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Tutor:_______________________________ Date:________________________

1. Action research question


What effect will giving the assessment criteria before an activity, versus after the activity, have on the
academic performance of primary school students in Years 3-6 for comprehension and language
conventions?

2.Review of the related literature


The following literature reviews will discuss two important aspects of the research question. One is
the emotional association students have between the learning process and assessment achievement;
the other is the effectiveness of student involvement in the assessment process.

Author Carole Newman from Florida International University suggests that a peer critique strategy
can help students become self-regulated learners who can refer to the marking rubric to assess their
work carefully and who can benefit from cooperating with an equally skilled partner who can provide
feedback and offer support. Newman claims if students were skilled in how to use a rubric and
engage in discussion with their classmate promotes unity in the classroom. Students should be
encouraged to take advantage of another’s’ point of view as they work together toward successfully
completing their assignments. Another advantage of pairing students and engaging them in the
assessment process such as rubric development is questions are raised and shared with the whole
class minimising anxiety for shy students (Newman, 2014). Overall Newman declares that student
involvement into the assessment process yields higher grades, stronger bonds between classmates
and an improvement in writing skills. Peer critiquing encourages students to be active learners and
strengthens student bonds creating a more supportive classroom environment.

Sylvia Bagley is a Professor at Mount Saint Mary's College in Santa. Monica, CA who also argues that
“by allowing students to take more ownership over their assessments, they learn to view assessment
as a valuable tool for growth rather than merely an arbitrary judgment handed down by someone in
authority “(Bagley, 2010). Developed in the 1980’s by Alan Fiske, Bagley, applies Relational Models
Theory (RMT), which states that human relationships and social systems are culturally specific
applications of four basic Relationship Models: Authority Ranking, Communal Sharing, Equality
Matching, and Market Pricing (Bagley, 2010). Bagley uses the framework of the RMT to categorise the
findings of her research, and more importantly to support the view that assessment is a culturally-
specific socio-cultural experience.

Listed below is Sylvia adapted Relational Models Theory she applied to her original research
conducted at a progressive secondary school in California:

• Authority Ranking: Assessment is handed down from teacher to students. Students have no course
for grievances.

• Market Pricing: Grades or marks are “earned” according to how well the student responded to a
clearly defined set of assessment criteria.

• Communal Sharing: Assessment is reached through consensus and common goals. Students receive
feedback from teachers and discuss student progress, and what improvements need to be made. The
shared common purpose between the students, teachers, and parents is a student’s success.

• Equality Matching: students assess each other.

The data collected was between years 2005 and 2006 and the results of the findings are ranked in
order of significance;
• Authority Ranking; was the major Relational Model between students and teachers in the realm of
assessment.

• Market Pricing; rubrics is the standard assessment tool however rubrics can be ambiguous, and
students need assistance in deciphering what it is the teacher is expecting.

• Communal Sharing; this plays a significant role in the students well being and motivation for
learning.

• Equality Matching; was least because teachers and students are not peers and very rarely to
students get to assess their teacher.

The research findings demonstrated that when using the RMT; Authority Ranking combined with
Communal Sharing and Market Pricing, ultimately encouraged students to take charge of their growth
and learning resulting in improved grades.

Interestingly Scott Marion and Paul Leather wrote an article on ‘Assessment and Accountability to
Support Meaningful Learning’ (Marion & Leather, 2015). The report specifically focused on an
improved system of performance assessment accountability and using both summative and interim
reports to measure the quality and scope of student knowledge before progressing to the next level
of task achievement. The accountability pilot was rolled out across the New Hampshire District and
involved significant organisational administration changes for both schools and districts. The
accountability pilot, known as Performance Assessment of Competency Education or PACE, is
competency based and designed for students to achieve mastery of knowledge and skills (Marion &
Leather, 2015). This pilot supports the findings of Sylvia Bagley in that evaluation models are very
much dominated by the RMT of Authority Ranking with minimal Communal Sharing and unspecified
Market Pricing. It would have been interesting to see the results of the pilot study if the relationship
between academic or skilled performance and student input into the assessment process were
included.

