

RA 9344 – Comprehensive Juvenile Justice System Act

RA 9262 – Anti-Violence Against Women and Children Act

RA 9003 – Philippine Ecological Solid Waste Management Act

Dangerous Drugs Board IEC Materials (2004)

Manual on DAPE and Community Information for Teachers, Community

Leaders/Workers/Media Practitioners (1988)

34
APPENDICES

35
APPENDIX A

April 14, 2004

Administrative Order No. 16


Series of 2004

Subject: Guidelines in the Implementation of the Family Drug Abuse


Prevention Program (FDAPP)

I. RATIONALE

Article IV Section 41 of Republic Act 9165 otherwise known as the


Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002, mandates the involvement of the
family in the enforcement of the said Act. The law further states that the family,
being the basic unit of the Filipino society, shall be primarily responsible for the
education and awareness of the members of the family on the ill effects of
dangerous drugs and close monitoring of family members who may be
susceptible to drug abuse.

Today, the Filipino family faces many challenges. Increasing violence,


continuous erosion of moral values, economic crisis and the insidious influence
of drug abuse have threatened the stability of the fundamental unit of our society.

The report on the national drug situation during the National Drug
Summit in June 2001 stated that in the past years, there were only 20,000 users
using only marijuana, a locally sourced drug. After 29 years, instead of abating
the problem, it worsened and assumed very alarming proportion. There are now
about 1.7 million regular users wherein 1.2 million of these abusers are youth.
The Dangerous Drugs Board (DDB) records show that family problems and
social pressures are reasons for taking drugs. Moreover, a study conducted by the
UNICEF and Asian Center for Women, on 1,000 cases of family violence in
1994-1996 revealed that influence of alcohol and drugs is a major aggravating
factor in domestic violence.

The families play an essential role in the prevention of drug abuse.


Positive parental role models and stable, loving relationships in the home offer
the first and best hope for a drug free and fulfilling life. Filipino families need to
be helped to build on their capacities to become aware of the early signs of
substance abuse and these effective techniques for intervention designed to
prevent drug abuse. They need to help individuals suffering from abuse to get
proper treatment.

36
II. LEGAL BASIS

 1987 Philippine Constitution which mandates the State to recognize the


family as the foundation of the nation and accordingly strengthen its
solidarity and actively promote its development. Further, the Family Code
(EO 209) reaffirms that the family is a basic social institution which public
policy cherishes and protects.

 RA 9165 “Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002” Section 41, Article IV which states
the involvement of the family and tasked it to be primarily responsible for
education and awareness on Drug Abuse Prevention.

 Letter of Instruction No. 1 (LOI #1) of President Macapagal-Arroyo signed


on July 4, 2001 which mandates the DSWD to lead in the implementation of
the Family Solidarity Development Program in the Prevention of Drug
Abuse.

 PD 603 as amended or the Child and Youth Welfare Code, Chapter 3 Article
46, general principles which states the right of every child to a wholesome
family life that will provide him with love, care and understanding, guidance
and counseling and national security. The Code also defines the
responsibilities and liabilities of parents and the responsibility of the State,
communities and institutions to assist them in the care and development of
their children.

III. DESCRIPTION

Family Drug Abuse Prevention Program is a community based prevention


program to educate and prepare families and their members as well as the
communities regarding the adverse effects of drug abuse. It involves the
promotion of family life enrichment activities to enhance cohesive, bonding and
harmonious relationship among family members. It further aims to equip the
families with parenting and life skills towards a drug free home. The programs
shall be adopted by the national government agencies (NGAs), local government
units (LGUs), non-government organizations (NGOs) and other concerned
entities.

IV. OBJECTIVES

1. To create awareness and educate families on the underlying causes of drug


abuse problem and its ill effects.

2. Develop capacities of families especially on parenting and life skills towards


the promotion of a drug-free home and community.

3. To organize and mobilize families to consolidate efforts in support of the


program and of families at risk.

37
4. To promote and strengthen Filipino family values which uphold the
importance of family ties, unity and growth.

5. To provide support services to families for it to be able to cope with their


needs through linkages and referrals with other agencies/organizations.

V. TARGET CLIENTELE

 Parents, youth and adult members within the family.

 Families whose members feel inadequate in their respective familial roles and
needs to help to function adequately e.g. first time parents.

 Families where members are discontented and members feel their needs are
not being met by their families.

 Families who are experiencing a stressful life situation due to substance


abuse.

VI. COMPONENTS

1. Organization of Families

This is the main strategy in the implementation of FDAPP. The families


shall be organized into family councils to conduct activities within their
groups/communities based on their needs and problems. The family council
shall be trained as advocates of drug abuse prevention. They will agree to
meet regularly to define and prioritize common problems, identify resources
and plans/activities/projects in response to identified needs and problems
related to drug counsel families in times of struggles and challenges.

2. Capability Building

This includes conduct of training activities for families, community


leaders and service providers on health, socio-cultural, psychological, legal
and economic dimensions and implications of the drug problem. It includes
the conduct of lifeskills, leadership training, peer counseling and values
education towards the promotion of positive lifestyle.

3. Advocacy and Social Mobilization

This involves social mobilization activities in ensuring support and


awareness in the implementation of FDAPP. The conduct of information and
education activities shall convey basic messages in promoting a drug free
home and community e.g. advocacy caravan; neighborhood support and
referrals, etc.

38
This also involves the participation of the family on drug abuse
prevention activities such as conduct of dialogue sharing among parents and
children; symposium, lecture discussion, takalayan, etc. Modules on drug
abuse prevention shall be integrated in the existing parent education and
family life programs and services.

4. Networking and Alliance Building

This involves collaboration and cooperation with existing anti-drug abuse


councils, government, non-government organizations, parents/youth
organizations’ on raising awareness of drug abuse prevention issues that
would affect the families and community. Efforts shall be intensified to
ensure effective implementation of FDAPP.

Programs and services available in the community shall be made


accessible to families as a means of outreach to families in need. Among the
core services of FDAPP are as follows:

a. Empowerment and Reaffirmation of Paternal Abilities (ERPAT) – this


involves organization of fathers as advocates in the promotion of a
drug free home. It gives importance and emphasis on the
development and expansion of knowledge, skills and appropriate
attitudes of fathers in performing their paternal roles and
responsibilities.

b. Parent Effectiveness Service – provides couples and caregivers with


parenting knowledge and skills to be able to respond to parental duties
and responsibilities, behavior management of children and other
challenges of parenting.

c. Family Violence Prevention Service – a community based strategy of


preparing family members to protect themselves against violence and
manage resolution of conflict within the family. The service
mobilizes the community to consolidate efforts in support to families
at risk or exposed to family violence.

d. Self-Employment Assistance Program – a capability building program


designed to enhance the social and economic skills towards the
establishment of sustainable self-managed community based
organizations for entrepreneurial development.

VII. PROCEDURES

The Family Drug Abuse Prevention Program (FDAPP) shall be


implemented nationwide, specifically in areas/localities with high incidence of
drug abuse. The following steps specify the procedures in implementing the
Family Drug Abuse Prevention Programs.

39
1. The DSWD Field Office shall identify in the respective region the
province that has the highest incidence of drub abuse. From the
provincial level, it shall go down to the municipal/city level down to
the barangay level.

2. The DSWD Field Office shall coordinate with the local government
unit to establish an agreement and support for a joint undertaking on
FDAPP implementation. The DSWD Field Office shall sought the full
participation of the Provincial/City Anti-Drug Abuse Council
(P/CADAC) down to the Municipal and Barangay Level.

3. The P/CADAC will coordinate with the MADAC to the Barangay


Council to elicit support and commitment for the full involvement of
the Barangay Anti-Drug Abuse Council (BADAC) and/or Barangay
Council for the Protection of Children (BCPC).

4. The P/C/M/BADAC through DILG-MC 98-227 and MC 99-236 shall


serve as the focal point through which various organizations and
individuals work together cooperating in the planning, implementation
and evaluation of programs on drug abuse prevention. They also
provide for an effective mechanism to plan, strategize, implement and
evaluate programs, projects on drug abuse prevention in the barangay.

5. In coordination with the Barangay Council, BADAC/or the BCPC


with the assistance of the LGU Social Worker shall identify the target
families at risk which include the following indicators:

 Families residing in the barangay, sitio or purok that has high


incidence of drug abuse.

 Families with members who are already involved in drug abuse.

