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Power Generation Portal

Version 4.1

Display Builder Manual


Power Generation Portal

Version 4.1

Display Builder Manual


NOTICE
The information in this document is subject to change without notice and should not be
construed as a commitment by ABB. ABB assumes no responsibility for any errors that
may appear in this document.

In no event shall ABB be liable for direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential
damages of any nature or kind arising from the use of this document, nor shall ABB be
liable for incidental or consequential damages arising from use of any software or hard-
ware described in this document.

This document and parts thereof must not be reproduced or copied without written per-
mission from ABB, and the contents thereof must not be imparted to a third party nor used
for any unauthorized purpose.

The software or hardware described in this document is furnished under a license and
may be used, copied, or disclosed only in accordance with the terms of such license.

This product meets the requirements specified in EMC Directive 89/336/EEC and in Low
Voltage Directive 72/23/EEC.

Copyright © 2005 by ABB.


All rights reserved.

Release: Oct 2007


Document number: 9AKK101130D1384

TRADEMARKS
Registrations and trademarks used in this document include:

Acrobat Registered trademark of Adobe Systems, Incorporated.

Adobe Registered trademark of Adobe Systems, Incorporated.

Advant Registered trademark of ABB Inc.

AdvaBuild Registered trademark of ABB Inc.

Industrial IT Trademark of ABB Inc.

Microsoft Registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

Windows Registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation


TABLE OF CONTENTS
About This Book
Scope ..............................................................................................................................19
Intended Audience...........................................................................................................19
Document Structure .........................................................................................................19
Use of Warning, Caution, Information, and Tip Icons ....................................................21
Document Conventions ...................................................................................................22
Related Documentation ...................................................................................................23
On-line Documentation ........................................................................................23

Section 1 - Introduction
Overview .........................................................................................................................25
Graphic Displays .............................................................................................................25
Background Data..................................................................................................25
Dynamic Fields ....................................................................................................25
Display Header.....................................................................................................26
Data Presentation.............................................................................................................26
Color Representation............................................................................................26
Graphic Display Builder Program ...................................................................................27
Starting the Graphic Display Builder ...................................................................27
Logo and Page Identification Area..................................................................................28
Display Builder Registry Keys ........................................................................................29
Files and Folders..............................................................................................................30
Eix_work .............................................................................................................30
Eix_bin .............................................................................................................30
Eix_tmp .............................................................................................................30
XA_SYMBOLS ...................................................................................................30
Editable Format Files ......................................................................................................30
Executable Format Files.......................................................................................31

9AKK101130D1384 5
Table of Contents

Text Format.......................................................................................................... 32
Library Format ..................................................................................................... 32
SODG Displays ............................................................................................................... 33
ASCII Compiled .DT Files .................................................................................. 33
Translation and Compilation Requirements ........................................................ 34
Translation Sequence .......................................................................... 34
Compiling Displays ............................................................................................. 34
Importing Text Format Displays with EIXCMP ............................................................. 35

Section 2 - Menu Commands


Menu Area....................................................................................................................... 37
File Menu ........................................................................................................................ 37
New ............................................................................................................ 38
WVP Rectangle Size........................................................................... 38
Open ............................................................................................................ 39
Close ............................................................................................................ 39
Save ............................................................................................................ 40
Save As ............................................................................................................ 40
Add To Library .................................................................................................... 40
Export to text form............................................................................................... 41
Add To System..................................................................................................... 41
Remove From System.......................................................................................... 41
Print ............................................................................................................ 41
Print Preview........................................................................................................ 41
Print Setup............................................................................................................ 41
Exit ............................................................................................................ 42
Edit Menu........................................................................................................................ 42
Undo ............................................................................................................ 42
Cut ............................................................................................................ 42
Copy ............................................................................................................ 43
Paste ............................................................................................................ 43
Delete ............................................................................................................ 43
Select All ............................................................................................................ 43

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Select All Hidden Objects....................................................................................43


Select By Name....................................................................................................44
Grid .............................................................................................................44
Snap To Grid ........................................................................................................45
Header .............................................................................................................45
Graph Properties...................................................................................................45
Default Drawing and Background Colors...........................................46
Layers Options ....................................................................................46
Unitext Options ....................................................................................................49
Object .............................................................................................................50
View Menu ......................................................................................................................50
Toolbar .............................................................................................................50
Status Bar .............................................................................................................50
Zoom In .............................................................................................................50
Zoom Out .............................................................................................................51
Zoom To .............................................................................................................51
Zoom Reset ..........................................................................................................51
Transform Menu ..............................................................................................................51
Raise .............................................................................................................52
Step Up .............................................................................................................52
Step Down ............................................................................................................52
Lower .............................................................................................................52
Show .............................................................................................................52
Hide .............................................................................................................52
Align Size And Position.......................................................................................53
Mirror .............................................................................................................54
Flip .............................................................................................................54
Window Menu .................................................................................................................54
Cascade .............................................................................................................54
Tile Horizontal .....................................................................................................55
Tile Vertical ..........................................................................................................55
Views .............................................................................................................55

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Table of Contents

Help ............................................................................................................ 55

Section 3 - Standard Toolbar


Options ............................................................................................................ 57
Size and Position.................................................................................................. 58

Section 4 - Objects Toolbar


ActiveX ............................................................................................................ 59
Rectangle ............................................................................................................ 60
Circle ............................................................................................................ 60
Line ............................................................................................................ 60
Closed Polyline .................................................................................................... 60
Opened Polyline................................................................................................... 61
Spline ............................................................................................................ 61
Opened Spline...................................................................................................... 61
Text ............................................................................................................ 62
Parallelogram ....................................................................................................... 62
Array ............................................................................................................ 62
Marker ............................................................................................................ 62
Picture ............................................................................................................ 63
Global Symbol ..................................................................................................... 63
Text Unicode........................................................................................................ 63
WVP ............................................................................................................ 63
Transform to Macro Symbol................................................................................ 64
Split Macro Symbol ............................................................................................. 64
Align Commands ................................................................................................. 65

Section 5 - Symbols Toolbar


Trend ............................................................................................................ 67
Bar ............................................................................................................ 67
Value ............................................................................................................ 68
XYPlot ............................................................................................................ 68
Plant Libraries...................................................................................................... 69

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Table of Contents

S1 ... Sn - O1 ... On ..............................................................................................69

Section 6 - Shortcut Menu


Element Name ......................................................................................................71
Graphic attributes .................................................................................................73
Check To Apply All Attributes Check Box ........................................74
Rotate .............................................................................................................75
Change Picture .....................................................................................................75
Change Symbol ....................................................................................................76
Transform to Local Macro Symbol ......................................................................76
Edit Font .............................................................................................................77
Edit Text .............................................................................................................77
To Unicode Text ...................................................................................................78
To Ascii Text ........................................................................................................78
Circle .............................................................................................................78
Polygonize............................................................................................................78
Arc .............................................................................................................78
Triangle Up / Triangle Down / Rectangle / Diamond ..........................................79
Modify Array .......................................................................................................80
Paste Dynamics ....................................................................................................80
Transform To Dynamic ........................................................................................80
Remove Dynamic.................................................................................................80
Dynamics .............................................................................................................81
Script .............................................................................................................81
Undo .............................................................................................................82
Cut .............................................................................................................82
Copy .............................................................................................................82
Paste .............................................................................................................82
Delete .............................................................................................................82
Group .............................................................................................................82
Ungroup .............................................................................................................82
Split Macro Symbol .............................................................................................83
Replace withe Symbol..........................................................................................83

9AKK101130D1384 9
Table of Contents

Redo Macro Symbol ............................................................................................ 83


Object ............................................................................................................ 83

Section 7 - Dynamic Objects


Default Name of Dynamic Objects ................................................................................. 85
Default Attributes of Dynamic Objects........................................................................... 85
Linked Tags of Dynamic Objects.................................................................................... 86

Section 8 - Actions
Introduction to Actions ................................................................................................... 89
Action Descriptions......................................................................................................... 89
Available Actions................................................................................................. 89
Load Page ............................................................................................................ 89
Change Page Action Type................................................................... 90
Page Name ...................................................................................... 91
Load a page as a secondary one.......................................................... 91
Remove Page ....................................................................................................... 91
Active Program .................................................................................................... 92
Par Int ...................................................................................... 92
Extra Par ...................................................................................... 92
Prog Name ...................................................................................... 92
System Programs that can be Executed as Actions ............................ 92
Add/Remove Actions ...................................................................................................... 93
Actions for Headers ............................................................................................. 93
Actions for Diagrams........................................................................................... 94
Activation Keys ................................................................................................... 95

Section 9 - Generic Options


Defining Tags Using a Suffix............................................................................... 98
Tag Name (Suffix) .............................................................................. 98
Activation Keys for Generic Options .................................................................. 99
Extra Parameters ................................................................................. 99
Details .................................................................................... 100

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Table of Contents

First Text ....................................................................................100

Section 10 - Macro Symbols

Section 11 - Global Symbols


To Create a New Global Symbol........................................................................103
To Modify a Global Symbol...............................................................................104
To Insert a Global Symbol In a Graphic Page....................................................104
Resizing Global Symbols...................................................................................105
To Retain the Original Size ...............................................................105
To Allow Resizing Global Symbols..................................................105
Adding Global Symbols to Library Pages .........................................................105
Managing of Tag Names in Global Symbols .....................................................106
Different Methods for Managing Tags..............................................106
To Change The Instantiations Of a Global Symbol ...........................................107
To Update One Graphic Display: ......................................................107
To Update Multiple Graphic Pages: ..................................................107
Some Hints for the Correct Use of the Global Symbols. ...................................107

Section 12 - Plant Libraries


To Create a Plant Library ...................................................................................109
To Delete a Plant Library ...................................................................................109

Section 13 - Customized Faceplates


Standard Faceplates ....................................................................................................... 111
Customized Faceplates .................................................................................................. 111
Faceplate Display Areas ................................................................................................112

Section 14 - Parametric Displays


Cascading Pages ............................................................................................................114

Section 15 - Add To System


Tag List Log...................................................................................................................117
Displays Distribution.....................................................................................................117

9AKK101130D1384 11
Table of Contents

Export for WEB ................................................................................................. 118


Activate TNTXML ........................................................................... 118
Create an XML file ........................................................................... 118

Section 16 - Tag Browser

Section 17 - Headers
Introduction ................................................................................................................... 121
General Diagram Info ........................................................................................ 122
Header Page .................................................................................................................. 123
Page Title .......................................................................................................... 123
Display Type ...................................................................................................... 123
SYMBOL .................................................................................... 123
History .................................................................................... 124
No History .................................................................................... 124
Keep Ratio .................................................................................... 124
Scroll Bar .................................................................................... 124
Multilanguage ................................................................................... 125
Security .................................................................................... 125
Page .................................................................................... 125
Modifier .................................................................................... 125
Window Dimensions......................................................................... 126

Section 18 - Diagrams
Introduction to Diagrams .............................................................................................. 127
General Diagram Info ........................................................................................ 128
Diagram Name .................................................................................. 128
Diagram Type.................................................................................... 129
Variables .................................................................................... 130
Visibility for not implemented .......................................................... 130
Action/Activation Keys .................................................................... 131
DALF Diagram ............................................................................................................. 131
Size .......................................................................................................... 132

12 9AKK101130D1384
Table of Contents

Format ...........................................................................................................132
Output ...........................................................................................................132
Colors and Quality Suffix .................................................................133
Tag Priority ....................................................................................135
DNNV Diagram.............................................................................................................136
Number of Variables ..........................................................................................136
Custom ...........................................................................................................137
Output ...........................................................................................................139
DINP Diagram...............................................................................................................140
Normal ...........................................................................................................140
Keep ...........................................................................................................140
Managing the Keep Option ...............................................................141
DTRN Diagram .............................................................................................................142
Layout ...........................................................................................................142
Defining Layout Using the Windows Registry .................................143
Curves ...........................................................................................................143
Span ...........................................................................................................143
Color ...........................................................................................................144
Configuration Parameters...................................................................................144
Tag Name (check for IDPT) ..............................................................145
Range ....................................................................................145
DXYP Diagram .............................................................................................................147
Layout ...........................................................................................................147
Color ...........................................................................................................148
Configuration Parameters...................................................................................149
X Parameters / Y Parameters .............................................................................150
DDYN Diagram.............................................................................................................153
Symbol Attributes ..............................................................................................153
Blink if UnAcked ..............................................................................153
Change Foreground ...........................................................................154
Change Background ..........................................................................154
Num Alm ....................................................................................154

9AKK101130D1384 13
Table of Contents

Num Qual .................................................................................... 154


Num Rng .................................................................................... 154
Items .......................................................................................................... 154
# Item .................................................................................... 155
Parameters .................................................................................... 155
Visibility .................................................................................... 157
DDYN Diagram Scripts..................................................................................... 158
DDYA Diagram............................................................................................................. 160
Symbol Attributes .............................................................................................. 160
Blink if UnAck.................................................................................. 160
Change Foreground ........................................................................ 160
Change Background ....................................................................... 161
Low Limit .......................................................................................................... 161
High limit .......................................................................................................... 161
# Item .................................................................................... 161
Parameters .................................................................................... 162
Visibility .................................................................................... 162
DDYA Diagram Scripts ..................................................................................... 162
DRDR Diagram............................................................................................................. 164
Layout .......................................................................................................... 164
Color .......................................................................................................... 165
Configuration Parameters .................................................................................. 165
Parameters.......................................................................................................... 166
Color .......................................................................................................... 167
Marker .......................................................................................................... 167
Values .......................................................................................................... 168
DALL Diagram ............................................................................................................. 169
Alarm Group ...................................................................................................... 169
Alarm Priority .................................................................................................... 169

Section 19 - Variables
Introduction ................................................................................................................... 171
Variable Common Info .................................................................................................. 172

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Table of Contents

Name ...........................................................................................................172
Type ...........................................................................................................173
IDPT ...........................................................................................................173
Data ...........................................................................................................173
Entry: ....................................................................................174
Type: ....................................................................................174
Sub-code: ....................................................................................174
Quality: ....................................................................................176
All Bits: ....................................................................................176
TextLength: ....................................................................................176
Time ...........................................................................................................176
Realtime Database Variable...........................................................................................177
Tag Name ...........................................................................................................177
Tag Type ...........................................................................................................177
Normal Factor ....................................................................................................178
Information.........................................................................................................178
Code: ....................................................................................178
Offset: ....................................................................................181
Generic Info: ....................................................................................181
SODG Command: .............................................................................181
File Access Variable ......................................................................................................187
Mod ...........................................................................................................187
File ...........................................................................................................188
External File Access Variable........................................................................................189
File, Rec and Word.............................................................................................189
Mod1, Mod2.......................................................................................................189
Action Key.....................................................................................................................190
Min ...........................................................................................................190
Max ...........................................................................................................190
Ini ...........................................................................................................190
Inc ...........................................................................................................191

Appendix A - Scripting Language

9AKK101130D1384 15
Table of Contents

Introduction ................................................................................................................... 193


Predefined Values.......................................................................................................... 193
Variables ........................................................................................................................ 194
Conventions and Types ...................................................................................... 194
Un-initialized Variables .................................................................... 194
Attributes....................................................................................................................... 195
Access .......................................................................................................... 195
Integer Attributes ............................................................................................... 195
Real Attributes ................................................................................................... 196
String Attributes................................................................................................. 197
Graph Attributes ................................................................................................ 197
Operators ....................................................................................................................... 197
Arithmetic Operators ......................................................................................... 198
Priority Order ..................................................................................................... 198
Comparison Operators ....................................................................................... 198
Logical Operators .............................................................................................. 198
Parentheses......................................................................................................... 199
Statements ..................................................................................................................... 199
Assignments....................................................................................................... 199
Structured Statements ........................................................................................ 199
Comments .......................................................................................................... 200
Procedures and Functions ............................................................................................. 201
Procedure declaration ........................................................................................ 201
Function declaration .......................................................................................... 201
Predefined Functions..................................................................................................... 201
Mathematical Functions..................................................................................... 202
Miscellaneous Functions.................................................................................... 203
Graphic Objects Functions................................................................................. 203
Events .......................................................................................................... 204
Predefined Color Names ............................................................................................... 205
Typical Scripts............................................................................................................... 234
Enable Typical Script Processing....................................................................... 234

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Table of Contents

Use PGP to Create a Text File Containing The Common Script Code..............235
Create the Typical Script File............................................................235
Start the Display Builder ...................................................................235
Modify the Common Script Code .....................................................235
Example Typical Script File..............................................................236
Display Builder Processing ...............................................................236
Create New Placeholders in Objects .................................................236
Global Script..................................................................................................................237

Appendix B - System Programs


Introduction ...................................................................................................................239
PRCBTN........................................................................................................................239
Additional Characters........................................................................242
Separators ....................................................................................243
Repeat ....................................................................................244
PRCMAN ......................................................................................................................244
ACKNWL......................................................................................................................245
DBMENU......................................................................................................................246
MMIACT.......................................................................................................................246

Appendix C - Terminology
Abbreviations and Acronyms ........................................................................................253

INDEX

9AKK101130D1384 17
Table of Contents

18 9AKK101130D1384
About This Book

Scope
This manual provides information to add new or to update existing drawings and
dynamics in a Graphic Display for InformIT Power Generation Portal basic software
and application software. Power Generation Portal is referred in this manual as
PGP.

Intended Audience
This manual can be used by anyone who performs the commands of a system The
software described in this document is provided under a license and may be
installed, used or copied only in accordance with the terms of such license.

Document Structure
The PGP Display Builder Manual contains following major sections:
• The first section contains general information about the Graphic Display
Builder.
• The next sections describe the Display Builder commands to create and modify
Graphic Displays.
• The Header section describes the specific characteristics of the Graphic
Display Header.
• The Diagrams section describes the characteristics common to all types of
Diagrams, along with information on managed Diagrams.
• The Variables section describes the characteristics common to all types of
variables along with information on each managed variable.

9AKK101130D1384 19
Document Structure About This Book

• Appendix A describes the syntax of the scripting language.


• Appendix B describes the system program commands.

20 9AKK101130D1384
About This Book Use of Warning, Caution, Information, and Tip Icons

Use of Warning, Caution, Information, and Tip Icons


This publication includes Warning, Caution, and Information, where appropriate,
to point out safety related or other important information. It also includes Tip to
point out useful hints to the reader. The corresponding symbols should be
interpreted as follows:

Electrical warning indicates the presence of a hazard which could result in


electrical shock.

Warning indicates the presence of a hazard which could result in personal injury.

Caution indicates important information or warning related to the concept


discussed in the text. It might indicate the presence of a hazard which could result
in corruption of software or damage to equipment/property.

Information alerts the reader to pertinent facts and conditions.

Tip indicates advice on, for example, how to design your project or how to use a
certain command.
Although Warning hazards are related to personal injury, and Caution hazards are
associated with equipment or property damage, it should be understood that
operation of damaged equipment could, under certain operational conditions, result
in degraded process performance leading to personal injury or death. Therefore,
comply fully with all Warning and Caution notices.

9AKK101130D1384 21
Document Conventions About This Book

Document Conventions
The following conventions are used for the presentation of material:
• The words in names of screen elements (for example, the title in the title bar of
a window, the label for a field of a dialog box) are initially capitalized.
• Capital letters are used for the name of a keyboard key if it is labeled on the
keyboard. For example, press the ENTER key.
• Lowercase letters are used for the name of a keyboard key that is not labeled on
the keyboard. For example, the space bar, comma key, and so on.
• Press CTRL+C indicates that you must hold down the CTRL key while
pressing the C key (to copy a selected object in this case).
• Press ESC E C indicates that you press and release each key in sequence.
• The names of push and toggle buttons are boldfaced. For example, click OK.
• The names of menus and menu items are boldfaced. For example, the File
menu.
– The following convention is used for menu operations: MenuName >
MenuItem > CascadedMenuItem. For example: choose File > New >
Type.
– The Start menu name always refers to the Start menu on the Windows
Task Bar.
• System prompts/messages are shown in the Courier font, and user
responses/input are in the boldfaced Courier font. For example, if you enter a
value out of range, the following message is displayed:
Entered value is not valid. The value must be 0 to 30.
You may be told to enter the string TIC132 in a field. The string is shown as
follows in the procedure:
TIC132
Variables are shown using lowercase letters.
sequence name

22 9AKK101130D1384
About This Book Related Documentation

Related Documentation
On-line Documentation
All documentation is supplied in Adobe® Acrobat® reader (.pdf) format.
The InformIT Power Generation Portal User Manual is also available as online Help.

Table 1. Related Documents

Category Title Description


Power Generation Portal
How to install Power Generation Portal.
Installation Manual
Software
Installation Power Generation Portal Known problems, fixed problems and other
Release Notes release information.
Power Generation Portal Shows you how to configure and use Power
Configuration Manual Generation Portal.
Configuration Power Generation Portal Display Provides instructions for building custom
Builder Manual Graphic Displays using the Display Builder.
Power Generation Portal User Provides instructions for using Power
Manual Generation Portal features.
Power Generation Portal Information about how to create application
Application Programmer programs that execute Power Generation
Interface Portal commands.
Operation
Power Generation Portal Quick A handy list of commonly used features and
Reference Guide commands.

9AKK101130D1384 23
Related Documentation About This Book

24 9AKK101130D1384
Section 1 Introduction

Overview
The Display Builder is application for creating and updating static and Dynamic
Objects within the Graphic Displays of PGP.
It consists of an off-line tool that allows you to create and modify plant Graphic
Displays. The tool runs on the same system where PGP is installed, either on the
Client or the Server. It can be used by all operators or maintenance people who have
the Windows rights to modify plant data.
The PGP Graphic Display Builder is implemented as single tool. It is independent
from the PGP application. You can run it along with any other applications on your
Windows workstation.

Graphic Displays
The Graphic Display Builder creates an application called PGP Explorer that allows
you to see process data displayed on a set of graphic pages.
The main elements of a Graphic Display are the following:

Background Data
All static implementatons are called the Graphic Display background. The static
information may consist of shapes, lines, text, special characters, etc.

Dynamic Fields
Each Graphic Display may contain Dynamic Objects to represent plant status. The
Graphic Display Builder automatically assigns a name to these objects when the
dynamic is associated.

9AKK101130D1384 25
Display Header Section 1 Introduction

Display Header
Each Graphic Display contains a Header block of information. The Graphic Display
Header contains information such as:
• The Graphic Display name and description. This text is displayed in the Title
Area of the PGP Explorer.
• Links (to step forward or backward to other Graphic Displays).
• Parameters (to define layout options of the current display).

Data Presentation
The representation of variables depends on different format methods. The most
commonly used are the following:
• Numerical values.
• Bar-charts.
• Trends.
• Xyplot.
• Radar.
• Alphanumeric description of the tag status.
• Graphic symbols representing a tag status.
These methods, together with the ability to change the color, size, orientation,
position and drawing attributes of the graphic objects allows you to generate very
complex Graphic Displays.

Color Representation
The color representation of variables can be configured at Graphic Display building
time. Process variables can be based on a color override rule.
The color override allows data to be displayed using a color based on tag quality
attributes such as
• Alarm condition.

26 9AKK101130D1384
Section 1 Introduction Graphic Display Builder Program

• Validity checks.
Optionally, the color override can append two suffix characters to the value (for
color blind users). The suffix is also based on the quality attribute of the tag.

Graphic Display Builder Program


The Graphic Display Builder program is named DisplayBuilder.exe. The program is
located in the \Power Generation Portal\bin folder.
PGP does not need to be running when you use the Graphic Display Builder.

Starting the Graphic Display Builder


Start the Graphic Display Builder using these methods:
• Selecting Start->Program -> ABB Industrial IT -> Power Generation Portal ->
Display Builder.
• Double-click any file with the .UCBG extension.
• In PGP Explorer select Display from the Configuration menu.
Figure 1 shows an example of a Graphic Display.

9AKK101130D1384 27
Logo and Page Identification Area Section 1 Introduction

The Graphic Displays can be plant pages or symbols. The type of page is defined in
the Header specification.

Figure 1. Graphic Display Example

When a Graphic Display is loaded, the graphic builder shows all objects. To identify
a Dynamic Object select it by clicking, or use the Select by Name command. All
other objects on the Graphic Display can be selected by clicking.

Logo and Page Identification Area


The logo area, located in the upper left corner of the window, shows the logo of the
Graphic Display Builder tool and the tool name.

28 9AKK101130D1384
Section 1 Introduction Display Builder Registry Keys

The logo area also displays the title assigned to the Graphic Display at configuration
time. This title is usually an abbreviation used to identify the Graphic Display.