A review of “SURFACING STUDENTS’ PRIOR KNOWLEDGE IN MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE CLASSROOMS


Exception or the Rule?” (Mesa, Pringle, & King, 2014) Supports the theory that teachers can improve
students surfacing of their prior knowledge about curriculum science by using enhanced methods of
techniques to probe and investigate students understandings. As a starting point, teachers needed to
use formative assessment to pre-assess the middle school students’ ideas relating to specific science
concepts, and that data was used to plan instruction. While this approach to surfacing students prior
knowledge about science concepts is valid, the question remains ‘would the engagement of student
involvement in the assessment process yield the same results?’ A study conducted in Ireland of
undergraduate nursing students involved peer assessment “Use of peer assessment as a
student engagement strategy in nurse education” (Casey et al., 2011). This study describes
how Peer Assessment (PA) was implemented to enhance student learning and the processes
involved. PA engaged students were found to be more autonomous and responsible for
taking control of their learning (Paris & Winograd, 2003). The result indicated that student
involvement with the assessment process yielded more self-regulated learners, and therefore
they acquired skills that will prepare them well for future education.

3. Data collection and analysis


After reviewing the related literature, and assessing the assignment one feedback, I realised two
processes needed to take place to address the action research question adequately. One is to
measure the emotions of the student before every assessment using the Likert scale, and the other is
to evaluate the academic performance after each assessment. Below is an explanation of how data
collection was achieved for analysis.
Before the assessment process

All participants were given a Likert scale to complete. The participants rated their feelings toward the
assessment activity by circling the category and the emotional level they felt before the assessment
activity. The reason this action research plan uses the term ‘assessment activity’ is because the
participants have already aquired the reading skills to accomplish the task. Therefore the participants
only require instructions about how to complete the task and the perameters for completing the task.

The questions for both extracts will be of a similar nature, that is, they will consist of;

• 2 short answers – (WILF) to assess level of comprehension after reading


• 3 mulitple choice – (WILF) to assess accurate recount details after reading
• 6 new vocabulary words – (WILF) to assess context understanding
• Recount of an experience related to the applicable story – (WILF) to assess grammar,
punctuation, reflection skills.

Process of Assessment Activity A

All participants must complete the Likert scale (Monkey Survey) before starting the activity.

The participants will be given an hour to complete the activity, they are to read the extract
called ”Friends Helping Friends” by Kelly Hashway. The participants are then required to complete the
attached worksheets within the allocated hour. The participants may ask questions but the assessor is
not allowed to provide the answers.

On completion of the assessment activity the survey, reading extract and worksheets shall be
collected for analysis and grading.

Process of Assessment Activity B

The same set of participants used in “Process of Assessment Activity A” will complete Process
Assessment Activity B. The reading extract and questions will be a slight variation used in assessment
activity A. This is to determine if giving the assessment criteria before an activity, versus after the
activity, have on the academic performance of primary school students in Years 3-6 for
comprehension and language conventions?

The participants are given a set of questions to the text extract that is to be read. The assessor will
explicitly explain what they are looking for (WILF) with each question and participants are able to
write notes and ask questions to clarify any ambiguity. All participants must complete the Likert scale
before starting this activity. If a participant is identified as having poor written communication skills
then they can verbally record their responses to the questions.

The participants will be given an hour to read the extract called ”Friends Helping Friends” by Kelly
Hashway and complete the attached worksheets. During the assessment activity the participants may
ask questions by signalling with a raised hand for the assessors attention but the assessor is not
allowed to provide the answer.

On completion of the assessment activity the Likert scale, reading extract and worksheets shall be
collected for analysis and grading.

Process Assessment Activities - Completion

The results are carefully graded, analysised and recorded. Comparisons between the collected data
are evaluated to differienate what effect will giving the assessment criteria before an activity, versus
after the activity, have on the academic performance of primary school students in Years 3-6 for
comprehension and language conventions.

4. Data analysis and presentation


The table A. below represents the emotional feelings of the Year 3 participants in primary school and
their emotional responses prior to Assessment Activity A and prior to Assessment Activity B.

Table A.