 Families with history of involvement in drug abuse.

 Families with members who are interested to know about drug


abuse.

 Families with young members who have problems in school.

 Families with members who are causing peace and order problems
in the community.

6. Regular meetings by BADAC shall be conducted to discuss plans and


priorities as regards to FDAPP implementation.

7. A meeting with the Barangay Council for the Protection of Children


(BCPC) will also be undertaken to initiate information campaign to
help promote and implement the Family Drug Abuse Prevention
Program.

40
8. The implementation of the Family Drug Abuse Prevention Program
shall form part of the Barangay Development Plan. The
BADAC/BCPC members shall be equipped with the necessary
knowledge and skills in undertaking activities on drug abuse
prevention program.

9. The BADAC/BCPC shall finalize with the LGU social worker the
listing of participants/families that shall serve as beneficiaries of the
FDAPP. The BADAC shall also be the one to coordinate with these
families to participate in the program.

10. Hence, the FDAPP implementation shall be coursed through BADAC


or BCPC who shall likewise oversee the implementation of FDAPP.
A core group of volunteers may also be organized and mobilized in
the implementation of the FDAPP as an additional strategy.

11. An orientation meeting shall be conducted to make the


BADAC/BCPC officials and barangay volunteers and identified
families informed on the objectives of the FDAPP, its mechanics and
their specific role in the implementation of the program.

12. Program Supervision in the implementation of FDAPP at the


Barangay shall be provided by the LGU social worker.

13. FDAPP sessions shall be conducted in coordination with the


BADAC/BCPC members or volunteers at the agreed date, time and
place. The FDAPP sessions shall be conducted and shall contain the
following basic contents:

a) Basic Terms in Understanding Drug Abuse


 Drug/Substance Addiction
 Drug/Substance Tolerance
 Dependency
 Withdrawal Symptoms

b) Types of Drugs/Substances Commonly Abused/Misused

c) Drug/Substance Danger/Consequences

d) Risks on the abuse use of drugs on the following levels


 Personal
 Family
 Community

e) Patterns of Substance Abuse in the Family

f) Preventing Drug Abuse in the Home


 The Role of Parents
 The Role of Youth
 The Role of Other Family Members and Relatives

41
 The Role of Community Members

g) Dealing with Substance Abuse in the Family


 Detecting Family members who are on drugs
 Treatment and rehabilitation services
 Referring/encouraging family members on drugs to undergo
rehabilitation

h) The Role of the Family in the treatment, rehabilitation and


aftercare of family members on drugs

i) Preventing drug abuse in the community

j) Advocacy and networking for improved services on drug abuse


prevention and rehabilitation

14. Target beneficiaries for FDAPP implementation shall be categorized


as follows:

 Parents
 Youth
 Community Volunteers/Leaders
 Other special groups that may be identified

15. A monthly report shall be prepared at the Barangay level up to


municipal/city level which shall include the number and progress of
families, issues and problems relative to the implementation of the
FDAPP.

16. The consolidated report in the implementation of the FDAPP shall be


submitted to the Provincial/Social Welfare Office and to the DSWD
Field Office through the Municipal Social Welfare and Development
Office. At the City level, it shall be directly submitted to the DSWD
Field Office.

17. The Local Government Unit and the Barangay Council/BADAC/


BCPC shall conduct sustaining activities to respond to the needs and
problems of volunteers and family members individually or in groups.
These activities shall include conduct of cultural and sports activities,
provision of recognition and awards, home visitations, peer support
groups and regular meeting among others.

18. Research, Monitoring and Evaluation of the project shall be


undertaken by the DSWD in coordination with DILG, NYC and local
government units concerned to ensure project sustainability and
development. The following scheme shall also be conducted:

 Conduct of research and related studies on drugs/substance abuse


prevention and rehabilitation, advocacy and sustainability for
program development and evaluation.

42
 Regular monitoring visits shall be conducted by the DSWD
national and field offices. This will be a joint activity together
with the local government units concerned.

 Mid-term project implementation review will be conducted to


evaluate the strengths and weaknesses in the project
implementation.

 Annual project implementation review will be conducted to


evaluate the overall project implementation for continuity and
improvement as a basis for plan of action for the succeeding years.

VIII. ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

a. Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD)

1. Social Technology Bureau (STB)

1.1. Develop and enrich program guidelines and manuals

1.2. Provide technical assistance and serve as resource person/s to


training to Field Office (FO) staff, LGUs

1.3. Pilot-test the implementation of FDAPP in selected regions

2. Program Management Bureau (PMB)

2.1. Provide technical assistance and resource augmentation to DSWD


Field Office in the implementation of FDAPP after completing the
pilot-testing of the program

2.2. Prepare annual national program report

2.3. Conduct monitoring visit and evaluation of FDAPP

3. Social Welfare Institutional Development Bureau (SWIDB)

3.1. Develop training modules in coordination with STB relative to the


implementation of FDAPP

3.2. Conduct training and serve as resource person/s to training of FO


staff

3.3. Facilitate access to other training activities local and international


related to Drug Abuse Prevention

43
4. DSWD-Field Office

4.1. Ensure implementation of the program at the Local Government


Units

4.2. Provide technical assistance and monitoring to LGUs e.g. on spot


visits, consultation/evaluation workshops

4.3. Facilitate administrative support to the project

4.4. Network/coordinate with LGUs other NGAs, NGOs in the


implementation of the program

4.5. Prepare and submit quarterly/year-end regional reports POB.

b. Local Government Units – City/Municipal Social Welfare Office/NGOs/Gos

1. Implement the program based on established guidelines

2. Ensure inclusion of program funds in the annual budget in the


implementation of FDAPP

3. Document area based implementation of the program

4. Coordinate with BC-BADAC/BCPCP and link with concerned LGUs,


NGOs, NGAs and other community structures/organizations regarding
implementation of FDAPP.;

5. Prepare and submit quarterly/annual report to DSWD Field Office.

c. Dangerous Drugs Board

1. Provide technical assistance and policy direction generated from the


reports submitted to LGU, NGO and GA implementors.

2. Provide implementers with modules, posters and other learning materials


on Drug Abuse Prevention among parents, youth, etc.

This order shall take effect immediately and rescinds previous order inconsistent
with it.

Signed.
CORAZON JULIANO-SOLIMAN
Secretary
Department of Social Welfare and Development

44
APPENDIX B

MODULE ON COMMUNITY-BASED EDUCATION ON DRUG


ABUSE PREVENTION FOR PARENTS AND FAMILY MEMBERS

SESSION 1
PREVALENCE OF DRUG ABUSE IN THE PHILIPPINES AND THE
COMPREHENSIVE DANGEROUS DRUGS ACT OF 2002

Estimated Time – 2 Hours


Materials – Manila paper, pentel pen, masking tape, paste, old newspapers and scissors

A. Objective

 To inform the participants on the present drugs abuse situation at the local
and national level
 To gain knowledge about the Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002
 To gain awareness on the importance of drugs abuse prevention at the local
and national level

B. Methodology

 Lecture
 Interactive Discussion
 Collage
 Workshop and Plenary Presentation

C. Key Learning Points

Basic Statistics and Facts About Drugs Abuse

 3.4M users (1999 DDB Survey


 2.2M-9.3M drug users (2001 SWS Survey)
 6.7M drug users (2005 DDB Survey

PROFILE OF DRUG ABUSERS (Facility based)*


CY 2006

 AGE : Mean age of 28 years


 SEX : Ratio of male to female - 9:1

45
 CIVIL STATUS : Single - 57.77%
 STATUS OF EMPLOYMENT : Unemployed - 35.81%
 EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT: High school Level - 29.79%
 ECONOMIC STATUS : Ave. Mo. Family Income - Php
13,706.43
 PLACE OF RESIDENCE : Urban (Specifically NCR) - 58.32%
 DURATION OF DRUG - TAKING : More than six (6) years
 NATURE OF DRUG – TAKING : Poly drug use**
 * Residential and Out-Patient Drug Treatment Facilities
 ** Poly drug users – abuse drugs one after the other or in
combination with other intoxicating substances.

MOST COMMONLY ABUSED DRUGS/SUBSTANCES


 Shabu
 Marijuana
 Inhalants
 Benzodiazepines
 Cough/Cold syrup preparations
 Ecstacy

THE DANGERS OF DRUGS ABUSE

 Once a person starts using drugs and succumbs to repeated use, it


becomes hard and even painful to quit on his own volition. The
most frightening effect of drug use is dependence.