Figure 2. Graphic Page Title

The logo and page identification area does not contain either sensitive elements or
data insertion fields.

Display Builder Registry Keys


The Windows registry subkeys used by the Display Builder program are defined
under the APPS\IbDisp key.
• See the InformIT Power Generation Portal Installation Manual for more
information about using the Windows registry.

Registry Key Type Default Description


Default refresh time assigned to new
DefaultRefreshTime DWORD 5
dynamic
YES to use Global symbols with
creation size
FixedGblSymSize String YES NO to resize global symbols
RESIZE_TEXT to resize global
symbols and internal text fonts
GlobalScriptFile String Global script file definition
LIBSuffix String LIB Library name suffix
ScriptFile String Script file definition
PC to update with new Graphic
Servern String undefined
Display on AddToSys
SizeSuffix DWORD 0 Size of TagName suffix

9AKK101130D1384 29
Files and Folders Section 1 Introduction

Registry Key Type Default Description


Start character (base 1) of TagName
StartSuffix DWORD 0
suffix
YES to enable “system” actions
AUTOLIB to enable new function to
create automatically displays
SYSMGR String NO
including configured global symbols
(the options could be used together
putting registry = YES AUTOLIB)
TagListLog String NO YES to create log file with tag list
YES to enable the update of new
UpdateServers String NO
displays on defined PC(s)
XA_CUSTOM_COL List of RGB codes of defined custom
BINARY Empty
ORS colors
XA_HEIGHT DWORD 680 Height of #WVP object
RGB color of Graphic Display
XA_RGBCOL DWORD -1
background (-1 to use system setting)
XA_WIDTH DWORD 920 Width of #WVP object

Files and Folders


The Display Builder uses following Directories registry keys to identify its folders:

Eix_work
Defines the folder where editable format Graphic Display files are saved.

Eix_bin
Defines the folder where the executable format Graphic Display files are saved.
This folder is used by programs like PGP Explorer.

30 9AKK101130D1384
Section 1 Introduction Eix_tmp

Eix_tmp
Defines the folder where the text format Graphic Display files are saved.

XA_PATH
Defines the list of the folders where the included pictures (if defined without
specific path) are searched.

XA_SYMBOLS
Defines the folder where the library Graphic Display files are saved.

Editable Format Files


Editable format files include all elements to define a Graphic Display.
These files are identified with the following extensions:

Table 2. Editable Format Files

Extension Purpose
.UCBG Defines each graphic portion and defines the scripts.
.UCBP Defines Header information.
.UCBD Defines information related to the Diagrams
.UCBV Defines information related to the Variables
Information related to the ActiveX objects. This file is present only if
.UCBX
ActiveX objects are included in the Graphic Display.

Executable Format Files


Executable Format files include all elements required for realtime processes, like
PGP Explorer, to show the Graphic Display with the current plant status.
This files are located in the folder identified by the Eix_bin registry key, an can be
created by:

9AKK101130D1384 31
Text Format Section 1 Introduction

• The Display Builder with Add to System command.


– See Add To System section on page 41 for more information.
• The SODG translator.
– See SODG Displays section on page 33 for more information.
• The EIXCMP compiler.
Each executable format file is identified with these extensions:

Extension Purpose
.G Defines each graphic portion and defines the scripts.
.PAGE Defines Header information.
.DIAG Defines information related to the Diagrams
.VAR Defines information related to the variables
Information related to the ActiveX objects. This file is present only if
.OLEX
ActiveX objects are included in the Graphic Display.

Text Format
Text format files that can be created by the Export to text form command in the
Display Builder.
• See Export to text form section on page 41 for more information.
Text format files can also be created by the SODG translator.
• See SODG Displays section on page 33 for more information.
Text format is used for source system Faceplates in the Eix_spg folder.
The Text Format includes the files with following extension:

Extension Purpose
.G Defines each graphic portion and defines the scripts.

32 9AKK101130D1384
Section 1 Introduction Library Format

Extension Purpose
.DIAG_A Defines information related to the Diagrams in text format
.PGVAR_A Defines Header and variables information in text format.

ActiveX objects are ignored in this format.

Library Format
Library Format files can be created by the Add To Library command in Display
Builder.
Library Format includes files with following extension:

Extension Purpose
.SYM Defines each graphic portion and defines the scripts.
.UCBP Defines Header information.
.UCBD Defines information related to the Diagrams
.UCBV Defines information related to the variables

ActiveX objects are ignored in this format.

SODG Displays
You can implement Graphic Displays using the Screen Oriented Display Graphic
(SODG) utility. Use this package to configure standard consoles such as the MCS
and OIS families. Configuration can be performed on databases, trends and Graphic
Displays.
These Graphic Displays can be imported in the PGP environment.
Refer to the Appendix 1, for details on the use of the SODG utility.
You can create Graphic Displays of the same format using Wintools and Composer
graphic tools.

9AKK101130D1384 33
ASCII Compiled .DT Files Section 1 Introduction

ASCII Compiled .DT Files


After you have configured a Graphic Display, the SODG utility allows you to
generate a compiled file in ASCII format; the file extension is .DT. These files can
be imported into the PGP environment, and used for presentation in the PGP
windows.
Usually, Graphic Displays refer to static and dynamic symbols. These are graphic
representations of devices and apparatuses (e.g. valves, motors, etc.) used several
times.
A set of standard symbols is predefined in the SODG utility; they may be referenced
in the Graphic Displays. The SODG utility also allows you to configure application
symbols.
Both standard and application symbols must be imported together to completely
perform Graphic Display importing in the PGP environment. Symbols also must be
compiled to obtain the ASCII .DT format file.

Translation and Compilation Requirements


In order to import Graphic Displays in the PGP environment both a translation and a
compilation are required. This produces a view of Graphic Displays.
The first time symbols and displays are imported in a PGP, a complete translation of
and compilation of all elements is required.
• The procedure to import Graphic Displays is explained in the InformIT Power
Generation Portal Configuration Manual.

Translation Sequence
The translation must take place in this sequence:
• All standard SODG symbols.
• All application symbols.
• All Graphic Displays.
After this sequence is complete, single items (symbols and/or Graphic Displays)
will be translated if they changed.

34 9AKK101130D1384
Section 1 Introduction Global Symbols extracted from .DT files

Global Symbols extracted from .DT files


SODG translator includes a funnction to create automatically PGP global symbols
starting from dynamic commands included in the .DT files.; in the displays
generated by the SODG translator, there aren’t link with these global symbols.
In the folder defined by the registry Directories\Sodg_sym, is added a new directory
named SODGLIBSYM. During translation of SODG files, for each dynamic
command will be create a new file named SuffEscapePicture_XX.DT where:
Suff - string extracted from the registry APPS\SODG\ExportedSymbolsSuffix
(string type): this registry could be undefined, but is better to use it to identify
“easily” the SODG global symbols that will be created.
Escape - is the SODG “command” from which derives the symbol.
Picture - this field is inserted in the symbol name only for the “graphic” commands
and is the name of the first graphic object used to define the dynamic.
_XX - this field is automatically added only when the formatted new symbol file is
already existing but defines a different dynamic (could change a colour, a name of
one graphic symbol, etc.); in this case is necessary to assign another name to the
new symbol in order to distinguish symbols similar but not equal. You can verify the
differences opening with a text editor the .DT files.
After the Translation Sequence, in the SODGLIBSYM folder you will found the
new .DT files: processing with SODG translator these files, will be created the PGP
global symbols (in the Eix_work folder the editable files, in the Eix_bin folder te
executable files) that will be displayed by the Display Builder in the list of the
global symbols and could be selected to insert them in the new displays.
In the displays generated by the SODG translator, there aren’t link with these global
symbols.
The global symbols derived automatically from SODG translator, are “simple”
because they include only a single dynamic object without actions; can be
customized with more details using the Display Builder.
In these global symbols the tags are defined normally as %TAG%, but where is
required a specific tag type, you can found also %TAG_DIGITAL%,
%TAG_ANALOG%, %TAG_MSDD%, etc.).

9AKK101130D1384 35
Compiling Displays Section 1 Introduction

Compiling Displays
By default the SODG translator automatically translates the Graphic Displays, then
calls the compiler. You can, however activate the compiler alone.
Compiling Graphic Displays is required when changes are made the tag database,
because Graphic Displays refer to the tags in the database by an index value. This
index value is created during the compilation.
Symbols (either standard or application) do not need to be complied.
Compilation is an off-line configuration process that can not be executed from the
PGP menus. The compiler is started from the Start menu of the computer where the
PGP is installed.
The procedure to compile the Graphic Displays is explained in the InformIT Power
Generation Portal Configuration Manual.
The SODG translator produces:
• Text format files in the Eix_asc folder.
• Editable format files n the Eix_work folder
• Executable format files in the Eix_bin folder.
Is not possible create an ASCII .DT file using Display Builder. If you use the
Display Builder to change a display originally created with SODG utility, you can
not export these changes to the SODG environment.

Importing Text Format Displays with EIXCMP


Files in the text format can be translated to Editable Format and to Executable
Format using the EIXCMP program.
This program produces:
• Editable format files in the Eix_work folder.
• Executable format files in the Eix_bin folder.
Use the EIXCMP program to create the editable format of the system Faceplates in
the Eix_spg folder. The Faceplates in editable format can be opened with the
Display Builder, modified, and saved with new names.

36 9AKK101130D1384
Section 2 Menu Commands

Menu Area
The menu area contains the main commands of the Display Builder.

Figure 3. Display Builder - Menu Area

File Menu
The File menu provides the following actions:

Figure 4. Display Builder - File Menu

9AKK101130D1384 37
New Section 2 Menu Commands

New
Select New from the File menu to create a new empty Graphic Display.
You can also click New on the standard toolbar.

New Graphic Displays always include the #WVP object:


• This is a rectangle that defines the Graphic Display area.
At run time the #WVP object re-scales the Graphic Display to the available display
area.
This rectangle is created with a default size of 920x680 pixels. You can change this
size using following keys in the Windows registry:
APPS\IbDisp\XA_WIDTH
APPS\IbDisp\XA_HEIGHT
• See the InformIT Power Generation Portal Installation Manual for more
information on using the Windows registry within the System Setup utility.

WVP Rectangle Size


The size of the WVP rectangle depends on the screen resolution of your monitor and
the layout of PGP Explorer.
• To see the your screen resolution hold down SHIFT and click the right mouse
button on the PGP Explorer screen.
The following table shows the recommended values for the default layout of PGP
Explorer.
The registry keys XA_WIDTH and XA_HEIGHT are displayed along the top row.
The screen resolution of your monitor resolution is displayed in the first column.

Resolution XA_WIDTH XA_HEIGHT


1024x768 829 594
1280x1024 1085 850

38 9AKK101130D1384
Section 2 Menu Commands Open

The size of the WVP rectangle is used to create the intermediate file for display on
the Web.

Open
Select Open from the File menu to open a Graphic Display for editing. See
Figure 5.
• The default folder for Graphic Display file storage is \display\work.
Select the .UCBG file and click the Open button to open the Graphic Display.
You can also click Open on the standard toolbar:

Figure 5. Display Builder - Open window

Close
Select Close from the File menu to close the current Graphic Display and save any
changes.

9AKK101130D1384 39
Save Section 2 Menu Commands

Save
Select Save from the File menu to store the Graphic Display as a file with the
extension .UCB*.
If the page contains Dynamic Objects and the #WVP object is not in the page, the
save operation will not proceed.
If the #WVP object has not been included in the page and all objects are static, you
can save the display as a drawing. A drawing file must be stored with the .UCBG
file extension. The drawing can be later edited to add the #WVP object and
Dynamic Objects.
You can also click Save on the standard toolbar:

Save As
Select Save As from the File menu to create a copy of the Graphic Display with a
new file name. You should use the *.UCB* file extension.

Add To Library
Select Add To Library from the File menu to export the current Graphic Display to
a library page. Library pages are saved in Library Format.
• Library files use the naming convention LIB_currentname.*.
They are stored in a folder that you define in the Windows registry with the key
name XA_SYMBOLS.
To delete a display library from your system, you must delete all its files from the
XA_SYMBOLS folder.
• See Plant Libraries section on page 69 for more information.
The Add To Library can be enabled/disabled using following
APPS\IbDisp\SYSMGR registry key:
• YES to enable
• NO to disable.

40 9AKK101130D1384
Section 2 Menu Commands Export to text form

Export to text form


Select Export to text form from the File menu to save the current Graphic Display
in text format. The file will be stored in the Eix_tmp folder.
These files can be used by the Graphic Display Compiler called EIXCMP.

Add To System
Select Add To System from the File menu to enable Graphic Displays for
presentation on the PGP system.
The Executable Format files and log files are created in the Eix_bin folder.
You can also click AddToSys on the standard toolbar:

Remove From System


Select Remove From System from the File menu to remove Graphic Displays from
the PGP system.

Print
Select Print from the File menu to send the current drawing to a printer.
You can also click Print on the standard toolbar:

Print Preview
Select Print Preview from the File menu to view the print format of the current
drawing.

Print Setup
Select Print Setup from the File menu to change the printing options.

9AKK101130D1384 41
Exit Section 2 Menu Commands

Exit
Select Exit from the File menu to terminate the Display Builder.

Edit Menu
The Edit menu provides the following actions on the current selected Graphic
Display.

Figure 6. Display Builder - Edit Menu

Undo
Select Undo from the Edit menu to cancel the last action. Not all actions can be
undone. The actions which may be undone are resizing, position change and object
delete.

Cut
Select Cut from the Edit menu to perform standard Windows cut operations.
You can also click Cut on the standard toolbar:

42 9AKK101130D1384
Section 2 Menu Commands Copy

Copy
Select Copy from the Edit menu to perform standard Windows copy operations.
You can also click Copy on the standard toolbar:

Paste
Select Paste from the Edit menu to perform standard Windows paste operations.
You can also click Paste on the standard toolbar:

Delete
Select Delete from the Edit menu to erases the selected objects from the drawing.
This command may be canceled with the Undo command.

Select All
Use Select All from the Edit menu to select all objects in the drawing. Hidden
objects, which are not visible in the PGP Explorer, will be also selected.

Select All Hidden Objects


Use Select All Hidden Objects from the Edit menu to select only hidden objects.

9AKK101130D1384 43
Select By Name Section 2 Menu Commands

Select By Name
Use the Select By Name from the Edit menu to select one of the named objects
from the list as show in Figure 7:

Figure 7. Display Builder - List of Objects

Grid
Select Grid from the Edit menu to enable and disable a grid of the Graphic Display.
The grid helps to fit objects within the drawing.
The grid is displayed behind the drawing. It will act as a magnet for the mouse
cursor.
You can also click Grid on the standard toolbar:

These are the Grid command options:


• Disabled.
• Enabled and not visible.
• Enabled and visible.
• Grid spacing.

44 9AKK101130D1384
Section 2 Menu Commands Snap To Grid

The grid spacing option is only meaningful if the grid has been enabled. The
available spacing values range from 2 to 100 pixels. Values of 0 or 1 automatically
disable the grid.

Figure 8. Display Builder - Grid Selection Window

Snap To Grid
Select Snap To Grid from the Edit menu to align all selected objects to the grid.
The grid must be enabled using the Grid command.
You can also click Snap To Grid on the standard toolbar.

Header
Select Header from the Edit menu to define the system properties of the selected
Graphic Display. The Header is managed as a specific Diagram.
• See the Section 17, Headers for more information.
You can also click Header on the standard toolbar:

Graph Properties
Select Graph Properties from the Edit menu to change the drawing or the default
background/foreground colors.

9AKK101130D1384 45
Graph Properties Section 2 Menu Commands

You can also click Graph on the standard toolbar:

These are the following color options: See Figure 9.


• Drawing color
• Default Foreground Color
• Default Background Color
Double-click a color option button to change the color.

Default Drawing and Background Colors


The Drawing and Background colors are set to the Windows color by default. To
modify this default, you can use the Display Builder registry key named
XA_RGBCOL to define the RGB color.
For example, you could set:

Red XA_RGBCOL = ff
Green XA_RGBCOL = ff00
Blue XA_RGBCOL = ff0000
White XA_RGBCOL = ffffff

For others colors you must define the value for red (lower), green (middle) and blue
(higher) and set the hexadecimal mask with these values.
For example to set the color gray use the value:
c0c0c0 (red = 192, green = 192, blue = 192)).
An invalid RGB color (for example fffffff) will set the color to the default value.

Layers Options
You can change the layers options. Layers can be used to show/hide objects on the
display:

46 9AKK101130D1384
Section 2 Menu Commands Graph Properties

There are two columns to define layers:


• Current Layers - select the layers to be displayed.
• Default Layers - select the layers assigned by default to new objects.
In a script, you can dynamically change the Current Layer mask for the page so that
only a sub-group of objects are displayed.
To do this, use a script with the string command:
graph.layers = mask;
The mask field is a bit-mask where bit 0 = layer 0, bit 1 = layer 1, etc. Use the mask
field to specify which layers to enable.
• See Appendix A, Scripting Language for information about scripts.

9AKK101130D1384 47
Graph Properties Section 2 Menu Commands

Figure 9. Display Builder - Graph Properties Editor

48 9AKK101130D1384
Section 2 Menu Commands Unitext Options

Unitext Options
Select Unitext Options from the Edit menu to manage unitext for text objects on
the current display.

Figure 10. Display Builder - Unitext Options

The selected option will be applied when you save the current display.

Option Description
Disabled Default option.
Transform to Unitext only dynamic All dynamic text objects will be
texts transformed to Unicode text.
All text objects will be transformed to
Transform to Unitext all texts
Unicode texts.
All dynamic Unicode text objects will
Transform to Text only dynamic texts
be transformed to generic texts.
All Unicode text objects will be
Transform to Text all texts
transformed to generic texts.

9AKK101130D1384 49
Object Section 2 Menu Commands

Object
Select Object from the Edit menu to display and change properties of the selected
ActiveX object. The properties dialog box is managed by the OCX of the ActiveX
object.

View Menu
The View menu contains commands to customize Graphic Display views.

Figure 11. Display Builder - View Menu

Toolbar
Select Toolbar from the View menu to view the standard toolbar. Select Toolbar
from the View menu again to remove the standard toolbar.

Status Bar
Select Status Bar from the View menu to display information on the status bar
located on the bottom of the Graphic Display.

Zoom In
Select Zoom In from the View menu to change the current zoom factor, increasing
the Graphic Display details.
You can also click Zoom In on the standard toolbar.

50 9AKK101130D1384
Section 2 Menu Commands Zoom Out

Zoom Out
Select Zoom Out from the View menu change the current zoom factor, decreasing
the Graphic Display details.
You can also click Zoom Out on the standard toolbar.

Zoom To
Select Zoom To from the View menu, and then click in one corner of the Graphic
Display. Drag to select the display area. The selected display area will be expanded
to the maximum available size.

Zoom Reset
Select Zoom Reset from the View menu to restore the zoom factor to the initial
setting.

Transform Menu
The Transform menu provides commands to change the order or the form of
objects on the Graphic Display.

Figure 12. Display Builder - Transform Menu

9AKK101130D1384 51
Raise Section 2 Menu Commands

Raise
Select Raise from the Transform menu to move the selected objects on top of other
objects.

Step Up
Select Step Up from the Transform menu to move objects through the various
planes of the drawing. Selected objects will move one plane upward, so that an
object previously above the moved objects will now appear behind. This command
does not necessarily move selected objects to the actual foreground. It just moves
objects one step up towards the foreground.

Step Down
Select Step Down from the Transform menu to move objects through the various
planes of the drawing. Selected objects will move one plane downward, so that an
object previously below the moved objects will now appear above. This command
does not necessarily move selected objects to the actual background. It just moves
objects one step closer to the background.

Lower
Select Lower from the Transform menu to move all selected objects behind all
other objects in the drawing.

Show
Select Show from the Transform menu to make selected hidden objects visible.

Hide
Select Hide from the Transform menu to hide selected objects from view.
You can use two methods to select invisible objects: the Select All command and
the Select All Hidden Objects command. Both commands can be selected from the
Edit menu.

52 9AKK101130D1384
Section 2 Menu Commands Align Size And Position

Align Size And Position


Select Align Size And Position from the Transform menu to align the size and
position of selected objects.

Figure 13. Display Builder - Align Size And Position

You can use following options.


For the X axis:
• Align: define a space (expressed in pixels) between the selected objects.
• Leave as is: the position relative to the X axis will not change.
• Left: all selected objects are aligned to the left.
• Center: all selected objects are vertically centered.
• Right: all selected objects are aligned to the right.
• Side By Side: all selected objects are vertically ordered and separated by space
defined by the Align option.
• Width: a specified width is assigned to all selected objects.
For the Y axis:
• Align: define a space (expressed in pixels) between the selected objects.
• Leave as is: the position relative to the Y axis will not change.
• Top: all selected objects are aligned to the top.

9AKK101130D1384 53
Mirror Section 2 Menu Commands

• Center: all selected objects are horizontally centered.


• Bottom: all selected objects are aligned to the bottom.
• Side By Side: all selected objects are horizontally ordered and separated by
space defined by the Align option.
• Height: a specified height is assigned to all selected objects.
Click Apply to set the selections, Cancel to exit from the dialog, Reset to set all
options to their initial status, or Undo to restore the previous size or position of
selected objects.

Mirror
Select Mirror from the Transform menu to simulate a reflected image on the
vertical axis. Selected objects will have the appearance of a mirrored image.

Flip
Select Flip from the Transform menu to flip the selected objects horizontally (from
top to bottom).

Window Menu
The Window menu provides commands to reorder created windows, and to select
loaded views.

Figure 14. Display Builder - Window Menu

Cascade
Select Cascade from the Window menu to arrange all existing windows in a
cascading fashion.

54 9AKK101130D1384
Section 2 Menu Commands Tile Horizontal

Tile Horizontal
Select Tile Horizontal from the Window menu to divide the screen horizontally in
order to display all windows.

Tile Vertical
Select Tile Vertical from the Window menu to divide the screen vertically in order
to display all windows.

Views
Select Views from the Window menu to select a window and make it active.

Help Menu
About...
Select About... from the Help menu to show information on the Display Builder.
You can also click About on the standard toolbar.

Figure 15. Display Builder - About window

9AKK101130D1384 55
About... Section 2 Menu Commands

56 9AKK101130D1384
Section 3 Standard Toolbar

The standard toolbar contains a set of command buttons that can be applied to the
selected Graphic Display.

Figure 15. Display Builder - Standard Toolbar

Information about most of these commands can be found in Section 2, Menu


Commands. The commands that can not be accessed through menus are listed
below.

Options

Click Options to display all options available for the selected object. These are the
same options that are available by right-clicking the object.
See Section 6, Shortcut Menu for details.

9AKK101130D1384 57
Size and Position Section 3 Standard Toolbar

Size and Position

Click Size and Position to set the size and position of a selected object with greater
precision.

Figure 16. Display Builder - Size and Position

Change the size and position by either clicking the buttons ,or directly setting the
values in the size boxes, and then click Apply.
The selected objects can be also moved pixel by pixel, using the arrows keys on the
keyboard, or by dragging with the mouse.

58 9AKK101130D1384
Section 4 Objects Toolbar

The objects toolbar contains a set of command buttons to manage the objects on the
Graphic Display page.

Figure 17. Display Builder - Object Toolbar

ActiveX

Click ActiveX to insert an ActiveX object.


Drag to select a drawing area, and then select the Active X object to be included in
the Graphic Display from the list of the OLE controls.

Figure 18. Display Builder - Insert OLE Control

9AKK101130D1384 59
Rectangle Section 4 Objects Toolbar

Rectangle

Click Rectangle to insert a rectangle or square.


Press and drag to draw the figure. You can press the Shift key while dragging to
create a regular square.

Circle

Click Circle to insert a circle, ellipse or arc.


Press and drag to draw the figure. You can click the Shift key while dragging to
create a circle.
• See Arc on page 79 to transform a circle into an arc.

Line

Click Line to insert a straight line. Press and drag to draw the figure.

Closed Polyline

Click Closed Polyline to create a closed polyline.


Click to create the starting point. Continue clicking to create multiple intermediate
points. Click with the right mouse button (right-click) to create the ending point.
The first and the last points are connected with the intermediate point to close the
figure.

60 9AKK101130D1384
Section 4 Objects Toolbar Opened Polyline

Opened Polyline

Click Opened Polyline to create an open polyline.


Click to create the starting point. Continue clicking to create multiple intermediate
points. Click with the right mouse button (right-click) to create the ending point.
The first and the last points are connected with the intermediate point to create a
line.

Spline

Click Spline to create a closed spline.