Likert Scale and Questions for Very Nervous Okay Confident Very
Assessments Activites A and B nervous confident
Assessment A I I I
1. How did you feel when you have
to do an assessment?
Assessment B I II
1. How did you feel when you have
to do an assessment?
Very Nervous Okay Confident Very
nervous confident
Assessment A I II
2. Are you eager to get your result
back after your Assessment?
Assessment B I II
2. Are you eager to get your result
back after your Assessment?
Nervous Anxious Okay Happy confident Relaxed
Assessment A I II
3. If you were given the assessment
questions before the assessment,
how would you feel about doing
the assessment?
Assessment B II I
3. If you were given the assessment
questions before the assessment,
how would you feel about doing
the assessment?
No Maybe Most Likely Yes Definitely
Assessment A II I
4. Do you think your assessment
results would improve if you were
given the questions before the
assessment?
Assessment B I II
4. Do you think your assessment
results would improve if you were
given the questions before the
assessment?
After analysising the three (3) Year 3 participants responses to the survey, the results indicated a
slightly positive trend towards being giving the assessment questions and explanation of what the
assessor is looking for within each question prior to the start of the assessment.

Table B. below represents the emotional feelings of the Year 5 and Year 6 participants in primary
school and their emotional responses prior to Assessment Activity A and prior to Assessment Activity
B.
Table B.

Likert Scale and Questions for Very Nervous Okay Confident Very
Assessments Activities A and B nervous confident
Assessment A I I
1. How did you feel when you have
to do an assessment?
Assessment B II
1. How did you feel when you have
to do an assessment?
Very Nervous Okay Confident Very
nervous confident
Assessment A I I
2. Are you eager to get your result
back after your Assessment?
Assessment B I I
2. Are you eager to get your result
back after your Assessment?
Nervous Anxious Okay Happy confident Relaxed
Assessment A I I
3. If you were given the assessment
questions before the assessment,
how would you feel about doing
the assessment?
Assessment B I I
3. If you were given the assessment
questions before the assessment,
how would you feel about doing
the assessment?
No Maybe Most Likely Yes Definitely
Assessment A I I
4. Do you think your assessment
results would improve if you were
given the questions before the
assessment?
Assessment B II
4. Do you think your assessment
results would improve if you were
given the questions before the
assessment?
After analysising the Year 5 and Year 6 participant’s responses to the survey, the results indicated a
slightly marginal trend towards being giving the assessment questions and explanation of what the
assessor is looking for within each question prior to the start of the assessment. During a discussion
after the activities it was revealed that the participants thought that because the questions and
assessment requirerments were given before the assessment they felt obligated to do well. This
feeling of obligation unfortunately eroded feelings of confidence.
Table C represents the academic data collect after Assessment Activities A and B for each participant.

Table C

Academic Results Participant A Participant B Participant C Participant D Participant E


for Assessment
Activities A and B Year 3 Year 3 Year 3 Year 5 Year 6

Assessment A 2/3 2/3 3/3 3/3 2/3

3 Multiple choice
questions

Assessment B 2/3 3/3 3/3 3/3 3/3

3 Multiple choice
questions

Assessment A 1/6 0/6 1/6 4/6 1/6

3 Short Answer
Questions

Assessment B 5/6 3/6 3/6 3/6 2/6

3 Short Answer
Questions

Assessment A 2/5 3/5 5/5 5/5 5/5

5 word matching
definitions

Assessment B 3/5 2/5 3/5 5/5 3/6

5 word matching
definitions

Assessment A 5/10 8/10 10/10 7/10 7/10

Retell of
experience

Assessment B 8/10 10/10 10/10 6/10 8/10

Retell of
experience

Assessment A 10/24 13/24 19/24 19/24 15/24


Total score

Assessment B 16/24 18/24 19/24 17/24 16/24


Total score

The results would indicate that giving the assessment criteria before an activity, versus after the
activity, only slightly improved the academic performance of primary school students in Years 3-6 for
comprehension and language conventions.
5. Description of what I learnt from my action research

The action research question was “What effect will giving the assessment criteria before an
activity, versus after the activity, have on the academic performance of primary school
students in Years 3-6 for comprehension and language conventions”?

The hypothesis; giving the assessment criteria before an activity, versus after the activity,
would improve the academic performance of primary school students in Years 3-6 for
comprehension and language conventions. However, after implementing the plan and
collecting data it was evident that the results of the surveys and the expectations of
assessment B indicated the hypothesis was not entirely true.