 Drug Dependence is a state in which a person can function only in


the presence of drugs in his systems due to periodic/continued
drug use. It is a compulsive behavior brought about by drug
abuse.

Physical Dependence

 Condition wherein a person cannot function without drugs in his


system and that with the drugs, he develops withdrawal symptoms
like restlessness, pain, convulsions, etc.

46
 A craving for the drug because of its desirable effects that it may
become a compulsion, requiring its continued use.

 A feeling that one cannot do normal tasks without a drug.

(Source: DDB Guide in the Prevention and Control of Drug Abuse)

SESSION 2

DRUG ABUSE AND THE FAMILY

Estimated Time – 2 Hours


Materials – Sample of Family Genogram or Family Tree

A. Objective

 To know the causes and effects of drug abuse in the family


 To gain knowledge on the importance of family in preventing drug abuse
in children

B. Methodology

 Lecture/Discussion
 Individual Work – Family Genogram
 Group Sharing/Synthesis

C. Key Learning Points

Importance of Family in Drug Abuse Prevention

 Families play a vital role in drug abuse prevention


 Evidence-based root causes of drug abuse emanate from conflict
in the home as follows:
 Conflict between and among members particularly
husband-wife marital conflict, arguments that resulted to
insulting and yelling at each other
 Family management problems such as not having clear
standards or rules for behavior and excessively severe or
inconsistent punishment
 Family living in poverty
 Family history of drug abuse
 Parents using drugs and having positive attitudes
towards drug use

47
Why the need to focus on the Family?

 Research confirms the benefits of parents providing consistent


rules and discipline, talking to children about drugs, monitoring
their activities, getting to know their friends, understanding their
problems and concerns and being involved in their learning.
Parent –child relationship continues through adolescence and
beyond.
 Parents and family members can have an enormous positive
impact on children’s substance-use decisions and behavior.
 No protection is absolute, but parents hold the greatest number of
tools and have the greatest opportunity to shape their children’s
choices when it comes to trying and continuing to use cigarettes,
alcohol and drugs.

The Best Approach in Drug Abuse Prevention Starts in the Family

 Go back to the most basic institution of the society,


 The family as a nurturing unit that provides protection, safety,
trust and open communication
 Where each of the members needs are met
 Where each of the members are free, open and expressive
 Where each of the members can be heard and have the opportunity
to decide for himself with the guidance of parents

“The best kind of prevention is that which begins at home. If the head of
the family takes the pains of informing their children about the dangers of
drug abuse, then the drug problem in the country would not be as
widespread as it is today.”
Ople-Osorio

SESSION 3
THE ROLE OF PARENTS IN DRUG ABUSE PREVENTION

Estimated Time – 2 Hours


Materials – Manila paper, pentel pen, and masking tape

A. Objective

 To know one’s roles as parents in preventing children from the ill-effects of


drugs abuse
 To gain skills and knowledge in preventing drugs abuse in one’s own family

48
 To promote a drug-free family by enhancing relationships and
communications with children and other family members

B. Methodology

 Lecture/Discussion
 Case Presentation and Sharing
 Group Exercises and Games

C. Key Learning Points

The Role of Parents

Parents are the first line of defense in the war against drug abuse.
Parents can exert a profound influence on their children’s lives by serving as
models. Their children can see how they meet the stresses of everyday live,
which will be their basis in meeting future problems (DDB Guidelines in
Drug Abuse Prevention).

What parents can do to prevent children from abusing drugs

 Discuss the risks of drugs with your children


 Educate yourself about drugs –basic facts and their harmful effects
 Help children to appreciate that using illicit drugs damages them
spiritually, physically, socially, and psychologically.
 Establish a relationship of trust with your children. Be a
confidential friend of your child.
 Take extra time and effort to get to know your child. Listen to
their thoughts, feelings, fears and hopes.
 Take time to hear about their friends no matter how boring it may
seem to you.
 Set firm boundaries and agree on certain family rules about the
kind of friends they should entertain and curfews outside the home
to ensure their safety.
 Be aware of the early signs of involvement with drugs.
 Remember that drug use is a preventable behavior!
 Build up your child’s self-esteem. Children with positive view of
oneself stand a better chance against the negative influence of peer
pressure.
 Help your child believe in himself as a special person – unique
and with special talents and characteristics. Nurture his feeling of
self-worth and self-respect. NEVER attack his/her person
especially when expressing anger.
 Be a model to your own child. Avoid any form of substance abuse
and not to be affected also by your own peers.
 Provide opportunities to promote alternatives to drugs. School,
church and community activities such as sports, arts and hobbies
such as reading, writing, drawing and singing are positive
alternatives to negative influence of drugs.

49
Promoting a Drug-Free Family as Parents in Your Own Home by Applying the
Basic Principles and Laws on Parenting

Basic Principles of Parenting

 The Principle of Love


 The Principle of Discipline
 The Principle of Values
 The Principle of Modeling

Basic Laws on Parenting:

 Love your children.


 Hug and kiss your children
 Spend adequate time with your child.
 Establish your family code.
 Discipline your child with the best end in mind.
 Catch your children doing right.
 Take an absolute stand against substance abuse
 Walk your talk.
 Grow with your child.
 Learn to negotiate.
 Be a hands-on parent.
 Listen to your child before you listen to others.
 Create a nurturing environment for your children.
 Teach good manners and right conduct.
 Uphold spiritual values.
 Encourage your child to dream dreams.

SESSION 4
PROMOTING COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION AND MOBILIZATION IN
DRUG ABUSE PREVENTION

Estimated Time – 2 Hours


Materials – Manila paper, pentel pen, crayon or water color and masking tape

A. Objective

 To encourage group discussion and reflection about the roles of families in


drug abuse prevention
 To promote community participation and volunteerism in drug abuse
prevention
 To visualize a drug-free community

50
B. Methodology

 Lecture/Discussion
 Group Creative Painting
 Workshop and Group Sharing

C. Key Learning Points

Tips in Prevention Drug Abuse in the Community

Communities can/should offer a variety of educational programs, seminars and open-


fora on drug abuse prevention. Community-based prevention programs should be
long-term with repeated interventions in order to prevent families, children, youth
and parents from the ill-effects of drug abuse. Community activities are most
successful when they use a variety of interactive techniques such as peer discussion
groups and parent role-playing.

 Involve and promote educating individuals, families and


communities about the destructive effects of alcohol and drugs and
the positive alternative life choices available to our youth and
adults.

 Organize a variety of indoor and outdoor activities including


pledges, contests, workshops, rallies, theatrical and musical
performances, and other family and educational events in the
community for the prevention of drugs abuse and awareness-
raising on the ill-effects of drugs abuse.

 Mobilize parents, leaders and volunteers, youth and other


members of the community for raising public awareness and in
combating alcohol, drug, and tobacco use among youth, parents
and families.

 Generate publicity in partnership with the local media, schools,


churches and other groups in your community.

 Help educate other parents in your community about the ill-effects


of drugs abuse in the family.

 Organize “Barkada Kontra Droga” among group of youth in your


community.