Click to create the starting point. Continue clicking to create multiple intermediate
points. Click with the right mouse button (right-click) to create the ending point.
The first and the last points are connected with the intermediate point to close the
figure.
All points are linked with curves.

Opened Spline

Click Opened Spline to create an opened spline.


Click to create the starting point. Continue clicking to create multiple intermediate
points. Click with the right mouse button (right-click) to create the ending point.
The first and the last points are connected with the intermediate point to create a
line.
All points are linked with curves.

9AKK101130D1384 61
Text Section 4 Objects Toolbar

Text

Click Text to create a text object.


Click to select the location of the text, and then enter the text.
See Edit Text on page 78 for details on editing text.

Parallelogram

Click Parallelogram to create a four point polyline with parallel sides.


Click three times to create the parallelogram.

Array

Click Array to create a squared array.


Press and drag to draw the figure. You can press the Shift key while dragging to
create a regular square.

Marker

Click Marker to create markers, which are a small triangular, rectangular or


diamond shaped symbols.
Click where you want to create your marker.
See Triangle Up / Triangle Down / Rectangle / Diamond on page 79 for details
about changing the type of marker. By default the marker type is the Triangle Up.

62 9AKK101130D1384
Section 4 Objects Toolbar Picture

Picture

Click Picture to insert a picture, and then select the image file in GIF, JPG or JPEG
format.
Click to specify the upper left-hand corner of the image, and then drag to create the
drawing area for the image. Click in the drawing area to position the picture.
The image will retain its original size.

Global Symbol

Click Global Symbol to insert a Global Symbol, and then choose the Global
Symbol using the selection box.
Enter the tags and reposition and/or resize the new symbol object.
See Section 11, Global Symbols for details.

Text Unicode

Click Text Unicode to create a text object with multi-byte fonts.


Click to select the location of the text, and then enter the text.
See To Unicode Text on page 78 for details.

WVP

Click WVP to manage the #WVP object for the current drawing. The #WVP object
is the rectangle that defines the page area.

9AKK101130D1384 63
Split Macro Symbol Section 4 Objects Toolbar

If #WVP object already exists when WVP is clicked, the #WVP object will be
selected.
Otherwise a #WVP object will be created with default size (920*680 pixels).
• See New on page 38 for information about re-sizing the object.
At run time this object is hidden. Its foreground color will be used as the drawing
color.

Transform to Macro Symbol

Click Transform to Macro Symbol to group selected objects in one Macro


Symbol. Macro Symbols can be used to collect Dynamic Objects so that a single tag
can be assigned to the group.
Three cases are possible when you click Transform to Macro Symbol:
1. When object(s) are selected.
A rectangle named #SYM and a Macro Symbol named #SYM_GROUP are
created. The rectangle becomes a boundary box of the selected objects. The
Macro Symbol includes the selected objects and the #SYM rectangle.
2. When #SYM object(s) are selected.
A Macro Symbol with the selected #SYM object and all other objects in the
selected area will be created.
3. When no objects are selected.
Drag to identify an area that includes all selected objects. These objects will be
grouped in the same manner as Step 1.

Split Macro Symbol

Click Split Macro Symbol to ungroup all selected Macro Symbols. This allows you
to access single objects in the Macro Symbol.

64 9AKK101130D1384
Section 4 Objects Toolbar Align Commands

After you perform a save or export operation the objects will be re-grouped in the
Macro Symbol.

Align Commands
The align commands (Left, Vertical, Right, Bottom, Horizontal, Top, Center) will
align the selected objects.

Figure 19. Align Commands

All selected objects will be aligned to the horizontal position


Left/Right:
of the left-most/right-most object in the selection.
All selected objects will be aligned to the vertical position of
Bottom/Top:
the lowest/highest object in the selection.
All selected object will be centered using the average
Horizontal/Vertical:
horizontal and vertical position.
The same center is assigned to all selected objects.
Center:

9AKK101130D1384 65
Align Commands Section 4 Objects Toolbar

66 9AKK101130D1384
Section 5 Symbols Toolbar

The Symbols toolbar contains a set of command buttons to create simple objects
such as values, trends, xy plots, etc.
You can also access predefined graphic objects. Predefined objects can be used to
add a new object in a Graphic Display.

Figure 20. Display Builder - Symbols Toolbar

Trend

Click Trend to define a trend object.


Drag to select a drawing area. Press the Shift key to create a square area.
Select the tag to be linked to the trend.
• See DTRN Diagram on page 142 to change the default parameters of the trend .

Bar

Click Bar to add a dynamic bar object.


Drag to select a drawing area. Press the Shift key to create a square area.
Select the tag to be linked to the bar.

9AKK101130D1384 67
Value Section 5 Symbols Toolbar

You can use a script to change the default graphic attributes of the bar.
• See the Appendix A, Scripting Language for information about scripts.

Value

Click Value to create a dynamic text object.


First select the type of value:

Analog value Displays the numeric value of the linked tag


Digital status Displays the state of the linked tag (digital point)
Tag name Displays the name of the linked tag
Tag description Displays the description of the linked tag
Engineering units Displays the engineering units of the linked tag

Click to select where to place the object on the Graphic Display.


Define the tag to be linked to this object.
The format of the Analog value (default %6.2f) can be changed using Dynamic
Objects.
• See Linked Tags of Dynamic Objects on page 87 for more information.

XYPlot

Click XYPlot to define a XY-Plot object.


Drag to select a drawing area. Press the Shift key to create a square area.
Define the tags to be linked to this object, with the first tag for X and second tag for
Y.

68 9AKK101130D1384
Section 5 Symbols Toolbar Plant Libraries

The default parameters of the XY Plot can changed using Dynamic Objects.
• See Linked Tags of Dynamic Objects on page 87 for more information.

Plant Libraries

Click Plant Libraries to display a list of all selectable library pages.


Plant Libraries is enabled if one or more Graphic Displays are defined in the
library.
The library pages cannot be modified. Drag or copy objects from the library pages
to your Graphic Display in order to modify them.

S1 ... Sn - O1 ... On

By clicking these buttons you can add custom symbols or objects to your Graphic
Display.
• The S* buttons call pages of SYMBOLS (dynamic elements)
• The O* buttons call pages of OBJECTS (static elements).
The SYMBOLS/OBJECTS pages cannot be modified. To modify objects, drag or
copy an object from these pages to your Graphic Display.
These buttons are displayed only if SYMBOLS_n.SYM or OBJECTS_n.OBJ pages
are defined in the XA_SYMBOLS folder.
To add a new S* button:
• Copy all graphic page files (UCB*) from your work folder to the
XA_SYMBOLS folder.
• Change the Graphic Display name to SYMBOLS_n (set n as new symbol
number).
• Change the SYMBOLS_n.UCBG file name to *.SYM.

9AKK101130D1384 69
S1 ... Sn - O1 ... On Section 5 Symbols Toolbar

To add a new O* button:


• Copy all graphic page (UCB*) files from you work folder to the to
XA_SYMBOLS folder.
• Change the Graphic Display name to OBJECTS_n (set n as new objects
number).
• Change the OBJECTS_n.UCBG file name to *.OBJ.

With the introduction of Plant Libraries these commands became obsolete. The
description is retained for compatibility with previous releases.

70 9AKK101130D1384
Section 6 Shortcut Menu

Each object or group of objects includes a shortcut menu (see Figure 21). Right-
click the object to access this menu.
• Hold down SHIFT and click the right mouse button with multiple objects.
Shortcut menus vary depending on the selected object type.
These commands are also available using the Toolbar button “Options”.
• See Section 4, Objects Toolbar for more information.

Figure 21. Display Builder - Shortcut Menu example

This section describes the available shortcut menu options.

Element Name
Select Element Name to manage the name of selected object.

9AKK101130D1384 71
Element Name Section 6 Shortcut Menu

Element Name is only enabled if a single named object is selected.

Figure 22. Display Builder - Element Name

If Element Name is blank the object is not named.


For static objects you can assign specific names to declare the object local to the
Graphic Display. This means that the object will not be included in a symbol.
The specific name of the object determines the order of the object.
• All objects named $ will be displayed above (raised)
• All objects named _$ will be displayed below.

72 9AKK101130D1384
Section 6 Shortcut Menu Graphic attributes

Graphic attributes
Select Graphic attributes to display and modify attributes of an object.

Figure 23. Display Builder - Attributes Editor

This command is only enabled if at least one object is selected.

9AKK101130D1384 73
Graphic attributes Section 6 Shortcut Menu

You can change the following object attributes:


• Foreground Color.
• Background Color.
• Shadow.
• Fill Style.
• Line Style.
• Layers Mask.

74 9AKK101130D1384
Section 6 Shortcut Menu Graphic attributes

Change Color
Clicking on the Foreground or Background buttons, will be activated the window to
change the selected color; as default is enabled only the left part of the window, but
selecting the Define Custom Colors>> button, you can obtain following image.

Figure 24. Display Builder - Colors Editor

Clicking on the right color table, you can select a detailed color and save it in the
Custom Colors table using Add to Custom Colors button; on OK, all custom colors
will be saved in a specific Display Builder registry named
XA_CUSTOM_COLORS to be memorized for future uses.

Check To Apply All Attributes Check Box


Use the CHECK TO APPLY ALL ATTRIBUTES check box when you want to
apply attributes from one object to multiple objects:

9AKK101130D1384 75
Rotate Section 6 Shortcut Menu

• Select the objects to be edited.


• Hold down SHIFT and right-click on an object, and then select Graphic
Attributes.
The current attributes of the object that you right-clicked are displayed. The
attributes of the other selected objects are not displayed.
If you want to apply all the current attributes of this object to the other selected
objects:
• Select the CHECK TO APPLY ALL ATTRIBUTES check box.
• Click APPLY or OK.
If you want to only apply changed attributes for this object to the other selected
objects:
• Change the attributes on the object.
• Clear the CHECK TO APPLY ALL ATTRIBUTES check box.
• Click APPLY or OK.
If you do not change any attributes, and the CHECK TO APPLY ALL
ATTRIBUTES check box is clear when you click APPLY or OK, no changes will
be made.

Rotate
Select Rotate to change the rotation angle of the selected object(s).

76 9AKK101130D1384
Section 6 Shortcut Menu Change Picture

You can rotate a single group, a line or a polyline object.

Figure 25. Display Builder - Rotate

You can also select multiple objects. If you rotate a group of objects or multiple
objects, the objects will rotate around the center of the group.

Change Picture
Select Change Picture to change the picture for the selected object.

Figure 26. Display Builder - Change Picture

Enter the name of the picture file or use the browse button (...) to access picture
files.
The Display Builder uses a Windows registry key called Directories\XA_PATH to
identify the standard PGP path name.
• See the InformIT Power Generation Portal Installation Manual for information
on the Windows registry.

9AKK101130D1384 77
Change Symbol Section 6 Shortcut Menu

If you save a file to the standard PGP path, then PGP will always be able to find the
file, even if PGP is installed on another system.
If you save a file to a non-standard PGP path, then another PGP system may not be
able to locate the file.

Always store files in standard PGP paths so that the files can be accessed by other
PGP systems.

Change Symbol
Select Change Symbol to change a Global Symbol object.

Figure 27. Display Builder - Change Symbol

Enter the name of the desired symbol, or use the browse button (...) to select
symbols.

Transform to Local Macro Symbol


Select Transform to Local Macro Symbol to transform a Global Symbol to a local
Macro Symbol. In this way you can split Global Symbol to display single objects.

78 9AKK101130D1384
Section 6 Shortcut Menu Transform to Local Macro Symbol

Edit Font
Select Edit Font to change the font type, size and format on text objects.

Figure 28. Display Builder - Font

9AKK101130D1384 79
Edit Text Section 6 Shortcut Menu

Edit Text
Select Edit Text to edit the text string on a either a regular text or unicode text
object.

Figure 29. Display Builder - Text Editor

To Unicode Text
Select To Unicode Text to transform a selected regular text object to a unicode text
object.

To Ascii Text
Select To Ascii Text to transform a selected unicode text object to a regular text
object.

Circle
Select Circle to transform an ellipse to a circle.

Polygonize
Select Polygonize to transform a single circle or rectangle object to a polyline
object. This operation is necessary if you want to rotate the shape.

80 9AKK101130D1384
Section 6 Shortcut Menu Arc

Arc
Select Arc to transform a circle or an ellipse to an arc.
You can then change the properties of the selected object.

Figure 30. Display Builder - Arc

Amplitude sets the size of the arc. Starting point sets the initial position.
If the object is filled, you can select either a Pie or Chord type of shape.

Triangle Up / Triangle Down / Rectangle / Diamond


Select Triangle Up / Triangle Down / Rectangle / Diamond to change the shape
of a selected marker object.

9AKK101130D1384 81
Modify Array Section 6 Shortcut Menu

Modify Array
Select Modify Array to change rows and columns on a selected array.

Figure 31. Display Builder - Array

Paste Dynamics
Select Paste Dynamics to copy dynamic properties and scripts to a single object.
• Copy a single Dynamic Object.
• Select an object that is not dynamic.
• Right-click, and then select Paste Dynamics.
The selected object is transformed into a Dynamic Object.

Transform To Dynamic
Select Transform To Dynamic to transform a single object without dynamics to a
Dynamic Object.
The new Dynamic Object is assigned default dynamic attributes.

Remove Dynamic
Select Remove Dynamic to remove dynamic attributes from a single selected
Dynamic Object.

82 9AKK101130D1384
Section 6 Shortcut Menu Dynamics

Dynamics
Select Dynamics to view and change the properties of a single Dynamic Object.
• See the section Section , Dynamic Objects for details about Dynamic Objects.

Script
Select Script to display and modify script text for a single selected object.
A script can be defined for both Dynamic and Non-Dynamic Objects.

Figure 32. Display Builder - Edit Script

Script text is the code typically used to animate an object. The script references data
produced by the linked Diagram.

9AKK101130D1384 83
Undo Section 6 Shortcut Menu

The default script for an object is assigned based on the Diagram type. You can
modify the default script to customize animations.
• Appendix A, Scripting Language describes the syntax of the scripting
language.

Undo
Select Undo to undo or cancel the last action executed.
This command is enabled only if the clipboard is not empty.

Cut
Select Cut to perform a standard Windows cut operation.

Copy
Select Copy to perform a standard Windows copy operation.

Paste
Select Paste to perform a standard Windows paste operation.

Delete
Select Delete to erase the selected objects from the drawing. This command can be
canceled using the Undo command.

Group
Select Group to collect multiple selected objects together as a single object.
This command will not work on Dynamic Objects.

Ungroup
Select Ungroup to separate objects from a selected group in to individual
components.

84 9AKK101130D1384
Section 6 Shortcut Menu Split Macro Symbol

Split Macro Symbol


Select Split Macro Symbol to un-groups all selected Macro Symbols.

Replace with Symbol


Select Replace with Symbol to replace a Macro Symbol with a Global Symbol.
• See the procedure described for Change Symbol on page 78 for more
information.

Redo Macro Symbol


Select Redo Macro Symbol redo the Macro Symbol with #SYM object and all
objects included in its area.

Object
Select Object to display and modify the properties of the selected ActiveX object.

9AKK101130D1384 85
Object Section 6 Shortcut Menu

86 9AKK101130D1384
Section 7 Dynamic Objects

A Dynamic Object is a text or graphic drawing (simple or complex) that can change
attributes based on value(s)/quality status of linked tag(s).

Default Name of Dynamic Objects


A default name VARn is assigned automatically when a dynamic is assigned to an
object; n is a progressive number automatically generated to create a new object
name. You can change this name using the Element Name option.

Default Attributes of Dynamic Objects


The default attributes of a new Dynamic Object are assigned to display the database
value of an analog tag (DNNV Diagram – RTDB access of the %TAG% tag).
• See DNNV Diagram on page 136 for more information.
If you want to change the name of the linked tag double-click the object to display
current tag definitions, and then select the new tag to display.
• See Section 16, Tag Browser for more information.
A group of elements is managed as a single object, but you can dynamically change
the attributes of each element by naming it.
For example:
• Create a static rectangle and name it RECT.
• Create a static circle and name it CIRC.

9AKK101130D1384 85
Linked Tags of Dynamic Objects Section 7 Dynamic Objects

• Select both objects and make them into a group.


– See Group on page 84.
• Transform the group to a Dynamic Object.
– See Transform To Dynamic on page 82 for more information.
You can now access the attributes of each element by using the dynamic group
name. The following instructions can be used in a script.
object.RECT.attrname = attrvalue;
object.CIRC.attrname = attrvalue;

Linked Tags of Dynamic Objects


Normally the tag names are not defined in a symbol (global or local).
You can, however, use the acronym:
• %TAG% to identify the first tag.
• %TAG1% to identify the second tag, and so on.
There aren’t limits on a number of different tags referenced in a symbol; of these
tags you can use a limitless number of atoms.

In the previous releases, a maximum of 10 different tags could be dynamically


referenced in a symbol. If you will use symbols with more than 10 tags on
previous releases, you can be found some problem.

For example, for a symbol created with this information:


• Dynamic Circle – DNNV Diagram with 4 variables linked to tags:
%TAG%,%TAG%.atom1, %TAG1%,%TAG1%.atom7
• Dynamic Text – DALF Diagram linked to tag %TAG2%
– See DALF Diagram on page 131for more information.

86 9AKK101130D1384
Section 7 Dynamic Objects Linked Tags of Dynamic Objects

By double-clicking the symbol in the Generic Options dialog box as shown below,
you can reference all the information in the symbol with these three acronyms:
%TAG%
%TAG1%
%TAG2%

Figure 32. Display Builder - Generic Options

• See Section 9, Generic Options for more information.

9AKK101130D1384 87
Linked Tags of Dynamic Objects Section 7 Dynamic Objects

88 9AKK101130D1384
Section 8 Actions

Introduction to Actions
Actions allow you to perform optional procedures during a run-time presentation.
Actions can be applied to Diagrams or to Headers.
• See Section 17, Headers for more information on Headers.
• See Section 18, Diagrams for more information on Diagrams.

Action Descriptions
Actions can be assigned to dynamic objects; if you define in a faceplate
(managed by PRCTRL) many objects overwrited having actions assigned, run
time all actions defined for the clicked objects will be executed (if enabled) in the
order Raise to Lower. If the display is not showed as faceplate, will be executed
only the actions assigned to the “Raise” object.

Available Actions
The following are the actions available.
• Load Page - For Diagrams only.
• Remove Page - For Diagrams only.
• Active Program - For both Headers and Diagrams.

9AKK101130D1384 89
Load Page Section 8 Actions

Load Page
Use Load Page to change a page on PGP Explorer, or to show a secondary page.
Set attributes by selecting Load Page on the associated action list.

Figure 33. General Diagram Info - Action - Load Page

Change Page Action Type


Use Change Page Action Type to select the way a Graphic Display will be loaded:

Action Type Description


Data Backward Change accessed data (for File access only).
Data Forward Change accessed data (for File access only).
Page Backward Call page defined as Page Backward in the Header.
Page Forward Call page defined as Page Forward in the Header.
Page Name Call defined page.
Page Previous Call previously displayed page (temporal order).

90 9AKK101130D1384
Section 8 Actions Load Page

Action Type Description


Recall Saved Page Display previously saved page
Save Page Save current page to recall it with the Recall action.

Page Name
If you select Page Name as the Change Page Action Type, you must specify the
name of the Graphic Display to load.

Load a page as a secondary one


Select Load a page as a secondary one to load the specified display page. A
chevron defines a secondary page.
Since PGP Explorer manages all change page actions on the primary page, this
option is only available for the Page Name option of Change Page Action Type.
A secondary page is loaded as a sub-window to the currently displayed page. You
need to enter the coordinates to position the secondary page.
Low Left X (LLX) position.
Low Left Y (LLY) position.
Upper Right X (URX) position.
Upper Right Y (URY) position.
These values define the position of the window corners on the secondary page. The
values are not absolute values, they are used to re-scale the window dimension
proportionally to the page dimension.
The range of values for the X and Y coordinates are:

X position: 0 - 800
Y position: 0 - 600

9AKK101130D1384 91
Remove Page Section 8 Actions

To use the dimensions defined in the Header of the secondary page define:
LLX = URX and LLY = URY

Remove Page
Use Remove Page to close a loaded page. At run time this action is only enabled in
a secondary page definitions in order to remove the secondary page.

Active Program
Use Active Program to make an application or system program active.

Figure 34. General Diagram Info - Active Program Sub-window

Par Int
An integer value can be defined to be passed as parameter to the activated program.

Extra Par
A string of parameters can be defined to be passed as command string to the
activated program.

92 9AKK101130D1384
Section 8 Actions Add/Remove Actions

Prog Name
Prog Name is the name of the program to be activated. It can be either an
executable or a command program. The Appendix B, System Programs includes the
list of the functions managed by the main system programs.

Add/Remove Actions
Actions can be applied to Diagrams or to Headers.
• See Section 17, Headers for more information on Headers.
• See Section 18, Diagrams for more information on Diagrams.
The method to add or remove actions is the same for both Headers and Diagrams.
Only the layout of displayed information is different.

Actions for Headers


To create an action for the Header first select when to activate the action during the
run time presentation:
• Activate the action when loading pages (Click here to associate actions
before Load Page).
• Activate the action when removing pages (Click here to associate actions
before Remove Page).

9AKK101130D1384 93
Actions for Diagrams Section 8 Actions

Next select the action from the list of Available actions. The only available action
for Headers is Active Program as shown below:

Figure 35. General Diagram Info - Action for Header

Actions for Diagrams


To create an action for a Diagram first select the key that will be clicked to activate
the action:
• The Left Mouse button (Click here to associate actions to the Left key).
• The Right Mouse button (Click here to associate actions to the Right key).

94 9AKK101130D1384
Section 8 Actions Activation Keys

Next select the action from the list of Available actions:

Figure 36. General Diagram Info - Action for Diagram

Activation Keys
You can set up shortcut keys that can be used to activate actions.

Activation keys can only be used with Diagrams, not Headers.

9AKK101130D1384 95
Activation Keys Section 8 Actions

Click the Activation Keys tab to define additional shortcut keys for the action.

Figure 37. General Diagram Info - Activation Keys

Shortcut keys can be defined using either one or two keys:


Select First Key to define the first key to press.
• If Second Key is not defined then the First Key will be the only key required
to activate the action.
Select Second Key to define the second key to press.
• If Second Key is defined then both the First Key and then the Second Key
must be pressed in sequence to activate the action.

96 9AKK101130D1384
Section 9 Generic Options

Use Generic Options to change the tags linked to the object.


Double-click an object (on the edge of the object if it is empty, anywhere in the
object if it is filled).

Figure 38. Display Builder - Generic Options for Dynamic Object

9AKK101130D1384 97
Defining Tags Using a Suffix Section 9 Generic Options

A similar dialog box is displayed whenever you create a new object.


You can define tags for Dynamic Objects, Global Symbols and Macro Symbols. For
more information:
• See Section 7, Dynamic Objects.
• See Section 11, Global Symbols.
• See First Text on page 100.
The Tag Selection (n) field displays the amount of tags linked to this Dynamic
Object, where n is the number of linked tags.

Defining Tags Using a Suffix


For applications where the database tags use common names (like PV-TAG-01, PV-
TAG-02...) you can define two Windows registry keys to store the suffix names.
APPS\IbDisp\SizeSuffix
APPS\IbDisp\StartSuffix
StartSuffix defines the position (base 1) of the first character of the sub-string.
SizeSuffix the number of the characters in the suffix name.
When these registry keys are defined the Tag Definition dialog box will display the
suffix name as the Tag Name.
• See the InformIT Power Generation Portal Installation Manual for information
about Windows registry keys.

Tag Name (Suffix)


Tag Name defines the order of the tag.

The Tag Name text box shows the name of the tag. This is an alphanumeric string.

98 9AKK101130D1384
Section 9 Generic Options Activation Keys for Generic Options

The tag name is uniquely identified in the tag database.

To change the tag name enter a new name, or use the browse button (...) to access
the Tag Browser.
• See on page 119 for details.

Activation Keys for Generic Options


Use Activation Keys to define the keyboard buttons associated with the action of
the left mouse button.

Two keys are available:


• First to activate the action using a single keyboard button.
• Second to activate the action using the sequence of the first and second
keyboard buttons.

Extra Parameters
Use Extra Parameters to define any extra parameters associated to the action:
• If the action is a Load Page you can define a page name.

9AKK101130D1384 99
Activation Keys for Generic Options Section 9 Generic Options

• If the action is an Active Program (the program name is displayed in the title)
you can define the program parameters.