After conducting my action research with the participants and evaluating the collected data
for both assessments A and B I then cross referencing the evaluations against the survey
questionaire and the results indicated a slight preference toward explicit instructions for
how each question was to be answered. But the anxiety about being assessed remained and
their seemed to be added complications because of the percieved expectation to do well.
Therefore as a classroom practice I would set the example of always explicitly going through
each assessment so the students are clear on the objectives and what I am looking for in
terms of content answers, but also providing positive feedback. This will aid in remodelling
the lesson plans for students who are struggling with concepts and new learning
experiences.

The surveys indicated that students were anxious about being assessed but moreover they
became aware of their strenghts and weaknesses because of the knowledge required to
answer the questions. For example, for the multi choice question the explicit instruction was
to look for the answer within the text. As opposed to best guess the answer by
remembering what was in the text.

Another example of demonstrating how to answer the short answer question was to advise
the students what the assessor is looking at the text comprehension level. Even though all
students are reading the same text, not every students reads and interprets the same way.
Using the strategy of vocabulary word matching helped me assess even further into the
ways students comprehending the text. If students scored below average in the vocabulary
word match indicated the text was a little too difficult and they were using word
assosication and contextual knowledge rather than fully understandig the entire text.

The retell of a personal experience was where the major differences lie between giving an
an explanation of WILF and not providing a WILF explanation. Interestingly enough the
students all thought that the content and the amount of writing that was on the page would
gain extra points through effeort rather than specific knowledge of content.

6. Recommendations for personal change

From the analysis it is evident that student knowledge comes from explicit instruction of
what it is I am assessing in an assessment and in a lesson plan objective. This continuing
practice of explicitly identifying the objectives within a lesson and focusing on the objectives
allows the students focus on the urgent and important content areas of detail as opposed to
generalising the subject matter. Depending on the instructions, the worksheets, the
demonstration, written material and hands on application every student will interpret what
they are learning differently (McInerney, 2014).

Because of the different learning abilities I would recommend that for every learning
objective there be at least two strategies to engage learning and use repeated lessons or
recaps of each objective learned. For instance, I would use a tree of growth with sticky notes
as leaves to indicate which part of the content area of the curriculum is yet to be instructed
(yellow sticky note), which content area of the curriculum has been instructed (red sticky
note) and which content area of the curriculum has been assessed (green sticky note).

This practice would give students an idea of scaffolding, what is to be taught, what has been
learned and gives them a sense of accountability in their learning because it is visually in
front of their eyes as to what the year ahead is going to look like.

I would recommend allocating not only assessment time but also explanation time of what
is expected in the assessment. Especially whan writing essays or short answer questions.

7. Recommendations for the next action research cycle related to this topic

The participants were at a disadvantage when I conducted my first action research cycle
because it did not allow them enough time between assessments.

Firstly I did not plan forward enough because the original participants were not going to be
available. The original participants were uni students and the uni break was in the middle of
the data collection phase.

Secondly, my original plan was for the participants to have a week break between
Assessment A and Assessment B. This did not happen because I had to change my
participants from uni students to primary school age students and this change meant I had
to rely on parents generosity in time to allow for their child to be part of my action research
question.
8. Appendices

1. Raw Data

The raw data can be found by clicking on the action research link or within the below action
research PDF.

action research.PDF

The action research folder contains the following raw data;


a. Consent Forms (5 each)
b. Short story Part A
c. Questionnaires Part A
d. Short story Part B
e. Questionnaires Part B
f. Assessment answers
Marking rubric for academic performance for Assessment A and Assessment B.
2. Assessment Activity A template.