51
APPENDIX C

FDAPP FORMS

FDAPP COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP FORM


Family Council Registration Form

Identifying Data
Name : ________________________________________________________________
Age : ___________________________ Sex : _____________
Date of Birth :________________________ Place of Birth : _______________
Occupation : ___________________________________________________________
Religion : _____________________________________________________________
Home Address : _________________________________________________________
Tel. No. ________________________________________________________________

Family Composition

Name Sex Relationship Age

Education Attainment :

Elementary : ___________________________________________________________
High School : ___________________________________________________________
Vocational : ___________________________________________________________
College : ___________________________________________________________
Others : ___________________________________________________________
Special Abilities: _______________________________________________________
Skills / Talent : _________________________________________________________
Hobbies : ____________________________________________________________
Other Skills : ___________________________________________________________
Community Involvement :_________________________________________________
School : _______________________________________________________________
Civic : ________________________________________________________________
Community : ___________________________________________________________
Workplace : ___________________________________________________________
Others : _______________________________________________________________

52
Seminars / Training Attended:
Title : ________________________________________________________________
Date: ________________________________________________________________
Organizers: ___________________________________________________________
Title: ________________________________________________________________
Date: ________________________________________________________________
Organizers: ___________________________________________________________

Signature: ___________________________________________________________
Date:__________________________________________________________________

53
FDAPP Registration Form

FDAPP/FAMILY PEER GROUP OF:


Name of Group/Organization:
Address:
Name of FDAPP Worker

Name Position Age Address Signature

Noted by:

NO.OF
ACTIVITIES/ DATE PERSON/AGENCY
PERSONS REMARKS
PROJECTS CONDUCTED INVOLVED
SERVED

LGU Supervisor
Date__________

54
QUARTERLY ACCOMPLISHMENT REPORT
FDAPP

MONTH/YEAR

A. Accomplishments for the Period ________


_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________

B. Issues/Concerns/Recommendations
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________

Prepared and Submitted by:

_________________________
Printed Name and Signature
Date

Noted by:

_____________________________
Printed Name and Signature
Date

55
RECORDING OF FDAPP SESSIONS:
(To be accomplished by LGU Worker/FDAPP Volunteer, One Desk Session)

SESSION NO. TOPIC:


DATE:
BARANGAY

1. NAME OF PARTICIPANT PRESENT: (Attached attendance sheet)

2. OBJECT OF THE SESSION:

3. REPORT OF RESULT OF ACTIVITIES CARRIED OUT AT HOME IN


RELATION TO PREVIOUS TOPICS ATTEND:

4. LEARNING HIGHLIGHTS/INSIGHTS IDENTIFIED BY PARTICIPANT

5. PLAN OF ACTION/HOME ASSESSMENT OF EACH PARTICIPANT


RELATIVE TO TOPIC DISCUSSED IN THE SESSION (REFER TO
APPLICANT)

6. WORKERS’ REFLECTIONS

DATE OF NEXT SESSION:


TOPIC:

Worker/Volunteer’s Signature

56
OATH OF COMMITMENT

We the members and Committee leaders of the FDAPP Family Peer Group of
(Barangay) do hereby pledge to perform our
duties and responsibilities, abide with the functions and responsibilities of the group and
serves as the role models in our community.

We further commit ourselves to render volunteer services in responding to the


issues/concerns on drug abuse problems and issues affecting our family and to support
the implementation of FDAPP program in the community.

So help me God.

Signed on (Day and Month) 2002 at

Name signature of members

57
APPENDIX D

HANDOUTS ON FAMILY DRUG ABUSE PREVENTION


PROGRAM

1. FAMILY AND DRUG ABUSE

What does family mean?

 Basic unit of society


 Relationships through adoption, blood and marriage
 Source of protection, security, love and nurturance
 Interacting and interdependent personalities who have common bonds and goals,
and share resources and living space
 Starts with the concept of marriage of two individuals
 Maintain basic family norms/values

Family Composition
 Father
 Mother
 Children
 Relatives

Family Functions:
 Reproduction
 Physical and Emotional Needs
 Social Placement - upbringing, norms and behavior, skills and knowledge
(education)
 Socialization and Social Control-teaching of socially accepted behavior

Family Life Stages


 Founding Stage
 Beginning a Family - Childbearing and Child-rearing Stage
 Schooling Stage
 Launching Stage
 Retirement Stage

Familial Roles and Responsibilities


 Varies in every stage of family life
 Varies in every developmental stage of children
 Varies depending on one’s family values and principles, practices
 Varies on power structures and systems in the family, including patterns of
interactions and communications, role expectations, family rules and disciplines

58
The Challenge is to how to strengthen the family as a nurturing unit.

Core areas:

a. The family as a structure- needs to maintain a state of equilibrium or balance – it


functions through the different stages of family life vis-à-vis stages of child achieved
development (ensuring that needs are met).
 Are the needs of the child/ members met?
 Are the roles of the each family member clear and defined?

b. The family as an interacting unit –Patterns of interactions are based on relationships


and expected roles relayed and communicated with one another

Problems occur when:


 Conflicting expectations, personality clashes
 Cultural norms and attitudes that block open interaction and communication
 Health conditions of family members
 Generation gap-modernization

 How can the family create a sense of belonging or connectedness and


opportunities to make meaningful relationships in the family?

c. The family – each has his/her own self-interest, most often in conflict with one
another, for each has his/her own desire in life. However, the one who has the power
is the one who earns in the family - has the say, has the decisions, heard and followed

 How can shared parenting be achieved?


 How can shared decision-making be achieved with the participation of older
children?
 How to achieve balance in the execution of power in the family – where each one can
fully express oneself, be heard and decide for oneself and for the good of the family.

The Significance of Family in Drug Abuse Prevention

Families play a vital role in drug abuse prevention


Evidence-based root causes of drug abuse emanate from conflict in the home as follows:
 Conflict between and among members particularly husband-wife marital conflict,
arguments that resulted to insulting and yelling at each other
 Family management problems such as not having clear standards or rules for
behavior and excessively severe or inconsistent punishment
 Family living in poverty
 Family history of drug abuse
 Parents using drugs and having positive attitudes towards drug use

Why the need to focus on the Family?

 Research confirms the benefits of parents providing consistent rules and


discipline, talking to children about drugs, monitoring their activities, getting
to know their friends, understanding their problems and concerns and being

59
involved in their learning. Parent –child relationship continues through
adolescence and beyond
 Parents and family members can have an enormous positive impact on
children’s substance-use decisions and behavior.
 No protection is absolute, but parents hold the greatest number of tools and
have the greatest opportunity to shape children’s choices when it comes to
trying and continuing to use cigarettes, alcohol and drugs.

The Best Approach in Drug Abuse Prevention Starts in the Family

Go back to the most basic institution of the society,


The family as a nurturing unit that provides protection, safety, trust and open
communication
Where each of the members needs are met
Where each of the members are free, open and expressive
Where each of the members can be heard and have the opportunity to decide for himself
with the guidance of parents

“The best kind of prevention is that which begins at home. If the head of the family
takes the pains of informing their children about the dangers of drug abuse, then the
drug problem in the country would not be as widespread as it is today.”

-Ople-Osorio

2. PRINCIPLED PARENTING: KEY TO HAPPY FAMILIES


Harry C. Lorenzo, Jr. MNSA, PhD

“As the Family goes, so goes the nation and so goes the whole world in which we live.”
- Pope John Paul II

Good and happy families do not just happen. They are products of basic principles
designed to achieve a certain purpose. “If you bungle raising your children,” according
to Jacqueline Kennedy, “I don’t think whatever else you do well matters very much.”

Basic Principles of Parenting

 The Principle of Love


 The Principle of Discipline
 The Principle of Values
 The Principle of Modeling

The Principle of Love

Parents may have all the best intentions in the world for raising their children but if love
is absent, that family becomes vulnerable to the storms of life.

60
“If children don’t get sufficient love early in life, they go crazy.”
-Erika Manfred – former Probation Officer for Family Court in Brooklyn, New York.

The Principle of Discipline

To put a child on a high pedestal without restrictions is a recipe for disaster, both for the
child and the parents.

Love without boundaries is not love at all. It is a license to do what one pleases.
Discipline, on the other hand, without love can easily be construed as harshness and
cruelty. It destroys the very purpose of discipline itself which is to do what right and
good.

The Principle of Values

 Families need to have a family code. The family code reflects the attributes and
expectations around which family members live their lives.

 Many parents fail to develop a formalized value system at home because they
themselves refuse to honor the values they wish their children to possess.

 Some parents simply do not have the time to talk about what value system to
develop for their families.
 Some parents lack the necessary values to share with their own children.

Principles of Modeling

“Our strong marriage,” according to one mother, “is the cornerstone of our family.”
Children do as their parents do. If parents love each other, care for each other, and
respect each other, children will do the same – to their parents and their siblings.

If parents want their children to accept their values, they must be conscious of setting
good examples in all areas of their lives: what they do, where they go, what they read,
what they eat and drink, how they speak, how they deal with others, and what they
believe in.

Laws of PARENTING

Laws are standards which specify the application of the general principles of parenting.
It is always a good policy to base our standards on principles which have universal
application. Parenting is like constructing a building. Architects and engineers should
first make a plan based on generally accepted principles of safety, convenience,
durability, cost, time, profitability, etc.

The following are the laws on parenting:

 Love your children. Without love, all other efforts at parenting will collapse.
 Hug and kiss your children. Infants who suffer from emotional and sensory
deprivation become retarded.