• If the action is an Active Program and the program is a system program using a
single tagname (PRCMAN, OPERPA, PRCBTN, PRCCMD, PRCCM1,
DBDISP, ACKNWL, MYSELF), the program name is displayed as title: if the
tagname used as program parameter is not equal of the tagname used for the
dynamic, the field is enabled and includes the tagname, else is disabled.

• If the action is an Active Program and the program is the system program
PRCBTN used to execute multicommands, the program name is displayed in
title and the field is disabled.

See Section 8, Actions for more information on actions.

Details
Click Details to access to the Action details. The specific action is associated to the
selected object is displayed.

First Text
Use First Text to change the first text string in the selected object, if a text string
exists.

100 9AKK101130D1384
Section 9 Generic Options Activation Keys for Generic Options

This text can be used to change a text object in a group without using the Ungroup
command.

9AKK101130D1384 101
Activation Keys for Generic Options Section 9 Generic Options

102 9AKK101130D1384
Section 10 Macro Symbols

A Macro Symbol is a particular group of objects. They are usually used to group
Dynamic Objects that use the same tagname. You can define the tag name by
double-clicking the Macro Symbol.
For example, you can create a Macro Symbol to display the following information:
NAME - DESCRIPTION - VALUE - E.U.
You can then double-click the Macro Symbol to enter a new tag name. This tag
name will be automatically assigned to all single objects in the Macro Symbol.
All objects of a Macro Symbol are included in a specific rectangle named
SYM_GROUP.
You can use Split Macro Symbol to split the group in to single objects. After
saving the drawing, the Macro Symbol will be recreated with the original group of
objects.

Border Color of the Macro Symbol (SYM_GROUP)


The color of the “boder” is used to identify the status of the linked tags with
following rule:
• black - all linked tags are valid
• blue - one or more of the linked tags are not defined in the Data Base: you have
to check all tagnames to identify the invalid tag(s).

9AKK101130D1384 101
Border Color of the Macro Symbol (SYM_GROUP) Section 10 Macro Symbols

102 9AKK101130D1384
Section 11 Global Symbols

A Global Symbol is an object that contains one or more objects (static or dynamic).
which constitute the graphic representation of one particular part of the plant or
equipment.
The purpose of a Global Symbol is to provide a common method to display and
animate all the plant devices of the same type (switches, pumps, engines, etc.).
The Global Symbol also allows you to easily change all displays that include the
Global Symbol.
Moving the mouse on a global symbol, its name and linked tags will be showed in
the status bar.

To Create a New Global Symbol


To create a new Global Symbol:
• In the Display Builder select File, New.
• On the standard toolbar, click Header (H).
• Click the Header page tab.
• Select SYMBOL for the DisplayType.
• Click OK.
• Draw the graphic objects and assign the necessary dynamics.
– The name of tag assigned to the Dynamic Objects will be %TAG% by
default. You must assign different acronyms for different tags.
• Save the Global Symbol.

9AKK101130D1384 103
Additional Attributes for the Global Symbols. Section 11 Global Symbols

Display Builder does not provide a method to distinguish Global Symbols from
other types of graphic pages. To identify Global Symbols easily it is a good
practise to add a prefix to all Global Symbol names, such as SYM_. You can also
store all Global Symbols in a dedicated folder.

• On the standard toolbar click AddToSys. The new symbol will be available for
configuration.

Additional Attributes for the Global Symbols.


For a Global Symbol is possible to define some additional option to customize the
parameters used in the scripts of the objects included in the symbol.
In the Header Page tab, when the SYMBOL check is selected, is displayed an
additional button named SYMBOL Attributes.

104 9AKK101130D1384
Section 11 Global Symbols Additional Attributes for the Global Symbols.

Figure 39. Global Symbols - Header Page

When selected is activated a dialog to define/change the attributes of the global


symbol.

9AKK101130D1384 105
Additional Attributes for the Global Symbols. Section 11 Global Symbols

Figure 40. Global Symbols - Initial Global Symbol Attributes

Initially is showed an empty page: you have to click on Details and then select Add
Item to define a new attribute

106 9AKK101130D1384
Section 11 Global Symbols Additional Attributes for the Global Symbols.

Figure 41. Global Symbols - Global Symbol Attributes - Add Item

Click OK to add the new item.

9AKK101130D1384 107
Additional Attributes for the Global Symbols. Section 11 Global Symbols

Figure 42. Global Symbols - Example of Global Symbol Attributes

In the script you can use the item COL_IF_BAD to change a color attribute of the
object (for example object.foregroundName = COL_IF_BAD; as default the color
will be “cyan”).
Click on the value of an item to change it.

108 9AKK101130D1384
Section 11 Global Symbols To Modify a Global Symbol

When the default value of an item of a global symbol already used in some
display, in the display the value will be maintained the old value (for example, if
you change in the header of the global symbol “cyan” to “red”, in the displays
where the symbol is already included will be maintained “cyan”)

You can use “Delete Item” to remove an unused item from the list.
Click OK to assigne the defined attributes to the global symbol.

To Modify a Global Symbol


You can modify Global Symbols in the same manner that you modify other objects.
After making changes, click AddToSys on the standard toolbar to activate the
modifications.

9AKK101130D1384 109
To Insert a Global Symbol In a Graphic Page Section 11 Global Symbols

To Insert a Global Symbol In a Graphic Page


To insert a Global Symbol in a Graphic Display click Global Symbol in the
Objects toolbar:

Figure 43. Display Builder - Global Symbols

• Select a Global Symbol from the list of all available Global Symbols.
– A preview of selected Global Symbol is displayed.
– Click OK or double-click the symbol name to add it to your Graphic
Display. Double click works only if is disabled the function to include
automatically a group of global symbols in a displays. For more
information, see Section 12, Plant Libraries.
• Specify the name of the tag (or the tags) to animate the symbol.
– See Section 16, Tag Browser.
• Customize the attributes of the symbol.
– See Section 9, Generic Options

110 9AKK101130D1384
Section 11 Global Symbols Customize the Global Symbol Attributes

• Click OK.
• Position the new symbol on the Graphic Display.
• The new symbol will be included with a rectangle as border; the color of this
rectangle is used to identify the status of the tags linked to the symbol.: black =
all linked tags are valid - red = the number of linked tags is changed

Customize the Global Symbol Attributes


If you have configured some SYMBOL attribute or if the global symbol includes
only rotatables objects , the Generic Options window will include an additional
button named Global Symbol Attributes.

9AKK101130D1384 111
Customize the Global Symbol Attributes Section 11 Global Symbols

Figure 44. Global Symbols - Generic Options

Selecting this button will be showed a window to customize the defined symbol
attributes.

112 9AKK101130D1384
Section 11 Global Symbols Customize the Global Symbol Attributes

Figure 45. Global Symbols - Customize Global Symbol Attributes

Following fields can be showed in the list :


Attributes/ROTATE - is showed only if the symbol includes all rotatable objects.
Details/Name(s) - is showed only if some Details Item has been defined for the
symbol.
Clicking on the values of the items is possible to customize the values for the
selected symbol.

9AKK101130D1384 113
Border Color of the Global Symbol Section 11 Global Symbols

After to OK, the selected ROTATE value will be applied to the symbol; the Details
will be applied run-time when the script wil be executed.

Border Color of the Global Symbol


The color of the “border” is used to identify the status of the linked tags with
following rule:
• black - all linked tags are valid
• red - in the Global Symbol has been changed the number of linked tags; you
have to check all tagnames to verify if are defined in the right way.
• blue - one or more of the linked tags are not defined in the Data Base: you have
to check all tagnames to identify the invalid tag(s).

Resizing Global Symbols


You can define Windows registry keys to control how Global Symbols are resized.

To Retain the Original Size


Set the registry key FixedGblSymSize = YES to retain the original size.
You can change the size of the Global Symbol, but when you save the Graphic
Display the Global Symbol will be resized to the original size.

To Allow Resizing Global Symbols


Set the registry key FixedGblSymSize = NO to allow resizing Global Symbols.

All graphic objects in a Global Symbol will be resized except for text.

Adding Global Symbols to Library Pages


You can include Global Symbols in the library pages.
• See Section 12, Plant Libraries for more information.

114 9AKK101130D1384
Section 11 Global Symbols Managing of Tag Names in Global Symbols

Managing of Tag Names in Global Symbols


A Global Symbol normally is not linked to a particular tag when is created. Instead
it refers to a generic tag. Generally the real tag name is specified when the Global
Symbol is added to a Graphic Display.
The name of the generic tag is %TAG%. You can append the name of an atom to
generic tag, for example: %TAG%.atomname.
The animation of a Global Symbol can depend on any or all of these attributes:
• A tag (%TAG%).
• The associated atoms (%TAG%.atomname).
• On many tags (%TAG%, %TAG2%, … %TAGn%).
Each Global Symbol can reference up to unlimited number of different tags. It is
also possible for each tag to reference additional information.

Different Methods for Managing Tags


Two examples are provides below of different management methods for tags.
Example 1: A Global Symbol that uses two different tags to animate the color
of an object.
When the Global Symbol is created the generic tags will be called:
• %TAG% for the first tag.
• %TAG2% for the second.
When the Global Symbol is added to a Graphic Display you can define the two real
tag names. You must replace:
• %TAG% with TAGNAME1
• %TAG2% with TAGNAME2.
Example 2: A Global Symbol that uses two different atoms to animate the color
of an object.
In this example there are two atoms associated with the same tag.

9AKK101130D1384 115
To Change the Instantiations of a Global Symbol Section 11 Global Symbols

When the Global Symbol is created the generic tags will be called:
• %TAG%.atom1.
• %TAG%.atom2.
When the Global Symbol is added to a Graphic Display you can define only one real
tag name. You must replace:
• %TAG% with TAGNAME1.

To Change the Instantiations of a Global Symbol


When a Global Symbol is modified, it is possible to update its instantiations in one
or more of the Graphic Displays that refer to the Global Symbol.

To Update One Graphic Display:


After modifying Open the Graphic Display using Display Builder.
Click Save and AddToSys.

To Update Multiple Graphic Pages:


From the standard toolbar click AddToSys.
Select all files that relate to the Graphic Displays that include the Global Symbol.
Click OK.

Some Hints for the Correct Use of the Global Symbols.


As described above, a Global Symbol can refer to one or to multiple tags. Each tag
can be addressed by specifying atom names.

Note that whenever Global Symbols are changed, the total number of tags can not
be changed.

These are some hints concerning modifying Global Symbols.


• Global symbols with one tag can be modified in any way, as long as the
number of tags is not modified.

116 9AKK101130D1384
Section 11 Global Symbols Some Hints for the Correct Use of the Global Symbols.

• If you change the number of tags in a Global Symbol, and the Global Symbol is
included in Graphic Displays, the border of the Global Symbol will be red
when you open the Graphic Display.
– You will need to manually re-check all tags associated with the Global
Symbol.
• The reordering of objects associated with a Global Symbol with multiple tags
can causes problems. Links to tags can become invalid. Make sure to manually
re-check tag definitions in each instantiation of the Global Symbol.

9AKK101130D1384 117
Some Hints for the Correct Use of the Global Symbols. Section 11 Global Symbols

118 9AKK101130D1384
Section 12 Plant Libraries

A Plant Library is a read-only storage area for global or local dynamic symbols.
When you configure a Graphic Display you can open a library, select an object and
copy or drag the object to the Graphic Display.

To Create a Plant Library


To create a Plant Library follow these steps:
• Set the Windows registry key APPS\IbDisp\SYSMGR to YES AUTOLIB:
YES to enable the Add To Library function, AUTOLIB to enable the multi-
selection on the global symbols list.
• Create or open to modify a Graphic Display.
• Execute the procedure to insert a global symbol in the display, but select more
than one symbol; after the click on the OK button, all selected items will be
automatically added to the current display, ordered from top left to right, row
by row, without any request to specify the tag names.
• Save the Graphic Display. The name of the Graphic Display will be the name
that will appear in the list of the available libraries.
• Select Add To Library from the File menu. The Graphic Display will be
added to the directory of the graphic libraries.
Click Plant Libraries on the Symbols toolbar to show all libraries.
• See Plant Libraries on page 69 for more information.

To Delete a Plant Library


To delete a Plant Library you must delete all files with this name:
LIB_*name.* files

9AKK101130D1384 109
Some Hints for the Use of the Plant Libraries. Section 12 Plant Libraries

Where name is the name of the library. The folder for storage of library files is
defined by the Windows registry key XA_SYMBOLS.

Some Hints for the Use of the Plant Libraries.


All global symbols included in the Plant Libraries, can be removed from system
using specific function.
I this way, these global symbol will not be visible in the list of configured, but their
replacement, during the load and save procedure of the displays, will be skipped.
When a global symbol included in a Plant Library and removed from system, will
be changed, you will have to:
• Open, modify, save and Add to Sys the global symbol.
• Make Add to Sys of all displays (included also the displays used to generate the
Plant Libraries) that use the changed symbol.
• Make Add to Library of the displays used to generate the Plant Libraries.
• Use the function “Remove from system” to delete the executable files of the
modified global symbol.

110 9AKK101130D1384
Section 13 Customized Faceplates

Standard Faceplates
Standard Faceplates are distributed with the PGP system to display and control the
plant tags.
The Faceplates are managed by the PRCTRL program. They are distributed in Text
Format (display/spg) and in Executable Format (display/bin).

Customized Faceplates
You can change Faceplates to customize them for your system.
To customize the Faceplates:
Activate the EIXCMP program to export the standard Faceplate files in to editable
format. These files will be stored in the display/work folder.
• Open the Graphic Display with the Display Builder.
• Select Save As from the File menu to create your new Faceplate
– If you put the prefix POP_ on the name of the file, the file will be
displayed in the selectable faceplates list during database configuration.
• Customize the Faceplate, save and add it to system.
The new Faceplate is available to be used with your tag.

9AKK101130D1384 111
Faceplate Display Areas Section 13 Customized Faceplates

Faceplate Display Areas


Inside a Faceplate display there are three areas identified by rectangles:
• #WVP rectangle - An area that includes all objects that will be displayed on
Faceplate activation.
• #WVP1 rectangle - An area that includes all objects that will be displayed on
TOGGLE command. This is normally used to display addition information
about a tag.
• #WVP2 rectangle - An area that includes all objects that will be displayed
when the “only commands” Faceplate is requested (using the PRCCMD
program name in the display action).
The run-time size of the Faceplate is a function of the size of WVP rectangle and of
the dimensions defined in the Header of the Faceplate.
• See WVP Rectangle Size on page 38 for more information about the WVP
rectangle.
• See Section 17, Headers for information about Headers.

112 9AKK101130D1384
Section 14 Parametric Displays

Parametric displays are pages that include Dynamic Objects with tags that can be
specified at run time during a Load Page action.
Tag names in a parametric displays can be an existing point. You can also indicate
only a part of the tag name with a suffix that will be specified on a Load Page
action.
• See Section 8, Actions for more information on the Load Page action.
Parametric displays can be used when you need two identical displays where:
• One display will be used to present the tags of Plant1.
• One display will be used to present the tags of Plant2.
You can define the names of tags in a database as follows:
• Plant1 = 1nnn.
• Plant2 = 2nnn.
You only need to create one display. The tag names can be defined with the
wildcard characters %TAG%nnn.
On the Load Page action you can define the call pages as follows (this is case
sensitive):
,T=1 for Plant1.
,T=2 for Plant2 .
You can specify the suffix names using:
• %TAG% wildcard characters for the first name.
• %TAG1% for the second name, etc.

9AKK101130D1384 113
Cascading Pages Section 14 Parametric Displays

The limit for the maximum number of characters is:


• 80 for the Faceplate parameter in the database.
• 31 for Load Page action definitions.

Cascading Pages
When you have a “cascade” of pages with parametric tagnames, you can only
specify the parameters for the first page.
If no parameters are specified, the same additional parameters will be added to the
following page names.
You can use the syntax ,T== for a parameter that will be unchanged from the
previous display. This option can be useful for “cascading” pages that have different
origins.
For example:
Page P_A is called with P_A,T=1,T=AA,T=BB
and from P_A, page P_A_A is called with P_A_A,T==,T=XX,T=YY
P_A_A will display the tags for Plant1
Page P_A is called with P_A,T=2,T=AA,T=CC
and from P_A, page P_A_A is called with P_A_A,T==,T=XX,T=YY
P_A_A will display the tags for Plant2
The Faceplates managed by the PRCTRL program are parametric displays, where
the first (and normally the only) parameter is the complete tag name.
For example, when you choose Prctrl.pop_ana for the tag PV-TAG-01 in the
Faceplate field of the database, the control display will automatically be called with
POP_ANA,T=PV-TAG-01.
You can also create customized Faceplates that use more than one parametric
tagname. If you enter a Faceplate in the database field as follows:
Prctrl.pop_ana,T=AA,T=BB

114 9AKK101130D1384
Section 14 Parametric Displays Cascading Pages

The control display will be loaded with:


POP_ANA,T=PV-TAG-01,T=AA,T=BB
In the Faceplate the wildcard characters %TAG% will be resolved with the
complete tagname (PV-TAG-01), %TAG1% with AA and %TAG2% with BB.

In the parametric displays is better to check the “NO HISTORY” flag in the
Header, because if the page is called without specifying the plant number all tags
would be unresolved.

9AKK101130D1384 115
Cascading Pages Section 14 Parametric Displays

116 9AKK101130D1384
Section 15 Add To System

The primary role of Add to System is to enable Graphic Displays for presentation on
the PGP system.
• See Add To System on page 41 for more information.
The following additional options can also be performed by selecting Add to System
from the File menu.

Tag List Log


The Windows registry key APPS\IbDisp\TagListLog manages the output of the list
of the tag used in the display.
• See the InformIT Power Generation Portal Installation Manual for more
information about the Windows registry.
If is set to YES, the Add to System option will create a log file in the Eix_bin folder;
the file is named dispname.LOG. and includes a list of all the tags used for the
variables in the Graphic Display.
The list does not include the tags used for actions.
• See Section 8, Actions for more information about actions.

Displays Distribution
You can use the Displays Distribution option to automatically distribute executable
files to other systems connected on a network.
This features allows you to maintain the “source” of all Graphic Displays on one
centralized PC.

9AKK101130D1384 117
Export for WEB Section 15 Add To System

To configure your system for distribution:


• Set the Windows registry key APPS\IbDisp\UpdateServers is set to YES,
• Define registry keys named Servern (where n is a progressive number 1
based). These string-type entries specify the names of the client or multimaster
PCs to update.
When you select Add to System from the File menu, the Display Builder activates
a procedure to copy the executable format files from the local folder Eix_bin to the
Eix_bin folders of all the designated systems.

Export for WEB


You can use Add To System to create XML output files for the WEB utility.

Activate TNTXML
First make sure that the TNTXML program is active. To do this:
• The PGP system must be active.
• The WEB extensions must be licensed.
See the InformIT Power Generation Portal Installation Manual for information
about installing and licensing WEB extensions.

Create an XML file


You can then create an XML format file.
Select Add to System from the File menu.
PGP will create an image in XML format from the static part of the Graphic
Display. The file is called displayname.tnt, and is stored in the \xml web folder.
The WEB utility uses this file to display the background of the page before
requesting an update of the Dynamic Objects in the Graphic Display.
If this file does not exist, the WEB utility will first request the background, and the
the update (after each refresh) of the Dynamic Objects.

118 9AKK101130D1384
Section 16 Tag Browser

Use the Tag Browser to find the configured tags. To access the Tag Browser, click
this button:

All configured tags are listed on the right. You can select an alarm group, perform a
query, or you can enter the tag name directly using Enter tag name.

Select the tag name, and then click OK to assign the selected tag to your object.

9AKK101130D1384 119
Section 16 Tag Browser

120 9AKK101130D1384
Section 17 Headers

Introduction
The Header contains general information such as: display title, display security
level, page size, page modifications, etc.
All information is organized in two tabs: General Diagram Info and Header Page.

9AKK101130D1384 121
General Diagram Info Section 17 Headers

General Diagram Info


Click the General Diagram Info tab to display information about actions:

Figure 40. Header - General Diagram Info

See Section 8, Actions for more information about actions.

122 9AKK101130D1384
Section 17 Headers Header Page

Header Page
Click Header page to display details about the Header.

Figure 41. Header Diagram - Header Page

Page Title
Page Title is an alphanumeric string containing the title that will appear in the PGP
Explorer toolbar.

Display Type

SYMBOL
Select SYMBOL to designate that the current Graphic Display is a Global Symbol.

9AKK101130D1384 123
Display Type Section 17 Headers

A Global Symbol can be used to define a specific animated object that will be
included in more that one Graphic Display.
• See Section 11, Global Symbols for more information.

History
If History is selected when you open this Graphic Display in PGP Explorer the
name of the Graphic Display will be added to the list of recently opened files.

No History
If No History is selected you open this Graphic Display in PGP Explorer the name
of the Graphic Display will not be added to the list of recently opened files.
This Graphic Display will be only loaded using:
• The Page By Name function.
• The Load Page command in the PGP Explorer menu.
• A Load Page action.
– See Section 8, Actions for more information about actions.

Keep Ratio
Select Keep Ratio to present the Graphic Display with the ratio aspect. The Graphic
Display will be shown on the screen using the maximum available area. The x/y
factor defined in the #WVP object will be maintained.
If this option is cleared, and if the Windows registry key KeepRatio is set to NO,
the page will be displayed using all the available area, ignoring the initial size of the
#WVP object. In general these Graphic Displays will appear “stretched”.

Scroll Bar
Select Scroll Bar to present the Graphic Display using the scroll bar. The Graphic
Display will be shown on the screen using the size of configured area (size of the
#WVP object). The scroll bar will be displayed if the dimension of the Graphic
Display is greater than the dimension of the screen.

124 9AKK101130D1384
Section 17 Headers Display Type

You must select Scroll Bar if you want to use the zoom options of PGP Explorer.

Multilanguage
Select Multilanguage to execute the translation of all text in the currently selected
language. This will occur during a Load Page action on PGP Explorer.

Security
This box contains two fields.
Level is a numeric value in the range 0 to 16 representing the security level to
access the Graphic Display. Only PGP users who have a greater security level can
gain access to the Graphic Display.
Use the increment/decrement arrows to change the value.
Group is a numeric value in the range 0 to 16 representing the security group
entitled to access the page. Only PGP users who are members of this group can gain
access to the Graphic Display.
Use the increment/decrement arrows to change the value.

Page
Fwd: defines the name of a Graphic Display for forwarding. The forward page can
be activated using the Page Forward action.
• This is an alphanumeric string with a maximum length of 31 characters.
Bck: defines the name of a Graphic Display for moving backward. The backward
page can be activate using the Page Backward action.
• This is an alphanumeric string with a maximum length of 31 characters.

Modifier
Use Page Mod to define a page modifier. You can access a file and define a pointer
to a word to be read in the file.
• See File Access Variable on page 187 for more information.

9AKK101130D1384 125
Display Type Section 17 Headers

Window Dimensions
Use Window Dimensions to define the dimensions of the display when the display
is loaded as a secondary page.
If the activation command of the secondary page map the coordinates:
URX to LLX.
URY to LLY.
The secondary page will be located in the following position:
LLX = specified value for LLX.
LLY = specified value for LLY.
URX = LLX + width.
URY = LLY + height.
If the activation command of the secondary page does not map these coordinates,
the window size is defined by the activation command.
Width: defines the width of the secondary page.
• The maximum supported width is 800 pixels.
Height: defines the height of the secondary page.
• The maximum supported height is 600 pixels.

126 9AKK101130D1384
Section 18 Diagrams

Introduction to Diagrams
The Diagram is the element that defines the “graphic type” of a Dynamic Object.
The Diagram definition is organized in two tabs: General Diagram Info and Specific
Diagram.

9AKK101130D1384 127
General Diagram Info Section 18 Diagrams

General Diagram Info


Click the General Diagram Info tab to display information about a Diagram:

Figure 42. Diagrams - General Diagram Info

Diagram Name
Diagram Name is a unique name within the Graphic Display. It is automatically
assigned when the Dynamic Object is created.
The Diagram Name can not be modified here. You can change the Diagram Name
by changing the name of the object.

128 9AKK101130D1384
Section 18 Diagrams General Diagram Info

Diagram Type
Select the type of the Diagram from the list:

Table 4. Diagram Types

Configure
Type Description Max. Variables
Variables
DALF Alphanumeric Diagram Needed 1
DNNV Multivariable Diagram Needed 10
DINP Data Input Diagram Not needed 0
DDYN Dynamic Digital Diagram Needed 1
DDYA Dynamic Analog Diagram Needed 1
DTRN Trending Diagram Not needed 0
DXYP XYPlot Diagram Not needed 0
DRDR Radar Diagram Not needed 0
DALL Alarm List Diagram Not needed 0

9AKK101130D1384 129
General Diagram Info Section 18 Diagrams

Variables
Click Configure to change the number of the variables linked to the Diagram.