Assessment Activity A - Friends Helping Friends by Kelly Hashway

Tom put on his coat and backpack and walked out of the school to catch his bus home. His backpack
weighed him down and all the materials he needed to finish his science fair project this weekend.
“Hey, Tom!” Peter yelled, running up to him. “My dad is running the park clean up this weekend. Can
you help out?”
“Um…” Tom knew he did not have time to help, but he did not want to disappoint Peter. “I guess I
can.”
“Great. Thanks!” Peter said, waving goodbye.
Tom stepped onto the bus and took his seat. He was going to have to stay up late tonight to work on
his project so he could help Peter in the morning.
“Tom,” Anne said, sitting down next to him. “I have been looking for you. I have to walk Mrs
Anderhoof’s dogs this weekend. Do you think you could help me?”
“Um…” Tom knew Mrs Jame’s dogs had to be walked three times a day. How would he manage to fit
that in on top of everything else? “I guess I can.”
“Great!” Anne waved goodbye as the bus pulled up to their stop.
Tom’s backpack felt even heavier as he walked into the house and flopped down on the couch.
“Rough day?” his mother asked.
‘More like a rough weekend. I have to finish my science fair project. Help Peter with the park cleanup,
and help Anne walk Mrs Jame’s dogs.”
“Sounds like you agreed to too many things this weekend,” his mother said.
“I know, but Peter and Anne are my friends. I could not say ’no’ to them. I did not want to let them
down.” Tom stared at his mum. “What should I do?”
“I am glad you wanted to help your friends, but you need to have time for your things, too.”
Tom knew she was right. “Maybe I can tell Peter I can only help for two hours in the morning. And I
can probably help Anne walk Mrs Jame’s dogs early in the morning, but not at lunch or in the evening.”
Tom’s stomach flopped. “Mum, do you think they will get mad?”
“They are your friends. Tell them you need time to finish your science fair project. They will
understand.”
Tom nodded and got the phone. He told Peter and Anne the truth. As soon as he hung up, he turned
to his mum. “They are fine with it, and they both offered to help with my project, too.”
“I knew it would work out,” Mum said.
Tom smiled. “Yeah, because friends help each other out.”
3. Assessment Activity A Questions template

1. The main character of the story is probably…

a. A young boy c. A teenage boy


b. A toddler d. A person over 21 years old.

2. How did Tom feel when he arrived home?

a. angry c. overwhelmed
b. hurt d. excited

3. Why was Tom nervous about calling his friends?

a. He was afraid they would be disappointed because he was not helping enough
b. He was afraid they would ask him to do even more
c. He was worried that they would not help him with his science project
d. He was worried that they would not answer the phone
4. Why did Peter and Anne ask for Tom’s help, were they being good friends?

5. How did Tom organise his time to help his friends and was he happy with the outcome?

6. What was the genre of the text, why do you think that?

Match each vocabulary word on the left with the definiation on the right.

1. ________ disappoint a. likely


2. ________ probably b. able
3. ________offered d. let down
4. ________manage e. promised
5. ________agreed f. show willingness to help someone
In the text extract “Friends Helping Friends” Tom promised to help his friends during the
weekend, but does not have time.
Write about a time when you have been very busy and how did you do everything in time?
4. Assessment Activity B template.

Assessment Activity B - Friends Helping Friends by Kelly Hashway

Tom hurried to put on his coat, grab his briefcase and walk out of the office to catch his bus home. His
briefcase weighed him down with all the contracts he needed to read over before his meeting with
his boss on Monday.
“Hey, Tom!” Peter yelled, walking up to him. “I am running the park clean up this weekend. Can you
help out?”
“Um…” Tom knew he did not have time to help, but he did not want to upset Peter. “I guess I can.”
“Great. Thanks!” Peter said, walking off.
Tom stepped onto the bus and took his seat. He was going to have to stay up late tonight to work on
his review of the contracts so he could help Peter in the morning.
“Tom,” Anne said, sitting down next to him. “I have been looking for you. I have to walk Mrs Jame’s
dogs this weekend, but I can’t do it tomorrow morning. Do you think you could help me?”
“Um…” Tom knew Mrs Jame’s dogs had to be walked twice a day. How would he manage to fit that in
on top of everything else? “I guess I can.”
“Great!” Anne waved goodbye as she stepped off the bus.
Tom’s shoulders felt tight as he walked into the house and flopped down on the couch.
“Rough day?” his wife asked.
‘More like a rough weekend. I have to finish reviewing the contracts ready for the meeting with the
boss first thing Monday morning, help Peter with the park cleanup tomorrow as well as help Anne
with walking Mrs Jame’s dogs plus spend time with my lovely wife.”
“Sounds like you agreed to too many things this weekend,” his wife said.
“I know, but Peter and Anne are my friends, and I was not quick enough to think about things or say
no. I did not want to let them down.” Tom stared at his wife. “What should I do?”
“I am glad you wanted to help your friends, but you need to have time for your own things, too.”
Tom knew she was right. “Maybe I can tell Peter I can only help for two hours in the morning. And I
can maybe help Anne walk Mrs Jame’s dogs early in the morning, but not at lunch or in the evening
because lunch is with you.” Tom’s stomach churned. “Honey, do you think they will be annoyed?”
“They are your friends. Tell them you need time to finish your contracts review. They will understand.”
Tom nodded and got the phone. He told Peter and Anne the truth. As soon as he hung up, he turned
to his wife. “They are fine with it, and they both offered to help with these reviews, too.”
“I knew it would work out,” his wife said.
Tom smiled. “Yeah, because friends help each other out.”
5. Assessment Activity B Questions template