61
 Spend adequate time with your child. Quality time is quantity time spend with
your child in love.
 Establish your family code. A family code is a unifying principle around which
family members are drawn together as one.
 Discipline your child with the best end in mind. Children who have not been
disciplined early in life develop a character/personality disorder and later become
a menace to society as anti-social persons.
 Catch your children doing right. By catching your children doing right and
reward them for it, you strengthen that particular behavior.
 Take an absolute stand against substance abuse. Drugs destroy countless
lives. When a member of the family is a drug addict, everybody becomes
psychologically sick.
 Walk your talk. Children imitate and adopt those values they believe are
acceptable to their parents.
 Learn to negotiate. Negotiating with your children is one way of making them
feel that they are important.
 Grow with your child. Allow kids to be kids.
 Be a hands-on parent. Hands-on parenting simply means you care for your
child and you diligently supervise his activities and behavior so that he will not
go astray.
 Listen to your child before you listen to others. Be loyal to your child even if
he/she causes embarrassment to the family.
 Create a nurturing environment for your children. A nurturing environment
is one where children can grow up to their potentials.
 Teach good manners and right conduct. When people behave in certain
acceptable ways there can be peace, understanding and harmony.
 Uphold spiritual values. When confronted with “breaking points” of life or
“nothingness” like death, hopelessness, suffering, tragedy, separation, anguish,
trials and uncertainties, it is the spiritual part of us that will carry us through the
rest of our life’s journey.
 Encourage your child to dream dreams. By encouraging your child to dream
dreams, you have provided him with strong sense of direction, a North Star to
follow even in the darkest of nights.

3. THE PHILIPPINE DRUG SITUATION & GOVERNMENT EFFORTS TO


ADDRESS THE DRUG PROBLEM

DRUG ABUSE TRENDS/Prevalence of Drug Abuse in the Philippines based on surveys

1999
Dangerous Drugs Board Survey:
 3.4M users
2001
 SWS Survey
 2.2M-9.3M drug users
2005
 DDB survey
 6.7M drug users

62
Drug Abuse Trends based on Treatment Data of Accredited TRCs & Out-patient
Facilities

PROFILE OF DRUG ABUSERS (Facility based)*


CY 2006

 AGE : Mean age of 28 years


 SEX : Ratio of male to female - 9:1
 CIVIL STATUS : Single - 57.77%
 STATUS OF EMPLOYMENT : Unemployed - 35.81%
 EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT: High school Level - 29.79%
 ECONOMIC STATUS : Ave. Mo. Family Income - Php 13,706.43
 PLACE OF RESIDENCE : Urban (Specifically NCR) - 58.32%
 DURATION OF DRUG - TAKING : More than six (6) years
 NATURE OF DRUG – TAKING : Poly drug use**

 * Residential and Out-Patient Drug Treatment Facilities


 ** Poly drug users – abuse drugs one after the other or in combination with other
intoxicating substances.

MOST COMMONLY ABUSED DRUGS/SUBSTANCES

 Shabu
 Marijuana
 Inhalants
 Benzodiazepines
 Cough/Cold syrup preparations
 Ecstacy

GOVERNMENT EFFORTS TO ADDRESS THE DRUG PROBLEM

Republic Act 9165


Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002
 Signed – June 7, 2002
 Published- June 19, 2002
 Took effect - July 4, 2002

THE DANGEROUS DRUGS BOARD

The DDB policy-making and strategy formulating body in the planning and formulation
of policies and programs on drug abuse prevention and control.

Vision: A Drug-Free Philippines by the year 2010


Mission: In fulfilling its vision, the DDB is committed to

 Eradicate the supply of, and demand for, dangerous drugs and their precursors
and to stop trafficking to and from the country.
 Promote regional and international cooperation in drug abuse prevention and
control.

63
STRATEGIES TO ADDRESS THE DRUG PROBLEM:

CIVIC AWARENESS - aimed at promoting public awareness and social response


by advocating on the dangers of drugs through:

 Public communication strategy using mass media such as Tri Media Activities
such as press releases, press conferences and radio/TV interviews and community
outreach programs such as Barkada Kontra Droga, Serbisyo Muna and Caravan
 Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking of Drugs (IDADAIT) every 26th
of June
 Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Week (DAPCW) every 3rd week of
November
 Production and distribution of DDB Bulletin and other Information, Education
and Communication (IEC) materials and collaterals

 DEMAND REDUCTION - is geared towards reducing the consumers’ demand


for drugs and other substances. This is done thru: Preventive Education
Programs, Treatment and Rehabilitation Programs and Research

 SUPPLY REDUCTION- The object is to take away the drugs from the person
through market denial operations and prevention of diversion from the licit
market.

 ALTERNATIVE DEVELOPMENT - aims to reduce the production of


marijuana and eventually eliminate its cultivation through sustainable rural
development and alternative livelihood programs. These include sustainable
income-generating programs and socio-economic programs such as health
services, education and infrastructure

 REGIONAL/INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION - Adherence to


international treaties and forging of MOAs and MOUs with other countries

 Conduct of tie-up projects with regional/international organizations;


 Attendance to various foreign trainings/conferences/ seminars;
 Submission of required reports to the UN, WHO and other international
organizations;
 Hosting of foreign visitors on study tours/field visits; and
 Regular financial contributions to ACCORD and Colombo Plan Bureau.

CONCLUSIONS

The vision for a drug-free Philippines can only be achieved through a holistic &
balanced approach utilizing advocacy and prevention strategies, sharing of information,
consensus building, sustainable alternative development programs, strengthened rule of
law, and enhanced networking of all sectors.

64
SHARING OF DRUG
INFORMATION

CONSENSUS
PROACTIVE BUILDING
ADVOCACY
HOLISTIC &
BALANCED
APPROACH
ENAHNED SUSTAINABLE
NETWORKING OF ALTERNATIVE
CONTROL
DEVELOPMENT
MEASURES
PROGRAMS

STRENGTHENED
RULE OF LAW

4. THE COMPREHENSIVE DANGEROUS DRUGS ACT OF 2002 (RA 9165)

Undesecretary Romeo G. Vera Cruz


Vice-Chairman
Dangerous Drugs Board

TOPICS
 State Policy
 Salient Features of R.A. 9165
 Unlawful Acts and Penalties; Aggravating Circumstances
 Immunity from Prosecution and Punishment
 Grant of Compensation, Reward and Award
 Drug Testing
 Participation of the Family, Students, Teachers
and School Authorities
 Special Drug Education Centers
 Drug-Free Workplace
 Participation of Local Government Units
 Treatment and Rehabilitation
 First-Time Minor Offender
 Liability of Parent, Spouse or Guardian
 Responsibility of Law Enforcement Agencies and
Government Officials and Employees
 Reclassification, Addition or Removal of Any Drug

65
a. BRIEF HISTORY OF DRUG USE/ABUSE AND ANTI-DRUGLEGISLATIONS

Early Period

 Mesolithic Period - Central Asia


 5000 BC - Sumerians
 2500 BC - Swiss
 950 BC - Egyptians
 28 BC - cultivation of marijuana
 1000 AD - Chinese
 South America - cocaine
 Central Asia - ephedrine (mahuang)

Medical Use:
 1525 - Opium
 1732 - “Dover’s powder”
 1803 - Morphine
 1841 - Hashish
 1855 - Cocaine
 1864 - Barbiturate
 1887 - Amphetamine
 1893 - Methamphetamine
 1898 - Heroin
 1919 - Crystallized Meth
 1938 – LSD

Industrial Use:
 Coca Cola
 Negro laborers

Military Use:
 Napoleon’s Army (marijuana)
 Bavarian Army (cocaine)
 Hitler (cocaine)
 Kamikaze Pilots (meth)

Opium Wars

 1st Opium War (1839-42)


 Sparked by the confiscation of British opium warehouses
 Waged to compel the Chinese to accept British opium imports

 Treaty of Nangking
 ceded Hongkong
 granted the British diplomats parity rights
 opened five ports

 2nd Opium War (1856-60)

 Sparked by the seizure of a British ship for smuggling

66
 Treaty of Tientsin
 expanded the terms of the Treaty of Nangking
 legalized opium importation

b. INTERNATIONAL/REGIONAL DRUG ABUSE PREVENTION & CONTROL


EFFORTS:

 1961 U.N. Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs


 1971 U.N. Convention on Psychotropic Substances
 1988 U.N. Convention Against Illicit Traffic in
Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances
 1998 Guiding Principles of Drug Demand Reduction and Measures to
Enhance International Cooperation to Counter the World Drug Problem
 1976 ASEAN Senior Officials on Drug Matters (ASOD)
 2000 ASEAN and China Cooperative Operations in
 Response to Dangerous Drugs (ACCORD) Philippines
 Chinese (17th Century)
 Spanish Period
 American Occupation (1898-1946)

 Banned the non-medical use of Opium in 1908


 Harrison Narcotic Act, 1914
 Revised Penal Code (Articles 190-194), 1935

 Japanese Occupation (1942-1945)

 Philippine Republic
- R.A. 6425, March 30, 1972
- R.A. 9165, July 4, 2002

c. “THE COMPREHENSIVE DANGEROUS DRUGS ACT OF 2002”

IT IS THE POLICY OF THE STATE :

 to safeguard the. . . well-being of its citizenry, particularly the


youth, from the harmful effects of dangerous drugs

 to re-integrate into society individuals who have fallen victims to drug abuse or
dangerous drug dependence

67
SALIENT FEATURES OF R.A. 9165

a) Heavier penalties

Unlawful Act R.A 9165 R.A. 6425 Revised Penal


Code
Importation Life 14y 1d to life 2y4m1d to 6y;
imprisonment to imprisonment; Fine of P300-
Death; Fine of Fine of P14T- P10T
P500T- P10M P30T
Sale, Delivery, (same as above) 12y1d to 20y; (same as above)
Transportation Fine of P12T-
P20T
Maintenance of (same as above) (same as above) 11d to 2y4m;
den, dive or Fine of P300-
resort P1,000
Possession 12y1d to Death; 6y1d to 12y; Fine (same as above)
Fine of P300T- of P6T-P12T
P10M
Use 6y1d to 12y; Fine (same as above) (same as above)
of P50T-P200T
(2nd offense)

b) Lower quantity to make the offense of possession non-bailable;

c) More comprehensive classification of dangerous drugs and controlled precursors


and essential chemicals;

d) Non-applicability of the rules on plea bargaining;

e) Non-applicability of probation law to convicted drug pusher or trafficker,


regardless of the penalty imposed;

f) Death penalty to a law enforcer or any person found guilty of planting evidence;

g) Maximum penalty to government officials and employees involved in illegal


drugs, and criminal liability of a law enforcer, government official or employee
who refuses to testify as prosecution witness in a dangerous drugs case;

h) Provision on immunity from prosecution and punishment;

i) Creation of the Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency (PDEA) as the


implementing arm of the DDB. It centralizes in the PDEA all the campaign
against illegal drugs;

j) Mandates the active participation of the different government agencies and the
local government units in the post rehabilitation programs of drug dependents.

68
UNLAWFUL ACTS AND PENALTIES UNDER R.A. 9165

Section 4. Importation of Dangerous Drugs and/or Controlled Precursors


and Essential Chemicals

 Penalties:

 Dangerous drug- life imprisonment to death and fine P500T - P10M


 CPECs- imprisonment 12 years and 1 day to 20 years and fine P100T
- P500T

 Maximum penalty:
 Use of diplomatic passport or facilities
 Financier

 Protector/Coddler- imprisonment 12 years and 1 day to 20 years and fine


P100T – P500T

Section 5. Sale, Trading, Administration, Dispensation, Delivery, Distribution and


Transportation of Dangerous Drugs and/or Controlled Precursors and Essential
Chemicals

 Penalties:
 Dangerous drug- life imprisonment to death and
fine P500T – P10M
 CPEC- imprisonment 12 years and 1 day to 20 years and
fine P100T – P500T
 Maximum penalty:
 if committed within 100 meters from a school;
 if the victim is a minor or mentally incapacitated individual;
 if it is the proximate cause of the death of the victim;
 Financier

 Protector/Coddler- imprisonment 12 years and 1 day to 20 years and


fine P100T – P500T

Section 6. Maintenance of a Den, Dive or Resort

 Penalties:

 Dangerous drug- life imprisonment to death and


fine P500T – P10M
 CPEC- imprisonment 12 years and 1 day to 20 years and
fine P100T – P500T
 If proximate cause of death of user- death and
fine P1M – P15M

69
 Maximum penalty:
 Administered, delivered or sold to a MINOR
 Financier

 Protector/Coddler- imprisonment 12 years and 1 day to 20 years and


fine P100T – P500T

Section 7. Employees and Visitors of a Den, Dive or Resort

 any employee of a den, dive or resort who is aware of the nature of the
place as such

 any person who is aware of the nature of the place as such and shall
knowingly visit the same

 Penalty- Imprisonment 12 years and 1 day to 20 years and fine P100T -


P500T

Section 8. Manufacture of Dangerous Drugs and/or Controlled Precursors


and Essential Chemicals

 Penalties:

 Dangerous drug- life imprisonment to Death and


Fine of P500T - P10M
 CPEC- Imprisonment 12 years and 1 day to 20 years and
Fine of P100T - P500T

 Maximum penalty- Financier

 Protector/Coddler- Imprisonment 12 years and 1 day to 20 years and


fine of P100T to P500T

Section 9. Illegal Chemical Diversion of Controlled Precursors


and Essential Chemicals

 Penalty- imprisonment 12 years and 1 day to 20 years and


fine of P100T - P500T

Section 10. Manufacture or Delivery of Equipment, Instrument, Apparatus, and


Other Paraphernalia for Dangerous Drugs and/or Controlled Precursors
and Essential Chemicals

 Penalty- imprisonment 12 years and 1 day to 20 years and


fine of P100T – P500T

70
 Penalty- Imprisonment 6 months and 1 day to 4 years and fine of P10T-
P50T if it is used to inject, ingest, inhale or otherwise introduce into the
human body

 Maximum penalty- if a minor or mentally incapacitated individual is used

Section 11. Possession of Dangerous Drugs

 Penalty- life imprisonment to death and fine P500T - P10M

For possession of the following:

 10 grams or more of opium; morphine; heroin; cocaine or cocaine


hydrochloride;
 50 grams or more of methamphetamine hydrochloride or "shabu";
 10 grams or more of marijuana resin or marijuana resin oil;
 500 grams or more of marijuana; and
 10 grams or more of other dangerous drugs

 If lesser quantity: reduced penalty of imprisonment and fine

Section 12. Possession of Equipment, Instrument, Apparatus and Other


Paraphernalia for Dangerous Drugs

 fit or intended for smoking, consuming, administering, injecting,


ingesting or introducing any dangerous drug into the body.

 Penalty- imprisonment 6 months and 1 day to 4 years and fine of P10T-


P50T

 Exempt: Medical practitioners and professionals

Section 13. Possession of Dangerous Drugs During Parties,


Social Gatherings or Meetings

 Possession of any dangerous drug during a party, or at a social gathering


or meeting, or in the proximate company of at least two (2) persons

 Penalty- Death and Fine P10M

Section 14. Possession of Equipment, Instrument, Apparatus and Other


Paraphernalia for Dangerous Drugs During Parties, Social Gatherings
or Meetings

71
 Possession of equipment, instrument, apparatus and other paraphernalia
for dangerous drugs during parties, social gatherings or meetings or in
the proximate company of at least two (2) persons

 Penalty- imprisonment 4 years and fine P50T

Section 15. Use of Dangerous Drugs

 Any apprehended or arrested person found positive for use of any


dangerous drug after confirmatory test

 Penalty:

 1st Offense- minimum of 6 months rehabilitation in a government


center
 2nd Offense- Imprisonment 6 years and 1 day to 12 years and fine
P50T – P200T

Section 16. Cultivation or Culture of Plants Classified as Dangerous Drugs


or Are Sources Thereof

 Penalty- life imprisonment to death and fine P500T – P10M

 Maximum penalty: Financier

 Protector/Coddler- imprisonment 12 years and 1 day to 20 years


fine P100T – P500T

 Exempted: medical laboratories and medical research centers for


medical experiments and research or for the creation of new types of
medicines

Section 17. (Violation or Failure to Comply with the) Maintenance and Keeping of
Original Records of Transactions on Dangerous Drugs and/or Controlled
Precursors and Essential Chemicals

 Penalty: imprisonment 1 year and 1 day to 6 years and fine of P10T –


P50T

 Additional penalty: revocation of license to practice or business license

Section 18. Unnecessary Prescription of Dangerous Drugs

 Prescription of any dangerous drug to any person whose physical or


physiological condition does not require the use or in the dosage
prescribed therein.