Figure 43. General Diagram Info - Configure

You can change the number of the variables that you want use to animate the object
using the increment/decrement arrows near the number of variables field.
For aech linked variable retrieved from the Real Time Data Base, is showed the
linked tag and the Data Base info.

Visibility for not implemented


Select Check for Visible to make the object visible when the linked tag is not
configured.
This object will be managed as a tag with a status value of BAD.
Clear Check for Visible to make the object invisible if the tag linked to this
Diagram is not defined in the real-time database.

This option is enabled only for DNNV, DALF, DDYN and DDYA Diagrams.

130 9AKK101130D1384
Section 18 Diagrams DALF Diagram

Action/Activation Keys
Select the Action or Activation Keys tab to add actions to the Diagram. Actions
allow you to perform optional procedures during a run-time presentation.
• See Actions for Diagrams on page 93 for more information.

DALF Diagram
The DALF Diagram type defines alphanumeric Diagrams.

Figure 44. DALF Diagram

9AKK101130D1384 131
Size Section 18 Diagrams

Size
Size is a numeric value that represents the quantity of characters of the output string.
The maximum string length is 132 characters, and can not be zero.

Format
Select the format of the output string from the Format list. Formats are listed in
Table 5.
Also enter the Format Type in the box to the right of the Format list.

Table 5. DALF Diagram - Format Types

Format Example of Format Format Type


DATE DD-MMM-YYYY None
DD-MMM-YYYY
DATE_TIME None
HH:MM:SS.MSEC
DOUBLE 111.11 %f (f = type floating)
FLOAT 111.11 %f (f = type floating)
%X (X = type
HEXA X0011
hexadecimal)
INT 111 %d (d = type decimal)
STRING TEXT %s (s = type string)
TIME_CENTISECONDS HH:MM:SS.mm None
TIME_DAYOFWEEK NNN None
TIME_MILLISECONDS HH:MM:SS.mmm None
TIME_SECONDS DDD HH:MM:SS None
TIME_WEEK WW None

Output
Select the Output format from the Output list. Output formats are listed in Table 6.

132 9AKK101130D1384
Section 18 Diagrams Output

Output specifies the color of the displayed data along with quality status
management.

Table 6. DALF Diagram - Outputs

Output Description
Only value - Color from
NO SUFFIX
BATTDECK file
OIS_COLOR Color management like OIS
OIS_COLOR_BLINK_ALARM Like OIS - Blinking if in alarm
OIS_COLOR_BLINK_ALARM_AND_NORMAL Like OIS - Always blinking
OIS_COLOR_BLINK_NORMAL Like OIS - Blinking if normal
STATIC_COLOR Static color
Dynamic color with qual
SUFFIX_NO_BLANK
(100.00HH)
SUFFIX_NO_VALUE Dynamic color only qual (HH)
Dynamic color with qual
SUFFIX_WITH_BLANK
(100.00 HH)

Colors and Quality Suffix


The colors and quality suffix are function of:
• The selected Output type.
• The script.
• The quality status of the linked tag.
If you select an Output format with the words “Like OIS”, you need to define the
colors for foreground, background and alarm in the script.

9AKK101130D1384 133
Output Section 18 Diagrams

You can specify the color as an RGB number, or as a negative index using the
following standard colors.

Table 7. DALF Diagram - Index Color Table

Index Color
0 Black
1 Red
2 Green
3 Yellow
4 Blue
5 Magenta
6 Cyan
7 White

A typical script for an OIS output type is:


fg_col = -2; // green if normal
bg_col = 0; // black color for background
al_col = -1; // red if alarm
object.string = value; // only for Text objects
object.foreground = fgc;
object.background = bgc;
The definition and use of foreground/background colors depends on the graphic
object attributes.

134 9AKK101130D1384
Section 18 Diagrams Output

Tag Priority
Colors and suffixes can be controlled by the priority of tags. You can use the
BATTDECK file to specify priorities for the single quality status color and suffix.
• See the InformIT Power Generation Portal Configuration Manual for
additional information.
Tags with an undefined priority (0) will be set to the default priority colors and
suffix. This default priority is defined in the Windows registry key:
APPS\TntExplorer\UndefinedDefaultPriority
If this registry key is not defined, the default priority will be set to 1.
A typical script for these output types is:
object.string = value; // only for Text objects
object.foreground = fgc;
object.background = bgc;
The definition and use of foreground/background colors depends on the object
attributes.

9AKK101130D1384 135
DNNV Diagram Section 18 Diagrams

DNNV Diagram
The DNNV type defines multi-variable Diagram: this is the default Diagram type
created when you transform to dynamic a static object.

Figure 45. DNNV Diagram

Number of Variables
The Number of Variables shows the number of the variables belonging to this
multivariable Diagram. There is a maximum of 10 variables.

136 9AKK101130D1384
Section 18 Diagrams Custom

Custom
Select Custom to manage the animation of the selected object using the script
language. At run-time the following information is available for each linked
variable:

value Value of the tag (string or float as function of linked variable


Foreground color in RGB format. It is retrieved from the BATTDECK
fgc
configuration as function of current quality of the tag.
Background color in RGB format. It is retrieved from the BATTDECK
bgc
configuration as function of current quality of the tag.
Blinking flag. It is retrieved from the BATTDECK configuration as
blink
function of current quality of the tag (1 = enabled).
badq Code to indicate the bad quality status of the tag (see Table 8).
almq Code to indicate the alarm status of the tag (see Table 9).
IsBad Flag to indicate the bad status of the tag (1 = BAD).
IsAlm Flag to indicate the alarm status of the tag (1 = ALARM).
Flag to indicate the un-acknowledge status of the tag (1 = to be
IsToAck
acknowledged).

The names of the information are as described for the first linked tag.
For any other tags (from second to tenth) the names will be formatted using the
name followed by _n, where n is the tag order
For example, for the third tag the names will be:
value_3, fgc_3, bgc_3, blink_3, badq_3, almq_3, IsBad_3, IsAlm_3, IsToAck_3
You can use this information to animate your object. You can change the color, the
blinking behavior, the position and any other possible attribute of the object.

9AKK101130D1384 137
Custom Section 18 Diagrams

Table 8. DNNV Diagram - BADQ codes

Output Description
QGood Good status (IsBad = 0)
QSubs Inserted value (IsBad = 0)
QInib Alarms inhibited (IsBad = 0)
QDise Off scan (IsBad = 1)
QBad Chann. fail., Old, Bad calc. (IsBad = 1)

Table 9. DNNV Diagram - ALMQ codes

Output Description
NoAlm PV - No alarm
LowAl PV - Low alarm
HigAl PV - High alarm
Lo2Al PV - Low 2 alarm
Hi2Al PV - High 2 alarm
Lo3Al PV - Low 3 alarm
Hi3Al PV - High 3 alarm
LDvAl PV - Low deviation alarm
HDvAl PV - High deviation alarm
NoAl_0 DI - No alarm status 0
NoAl_1 DI - No alarm status 1
NoAl_2 DI - No alarm status 2
NoAl_3 DI - No alarm status 3
Alm_0 DI - Alarm status 0

138 9AKK101130D1384
Section 18 Diagrams Output

Table 9. DNNV Diagram - ALMQ codes

Output Description
Alm_1 DI - Alarm status 1
Alm_2 DI - Alarm status 2
Alm_3 DI - Alarm status 3

Output
Select the Output format from the Output list. Output formats are listed in
Table 10.
For output types “like OIS”, the colors are managed as described in the DALF
Diagram on page 131.

Table 10. DNNV Diagram - Outputs

Output Description
DYN_COLOR Foreground color from BATTDECK
DYN_COLOR_BG Background color from BATTDECK
NO_COLOR Color is unused
OIS_COLOR Color management like OIS
OIS_COLOR_BLINK_ALARM Like OIS - Blinking if in alarm

9AKK101130D1384 139
DINP Diagram Section 18 Diagrams

DINP Diagram
The DINP type defines a data input Diagram.

Figure 46. DINP Diagram

Normal
Select Normal to specify that the Diagram area will not be highlighted when it is
selected at run time.

Keep
Select Keep to specify that the Diagram area will be highlighted when it is selected
at run time.

140 9AKK101130D1384
Section 18 Diagrams Keep

Managing the Keep Option


If you select the Keep option, you must add special instructions in the script to
manage the selection of the object:
• Unselected status (value = 0).
• Selected status (value = 1).
The following script shows an example of how to set a green rectangle when the
object is not selected, and a red rectangle when the object is selected:

Figure 47. DINP Diagram - Keep Script Example

At runtime the selected status (with a value = 1 in the script) will be automatically
removed (with a value = 1 in the script) when:
• Another object with the Keep option is clicked.
• A secondary page or faceplate is closed.

9AKK101130D1384 141
DTRN Diagram Section 18 Diagrams

DTRN Diagram
The DTRN Diagram type defines a trend object.

Figure 48. DTRN Diagram

Layout
Select options to be displayed on the Diagram during run time:

Time Displays the time axis.


Limits Displays scale limits.
Grid Displays a grid.
Date Displays the date on the time axis.

142 9AKK101130D1384
Section 18 Diagrams Layout

Defining Layout Using the Windows Registry


Others parameters for the trend layout can be changed by defining the Windows
registry key called APPS\TntExplorer\TrendDisplayMask.
0x10 - to show the selected tag parameters.
0x20 - to enable the display of the cursor on mouse click.
0x40 - to enable the display of the time and value cursor on mouse click.
0x100 - to activate the “paused” trend.
0x200 - to enable the display of the main information of the trend.
0x400 - to enable the display of the date.
0x1000 - to display the trend curve in interpolate mode.
0x2000- to enable the display of the markers.
0x4000- to display the trend with a filled area.
When this option is defined with one tag in the trend:
– The area between the curve and the time axis will be filled with the curve
color.
When this option is defined with two or more tags in the trend:
– The area between first and second curve will be filled using the color of
“lower” curve.
0x8000- to display the range of the tag at right of the trend.
0x40000000 - to display the trends defined with a DTRN diagram in transparent
mode.

Using a transparent trend, you can insert an image as trend background but, run-
time, zoom-in/out trend actions will be executed only on the trend and nothing
will be executed on the image.

If the APPS\TntExplorer\TrendDisplayMask registry key is not defined, all of the


options are disabled (mask = 0).

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The registry setting defines the parameters for all “DTRN” trends layout, but is
possible customize single trend using the script of the trend object.
In the script you can define the variable TrendDisplayMask that will be used to
overwrite the value of the registry.
For example, to add the transparent option only on specific trend, add to the script
following code:
DefMask = XXX; // value of your TrendDisplayMask registry
TrendDisplayMask = DefMask + 2^30; // registry setting + transparent
For example, to define a new trend layout filled, with right legend and transparent:
TrendDisplayMask = 2^14+2^15+2^30; // filled, right,transparent

Curves
Curves represent the number of tags to be displayed within the trend. The number
of curves range is from 1 to 10.

Span
Span represents the span time of the trend (in seconds).

Color
Color defines the trend colors.
If the fields in this area are set to -1, the default trend colors defined in the
APPS\TntExplorer Windows registry keys are used.
Grid: represents the color index (range 0-63) of the trend grid.
Frame: represents the color index (range 0-63) of the trend frame.
BckGnd: represents the color index (range 0-63) of the trend “border”.
Text: represents the color index (range 0-63) of the trend scale.

Configuration Parameters
The Configuration Parameters area displays the data of defined curves.

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Curve Color: defines the color (range 0-63) of the curve.


Var Name: defines the name of variable associated to the curve to be displayed on
the trend. This parameter can undefined when a tag name is used.
Tag Name: defines the name of the tag associated to the trend curve. This
parameter can be undefined when a variable name is used.
All curve Configuration Parameters can be set or modified by double-clicking the
row that defines a curve. You can then define the curve parameters:

Figure 49. DTRN Diagram - Set Curve Parameters

Tag Name (check for IDPT)


Defines the name of the tag.
• See Section 16, Tag Browser for details.
Select the IDPT option when an indirect access to the tag is done through a variable
containing all the references.

Range
The presentation limits of the measure on the trend are defined by:

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Low from DB: defines the low scale limit; if selected, the low scale limit defined in
the tag database is used; otherwise, the entered valid value is used.
High from DB: defines the high scale limit; if selected, the high scale limit defined
in the tag database is used; otherwise, the entered valid value is used.
Color: defines the color (range 0-63) of the curve. Enter the color index or click the
button to open the color selection table:

Figure 50. DTRN Diagram - Table of Colors

146 9AKK101130D1384
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DXYP Diagram
The DXYP type defines a XY Plot Diagram. This type of Diagram does not require
any configuration of variables in the properties page.

Figure 51. DXYP Diagram

Layout
X Limits: enables the display of the scale on the X axis.
Y Limits: enables the display of the scale on the Y axis.
Grid: enables the display of the grid.
X Tics: defines the number of tics on the X axis.
Y Tics: defines the number of tics on the Y axis.

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Curves: defines the number of curves to be displayed in the XY Plot


• The number of curves range is from 1 to 10.
Type: defines the type of the XY Plot; the types are listed in Table 11.

Table 11. DXYP Diagram - XY Plot Types

Type Description
NORMAL Independent curves on filled background
NORMAL_TRANSPARENT Independent curves on transparent background
LINKED Linked curves on filled background
LINKED_TRANSPARENT Linked curves on transparent background
Linked and filled area between first two curves
FILLED
on filled background
Linked and filled area between first two curves
FILLED_TRANSPARENT
on transparent background
NORMAL_NO_LINKED Independent points on filled background
NORMAL_NO_LINKED_TRANSPARENT Independent points on transparent background

Color
Defines the colors of the XYPlot frames.
If the fields in this area are set to -1, the default trend colors defined in the Windows
registry key called APPS\TntExplorer are used.
Grid: represents the color index (range 0-63) of the XYPlot grid.
Frame: represents the color index (range 0-63) of the XYPlot frame.
BckGnd: represents the color index (range 0-63) of the XYPlot border.
Text: represents the color index (range 0-63) of the XYPlot scale.

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Configuration Parameters
Each row, in this area, displays the definition data of a curve of the XYPlot.
Col: defines the color (range 0-63) of the curve.
Sample: defines the number of samples used to create a XYPlot single point
(sample = 1) or multipoint (sample > 1).
Var X: defines the name of variable, associated to the curve, to be displayed on the
X axis; it can be left undefined when the tag name (Tag X) is used.
Tag X: defines the name of the tag, associated to the curve, to be displayed on the X
axis; it can be left undefined when the variable name (Var X) is used.
Var Y: defines the name of variable, associated to the curve, to be displayed on the
Y axis; it can be left undefined when the tag name (Tag Y) is used.
Tag Y: defines the name of the tag, associated to the curve, to be displayed on the Y
axis; it can be left undefined when the variable name (Var Y) is used.

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All the parameters can be set or modified by double-clicking the row defining a
curve. You can then define the curve parameters.

Figure 52. DXYP Diagram - Set Curve Parameters

X Parameters / Y Parameters
Tag Name: defines the name of the point. Tag Name is only enabled if Checked
for FILE access is clear.
• See Section 16, Tag Browser for more information.
Checked for FILE access: is selected when the data used to plot the XYPlot is
retrieved from a data file.

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Click the Browse button to define the access to the data file.

• See Variables on page 130 for details about file access.


Low from DB: defines the low scale limit. If this option is selected, the low scale
limit defined in the tag database is used. Otherwise, the entered valid value is used.
High from DB: defines the high scale limit. If this option is selected, the high scale
limit defined in the tag database is used; otherwise, the entered valid value is used.
Color: defines the color (range 0-63) of the curve. Enter the color index or click the
button to open the color selection table as show in Figure 50.
Samples: Defines the number of samples used to plot the curve.
A single sample will be displayed as single point (with defined marker). Multiple
samples will be displayed as a curve.
Marker: Defines the curve marker.
If Marker is not defined, a filled circle will be used for the single sample.
The allowed markers are listed below:

Table 12. DXYP Diagram - Markers

Marker Description
NONE Continuous curve
CIRCLE Empty circle
FILLED CIRCLE Filled circle
DIAMOND Empty diamond
FILLED DIAMOND Filled diamond
BOX Empty box
FILLED BOX Filled box
TRIANGLE UP Empty triangle up

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Table 12. DXYP Diagram - Markers

Marker Description
FILLED TRIANGLE UP Filled triangle up
TRIANGLE DOWN Empty triangle down
FILLED TRIANGLE DOWN Filled triangle down
TRIANGLE LEFT Empty triangle left
FILLED TRIANGLE LEFT Filled triangle left
TRIANGLE RIGHT Empty triangle right
FILLED TRIANGLE RIGHT Filled triangle right
BAR CHART Empty bars (height = XY point)
FILLED BAR CHART Filled bars (height = XY point)

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DDYN Diagram
The DDYN type defines a dynamic Diagram for analog or digital points.

Figure 53. DDYN Diagram

Symbol Attributes

Blink if UnAcked
If set, the object blinks when the associated tag is to be acknowledged.

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Items Section 18 Diagrams

Change Foreground
If set, the resulting color is assigned to the object foreground.

Change Background
If set, the resulting color is assigned to the object background.

Num Alm
Num Alm defines the number of tag statuses managed from the variable. The value
ranges from 0 to 9 for analog tags, or a maximum of 8 for digital tags.
During the configuration phase, the typology of the tag to be displayed through this
Diagram must be known, in order to select the proper number of statuses.

Num Qual
Num Qual defines the number of quality statuses managed from the variable. The
value ranges from 0 to 5.

Num Rng
Num Rng defines a range of values within the each variable that will assume
specified characteristics. The value ranges from 0 to 25.

Items
In the lower area of the dialog box a row is dedicated to the definition of each item.
The number of rows corresponds to the number of items defined.

154 9AKK101130D1384
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Double-click a row to set or change the parameters:

Figure 54. DDYN Diagram - Modify List Item Parameters

# Item
Defines the item number of the currently displayed parameter.

Parameters
Value: defines the status (analog or digital) the variable can assume
The status values to manage a digital tag are:
• Digit_Alm_0
• Digit_Alm_1
• Digit_Alm_2
• Digit_Alm_3
• Digit_NoAl_0
• Digit_NoAl_1

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Items Section 18 Diagrams

• Digit_NoAl_2
• Digit_NoAl_3
The status values to manage a analog tag are:
• Anal_No_alm
• Anal_Low_alm
• Anal_High_alm
• Anal_Low2_alm
• Anal_High2_alm
• Anal_Low3_alm
• Anal_High3_alm
• Anal_LowDev_alm
• Anal_HighDev_alm
The status values to manage a quality status are:
• Substituted
• Inhibited
• Disestablished
• Bad Quality
• Suspect
A range status uses floating values.
Foreground Color: defines the foreground color (range 0-63) used to represent the
variable when in the specified status. Enter the color index or click the button to
open the color selection table as show in Figure 50.
Blink: enables blink for the variable.
Move: enables the object movement according to the number of pixels value
defined for this state.
Delta move X: number of pixels to move object on the X axes. Move to left if a
positive value, to right if negative.

156 9AKK101130D1384
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Delta move Y: number of pixels to move object on the Y axes. Move down if a
positive value, up if negative.

Visibility
You can use the move options to set the object to not visible. If either Delta move
X or Delta move Y are set to 5000, the object will not be visible.

In the Graphic Displays produced with the SODG translator, there are many
objects with the DDYN/DDYA Diagrams. It can be difficult to understand the
operation of the Dynamic Objects in this Diagram.

For these Dynamic Objects the SODG translator creates unique scripted objects.
You can not be create similar objects with the Display Builder.
Typically these object only have a single line as a script:
object.dynoValue = value;
If you want to analyze one of these objects, follows these steps:
• Select the object.
• Remove the Dynamic Object.
• Right-click, and then select Ungroup.
• Without clicking on the Graphic Display, select Show from the Transform
menu.
• Click the object and try to move it.
You will see that the object was composed of overwritten objects, each with a
different color and each named with a number.
To use the graphic drawing for other Dynamic Objects, use only one of these
objects, with the object name removed.

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You can use a DDYN or DDYA Diagram to change the colors of the object.
• Select Change Foreground and/or Change Background DDY* options:

Figure 55. DDYN Diagram - Change DDY* options

DDYN Diagram Scripts


The DDYN Diagram automatically manages the change of colors, blink, position,
etc. However you can add a script to execute other functions.
At runtime the script variable “value” will have a number (zero based) that is the
index of the parameters defined for the Diagram.

158 9AKK101130D1384
Section 18 Diagrams DDYN Diagram Scripts

For example, with the parameters showed in the previous figure, at run time you
execute the following script:
if (value == 0) { // Digit_NoAl_0
...
} else if (value == 1) { // Digit_Alm_0
...
} else if (value == 2) { // Digit_NoAl_1
...
} else if (value == 3) { // Digit_Alm_1
...
} else if (value == 4) { // Bad Quality
...
} else {
// if the Diagram is correctly configured, the script will not go to this point.
}

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DDYA Diagram
The DDYA type defines a dynamic Diagram for analog points.

Figure 56. DDYA Diagram

Symbol Attributes

Blink if UnAck
If set, the object blinks when the associated tag is acknowledged.

Change Foreground
If set, the resulting color is assigned to the object foreground.

160 9AKK101130D1384
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Change Background
If set, the resulting color is assigned to the object background.

Low Limit
Low Limit represents the low limit of the range for the dynamic management.

High limit
High Limit represents the high limit of the range for the dynamic management.

Items
The items listed on the bottom show analog range definitions. Double-click a row to
set or change the current parameters:

Figure 57. DDYA Diagram - Modify List Item Parameters

# Item
Defines the item whose parameters are currently displayed.

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DDYA Diagram Scripts Section 18 Diagrams

Parameters
Foreground Color: Defines the foreground color (range 0-63) used to represent the
variable when in the specified status. Enter the color index or click the button to
open the color selection table as show in Figure 50.
Blink: enables blink for the variable.
Move: enables the object movement according to the number of pixels value
defined for this state.
Delta move X: number of pixels to move object on the X axis. Move to left if a
positive value, to right if negative.
Delta move Y: number of pixels to move object on the Y axis. Move down if a
positive value, up if negative.

Visibility
You can use the move options to set the object to not visible. If either Delta move
X or Delta move Y are set to 5000, the object will not be visible.

DDYA Diagram Scripts


The DDYA Diagram automatically manages the change of colors, blink, position,
etc. However you can add a script to execute other functions. The script variable
“value” will have a run-time a number (zero based) that is the index of the
parameters defined for the Diagram.

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Section 18 Diagrams DDYA Diagram Scripts

For example, at run time you execute the following script:


f (value == 0) { // Low
...
} else if (value == 1) { // Low+Al
...
} else if (value == 2) { // Mid
...
} else if (value == 3) { // Mid+Al
...
} else if (value == 4) { // High
...
} else if (value == 5) { // High+Al
...
} else if (value == 6) { // Bad Quality
...
}

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DRDR Diagram
The DRDR type defines a Radar Diagram. This type of Diagram does not require
any configuration of variables in the properties page.

Figure 58. DRDR Diagram

Layout
Scale: enables the display of the scale. Tics defines the number of tics for the Scale.
Grid: enables the display of the grid. Tics defines the number of tics for the Grid.
Curves: defines the number of curves to be displayed in the Radar. The number of
curves range is from 1 to 10.
Items: defines the number of “points” to be displayed in the Radar for each curve.
The number of items range is from 3 to 10.

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Type: defines the type of the Radar; the types are listed in Table 13.
Low Limit: defines the low scale limit.
High Limit: defines the high scale limit.

Table 13. DRDR Diagram - Radar Types

Type Description
NORMAL Filled background
TRANSPARENT Transparent background

Color
Color defines the Radar colors.
If the fields in this area are set to -1, the default trend colors defined in the
APPS\TntExplorer Windows registry keys are used.
Grid: represents the color index (range 0-63) of the Radar grid.
Frame: represents the color index (range 0-63) of the Radar frame.
BckGnd: represents the color index (range 0-63) of the Radar “border”.
Text: represents the color index (range 0-63) of the Radar scale.

Configuration Parameters
This area show the parameters of each defined curve.
Color: defines the color (range 0-63) of the curve.
Var n: defines the name of variable associated with the curve to be displayed on the
Radar. This parameter can undefined when a tag name (Tag n) is used.

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Parameters Section 18 Diagrams

Tag n: defines the name of the tag associated with the Radar curve. This parameter
can be undefined when a variable name (Var n) is used.