3. The main character of the story is probably…

a. A young boy c. A teenage boy


b. A toddler d. A person over 21 years old.

4. What did Tom have when he arrived home and what did he do?

a. Tight shoulders and flopped on the couch c. Walked in and sat on the couch
b. Relaxed shoulders and walked into the room d. A backpack and books

3. What did Tom do when he got the phone?

a. Told his friends lies c. Was nasty when speaking with his friends
b. Called his friends to whinge d. Told his friends the truth

4. Why did Peter and Anne ask for Tom’s help, were they being good friends?

5. How did Tom organise his time to help his friends and was he happy with the outcome?

6. What was the genre of the text, why do you think that?

Match each vocabulary word on the left with the definition on the right.

1. ________ upset a. flipped


2. ________ churned b. disappoint
3. ________ hurried c. carrycase
4. ________flopped d. rushed
5. ________briefcase e. slumped
In the text extract “Friends Helping Friends” Tom’s wife listened while Tom explained his
situation. Then she gave him advice about what he should say to his friends.
Write about a time when you listened to your friend’s problems. Did you offer advice
and what was it?
6. Assessment criteria for Assessment Activities A and B

Assessment Criteria What I am looking for (WILF) was only explained to the students when doing
Assessment Activity B.
• 3 multiple choice – to assess accurate recount details after reading
• 3 short answers – to assess level of comprehension after reading
• 5 new vocabulary words – to assess contextual understanding
• A recount of an experience related to the applicable story – to assess grammar, punctuation
and reflection skills.

7. Assessment Answers Part A and B

Multiple Choice

1. The main character of the story is probably…


c. A teenage boy (Part A)
d. A person over 21 years old (Part B)

2. How did Tom feel when he arrived home?


c. overwhelmed (Part A)

2. What did Tom have when he arrived home and what did he do?
a.Tight shoulders and flopped on the couch(Part B)

3. Why was Tom nervous about calling his friends?


a. He was afraid they would be disappointed because he was not helping enough (Part A)

3. What did Tom do when he got the phone?


d. Told his friends the truth (Part B)

Short Answer

4. Why did Peter and Anne ask for Tom’s help, were they being good friends? (Part A)
Because they needed help themselves; they were friends with Tom; they felt they could depend
on Tom; they though it would be nice if they had a friend to do things with.
4. Why did Peter and Anne ask for Tom’s help, were they being good friends? (Part B).
Because they needed help themselves; they were friends with Tom; they felt they could depend
on Tom

5. How did Tom organise his time to help his friends and was he happy with the outcome? (Part A
and B)
He thought aloud his options; the then prioritised what he could do first, then next because he
could help his friends and they were grateful for his help everyone was happy.

6. What was the genre of the text, why do you think that? (Part A and B) narrative
Because narratives tells a story to entertain; has an orientation/introduction, a complication and a
resolution; uses everyday language; uses nouns to refer or describe characters or events; uses
adjectives and adjectival phrases to build up descriptions of parts of the story; uses past tense
action verbs; uses saying, thinking and feeling verbs to indicate what a character is saying, feeling
and thinking; uses adverbs or adverbial phrases to indicate when and where the action is takes
place; uses conjunctions and connectives to show the sequence of events.

Match each vocabulary word on the left with the definition on the right. (Part A)

1. __d_____ disappoint a. likely


2. __a_____probably b. able
3. __f_____offered d. let down
4. __b_____manage e. promised
5. ___e____ agreed f. show willingness to help someone

Match each vocabulary word on the left with the definition on the right. (Part B)

1. ___b_____ upset a. flipped


2. ___a_____ churned b. disappoint
3. ____d____ hurried c. carrycase
4. ____e____flopped d. rushed
5.____c____briefcase e. slumped

Retell of experience.
Punctuation:
Full stops, commas, exclamation marks and quotation marks are used correctly.