72
 Penalty- Imprisonment 12 years and 1 day to 20 years and fine ranging
from P100T- P500T

 Additional penalty- revocation of license to practice

Section 19. Unlawful Prescription of Dangerous Drugs

 Penalty- life imprisonment to death and fine P500T- P10M

Section 26. Attempt or Conspiracy

Same penalty prescribed for the commission of the ff:

 Section 4 (Importation)
 Section 5 (Sale)
 Section 6 (Den, Dive, Resort)
 Section 8 (Manufacturing)
 Section 16 (Cultivation)

Section 27. Misappropriation, Misapplication or Failure to Account for the


Confiscated, Seized or Surrendered Dangerous Drugs, Plant Sources of
Dangerous Drugs, Controlled Precursors and Essential Chemicals,
Instruments/Paraphernalia and/or Laboratory Equipment, including the
Proceeds or Properties Obtained from the Unlawful Act Committed

 Penalty- life imprisonment to death a fine P500T- P10M and absolute


perpetual disqualification

 Any local or national official found to have benefited from the proceeds
of the trafficking of dangerous drugs or have received any financial or
material contributions or donations from persons found guilty of
trafficking dangerous drugs

 Penalty- Removal from office and perpetual


disqualificationfrom holding any elective or appointive
positions in the government.

Section 29. Planting Evidence

 Penalty- Death

Section 32. Liability of a Person Violating Any Regulation Issued by the Board

 Penalty- imprisonment 6 months and 1 day to 4 years and fine of P10T


50T

Section 37. Issuance of False or Fraudulent Drug Test Results

73
 Penalty- Imprisonment 6 years and 1 day to 12 years and fine of 100T-
P500T and revocation or license to practice and closure of center.

Aggravating Circumstances:

a) Qualifying Aggravating Circumstance (one degree higher)

Section 25. Qualifying Aggravating Circumstances in the Commission


of a Crime by an Offender Under the Influence of Dangerous Drugs.

b) Special Aggravating Circumstance (maximum period)

Section 28. Criminal Liability of Government Officials and Employees.

Immunity from Prosecution and Punishment (Section 33)

 Available to any person who has violated:


 Section 7 (Employees and Visitors of a Den, Dive or Resort)
 Section 11 (Possession of Dangerous Drugs)
 Section 12 (Possession of Equipment, Instrument, Apparatus and Other
Paraphernalia for Dangerous Drugs)
 Section 14 (Possession of Equipment, Instrument, Apparatus and Other
Paraphernalia for Dangerous Drugs During Parties, Social Gatherings
or Meetings)
 Section 15 (Use of Dangerous Drugs)
 Section 19 (Unlawful Prescription of Dangerous Drugs)

Who voluntarily gives INFORMATION:

On any violation of the following:

a) Section 4 (Importation)
b) Section 5 (Sale, Trading, Administration, Dispensation, Delivery, Distribution
and Transportation)
c) Section 6 (Den, Dive or Resort)
d) Section 8 (Manufacture)
e) Section 10 (Manufacture or Delivery of Equipment, Instrument, Apparatus
and Other Paraphernalia)
f) Section 13 (Possession of Dangerous Drugs During Parties)
g) Section 16 (Cultivation or Culture) OR

On any violation of the above-mentioned offenses if committed by a drug s syndicate


or leading to the whereabouts, identities and arrest of the members AND who
willingly testifies against such persons.

 Conditions for Immunity:


• Necessary for the conviction of the persons liable
• Not yet in the possession of the State
• Can be corroborated on its material points

74
• Informant has not been previously convicted of a crime involving moral
turpitude
• Informant shall strictly and faithfully comply, without delay, any
condition or undertaking

Grant of Compensation, Reward and Award (section 22)


 To any person providing information, OR
 To law enforcers participating in the operation

which results in the successful confiscation, seizure or surrender of dangerous drugs,


plant sources of dangerous drugs, and precursors and essential chemicals”

Board Regulation No. 1, series of 2005 (amending


Board Regulation No. 5, series of 2003)

“Capture of Wanted Drug Personalities. A reward shall be paid to those who


provide information that leads directly to the arrest/recapture of drug
offenders who are at large.”

Drug Testing (Section 36)


Required to undergo drug testing:

 Applicants for driver's license (mandatory)


 Applicants for firearm's license and for permit to carry firearms
 outside of residence (mandatory)
 Students of secondary and tertiary schools (random)
 Officers and employees of public and private offices (random)
 Officers and members of the military, police and other law enforcement
agencies (mandatory)
 All persons charged before the prosecutor's office with a criminal
offense having an imposable penalty of imprisonment of not less than six
(6) years and one (1) day (mandatory)
 All candidates for public office whether appointed or elected both in the
national or local government (mandatory)

Participation of the Family, Students, Teachers and School Authorities


in the Enforcement of The Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002
(Article IV)

Involvement of the Family (section 41)


 basic social unit
 primary responsible for education and awareness and
close monitoring of family members

Student Councils and Campus Organizations (section 42)


 prevention and deterrence in the use of dangerous drugs
 referral for treatment and rehabilitation of students

75
Integration of drug abuse prevention and control
in the school curricula (section 43)

 Adverse effects of the abuse and misuse of dangerous drugs


 Preventive measures against drug abuse
 Health, socio-cultural, psychological, legal and economic dimensions
 and implications of the drug problem
 Steps to take when intervention on behalf of a drug dependent is needed
 Misconceptions about the use of dangerous drugs

School Officials are Persons in Authority (section 44)

 empowered to arrest (Sec. 5, Rule 113 of the Rules of Court)


 duty-bound to report

Special Drug Education Centers (section 46)


 out-of-school youth and street children
 one center in every province
 drug prevention programs and activities and information campaign
 Board Regulation No. 1, series 0f 2003

Promotion of a National Drug-Free Workplace Program (Article V)

Drug-Free Workplace (sections 47, 48, 49)


 it is a policy of the state to promote drug-free workplaces
 national drug abuse prevention program
 mandatory for companies with 10 or more employees
 Collective Bargaining Agreements
 joint continuing programs and information campaigns
 Guidelines
 DDB Board Regulation No. 2, Series of 2004

Participation of Local Government Units (article VII)

 LGUs are mandated (Section 51) to appropriate substantial portion of


their annual budgets to assist in the enforcement of R.A. 9165, giving
priority to:

 preventive and educational programs


 rehabilitation and treatment of drug dependents

Abatement of Drug Related Public Nuisances

 creation of Administrative Boards in cities and municipalities (Section


52)

• hear complaints regarding drug related nuisance


• declare a place to be a public nuisance (Section 53)

76
 order prohibiting the conduct, operation or
maintenance of any business or activity on the premises
 effective for one (1) year; permanent injunction

Treatment and Rehabilitation of Drug Dependents

Voluntary Submission

a) Voluntary Confinement, Treatment and Rehabilitation (section 54)


 Drug dependent or any person who violates Section 15
(Use)
 DDB > Court > DOH accredited-physician
 6 months to 1 year treatment & rehabilitation and 18
months after-care program

b) Exemption from criminal liability (section 55)


 complied with the rules and regulations
 never been charged or convicted of any offense
 no record of escape from a Center
 poses no serious danger

c) Temporary release; After-care (section 56)


 after-care and follow-up treatment for up to 18 months
 discharge subject to Section 55 (Exemption) OR recommit

d) Probation and Community Service (section 57)


 discharged as rehabilitated but does not qualify for
exemption
 probation and community service in lieu of imprisonment
and fine

e) Filing of Charges if Not Rehabilitated (section 58)


 if not rehabilitated after second commitment,
to be charged under Section 15 (Use)
 credited for period of confinement

f) Escape and Recommitment (section 59)


 submit for recommitment within 1 week
 if repeated, charged under Section 15 (Use) and subjected under
compulsory confinement

g) Confidentiality of Records (section 60)


 judicial and medical records are confidential
 Exception: to determine frequency confinement, treatment and
rehabilitation

77
Compulsory Submission

a) Compulsory confinement (section 61)

1. Any person determined and found to be drug dependent


 through a petition filed by the DDB with the RTC
2. Drug dependent charged with an offense (section 62)
 prosecutor or court
3. Drug dependent who escaped confinement (section 59)

b) Confidentiality of Records (section 64)

 confidential if rehabilitated and discharged


 if not rehabilitated or has escaped, use of the records to be
determined by the court