Figure 59. DRDR Diagram - Set Curve Parameters

Parameters
Only the fields of the defined items are enabled.
Title: These fields are enabled only on first curve. Title defines the title of the point
in the radar Diagram. It is an alphanumeric string

166 9AKK101130D1384
Section 18 Diagrams Color

Tag Name: defines the name of the point. Tag Name is only enabled if Checked
for FILE access is clear.
• See Section 16, Tag Browser for more information.
Checked for FILE access: is selected when the data used to plot the Radar is
retrieved from a data file.
Click the browse button to define the access to the data file.

See Variables on page 130 for details about file access.

Color
Color defines the color (range 0-63) of the curve. Enter the color index or click the
button to open the color selection table as show in Figure 50.

Marker
Marker defines the curve marker.
The allowed markers are listed in Table 14:

Table 14. DRDR Diagram - Markers

Marker Description
NONE Continuous curve
CIRCLE Empty circle
FILLED CIRCLE Filled circle
DIAMOND Empty diamond
FILLED DIAMOND Filled diamond
BOX Empty box
FILLED BOX Filled box
TRIANGLE UP Empty triangle up

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Table 14. DRDR Diagram - Markers

Marker Description
FILLED TRIANGLE UP Filled triangle up
TRIANGLE DOWN Empty triangle down
FILLED TRIANGLE DOWN Filled triangle down
TRIANGLE LEFT Empty triangle left
FILLED TRIANGLE LEFT Filled triangle left
TRIANGLE RIGHT Empty triangle right
FILLED TRIANGLE RIGHT Filled triangle right

Values
Enable: select this box to display the points value and to set the color that will be
used to display the values.

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DALL Diagram
The DALL Diagram defines an alarm list Diagram. Using this Diagram you can
display on your page a list of alarms by group or/and by priority.
This type of Diagram does not require any configuration of variables in the
properties page.

Figure 60. DALL Diagram

Alarm Group
You can choose to display alarms of all groups or of selected group.

Alarm Priority
You can choose to display alarms of all priorities or of a selected priority.

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170 9AKK101130D1384
Section 19 Variables

Introduction
Variables allow you to link Dynamic Objects to the PGP internal database.
The type of variable defines the environment where the data must be retrieved
(Realtime Database, Data Files). Other information is used to specify data format.

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Variable Common Info


General information on variables is similar to the general information for Diagrams.
An example of Variable Common Information dialog box is shown in the Figure 61:

Figure 61. Variables - Example of Variable Common Info

Name
Name is an alphanumeric string containing the name of the variable. The name is
unique within the Graphic Display; it is automatically assigned during the Graphic
Display definition phase and can not be modified.

172 9AKK101130D1384
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Type
Defines the type of the variable. Allowed types are:
Realtime DataBase: variable values are retrieved from a Realtime Database.
File Access: variable values are retrieved from a data file by specifying the address.
External File Access: variable values are retrieved from a set of data in a file:
• This type is only enabled to define indirect access of IDPT for DXYP
Diagrams.
– See DXYP Diagram on page 147 for more information about the DXYP
Diagram.

IDPT
This option defines an indirect access to the tag through a variable containing all of
the references.
• If not selected, the tag access is direct. That is, the tag name only is associated
to the variable, and allows data retrieval.
• If selected, you must define the variable through which to access the tag (in an
indirect way).
The IDPT mechanism is supported only for the variable of Realtime Database type.

Data
This area contains data information common to all type of variables.
All fields in this area are updated with default values based on the type of the data
selected for the Realtime Database access.
The only exception is the Realtime Database variable coded DB_INFO_VALUE.
• For the DB_INFO_VALUE code you must change the defaults based on the
type (analog, di, txtsel, ...) of the specified tag.
– See Realtime Database Variable on page 177 for more information.

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Entry:
Entry defines if data entry is allowed. This field is enabled only for a variable with
File Access type.
• See Type on page 173 for more information.
Allowed values are listed in Table 15:

Table 15. Variable - Data Entry


Entry Description
NO_DATA_ENTRY Data entry is not allowed
NO_VALIDATION Data entry is allowed (not validated)

Type:
Type defines the type of data to read from selected database or file. Allowed values
are listed in Table 16:

Table 16. Variable - Data Types


Type Description
MISDICODE Keyword to read a digital data (bits)
TIMECODE Keyword to read a variable representing a time
MISPVCODE Keyword to read an analog value
TEXTCODE Keyword to read a text string
IDPTCODE Keyword to read a Point ID
NUMBERCODE Keyword to read a number

Sub-code:
Sub-code specifies the sub-type of data. Allowed sub-codes are listed in Table 17:

174 9AKK101130D1384
Section 19 Variables Data

Table 17. Variable - Data Sub-code


Type Sub-code Description
MISDICODE No sub-code
Absolute Time
ABSOLUTIME
Format: according to TIME64
TIMECODE Delta time in seconds
DELTATIME
Format: Integer 4 bytes
Internal PGP absolute time
JULIANTIME
Format: Integer 4 bytes
REAL Format Real (4 bytes)
INT2B Format Integer (2 bytes)
MISPVCODE INT4B Format Integer (4 bytes)
UNBYTE Format Integer (1 byte)
REAL8 Format Real (8 bytes)
ASCII ASCII string
TEXTCODE
ASCIIZ ASCII string with zero
DIGITALPOINT Tagidx number of a DIGITAL tag (DI)
ANALOGPOINT Tagidx number of an ANALOG tag (PV)
Tagidx number of an undefined point.
UNDEFINEDPOINT It can be either PV or DI. If the most
significative bit is 1, the point is a DI
The point can be either PV or DI. Format
TAGIDXPOINT
to read is a TAGIDX structure
IDPTCODE Use TAGIDX to found the index of the
SETPOINT
Set Point of a control station.
Use TAGIDX to found the index of the
CONTROLOUTPUT
Control Output of a control station.
Use TAGIDX to found the index of the
RATIOINDEX
Ratio Index of a control station.
Use TAGIDX to found the index of the
STATIONSTATUS
Station Status
INTEGER Format Integer 4 bytes
NUMBERCODE
FLOATING Format Floating Point 4 bytes

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Quality:
Quality defines the quality management for the variable. Allowed values are listed
in Table 18:

Table 18. Variable - Quality


Quality Description
NO_QUAL No quality to read - quality status is ignored
USE_QUAL Quality is defined (as quality status bit map)

All Bits:
All Bits is only enabled for MISPVCODE and MISDICODE types.
• See Type on page 173 for more information.
This option allows you to use all value bits of a specific data type (for example
MSDD, RCM etc.). No filters will be applied during run time to the Realtime value.
The following two fields are enabled only when the MISDICODE type is selected.
A digital value can be read as a bit map (16 bits). These fields specify:
Start Bit: defines the bit (range 0-15) from which to start reading the value
Num Bits: defines number (range 1-16) of bits to be read starting from the Start Bit.
The two settings are equivalent:
Start Bit = 0 and Num Bits = 0.
Start Bit = 0 and Num Bits = 16.

TextLength:
TextLength is only enabled for the TEXTCODE type. It defines the number of
characters to be read for the text string .

Time
Defines the refresh time of the variable. Refresh time is the number of seconds
between two subsequent accesses to a database to update the value of the variable.

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Realtime Database Variable


These variables are retrieved from a Realtime Database (RTDB).

Figure 62. Realtime Database Variables

Tag Name
Defines the name of the tag associated to the variable.
• See Section 16, Tag Browser for more information about the automatic
selection of the tag names.
Is possible to get dynamically run-time the tagname (or part of the tagname) from a
Data Base field or from an atom value, using following syntax:

9AKK101130D1384 177
Tag Type Section 19 Variables

• {<Tag->DB_FieldName>} to read the tagname from the field FieldName of


the Data Base of the tag named Tag.
• {<Tag->AtomName>} to read the tagname from the value of the specified
AtomName atom of the tag named Tag.
Tag can be also defined as %TAG% and specified when the page is loaded.

Tag Type
This is a read-only field that shows the type of the subtype tag.
It indicates if you want to read from the database either:
• The value of specified tag (TAGIDXPOINT - default)
• The value of a subtype of the tag:
– SETPOINT for the SP
– CONTROLOUTPUT for the CO
– RATIOINDEX for the RI.
These codes can be generated only by the SODG translator.
• See the InformIT Power Generation Portal Configuration Manual for more
information about the SODG translator.
If you want to access, for example, the value of the set point of the station, you can
use the name TAGNAME-SP or TAGNAME.SP.

Normal Factor
The Normal Factor is used to convert the RTDB value as a percentage of the scale
range.
Allowed normal factor values are defined in Table :

178 9AKK101130D1384
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Table 19. Realtime Database Variables - Normal Factor


Normal Factor Description
DEF_NO_NORM No factor applied
The value read from the database is the re-scaled
DEF_NORM_VALUE percentage (0:100 scale) respect to the presentation
limits

Information

Code:
Table 20 defines the codes (sorted by name) and their descriptions.

Table 20. Realtime Database Variables - Codes


Code Description
DB_INFO_ALMGRP Alarm group index
DB_INFO_ALMPRI The alarm priority index
DB_INFO_ALMST Alarm status, quality, group
DB_INFO_ALMST1 Alarm status (1 char)
DB_INFO_ALMST2 Alarm status (2 chars)
DB_INFO_ALMTXT Alarm text descriptor
DB_INFO_BLOCK The number of block (for C-Net tags)
DB_INFO_CO_STRING Control Output string
DB_INFO_CO_VALUE Control Output value
DB_INFO_CTRLINH Control inhibit status
DB_INFO_DESC The description of the tag
DB_INFO_DI_STATE_0 The digital state 0 descriptor
DB_INFO_DI_STATE_1 The digital state 1 descriptor
DB_INFO_DI_STATE_2 The digital state 2 descriptor
DB_INFO_DI_STATE_3 The digital state 3 descriptor
DB_INFO_EXTDESC The extended description of the tag
DB_INFO_HIG_DEF High presentation limit
DB_INFO_HIG_HIG_VAL The high-high alarm limit
DB_INFO_HIG_INST The high instrument limit

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Table 20. Realtime Database Variables - Codes


Code Description
DB_INFO_HIGH_VAL The high alarm limit
DB_INFO_LOW_DEF Low presentation limit
DB_INFO_LOW_INST The low instrument limit
DB_INFO_LOW_LOW_VAL The low-low alarm limit
DB_INFO_LOW_VAL The low alarm limit
DB_INFO_MODULE The number of module (for C-Net tags)
DB_INFO_NEG_ROC Negative rate of change
DB_INFO_OIS_INDEX OIS index
DB_INFO_OIS_QUAL OIS quality (multi chars)
DB_INFO_OIS_QUAL1 OIS quality (1 char)
DB_INFO_PAR Database parameter in default format
DB_INFO_PAR_STRING Database parameter in text format
DB_INFO_PAR_STRING_EX DB parameter and its description in text format
DB_INFO_PCU The number of PCU (for C-Net tags)
DB_INFO_POINTNAME Tag name
DB_INFO_POS_ROC Positive rate of change
DB_INFO_PSN Customer identifier (Text format)
DB_INFO_QUAL1 The word 1 quality
DB_INFO_QUAL2 The word 2 quality
DB_INFO_QUALNDX Quality in extended format
DB_INFO_RI_STRING Ratio Index string value
DB_INFO_RI_VALUE Ratio Index value
DB_INFO_RING The number of Loop (for C-Net tags)
DB_INFO_SIG_HIG HH3 value
DB_INFO_SIG_LOW LL3 value
DB_INFO_SODG The information like SODG commands
DB_INFO_SP_STRING Set Point string
DB_INFO_SP_VALUE Set Point value
Tag value read from the database in ASCII
DB_INFO_STRINGVALUE
format
DB_INFO_SYI System option parameters
DB_INFO_TAGTYPE Type of the tag

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Section 19 Variables Information

Table 20. Realtime Database Variables - Codes


Code Description
DB_INFO_TIMESTAMP_TEXT Time stamp in text format
DB_INFO_TOTAL_1_DAY The totalized value over last day
DB_INFO_TOTAL_1_HOUR The totalized value over last hour
DB_INFO_TOTAL_1_MIN The totalized value over last minute
DB_INFO_TOTAL_1_MONTH The totalized value over last month
DB_INFO_TOTAL_1_YEAR The totalized value over last year
DB_INFO_TOTAL_10_MIN The totalized value over last 10 minutes
DB_INFO_TOTAL_30_MIN The totalized value over last 30 minutes
DB_INFO_TOTAL_8_HOUR The totalized value over last 8 hours
DB_INFO_TXTSEL The text selector index
DB_INFO_UNITS The engineering unit of the tag (ASCII)
DB_INFO_VALUE Tag value read from the database in real format

Offset:
Defines a offset (range 0-131) within a text string read from the database.
• This field is meaningful only when the selected code is DB_INFO_DESC or
DB_INFO_TXTSEL.

Generic Info:
This field is meaningful only when the selected code is DB_INFO_PAR* or
DB_INFO_SYI. It defines the subcodes of selected items.
DB_INFO_PAR: With the DB_INFO_PAR code you can access all Database
information of selected tag. For example, to read from Database the TAGNAME
you can use either:
• DB_INFO_TAGNAME.
• DB_INFO_PAR with the DB_TAGNAME Generic Info option.
– The Generic info list will be loaded with all configured options.
DB_INFO_SYI: With this code you can access at run time the “Internal flags” of
the system:

9AKK101130D1384 181
Information Section 19 Variables

• The Generic info list will be loaded with all configured system options.

SODG Command:
Defines the command sub-code to operate like an SODG command.
• This field is meaningful only when the selected code is DB_INFO_SODG.
The supported SODG commands are listed in Table 21:

Table 21. Realtime Database Variables - SODG Commands


Code Description
SODG_CMD_33 Alarm comment
SODG_CMD_37 Logic state descriptor
SODG_CMD_43_32 Output indicator: zero and one state
SODG_CMD_43_33 Output indicator: zero state only
SODG_CMD_43_34 Output indicator: one state only
SODG_CMD_44_32 RCM feedback indicator: zero and one state
SODG_CMD_44_33 RCM feedback indicator: zero state only
SODG_CMD_44_34 RCM feedback indicator: one state only
SODG_CMD_45_32 RCM set permissive indicator: zero and one state
SODG_CMD_45_37 RCM set permissive indicator: zero state only
SODG_CMD_45_38 RCM set permissive indicator: one state only
SODG_CMD_46 RCM override indicator
SODG_CMD_47 Station mode - type 1
SODG_CMD_48 Station status - type 1
Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: digital dynamic
SODG_CMD_54_46
symbol
Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: MSDD
SODG_CMD_54_56
dynamic symbol - current state
Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: MSDD
SODG_CMD_54_57
dynamic symbol - requested state
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: ANALOG -
03 Calibration Quality
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: ANALOG -
04 Point disabled

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Table 21. Realtime Database Variables - SODG Commands


Code Description
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: DI, RCM, DD,
06 MSDD, RMCB - State
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: ALL - Red tag
08 status
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: STATION -
09 Set point tracking
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: STATION -
10 Bypass mode
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: STATION -
11 Mode interlock
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: STATION -
12 Output tracking
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: STATION -
13 Analog output status
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: STATION -
14 Computer status
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: STATION -
15 Station level
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: STATION -
16 Cascade, ratio or normal
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: STATION -
17 Auto/manual
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: RCM - Logic
18 set
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: RCM - Set
19 permissive
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: RCM - Logic
20 reset
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: RCM -
21 Override
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: RCM -
22 Feedback
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: RCM - Set
23 command

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Information Section 19 Variables

Table 21. Realtime Database Variables - SODG Commands


Code Description
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: RCM - Reset
24 command
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: DD, MSDD -
25 Feedback status
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: DD, MSDD -
26 Status override
SODG_CMD_54_58_
Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: DD - Mode
27
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: MSDD -
28 Requested state
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: MSDD - Last
29 good state
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: DD, MSDD,
30 RMCB - Feedback 1 state
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: DD, MSDD,
31 RMCB - Feedback 2 state
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: MSDD -
32 Feedback 3 state
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: MSDD -
33 Feedback 4 state
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: MSDD -
35 Control override
SODG_CMD_54_58_
Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: MSDD - Mode
36
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: RMCB - Bad
37 start
SODG_CMD_54_58_
Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: RMCB - Fault
38
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: RMCB - Start
39 permissive 1
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: RMCB - Start
40 permissive 2
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: RMCB - Error
41 code

184 9AKK101130D1384
Section 19 Variables Information

Table 21. Realtime Database Variables - SODG Commands


Code Description
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: RMSC -
42 Tracking
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: STATION - PV
43 status
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: N90STA -
51 Backup status
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: N90STA -
52 Local I/O error
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: N90STA -
53 Remote I/O error
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: TEXSTR -
65 Echo control
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: TEXSTR -
66 String Interlock
SODG_CMD_54_58_ Exception report discrete dynamic symbol: TEXSTR -
67 Truncated
SODG_CMD_57 RMSC - tracking indicator
SODG_CMD_58 DD or MSDD override
SODG_CMD_59_33 Feedback indicator: feedback 1
SODG_CMD_59_34 Feedback indicator: feedback 2
SODG_CMD_59_47 Feedback indicator: MSDD - feedback 1
SODG_CMD_59_48 Feedback indicator: MSDD - feedback 2
SODG_CMD_60 Mode
SODG_CMD_61_33 MSDD output indicator: default output
SODG_CMD_61_34 MSDD output indicator: output 1 indicator
SODG_CMD_61_47 MSDD output indicator: output 2 indicator
SODG_CMD_61_48 MSDD output indicator: output 3 indicator
SODG_CMD_62 MSDD control override
SODG_CMD_63 Node status - Number
SODG_CMD_64 Node status - Node text
SODG_CMD_65_50 Node status: short form error
SODG_CMD_65_51 Node status: long form off line error
SODG_CMD_65_52 Node status: long form module error

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Information Section 19 Variables

Table 21. Realtime Database Variables - SODG Commands


Code Description
SODG_CMD_65_53 Node status: long form communication error
SODG_CMD_65_54 Node status: long form node status error
SODG_CMD_66_51 Node status: node text - len 4
SODG_CMD_66_52 Node status: module text - len 6
SODG_CMD_66_53 Node status: communication system text - len 20
SODG_CMD_66_54 Node status: node status text - len 11
SODG_CMD_67 Module address
SODG_CMD_68 Module status - type and configuration error
SODG_CMD_69 Module status - mode
SODG_CMD_70 Module status - error indicator
SODG_CMD_71 Module status - status bytes
SODG_CMD_74 Station mode - type 2
SODG_CMD_75 Station status - type 2
SODG_CMD_76 Station tracking - type 2
SODG_CMD_77 Station mode - type 3
SODG_CMD_79 Text selector
SODG_CMD_80_33 RMCB texts: Bad start text
SODG_CMD_80_34 RMCB texts: Fault indication text
SODG_CMD_81_33 RMCB permissive indicator: permissive 1
SODG_CMD_81_34 RMCB permissive indicator: permissive 2
SODG_CMD_92 RMCB error code text
SODG_CMD_95 Device status: description
SODG_CMD_96 Device type
SODG_CMD_97_32 Device number
SODG_CMD_97_61 Device sub-number
SODG_CMD_100 Red tag status - text
SODG_CMD_103 Alarm priority

For details on the SODG Utility, see the .InformIT Power Generation Portal
Configuration Manual.

186 9AKK101130D1384
Section 19 Variables File Access Variable

After changing codes or sub-codes PGP will configure the variable to allow
access to the database in the correct format.

File Access Variable


These variables are retrieved through access to a data file.

Figure 63. File Access Variables

Mod
The modifiers used to compute the word number to access a file according to the
following formula:
If Mod1<0==>Mod1 = RECSIZE

9AKK101130D1384 187
File Section 19 Variables

If Mod2<0==>Mod2 = (-Mod2) * RECSIZE


IOFF = (ICRT-1) * Mod2 + PAGEMOD * Mod1
READ_WORD = IOFF + (Rec-1) * RECSIZE + Word - 1
where
RECSIZE= Size of the record in the file,
PAGEMOD= Page Modifier defined in the Header,
ICRT = Current index of the MMI Interface (Dynamically assigned in
Realtime by the system).
Mod1: defines the first modifier value to access, as a function of the page modifier,
to the block in the record.
Mod2: defines the second modifier value to access, as a function of the MMI
number, to a specific record.

File
This area contains the information required to access the data file.
File: defines a data file of the PGP internal database containing the information to
be read.
Rec: defines the number of the record within the file.
Word: defines the number of the word within the record.

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Section 19 Variables External File Access Variable

External File Access Variable


These variables are retrieved from a data file defined in an extended and general
form.

Figure 64. External File Access Variables

File, Rec and Word


These three fields specify the parameters (file, record and word number) to access a
file containing the information to be retrieved.

Mod1, Mod2
First and second modifier to access information in the data file.

9AKK101130D1384 189
Min Section 19 Variables

Action Key
Defines how the data file is accessed. Two are the allowed access orders
MULTI_SAMPLE_BW: values are retrieved from the file starting from the word
CURMOD = (Max-Inc+1) and the “Inc” value decrements until the CURMOD
value is less than the Min. value.
MULTI_SAMPLE_FW: values are retrieved from the file starting from the word
CURMOD = maximum (Ini, Min) and the “Inc” value increments until the
CURMOD value is greater than the Max. value.
The word to access the file is computed according to the following formula:
If Mod1< 0 ==> Mod1=RECSIZE
If Mod2 < 0 ==> Mod2=(-Mod2)*RECSIZE
IOFF = (ICRT-1) * Mod2 + CURMOD * Mod1
READ_WORD = IOFF + (Rec-1) * RECSIZE + Word - 1
where
RECSIZE= Size of the record in the file,
CURMOD= Modifier related to the current sample,
ICRT = Current index of the MMI Interface (Dynamically assigned in
Realtime by the system).

Min
Minimum limit.

Max
Maximum limit.

Ini
Initial limit.

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Section 19 Variables Inc

Inc
Increment size.

9AKK101130D1384 191
Inc Section 19 Variables

192 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix A Scripting Language

Introduction
The Display Builder Scripting Language provides an easy way to animate the
Dynamic Objects. The syntax is like the “C” language:
• It is case sensitive.
• The standard instructions separator is “;”.
The details of the commands used to define a script are described in the following
sections.

Predefined Values
The predefined variables and constants are listed below.

Table 22. Predefined Values


Attribute Description
It control the conversions from a real number to a string. This
textFormat global variable is a string containing the format to be used.
By default its value is “%g”
Return the x mouse position in the window. It is read-only
mouseX
predefined variable
Return the y mouse position in the window. It is read-only
mouseY
predefined variable
TRUE Logical constant. Value = 1
FALSE Logical constant. Value = 0
PI Arithmetic (pi greek) constant. Value = 3.141592653589
E Exponential constant. Value = 2.718281828459

9AKK101130D1384 193
Variables Appendix A Scripting Language

Table 22. Predefined Values


Attribute Description
GAMMA Constant. Value = 0.577215664901
DEG Constant. Value = 57.29577951308
PHI Constant. Value = 1.618033988749

Variables
Conventions and Types

Un-initialized Variables
Variables do not necessarily need to be declared. They are considered declared
when they are initialized. An un-initialized variable will always have a value of 0.
Un-initialized variables are typically used to take advantage of the default value of
0. The following syntax can be used to execute instructions only the first time the
script is executed.
if (firstTime == 0) {
// instructions to be executed the first time only ....
firstTime = 1;
}
The first character of a variable must be an alphanumeric character (a-z, A-Z).
The following types are implicitly recognized:
realReal numbers.
stringCharacter strings.
The keyword declare can be used to explicitly declare a variable (e.g. declare a;).
By default, a variable is local to its script. The keyword global can be used to
declare global variables (e.g. global a = 0;).

194 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix A Scripting Language Attributes

Attributes
Special variables can be used to access the various attributes of objects.

Access
The generic form to access the attributes of the objects is:
ObjectName.ElementName.Attribute
where:

Table 23.
ObjectName Is the name of the object.
Is the name of the element in the main object (for example
ElementName
the element of a group), it is optional.
Attribute Is the name of desired attribute.

In the script the main object is simply identified with the name “object”.
For example:
object/blink = TRUE;
This line in the script sets the main object to be blinking.

Integer Attributes
The predefined Integers attributes for objects and elements are listed below.