Uses comprehension strategies to interpret and analyse information and ideas, comparing content
from a variety of textual sources including media and digital texts (ACELY1713)

Plan, draft and publish imaginative, informative and persuasive texts, choosing and experimenting
with text structures, language features, images and digital resources appropriate to purpose and
audience (ACELY1714)
Marking rubric for academic performance for Assessment A and Assessment B.

Assessment A Vocabulary Word Match

Assessment B Vocabulary Word Match


Assessment A Short Answer

Assessment B Short Answer


Assessment A Multi Choice
Assessment B Multi Choice

10 Marks Assessment A Short retell

10 Marks Assessment B Short retell

Total assessment A

Total assessment B
3 Marks

3 Marks

6 Marks

6 Marks

5 Marks

5 Marks
Year Student 24 24
Group Name comment comment comment comment comment comment Marks Marks
the short questions.
Needed explicit Student knew WILF and indicates the student An improved Used full stops and
Crystal explanation of what I that improved the used contextual understanding of the capital letters Used full stops and
Year 3 Clement 3 2 1 am looking for. 5 academic performance 2 knowledge. 3 comprehension of text 5 sometimes. 4 capital letters seldom. 11 14
Below average for word Used full stops,
Did not understand Student knew WILF and meaning. However the quotation marks, capital
what was required for that improved the showed good word overall results would consistently used full letters and concluding
Year 3 Mia Sullivan 2 3 0 the short questions 3 academic performance 3 recognisation 2 suggested otherwise. 8 stops and capital letters 10 paragraph. 13 18
Did not understand Student knew WILF and excellent word Used full stops and Used full stops and
Roshani what was required for that improved the recognisation and showed good word capital letters capital letters
Year 3 Fernando 3 3 1 the short questions 3 academic performance 5 meaning 3 recognisation 9 consistently. 9 consistently. 18 18
therefore does not Only answered half the excellent word excellent word Used full stops and
Saffron know the specific question and is not recognisation and recognisation and capital letters Seldom used full stops
Year 5 Pedrana 3 3 4 characteristics of 3 genre aware. 5 meaning 5 meaning 5 sometimes. 4 and capital letters. 17 15
Did not understand
what was required for excellent word Used full stops and Used full stops,
Molly the short questions and slight improvement with recognisation and showed good word capital letters paragraphs, and capital
Year 6 Pedrana 2 3 1 is not genre aware 2 WILF 5 meaning 3 recognisation 9 consistently. 10 letters. 17 18
References:

Amy Seely Flint, L. K., Kaye Lowe, Kylie Shaw. (2014). Literacy in Australia: pedagogies
for engagement. Milton, Qld: John Wiley & Sons Australia,Ltd.
Bagley, S. S. (2010). Students, teachers and alternative Assessment in secondary school:
Rational Models Theory (RMT) in the Field of Educational. The Australian
Educational Researcher, 37(1), 83-106.
Casey, D., Burke, E., Houghton, C., Mee, L., Smith, R., Van Der Putten, D., . . . Folan, M.
(2011). Use of peer assessment as a student engagement strategy in nurse education.
Nursing and Health Science, 13(4), 514-520. doi:10.1111/j.1442-2018.2011.00637.x
Marion, S., & Leather, P. (2015). Assessment and Accountability to Support Meaningful
Learning. Education Policy Analysis Archives. doi:10.14507/epaa.v23.1984
Mesa, J. C., Pringle, R. M., & King, N. (2014). SURFACING STUDENTS' PRIOR
KNOWLEDGE IN MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE CLASSROOMS: Exception or the
Rule? Middle Grades Research Journal, 9(3), 61.
Newman, C. (2014). Writer’s Forum—Using peer critique to promote learning. New
Horizons in Adult Education & Human Resource Development, 26(3), 66-70.
The appendices for the data collection can be found at the action research link. The
appendice folder contains the following action research data;
a. Consent Forms (5 each)
b. Short story Part A
c. Questionnaires Part A
d. Short story Part B
e. Questionnaires Part B
f. Assessment answers

action research.PDF