First-Time Minor Offender

Suspension of Sentence (section 66, Board Regulation No. 2, series of 2005)

 may be availed of by an accused over 15 years of age at the time of the


commission of the offense (section 11 or Possession) but not more than
18 years of age when judgment should have been promulgated

 He/she has not been previously convicted of violating any


provision of R.A. 9165, R.A. 6425 or of the Revised Penal Code,
or of any special penal laws;
 He/she has not been previously committed to a Center or to the
care of a DOH-accredited physician; and
 The Board favorably recommends that his/her sentence
suspended

Discharge of the Minor Offender (section 67)

 complies with rules and regulations of the DDB


 confinement in a treatment and rehabilitation center
 favorable recommendation of the DDB upon discharge of the
accused and dismissal of all proceedings:

 all records are expunged, except confidential records to be retained by


the DOJ discharged minor not liable for perjury

Promulgation of Sentence (section 69)

 minor offender violates the conditions of the suspended sentence and


rules and regulations of the Board and the treatment and rehabilitation
center
 he/she may be placed under probation or render community
service (section 70)

78
Confidentiality of Records (section 71)

 DOJ to keep confidential record


 to be used only to determine first time offense

Liability of Parent, Spouse or Guardian (section 73)

 refusal to cooperate in the treatment and rehabilitation of a minor drug


dependent
 prevents or delays the after-care, follow-up or other programs
 contempt of court

Responsibility of Law Enforcement Agencies and


Government Officials and Employees

1. As Prosecution Witness (section 91)

 failure or refusal, intentionally or negligently, to appear as witnessPenalty-


Imprisonment 12 years and 1 day to 20 years and Fine of not less than P500T;
administrative liability

Immediate superior- Imprisonment 2 months and 1 day to 6 years and fine of not
more than P50T; perpetual absolute disqualification

2. As Prosecutor (section 92), Prosecution Witness or Law Enforcement Agent (IRR)

 patent laxity, inexcusable neglect, unreasonable delay or deliberately causes the


unsuccessful prosecution and/or dismissal of the drug case

Penalty- Imprisonment 12 years and 1 day to 20 years

Reclassification, Addition or Removal of Any Drug


from the List of Dangerous Drugs

The Board shall have the power to reclassify, add to or remove any drug from the list
of dangerous drugs (section 93; Board Regulation No. 3, Series 2003)
Procedure:
 Petition to DDB/ Initiated by PDEA or DOH from any interested party,
including the manufacturer of a drug, a medical society or association, a
pharmacy association, a public interest group concerned with drug abuse, a
national or local government agency, or an individual citizen.
 Investigation by DDB
 Public Hearing ( with notice)

Factors to be considered:

 Its actual or relative potential for abuse;


 Scientific evidence of its pharmacological effect if known;

79
 The state of current scientific knowledge regarding the drug or other
substance;
 Its history and current pattern of abuse;
 The scope, duration, and significance of abuse;
 Risk to public health; and
 g. Whether the substance is an immediate precursor of a substance
already controlled under R.A. 9165.

The Board shall also take into accord the obligations and commitments to
international treaties, conventions and agreements to which the Philippines is a
signatory.

80
APPENDIX E

DIRECTORY OF NATIONAL DRUG REHABILITATION CENTERS

Region Name of Center Address Contact


Person/Tel
Nos.
NCR DDB-EU Treatment and Newport cor. Marlboro St. East 939-5917
Rehabilitation Center Fairview, Quezon City
PNP-CUREDD Camp Bagong Diwa, Bicutan, (02) 837-2471
Taguig, Metro Manila local 881
Bahay Bagong Buhay for Camp Bagong Diwa, Bicutan, (02) 837-2471
Street Children on Drugs Taguig, Metro Manila local 881
III Central Luzon Drug Barangay Sto. Nino, Magalang, Col. Sofronio
Rehabilitation Centers Pampanga Rabadon Ginez
IV –A Bureau of Corrections New Bilibid Prison Compound, 809-8399
Therapeutic Community Muntinlupa City
DOH Treatment and Tagaytay City 413-1334
Rehabilitation Center
V Malinao Albay Center Comun, Malinao, Albay P/Sr. Insp. Pablo
(MCUREDD) Rustico Apolonio
VII Cebu City Center Camp Maxilom, Salinas Drive, (032) 231-4752
(CCUREDD Lahug, Cebu City
NBI New Horizons Binlod, Argao, Cebu (032) 256-3366
Treatment and Rehabilitation
Center
X NBI North Eastern Mindanao NBI NEMRO 10 Capitol (08822) 722-835
Rehabilitation Center Compound, Cagayan de Oro City
9000

OUTPATIENT CENTERS

Region Name of Center Address Contact


Person/Tel. Nos.
NCR Air Force General Hospital Col. Jesus Villamor Airbase, (02) 854-6701
Pasay City local 463
DDB Treatment and Ground Floor, CHAMP Bldg., (02) 5273213
Rehabilitation Division Bonifacio Drive, Port Area,
Manila
Malaya Center – DSWD JP Burgos St. Project 4, Quezon (02) 913-9786
NCR City

81
REFERENCES:

Republic Act 9165 and Its Implementing Rules and Regulations, DDB Publication

Preventing Drug Abuse… What can we do?. Guide in the Prevention and Control of
Drug Abuse, DDB Manuscript

Drug Abuse, Crime and Home. Lorenzo, Jr. DDB and KILL Droga Manuscript, 2007

Empowerment and Reaffirmation of Paternal Abilities, DSWD Publication, 2002

Barkada Kontro Droga. DDB Leaflets

Drug Abuse Prevention Through Family Interventions. Ashery, Robertson, Kumpfer,


Ph.D. NIDA Research Monograph 177, USA.1998

Red Ribbon Community Action Guide.US Dept. of Health and Human Services.2005

82
The WRITERS
1. Alcala, Rufinno G. Punong Barangay
Brgy Punta Taytay, Bacolod City
09228125475

2. Alvarez, Angeline E. Social Welfare Officer II


Youth Coordination Officer
DSWDO, Roxas City
092862335378; (036) 6211318; (036) 6211318
Alvarez@yahoo.com

3. Baclagon, Manuel PO III PDPB / DSWD


09198714531
araro-ph@yahoo.com

4. Beringuel, Marlene T. SWO III


SB / DSWD
09106160471
marlyn_beri@yahoo.com

5. Brigole, Estrella D. SWO IV


FO XI
09177002713
edbrigole@yahoo.com

6. Guillena, Gilberto R. Barangay Kagawad


DSSD, Bacolod City
09162028901

7. Legaspi, Ofelia M. HEPO II (Health & Promotion Officer)


Dangerous Drug Board
NIA Rd. Brgy Pinahan
9296638 / 9297136
omlegaspi@yahoo.com

8. Marte, Judith S. SWO


DSWD VI
09187525512
jelthmarte@yahoo.com

9. Paula de, Basilisa G. SWO III


DSSD, Bacolod City
09192753743
basilisadepaula@hotmail.com

10. Rosa de la, Gene V. Barangay Secretary


DSSD, Bacolod City
09229526217
dork282005@yahoo.com

83
11. Telles, Rosalinda M. HEPO III (Health & Promotion Officer)
Dangerous Drug Board
NIA Rd. Brgy Pinahan, Diliman, Quezon City
9296638, 9297136

12. Solloso, Ernestina Z PDO III


DSWD Social Technology Bureau
Batasan Complex, Constitution Hills, Quezon City
9517124, 9318144

Project and Editorial Team:


Fernandez, Gary P. Encoder / Clerk II
DSWD Social Technology Bureau
09195932311

Solloso, Ernestina Project Development Officer


DSWD Social Technology Bureau

Gemma G. Gabuya Social Welfare Officer V


Child and Youth Division
DSWD Social Technology Bureau

Brenda Martinez Documentation Officer


Children’s Laboratory for Drama in Education

Bing Baguioro Principal Writer and Editor


Children’s Laboratory for Drama in Education

Dir. Finardo G. Cabilao Director


Social Technology Bureau

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The Family Drug Abuse Prevention Program
is a programme of the
Department of Social Services and Development (DSWD)
Constitution Hills, Batasan Complex
Diliman, Quezon City
with the support of the
Dangerous Drugs Board (DDB)

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