Table 24. Integer Attributes


Attribute Description
allowResize TRUE if the object can be resized
angle1 The starting angle of an arc (in 1/64th degrees)
angle2 The ending angle of an arc (in 1/64th degrees)
arcMode 0 for pie, 1 for chord
background The fill color index (RGB)
blink TRUE if the element should blink

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Real Attributes Appendix A Scripting Language

Table 24. Integer Attributes


Attribute Description
closed TRUE if the polyline is closed
currentRotationStep The current step in a rotation animation
fillStyle Fill style code
flat TRUE if the polyline is displayed as a spline
foreground The outline color index (RGB)
frame The current image index of an animated GIF image
TRUE if the element is a ghost element (visible but not
ghostElement
selectable)
lineArrow Arrows for lines and polylines
lineStyle Line style
lineWidth Line width
numFrames Total number of images of an animated GIF image
rotationStep The rotation increment value
shadowInverted TRUE if the shadow is displayed inverted (released)
shadowThickness The shadow thickness for poly-lines and parallelograms
show TRUE if the element must be visible

Real Attributes
The predefined Reals attributes for objects and elements are listed below.

Table 25. Real Attributes


Attribute Description
dynoValue Value of a Dynamic Object (*)
dynoUserMaximum Maximum possible value for a Dynamic Object (*)
dynoUserMinimum Minimum possible value for a Dynamic Object (*)
height The height in pixel at a zoom factor of 1.0
width The width in pixels at zoom 1.0
x The X position in pixels at zoom 1.0
y The Y position in pixels at zoom 1.0

(*) A Dynamic Object can be found only in a Graphic Display derived from SODG
translator.

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Appendix A Scripting Language String Attributes

String Attributes
The predefined Strings attributes for objects and elements are listed below.

Table 26. String Attributes


Attribute Description
backgroundName Fill color name (e.g. ”#0000ffff0000” or “green”)
foregroundName Outline color name (e.g. ”#00000000ffff” or “blue”)
imageName Image file name
name Element name
string String of text element

Graph Attributes
The reading Graph attributes are listed below.

Table 27. Graph Attributes


Attribute Type Description
animationTimeOut Integer Indicates the animation period in milliseconds
blinkingTimeOut Integer Indicates the blinking period in milliseconds
Indicates the visible layers of the current graph.
This attribute is a combination of bits, where each
layers Integer bit indicates the corrisponding layer visibility.
For example, to show layers 1,2,3 use
graph.layers = 2^0+2^1+2^2; in the script.
zoom Real Indicates the zoom factor of the current graph.

Operators
The following sections list the predefined operators.

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Arithmetic Operators Appendix A Scripting Language

Arithmetic Operators
Table 28. Arithmetic Operators
Operator Description
+ Addition or unary plus
- Subtraction or unary minus
* Multiplication
/ Division
^ Power

Priority Order
Table 29. Priority Table
Operator Priority
^ Highest
+, - (unary)
*, /
+, - Lowest

Comparison Operators
Table 30. Comparison Operators
Operator Description
== Equality
!= Inequality
> Greater than
< Less than
>= Greater than or equal
<= Less than or equal

Logical Operators
Table 31. Logical Operators
Operator Description
! Negation (Not)

198 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix A Scripting Language Parentheses

Table 31. Logical Operators


Operator Description
|| Logical OR
&& Logical AND

Parentheses
Parentheses are used to resolve precedence conflicts, to delimit arguments of
function calls and to bound if and while statements.

Statements
Assignments
The assignment operator is the equal character =.
Example: a = 3;

Structured Statements
A value can be tested with the if statement.
if (expression) statement;

if (expression) {
statement;
}

if (expression) statement else statement;

if (expression) {
statement;
} else if (expression) {

9AKK101130D1384 199
Comments Appendix A Scripting Language

statement;
} else {
statement;
}

if (expression) {
statement;
} else {
statement;
}

The while keyword can be used to program loops:


while (expression) statement;

while (expression) {
statement;
}

Comments
Comments start with the // characters and continue until the end of the line.
Example:
// This is a comment line
a = 1; // This is a comment following a command line

200 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix A Scripting Language Procedures and Functions

Procedures and Functions


Procedures and functions are declared before the script body (the main statement of
the script) providing the name and the type (procedure or function) of the entity. A
function always returns a value while a procedure never does. Parameters are not
explicitly declared but can be referenced using the $i symbol where i is the index of
the parameter. Functions must use the return instruction to return a value and exit
from the function. Procedure can use the return instruction (without any
parameters) to exit.

Procedure declaration
proc ProcName() {
statement
}

Function declaration
func FuncName() {
statement
}
Example:
func MySum() {
return $1+$2;
}
object.string = MySum(5, 6);

Predefined Functions
The following functions are predefined in the script language.

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Mathematical Functions Appendix A Scripting Language

Mathematical Functions
Table 32. Mathematical Functions
Function Description
abs(x) Calculate the absolute value of x
acos(x) Calculate the arc cosine of x in the range 0 to PI radians
asin(x) Calculate the arc sine of x in the range -PI/2 to PI/2 radians
atan(x) Calculate the arc-tangent of x
ceil(x) Return the smallest integer that is greater than or equal to x
cos(x) Calculate the cosine of x
cosh(x) Calculate the hyperbolic cosine of x
exp(x) Calculate the exponential of x
floor(x) Return the largest integer that is less than or equal to x
Calculate the length of the hypotenuse of a right triangle,
hypo(x,y)
given the length of the two sides x and y
int(x) Convert x to an integer
j0(x) Bessel function of the first kind, order 0
j1(x) Bessel function of the first kind, order 1
jn(x,n) Bessel function of the first kind, order n
ln(x) Calculate the natural logarithm of x
log(x) Calculate the 10-based logarithm of x
max(x,y) Return the greater of two specified values
min(x,y) Return the smaller of two specified values
Return the remainder of the first operand divided by the
mod(x,y)
second
sin(x) Calculate the sine of x
sinh(x) Calculate the hyperbolic sine of x
sqrt(x) Calculate the square root of x
tan(x) Calculate the tangent of x
tanh(x) Calculate the hyperbolic tangent of x
y0(x) Bessel function of the second kind, order 0
y1(x) Bessel function of the second kind, order 1
yn(x,n) Bessel function of the second kind, order n

202 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix A Scripting Language Miscellaneous Functions

Miscellaneous Functions
Table 33. Miscellaneous Functions
Function Description
beep() Play a sound
Append s2 to s1. The variable s2 must be a string, s1 can be
concat(s1,s2)
a string or a number
len(s) Return the length of the string s
random() Generate a pseudo-random number in the range 0-1
Extract a substring of length len characters form the string
subString(s1, pos,
s1, starting at position pos (zero-based); the results is
len, s2
returned in s2
toNumber(s) Convert the string in float number

Graphic Objects Functions


Table 34. Graphic Objects Functions
Function Description
getXPoint(obj, Return the X coordinates of the point specified by its index;
index) obj must be a line or a polyline
getYPoint(obj, Return the Y coordinates of the point specified by its index;
index) obj must be a line or a polyline
setXPoint(obj, Set the X coordinates of the point specified by its index;
index) obj must be a line or a polyline
setYPoint(obj, Set the Y coordinates of the point specified by its index;
index) obj must be a line or a polyline
Return the number of points of the object; obj must be a line
getNumPoints(obj)
or a polyline
raise(obj) Move the given object to the foreground
lower(obj) Move the given object to the background
stepUp(obj) Raise the given object in the graphic planes
stepDown(obj) Lower the given object in the graphic planes

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Events Appendix A Scripting Language

Table 34. Graphic Objects Functions


Function Description
Rotate the given object around its center; the rotation angle
is given in the angle parameter and is expressed in degrees
rotate(obj,angle) (positive angle for clockwise rotation). Works only for
rotatable objects (line, polyline, parallelogram, grouped or
not)
Do the same action that the rotate function, but if the object
rotateAll(obj,angle) contains not rotatable elements, those elements are only
moved. Works only if the object is a group

Events
Objects can be configured to call a procedure when certain events occur.
The following is a list of the supported events.

Table 35. Miscellaneous Events


Events Triggered when
click Left mouse button down
release Left mouse button up
dbclick Double click
rclick Right mouse button down
rrelease Right mouse button up
rdbclick Right mouse double click

To declare an event:
when event functionName.
Example for a text object:
proc ShowPush() {
object.string = “pushed”;
}
proc ShowRelease() {

204 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix A Scripting Language Predefined Color Names

object.string = “released”;
}
when click ShowPush;
when release ShowRelease;

Predefined Color Names


Following all predefined color names usable in the script to assigne colors in the
string format.

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
AliceBlue 240 248 255
AntiqueWhite 250 235 215
AntiqueWhite1 255 239 219
AntiqueWhite2 238 223 204
AntiqueWhite3 205 192 176
AntiqueWhite4 139 131 120
BlanchedAlmond 255 235 205
BlueViolet 138 43 226
CadetBlue 95 158 160
CadetBlue1 152 245 255
CadetBlue2 142 229 238
CadetBlue3 122 197 205
CadetBlue4 83 134 139
CornflowerBlue 100 149 237
DarkBlue 0 0 139
DarkCyan 0 139 139
DarkGoldenrod 184 134 11

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Predefined Color Names Appendix A Scripting Language

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
DarkGoldenrod1 255 185 15
DarkGoldenrod2 238 173 14
DarkGoldenrod3 205 149 12
DarkGoldenrod4 139 101 8
DarkGray 169 169 169
DarkGreen 0 100 0
DarkGrey 169 169 169
DarkKhaki 189 183 107
DarkMagenta 139 0 139
DarkOliveGreen 85 107 47
DarkOliveGreen1 202 255 112
DarkOliveGreen2 188 238 104
DarkOliveGreen3 162 205 90
DarkOliveGreen4 110 139 61
DarkOrange 255 140 0
DarkOrange1 255 127 0
DarkOrange2 238 118 0
DarkOrange3 205 102 0
DarkOrange4 139 69 0
DarkOrchid 153 50 204
DarkOrchid1 191 62 255
DarkOrchid2 178 58 238
DarkOrchid3 154 50 205
DarkOrchid4 104 34 139
DarkRed 139 0 0
DarkSalmon 233 150 122

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Appendix A Scripting Language Predefined Color Names

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
DarkSeaGreen 143 188 143
DarkSeaGreen1 193 255 193
DarkSeaGreen2 180 238 180
DarkSeaGreen3 155 205 155
DarkSeaGreen4 105 139 105
DarkSlateBlue 72 61 139
DarkSlateGray 47 79 79
DarkSlateGray1 151 255 255
DarkSlateGray2 141 238 238
DarkSlateGray3 121 205 205
DarkSlateGray4 82 139 139
DarkSlateGrey 47 79 79
DarkTurquoise 0 206 209
DarkViolet 148 0 211
DeepPink 255 20 147
DeepPink1 255 20 147
DeepPink2 238 18 137
DeepPink3 205 16 118
DeepPink4 139 10 80
DeepSkyBlue 0 191 255
DeepSkyBlue1 0 191 255
DeepSkyBlue2 0 178 238
DeepSkyBlue3 0 154 205
DeepSkyBlue4 0 104 139
DimGray 105 105 105
DimGrey 105 105 105

9AKK101130D1384 207
Predefined Color Names Appendix A Scripting Language

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
DodgerBlue 30 144 255
DodgerBlue1 30 144 255
DodgerBlue2 28 134 238
DodgerBlue3 24 116 205
DodgerBlue4 16 78 139
FloralWhite 255 250 240
ForestGreen 34 139 34
GhostWhite 248 248 255
GreenYellow 173 255 47
HotPink 255 105 180
HotPink1 255 110 180
HotPink2 238 106 167
HotPink3 205 96 144
HotPink4 139 58 98
IndianRed 205 92 92
IndianRed1 255 106 106
IndianRed2 238 99 99
IndianRed3 205 85 85
IndianRed4 139 58 58
LavenderBlush 255 240 245
LavenderBlush1 255 240 245
LavenderBlush2 238 224 229
LavenderBlush3 205 193 197
LavenderBlush4 139 131 134
LawnGreen 124 252 0
LemonChiffon 255 250 205

208 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix A Scripting Language Predefined Color Names

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
LemonChiffon1 255 250 205
LemonChiffon2 238 233 191
LemonChiffon3 205 201 165
LemonChiffon4 139 137 112
LightBlue 173 216 230
LightBlue1 191 239 255
LightBlue2 178 223 238
LightBlue3 154 192 205
LightBlue4 104 131 139
LightCoral 240 128 128
LightCyan 224 255 255
LightCyan1 224 255 255
LightCyan2 209 238 238
LightCyan3 180 205 205
LightCyan4 122 139 139
LightGoldenrod 238 221 130
LightGoldenrod1 255 236 139
LightGoldenrod2 238 220 130
LightGoldenrod3 205 190 112
LightGoldenrod4 139 129 76
LightGoldenrodYello
250 250 210
w
LightGray 211 211 211
LightGreen 144 238 144
LightGrey 211 211 211
LightPink 255 182 193
LightPink1 255 174 185

9AKK101130D1384 209
Predefined Color Names Appendix A Scripting Language

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
LightPink2 238 162 173
LightPink3 205 140 149
LightPink4 139 95 101
LightSalmon 255 160 122
LightSalmon1 255 160 122
LightSalmon2 238 149 114
LightSalmon3 205 129 98
LightSalmon4 139 87 66
LightSeaGreen 32 178 170
LightSkyBlue 135 206 250
LightSkyBlue1 176 226 255
LightSkyBlue2 164 211 238
LightSkyBlue3 141 182 205
LightSkyBlue4 96 123 139
LightSlateBlue 132 112 255
LightSlateGray 119 136 153
LightSlateGrey 119 136 153
LightSteelBlue 176 196 222
LightSteelBlue1 202 225 255
LightSteelBlue2 188 210 238
LightSteelBlue3 162 181 205
LightSteelBlue4 110 123 139
LightYellow 255 255 224
LightYellow1 255 255 224
LightYellow2 238 238 209
LightYellow3 205 205 180

210 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix A Scripting Language Predefined Color Names

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
LightYellow4 139 139 122
LimeGreen 50 205 50
MediumAquamarine 102 205 170
MediumBlue 0 0 205
MediumOrchid 186 85 211
MediumOrchid1 224 102 255
MediumOrchid2 209 95 238
MediumOrchid3 180 82 205
MediumOrchid4 122 55 139
MediumPurple 147 112 219
MediumPurple1 171 130 255
MediumPurple2 159 121 238
MediumPurple3 137 104 205
MediumPurple4 93 71 139
MediumSeaGreen 60 179 113
MediumSlateBlue 123 104 238
MediumSpringGreen 0 250 154
MediumTurquoise 72 209 204
MediumVioletRed 199 21 133
MidnightBlue 25 25 112
MintCream 245 255 250
MistyRose 255 228 225
MistyRose1 255 228 225
MistyRose2 238 213 210
MistyRose3 205 183 181
MistyRose4 139 125 123

9AKK101130D1384 211
Predefined Color Names Appendix A Scripting Language

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
NavajoWhite 255 222 173
NavajoWhite1 255 222 173
NavajoWhite2 238 207 161
NavajoWhite3 205 179 139
NavajoWhite4 139 121 94
NavyBlue 0 0 128
OldLace 253 245 230
OliveDrab 107 142 35
OliveDrab1 192 255 62
OliveDrab2 179 238 58
OliveDrab3 154 205 50
OliveDrab4 105 139 34
OrangeRed 255 69 0
OrangeRed1 255 69 0
OrangeRed2 238 64 0
OrangeRed3 205 55 0
OrangeRed4 139 37 0
PaleGoldenrod 238 232 170
PaleGreen 152 251 152
PaleGreen1 154 255 154
PaleGreen2 144 238 144
PaleGreen3 124 205 124
PaleGreen4 84 139 84
PaleTurquoise 175 238 238
PaleTurquoise1 187 255 255
PaleTurquoise2 174 238 238

212 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix A Scripting Language Predefined Color Names

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
PaleTurquoise3 150 205 205
PaleTurquoise4 102 139 139
PaleVioletRed 219 112 147
PaleVioletRed1 255 130 171
PaleVioletRed2 238 121 159
PaleVioletRed3 205 104 137
PaleVioletRed4 139 71 93
PapayaWhip 255 239 213
PeachPuff 255 218 185
PeachPuff1 255 218 185
PeachPuff2 238 203 173
PeachPuff3 205 175 149
PeachPuff4 139 119 101
PowderBlue 176 224 230
RosyBrown 188 143 143
RosyBrown1 255 193 193
RosyBrown2 238 180 180
RosyBrown3 205 155 155
RosyBrown4 139 105 105
RoyalBlue 65 105 225
RoyalBlue1 72 118 255
RoyalBlue2 67 110 238
RoyalBlue3 58 95 205
RoyalBlue4 39 64 139
SaddleBrown 139 69 19
SandyBrown 244 164 96

9AKK101130D1384 213
Predefined Color Names Appendix A Scripting Language

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
SeaGreen 46 139 87
SeaGreen1 84 255 159
SeaGreen2 78 238 148
SeaGreen3 67 205 128
SeaGreen4 46 139 87
SkyBlue 135 206 235
SkyBlue1 135 206 255
SkyBlue2 126 192 238
SkyBlue3 108 166 205
SkyBlue4 74 112 139
SlateBlue 106 90 205
SlateBlue1 131 111 255
SlateBlue2 122 103 238
SlateBlue3 105 89 205
SlateBlue4 71 60 139
SlateGray 112 128 144
SlateGray1 198 226 255
SlateGray2 185 211 238
SlateGray3 159 182 205
SlateGray4 108 123 139
SlateGrey 112 128 144
SpringGreen 0 255 127
SpringGreen1 0 255 127
SpringGreen2 0 238 118
SpringGreen3 0 205 102
SpringGreen4 0 139 69

214 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix A Scripting Language Predefined Color Names

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
SteelBlue 70 130 180
SteelBlue1 99 184 255
SteelBlue2 92 172 238
SteelBlue3 79 148 205
SteelBlue4 54 100 139
VioletRed 208 32 144
VioletRed1 255 62 150
VioletRed2 238 58 140
VioletRed3 205 50 120
VioletRed4 139 34 82
WhiteSmoke 245 245 245
YellowGreen 154 205 50
alice blue 240 248 255
antique white 250 235 215
aquamarine 127 255 212
aquamarine1 127 255 212
aquamarine2 118 238 198
aquamarine3 102 205 170
aquamarine4 69 139 116
azure 240 255 255
azure1 240 255 255
azure2 224 238 238
azure3 193 205 205
azure4 131 139 139
beige 245 245 220
bisque 255 228 196

9AKK101130D1384 215
Predefined Color Names Appendix A Scripting Language

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
bisque1 255 228 196
bisque2 238 213 183
bisque3 205 183 158
bisque4 139 125 107
black 0 0 0
blanched almond 255 235 205
blue violet 138 43 226
blue 0 0 255
blue1 0 0 255
blue2 0 0 238
blue3 0 0 205
blue4 0 0 139
brown 165 42 42
brown1 255 64 64
brown2 238 59 59
brown3 205 51 51
brown4 139 35 35
burlywood 222 184 135
burlywood1 255 211 155
burlywood2 238 197 145
burlywood3 205 170 125
burlywood4 139 115 85
cadet blue 95 158 160
chartreuse 127 255 0
chartreuse1 127 255 0
chartreuse2 118 238 0

216 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix A Scripting Language Predefined Color Names

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
chartreuse3 102 205 0
chartreuse4 69 139 0
chocolate 210 105 30
chocolate1 255 127 36
chocolate2 238 118 33
chocolate3 205 102 29
chocolate4 139 69 19
coral 255 127 80
coral1 255 114 86
coral2 238 106 80
coral3 205 91 69
coral4 139 62 47
cornflower blue 100 149 237
cornsilk 255 248 220
cornsilk1 255 248 220
cornsilk2 238 232 205
cornsilk3 205 200 177
cornsilk4 139 136 120
cyan 0 255 255
cyan1 0 255 255
cyan2 0 238 238
cyan3 0 205 205
cyan4 0 139 139
dark blue 0 0 139
dark cyan 0 139 139
dark goldenrod 184 134 11

9AKK101130D1384 217
Predefined Color Names Appendix A Scripting Language

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
dark gray 169 169 169
dark green 0 100 0
dark grey 169 169 169
dark khaki 189 183 107
dark magenta 139 0 139
dark olive green 85 107 47
dark orange 255 140 0
dark orchid 153 50 204
dark red 139 0 0
dark salmon 233 150 122
dark sea green 143 188 143
dark slate blue 72 61 139
dark slate gray 47 79 79
dark slate grey 47 79 79
dark turquoise 0 206 209
dark violet 148 0 211
deep pink 255 20 147
deep sky blue 0 191 255
dim gray 105 105 105
dim grey 105 105 105
dodger blue 30 144 255
firebrick 178 34 34
firebrick1 255 48 48
firebrick2 238 44 44
firebrick3 205 38 38
firebrick4 139 26 26

218 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix A Scripting Language Predefined Color Names

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
floral white 255 250 240
forest green 34 139 34
gainsboro 220 220 220
ghost white 248 248 255
gold 255 215 0
gold1 255 215 0
gold2 238 201 0
gold3 205 173 0
gold4 139 117 0
goldenrod 218 165 32
goldenrod1 255 193 37
goldenrod2 238 180 34
goldenrod3 205 155 29
goldenrod4 139 105 20
gray 190 190 190
gray0 0 0 0
gray1 3 3 3
gray10 26 26 26
gray100 255 255 255
gray11 28 28 28
gray12 31 31 31
gray13 33 33 33
gray14 36 36 36
gray15 38 38 38
gray16 41 41 41
gray17 43 43 43

9AKK101130D1384 219
Predefined Color Names Appendix A Scripting Language

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
gray18 46 46 46
gray19 48 48 48
gray2 5 5 5
gray20 51 51 51
gray21 54 54 54
gray22 56 56 56
gray23 59 59 59
gray24 61 61 61
gray25 64 64 64
gray26 66 66 66
gray27 69 69 69
gray28 71 71 71
gray29 74 74 74
gray3 8 8 8
gray30 77 77 77
gray31 79 79 79
gray32 82 82 82
gray33 84 84 84
gray34 87 87 87
gray35 89 89 89
gray36 92 92 92
gray37 94 94 94
gray38 97 97 97
gray39 99 99 99
gray4 10 10 10
gray40 102 102 102

220 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix A Scripting Language Predefined Color Names

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
gray41 105 105 105
gray42 107 107 107
gray43 110 110 110
gray44 112 112 112
gray45 115 115 115
gray46 117 117 117
gray47 120 120 120
gray48 122 122 122
gray49 125 125 125
gray5 13 13 13
gray50 127 127 127
gray51 130 130 130
gray52 133 133 133
gray53 135 135 135
gray54 138 138 138
gray55 140 140 140
gray56 143 143 143
gray57 145 145 145
gray58 148 148 148
gray59 150 150 150
gray6 15 15 15
gray60 153 153 153
gray61 156 156 156
gray62 158 158 158
gray63 161 161 161
gray64 163 163 163

9AKK101130D1384 221
Predefined Color Names Appendix A Scripting Language

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
gray65 166 166 166
gray66 168 168 168
gray67 171 171 171
gray68 173 173 173
gray69 176 176 176
gray7 18 18 18
gray70 179 179 179
gray71 181 181 181
gray72 184 184 184
gray73 186 186 186
gray74 189 189 189
gray75 191 191 191
gray76 194 194 194
gray77 196 196 196
gray78 199 199 199
gray79 201 201 201
gray8 20 20 20
gray80 204 204 204
gray81 207 207 207
gray82 209 209 209
gray83 212 212 212
gray84 214 214 214
gray85 217 217 217
gray86 219 219 219
gray87 222 222 222
gray88 224 224 224

222 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix A Scripting Language Predefined Color Names

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
gray89 227 227 227
gray9 23 23 23
gray90 229 229 229
gray91 232 232 232
gray92 235 235 235
gray93 237 237 237
gray94 240 240 240
gray95 242 242 242
gray96 245 245 245
gray97 247 247 247
gray98 250 250 250
gray99 252 252 252
green yellow 173 255 47
green 0 255 0
green1 0 255 0
green2 0 238 0
green3 0 205 0
green4 0 139 0
grey 190 190 190
grey0 0 0 0
grey1 3 3 3
grey10 26 26 26
grey100 255 255 255
grey11 28 28 28
grey12 31 31 31
grey13 33 33 33

9AKK101130D1384 223
Predefined Color Names Appendix A Scripting Language

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
grey14 36 36 36
grey15 38 38 38
grey16 41 41 41
grey17 43 43 43
grey18 46 46 46
grey19 48 48 48
grey2 5 5 5
grey20 51 51 51
grey21 54 54 54
grey22 56 56 56
grey23 59 59 59
grey24 61 61 61
grey25 64 64 64
grey26 66 66 66
grey27 69 69 69
grey28 71 71 71
grey29 74 74 74
grey3 8 8 8
grey30 77 77 77
grey31 79 79 79
grey32 82 82 82
grey33 84 84 84
grey34 87 87 87
grey35 89 89 89
grey36 92 92 92
grey37 94 94 94

224 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix A Scripting Language Predefined Color Names

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
grey38 97 97 97
grey39 99 99 99
grey4 10 10 10
grey40 102 102 102
grey41 105 105 105
grey42 107 107 107
grey43 110 110 110
grey44 112 112 112
grey45 115 115 115
grey46 117 117 117
grey47 120 120 120
grey48 122 122 122
grey49 125 125 125
grey5 13 13 13
grey50 127 127 127
grey51 130 130 130
grey52 133 133 133
grey53 135 135 135
grey54 138 138 138
grey55 140 140 140
grey56 143 143 143
grey57 145 145 145
grey58 148 148 148
grey59 150 150 150
grey6 15 15 15
grey60 153 153 153

9AKK101130D1384 225
Predefined Color Names Appendix A Scripting Language

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
grey61 156 156 156
grey62 158 158 158
grey63 161 161 161
grey64 163 163 163
grey65 166 166 166
grey66 168 168 168
grey67 171 171 171
grey68 173 173 173
grey69 176 176 176
grey7 18 18 18
grey70 179 179 179
grey71 181 181 181
grey72 184 184 184
grey73 186 186 186
grey74 189 189 189
grey75 191 191 191
grey76 194 194 194
grey77 196 196 196
grey78 199 199 199
grey79 201 201 201
grey8 20 20 20
grey80 204 204 204
grey81 207 207 207
grey82 209 209 209
grey83 212 212 212
grey84 214 214 214

226 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix A Scripting Language Predefined Color Names

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
grey85 217 217 217
grey86 219 219 219
grey87 222 222 222
grey88 224 224 224
grey89 227 227 227
grey9 23 23 23
grey90 229 229 229
grey91 232 232 232
grey92 235 235 235
grey93 237 237 237
grey94 240 240 240
grey95 242 242 242
grey96 245 245 245
grey97 247 247 247
grey98 250 250 250
grey99 252 252 252
honeydew 240 255 240
honeydew1 240 255 240
honeydew2 224 238 224
honeydew3 193 205 193
honeydew4 131 139 131
hot pink 255 105 180
indian red 205 92 92
ivory 255 255 240
ivory1 255 255 240
ivory2 238 238 224

9AKK101130D1384 227
Predefined Color Names Appendix A Scripting Language

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
ivory3 205 205 193
ivory4 139 139 131
khaki 240 230 140
khaki1 255 246 143
khaki2 238 230 133
khaki3 205 198 115
khaki4 139 134 78
lavender blush 255 240 245
lavender 230 230 250
lawn green 124 252 0
lemon chiffon 255 250 205
light blue 173 216 230
light coral 240 128 128
light cyan 224 255 255
light goldenrod
250 250 210
yellow
light goldenrod 238 221 130
light gray 211 211 211
light green 144 238 144
light grey 211 211 211
light pink 255 182 193
light salmon 255 160 122
light sea green 32 178 170
light sky blue 135 206 250
light slate blue 132 112 255
light slate gray 119 136 153
light slate grey 119 136 153

228 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix A Scripting Language Predefined Color Names

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
light steel blue 176 196 222
light yellow 255 255 224
lime green 50 205 50
linen 250 240 230
magenta 255 0 255
magenta1 255 0 255
magenta2 238 0 238
magenta3 205 0 205
magenta4 139 0 139
maroon 176 48 96
maroon1 255 52 179
maroon2 238 48 167
maroon3 205 41 144
maroon4 139 28 98
medium aquamarine 102 205 170
medium blue 0 0 205
medium orchid 186 85 211
medium purple 147 112 219
medium sea green 60 179 113
medium slate blue 123 104 238
medium spring
0 250 154
green
medium turquoise 72 209 204
medium violet red 199 21 133
midnight blue 25 25 112
mint cream 245 255 250
misty rose 255 228 225

9AKK101130D1384 229
Predefined Color Names Appendix A Scripting Language

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
moccasin 255 228 181
navajo white 255 222 173
navy blue 0 0 128
navy 0 0 128
old lace 253 245 230
olive drab 107 142 35
orange red 255 69 0
orange 255 165 0
orange1 255 165 0
orange2 238 154 0
orange3 205 133 0
orange4 139 90 0
orchid 218 112 214
orchid1 255 131 250
orchid2 238 122 233
orchid3 205 105 201
orchid4 139 71 137
pale goldenrod 238 232 170
pale green 152 251 152
pale turquoise 175 238 238
pale violet red 219 112 147
papaya whip 255 239 213
peach puff 255 218 185
peru 205 133 63
pink 255 192 203
pink1 255 181 197

230 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix A Scripting Language Predefined Color Names

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
pink2 238 169 184
pink3 205 145 158
pink4 139 99 108
plum 221 160 221
plum1 255 187 255
plum2 238 174 238
plum3 205 150 205
plum4 139 102 139
powder blue 176 224 230
purple 160 32 240
purple1 155 48 255
purple2 145 44 238
purple3 125 38 205
purple4 85 26 139
red 255 0 0
red1 255 0 0
red2 238 0 0
red3 205 0 0
red4 139 0 0
rosy brown 188 143 143
royal blue 65 105 225
saddle brown 139 69 19
salmon 250 128 114
salmon1 255 140 105
salmon2 238 130 98
salmon3 205 112 84

9AKK101130D1384 231
Predefined Color Names Appendix A Scripting Language

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
salmon4 139 76 57
sandy brown 244 164 96
sea green 46 139 87
seashell 255 245 238
seashell1 255 245 238
seashell2 238 229 222
seashell3 205 197 191
seashell4 139 134 130
sienna 160 82 45
sienna1 255 130 71
sienna2 238 121 66
sienna3 205 104 57
sienna4 139 71 38
sky blue 135 206 235
slate blue 106 90 205
slate gray 112 128 144
slate grey 112 128 144
snow 255 250 250
snow1 255 250 250
snow2 238 233 233
snow3 205 201 201
snow4 139 137 137
spring green 0 255 127
steel blue 70 130 180
tan 210 180 140
tan1 255 165 79

232 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix A Scripting Language Predefined Color Names

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
tan2 238 154 73
tan3 205 133 63
tan4 139 90 43
thistle 216 191 216
thistle1 255 225 255
thistle2 238 210 238
thistle3 205 181 205
thistle4 139 123 139
tomato 255 99 71
tomato1 255 99 71
tomato2 238 92 66
tomato3 205 79 57
tomato4 139 54 38
turquoise 64 224 208
turquoise1 0 245 255
turquoise2 0 229 238
turquoise3 0 197 205
turquoise4 0 134 139
violet red 208 32 144
violet 238 130 238
wheat 245 222 179
wheat1 255 231 186
wheat2 238 216 174
wheat3 205 186 150
wheat4 139 126 102
white smoke 245 245 245

9AKK101130D1384 233
Typical Scripts Appendix A Scripting Language

Table 36. Predefined Color Names


Color Name RGB
white 255 255 255
yellow green 154 205 50
yellow 255 255 0
yellow1 255 255 0
yellow2 238 238 0
yellow3 205 205 0
yellow4 139 139 0

Typical Scripts
PGP includes a function that you can use to import/export script code. This can be
useful when you have multiple objects that use Common Script Code.
To change this Common Script Code, you can:
• Use PGP to create a text file containing the Common Script Code.
• Modify the code in a text file.
• Use PGP to write the updated code to multiple objects.

Enable Typical Script Processing


Enable this function by setting the APPS\IbDisp\ScriptFile Windows registry key
to point to a text file:
• For example path...\display\ScriptFile.txt.
This text file is identified as the Typical Script File.

234 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix A Scripting Language Use PGP to Create a Text File Containing The Common Script

Use PGP to Create a Text File Containing The Common Script Code

Create the Typical Script File


The Typical Script File must contain the following instructions in the first three
rows.
$// Typical_Script_Identifier
$START
$END
The Typical Script File must start with $// .
Typical_Script_Identifier is a customizable string used to identify in the scripts the
code to import/export from/to the Typical Script File.
Save the file in the path and file name specified in the APPS\IbDisp\ScriptFile
Windows registry key.

Common Script Code


A Common Script Code is identified by following rows:
// Typical_Script_Identifier Placeholder_Name START
// Typical_Script_Identifier Placeholder_Name END
Placeholder_Name is the name of the Common Script Code that will be stored in a
PGP object.
Between these rows is included the script code that could be used in multiple
objects.
In the script of an object a Common Script Code can be preceded and followed by
other instructions; is possible to use more than one Common Script Code in a script;
is not possible to include a Common Script Code into another.

Start the Display Builder


PGP will detect the Typical Script File. It will search all objects for scripts that
contain the Typical Script Identifier.

9AKK101130D1384 235
Use PGP to Create a Text File Containing The Common Script Code Appendix A Scripting

When the Typical_Script_Identifier is detected, PGP reads the Placeholder_Name


to search it in the Typical Script File: if the Placeholder_Name is not in the file, will
copy the Common Script Code from the script of the object to the Typical Script
File; if the Placeholder_Name is in the file, will copy the Common Script Code
from the Typical Script File to the script of the object.
In the first case, the new Common Script Code will be located at the end of the
Typical Script File as follows:
// Typical_Script_Identifier Placeholder_Name START
.... script code
// Typical_Script_Identifier Placeholder_Name END

Modify the Common Script Code


Open the Typical Script File using a text editor, change the Common Script Code
and save the file. The new code will be applied to the displays that will be saved
after this change; also the Add To System function will update the scripts in all
selected displays.

Example Typical Script File


In the example below, the Typical_Script_Identifier is called TYPICAL, and the
Placeholder_Name is called SET_TITLE.
$// TYPICAL
$START
$END
// TYPICAL SET_TITLE START
str = “Welcome Message”;
object.string = str;
// TYPICAL SET_TITLE END

Display Builder Processing


Start the Display Builder.

236 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix A Scripting Language Use PGP to Create a Text File Containing The Common Script

PGP will search the scripts of all PGP objects, looking for Placeholder_Name.
If the Placeholder called SET_TITLE is found, PGP will copy the Common Script
Code from the Typical Script file to the script of the PGP object.
The new code will be inserted between the START and END rows of the
SET_TITLE Placeholder lines:
// TYPICAL SET_TITLE START
str = “Welcome Message”;
object.string = str;
// TYPICAL SET_TITLE END

Create New Placeholders in Objects


You can also add the Placeholder to multiple object scripts.
Modify the script by right-clicking an object, and then selecting Script.
Enter these two lines of text in the place where you want the new code to be copied:
// Typical_Script_Identifier Placeholder_Name START
// Typical_Script_Identifier Placeholder_Name END
In our example the lines would look like this:
// TYPICAL SET_TITLE START
// TYPICAL SET_TITLE END
and enter also following lines:
// TYPICAL SET_DEFAULT_COLOR START
object.foregroundName = “red”;
// TYPICAL SET_DEFAULT_COLOR END

When the display is saved, PGP will copy the Common Script Code is located in the
Typical Script File between the SET_TITLE START and END lines:
// TYPICAL SET_TITLE START

9AKK101130D1384 237
Global Script Appendix A Scripting Language

str = “Welcome Message”;


object.string = str;
// TYPICAL SET_TITLE END
and will save the new Common Script Code between the SET_DEFAULT_COLOR
START and END lines in the Typical Script File that will be
$// TYPICAL
$START
$END
// TYPICAL SET_TITLE START
str = “Welcome Message”;
object.string = str;
// TYPICAL SET_TITLE END
// TYPICAL SET_DEFAULT_COLOR START
object.foregroundName = “red”;
// TYPICAL SET_DEFAULT_COLOR END

Global Script
You can define a script of Global Symbols that PGP will execute for all pages
loaded at run time.
This utility is enabled if the APPS\IbDisp\GlobalScriptFile Windows registry key
points to an existing text file.
• For example path...\display\GlobalScriptFile.txt.
This file must include a script global variable definition like following example:
global PGP_TITLE = “My system is named PGP”;
You can then include the global variable PGP_TITLE in any of your pages.

238 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix A Scripting Language Global Script

For example, if you add the following code to a script in an object:


object.string = PGP_TITLE;
Display Builder will display: “My system is named PGP”.
You can only customize global variables with this file. You can not change any of
your Graphic Displays.

9AKK101130D1384 239
Global Script Appendix A Scripting Language

240 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix B System Programs

Introduction
This section describes the main PGP system programs and their commands.

Table 37. PGP System Programs


Program
Generic Extra Par Function
Name
OPERPA TagName Shows the Operating Parameters view
PRCBTN See details Commands
PRCMAN TagName Faceplate Control
PageName,ulx,uly,lrx,
TNTCHILD Shows secondary page
lry[,T=...]
SHELL ProgramName Actives program
Opens the file using the default associated
SHELL FileName
program (same as doubleclicking on the file)
Loads (if defined in database) the primary
DBDISP TagName
display of the specified tag
ACKNWL See details Acknowledgement alarms
DBMENU See details Actives specified menu function
MMIACT See details Shows specified menu
Used to manage TOGGLE on Faceplates
MYSELF TagName\TOGGLE
managed by PRCTRL

PRCBTN
PRCBTN is a system program that executes commands on the system tags.

9AKK101130D1384 239
PRCBTN Appendix B System Programs

You can use this program in your pages to modify the value of tags in the real-time
database.
All commands can be executed only if the operator is enabled to operate on the tag
(the point has a status of good, the operator has the appropriate priviledges, etc.).
The managed commands are listed below.

Table 38. PRCBTN commands


Command Syntax Description
ACK %TAG%,ACK Acknowledge the specified tag
SETn %TAG%,SETn Sets to n the specified tag (n = 0 - 15)
INC %TAG%,INC[=%TAG%] Increment the specified tag
DEC %TAG%,DEC[=%TAG%] Decrement the specified tag
FASTINC %TAG%,FASTINC[=%TAG%] Fast increment of the specified tag
FASTDEC %TAG%,FASTDEC[=%TAG%] Fast decrement of the specified tag
INC_CO %TAG%,INC_CO[=%TAG%] Increment CO of the specified tag
DEC_CO %TAG%,DEC_CO[=%TAG%] Decrement CO of the specified tag
FASTINC_CO %TAG%,FASTINC_CO[=%TAG%] Fast increment CO of the specified tag
FASTDEC_CO %TAG%,FASTDEC_CO[=%TAG%] Fast decrement CO of the specified tag
Sets to 1 the specified tag and use AUTO string in
AUTO %TAG%,AUTO
confirm dialog and in OJ
Sets to 0 the specified tag and use MAN string in
MAN %TAG%,MAN
confirm dialog and in OJ
Sets to 0 the specified tag and use INTERNAL string
INTERNAL %TAG%,INTERNAL
in confirm dialog and in OJ
Sets to 1 the specified tag and use EXTERNAL
EXTERNAL %TAG%,EXTERNAL
string in confirm dialog and in OJ
ENTER %TAG%,ENTER[=%TAG%] Requests a value for the specified tag
Requests a value for the specified tag and use n
(float or int value) to mul/div entered value.
ENTER_FACTn %TAG%,ENTER_FACTn[=%TAG%]
If n > 0 => Output = Entered value * n
if n < 0 => Output = Entered value / n
Requests a value for the specified tag in Date/Time
ENTER_DT %TAG%,ENTER_DT[=%TAG%]
format
ENTER_CO %TAG%,ENTER_CO[=%TAG%] Requests a CO value for the specified tag
RESET %TAG%,RESET Resets the specified tag
SETBn %TAG%,SETBn Sets to 1 the bit n of the tag (n = 0 - 31)
RESETBn %TAG%,RESETBn Sets to 0 the bit n of the tag (n = 0 - 31)
SETBYTEn %TAG%,SETBYTEn Sets all bits to 1 in the byte n of the tag (n = 0 - 3)
RESETBYTEn %TAG%,RESETBYTEn Sets to 0 the byte n of the tag (n = 0 - 3)
SETWORDn %TAG%,SETWORDn Sets all bits to 1 in the word n of the tag (n = 0 - 1)
RESETWORDn %TAG%,RESETWORDn Sets to 0 the word n of the tag (n = 0 - 1)
SETDWORDn %TAG%,SETDWORDn Sets all bits to 1 in the double word of the tag
RESETDWORDn %TAG%,RESETDWORDn Sets to 0 the double word of the tag

240 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix B System Programs PRCBTN

Table 38. PRCBTN commands


Command Syntax Description
If the confirm command is enabled, presents request
for pulse 0.
PULSE0 %TAG%,PULSE0
Sets value to 0 for defined time (as def. 1 sec.) and
returns tag to initial value
If the confirm command is enabled, presents request
for pulse 1.
PULSE1 %TAG%,PULSE1
Sets value to 1 for defined time and returns tag to
initial value
If the confirm command is enabled, presents status n
of the digital point.
PULSE1_n %TAG%,PULSE1_n
Sets value to 1 for defined time (as def. 1 sec.) and
returns tag to initial value
PRESET %TAG%,PRESETffff Sets to ffff (hexadecimal value) the tag
SETVALUE %TAG%,SETVALUEn Sets to n (float or int value) the tag
If the confirm command is enabled, presents request
SETVALUE_ %TAG%,SETVALUE_n for set value.
Sets to n (float or int value) the tag
TOGGLE %TAG%,TOGGLEf Toggle (1/0) the value of selected tag
STPU %TAG%,STPU Increment the specified tag (specific for driver104)
STPD %TAG%,STPD Decrement the specified tag (specific for driver104)
Fast increment of the specified tag (specific for
FASTSTPU %TAG%,FASTSTPU
driver104)
Fast decrement of the specified tag (specific for
FASTSTPD %TAG%,FASTSTPD
driver104)
Requests a check level value for the specified tag
ENTERCHECKLEVEL %TAG%,ENTERCHECKLEVEL
(specific for driver104)
Requests a atom value for the specified tag (specific
ENTERATOMVAL %TAG%,ENTERATOMVAL
for driver104)
USERID %TAG%,USERID Sets to specified tag the current SYI_LoggedUserID
LOCKCMD %TAG%,LOCKCMD Reserve selected tag for commands
UNLOCKCMD %TAG%,UNLOCKCMD Unreserve selected tag for commands

Additional Characters
Additional characters can be added to the command line to manage specific
requirements; if you want to use more than one additional character in a command
line, you have to follow a description order (see the examples).
-@ - can be added to the command line to disable the queue of the executed
command to the OJ (Operating journal) also if the Windows registry key
APPS\PRCMAN\RecordToOj is YES
Example: PV-TAG-01,-@FASTINC

9AKK101130D1384 241
PRCBTN Appendix B System Programs

-? - can be added to the command line to disable the confirm command, also if
is not requested as default for the command, and is managed only if the
Windows registry key APPS\PRCMAN\ConfirmCommand is YES
Examples:
PV-TAG-01,-@-?FASTINC
PV-TAG-01,-?FASTINC
? - can be added to the command line to enable the confirm command, also if
is requested as default for the command, and is managed only if the Windows
registry key APPS\PRCMAN\ConfirmCommand is YES
Examples:
PV-TAG-01,-@?FASTINC
PV-TAG-01,?FASTINC
?confirmstring? - same as ? but you can customize the confirm command
text.
Examples:
PV-TAG-01,-@?Fast Increment?FASTINC
PV-TAG-01,?Fast Increment?FASTINC
=Tagname - (Managed for commands where is specified [=%TAG%]) can be
added after the command code to specify the tag (when Is different from the tag
to write) to obtain the current status/value to use for the command (for example
to display on ENTER command the default value).
Example:
PV-TAG-01,ENTER=PV-TAG-02
;Ojstring - can be added to the end of the command string to customize the
text to write in the OJ when the executed command is archived.
Examples:
PV-TAG-01,-@?Fast Increment?FASTINC;Fast Increment
PV-TAG-01,?Fast Increment?FASTINC;Fast Increment

242 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix B System Programs PRCMAN

Separators
You can execute multi commands using following separators:
&& if error, continue without message
&+ if error, continue after message
&# if error, exit without message
&* if error, exit after message
<> to execute first command on button down and second command on button
up
For example:
PV-TAG-01,SETVALUE1&&DI-TAG-01,SET0
writes value 1 to tag PV-TAG-01, and continues writing 0 to the DI-TAG-01, even if
there is an error on first write; to define the number of seconds that the program
must wait before executing the next command you can define the Windows registry
key: APPS\Prcbtn\SecondsBetweenCommands
DI-LAB,-?SET1<>DI-LAB,-?SET0
SET1 will be executed on button down and SET0 will be executed on button up (-?
is necessary to write the value without ask the confirm command).

Repeat
Using PRCBTN_REPEAT as a program name, the specified command will be
repeated, as long as the mouse button is clicked. This option must be applied to
INC/DEC FASTINC/FASTDEC commands to activate automatically the specific
program FSTBTN to manage a fast sequence of the same command..

PRCMAN
PRCMAN is the system program name used to display the control Faceplates.
Choosing this program as the Active Program, you enable Faceplate activation.

9AKK101130D1384 243
PRCMAN Appendix B System Programs

• Faceplate activation will be managed by PRCMAN or PRCTRL program as


defined in the field Faceplate of the tag database.
Normally the Faceplate will be loaded in the right/bottom corner of the screen. You
can change this default setting using the activation parameters.

Table 39. PRCMAN commands


Program name Extra Par Description
Faceplate in the right/bottom corner of
PRCMAN %TAG%
calling view
Faceplate near right/bottom clicked
PRCMAN/NEAR %TAG%
object
Faceplate by position: the coordinates
(left,bottom) specified in the command
PRCCM1 %TAG%,left,bottom line are referred to a virtual screen
(w=800, h=600) and will be translated at
run-time to the size of the display area
Only commands Faceplate by position:
the coordinates (left,top,right,bottom)
specified in the command line are
PRCCMD %TAG%,l,t,r,b
referred to a virtual screen (w=800,
h=600) and will be translated at run-time
to the size of the display area

PRCCM1 and PRCCMD are methods to activate the Faceplates in a specific


position, and had been introduced to manage SODG commands.
The “Only commands” Faceplate called using PRCCMD syntax, is a reduced
Faceplate where only the control buttons are displayed. For Faceplates managed by
PRCTRL program, all objects included in the #WVP2 rectangle will be displayed.
Defining the Windows registry key APPS\Prcman\PopupNear (string = YES)
automatically activates all Faceplates with Program Name = PRCMAN. This will
be loaded near the clicked object, without changing your displays.

244 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix B System Programs ACKNWL

ACKNWL
ACKNWL isn’t a system program name, but only a specific name to manage
acknowledge actions that can occur during clicks on the display page.

Table 40. ACKNWL commands


Program name Extra Par Description
ACKNWL %TAG% Ack specified tag
Ack all tags for specified alarm group
ACKNWL %ALARMGROUP%
name
ACKNWL,ACKPAG Ack all objects displayed in the page
ACKNWL,ACKAUD Ack audible alarm
ACKNWL,ACKALL Ack all alarms

DBMENU
DBMENU isn’t a system program name, but only a specific name that replies to
clicks on the display page with PGP Explorer menu actions.

Table 41. DBMENU commands


Program name Description
DBMENU,ZOOM_IN If scroll bar enabled, zoom in the display
DBMENU,ZOOM_OUT If scroll bar enabled, zoom out the display
If scroll bar enabled, reset the zoom on the
DBMENU,ZOOM_RESET
display
DBMENU,SHOW_TAGNAME To show on the display the tagnames linked to
S single Dynamic Object
DBMENU,SHOW_TAGNAME To show on the display the first linked tagname
DBMENU,SHOW_TAGINDEX To show on the display the first linked tagindex
DBMENU,SHOW_DISABLE To remove all showed tagname or tagindex

9AKK101130D1384 245
MMIACT Appendix B System Programs

MMIACT
MMIACT is a system program that shows a “Context Menu” or a “Scroll List” of all
items defined in a XML file.
The XML files must be stored in a folder defined by Windows registry key
ConfigMenu.

Table 42. MMIACT commands


Program
Extra Par Description
name
Shows as scroll list (default) all items
MMIACT MenuFile.xml[,T=...]
defined in the MenuFile.xml
Shows as scroll list all items defined in
MMIACT LIST,MenuFile.xml[,T=...]
the MenuFile.xml
Shows as context menu all items
MMIACT MENU,MenuFile.xml[,T=...]
defined in the MenuFile.xml

In the MenuFile.xml file you can define all the items to be displayed.
This is an example of a menu:
<MENU>

<!-- $$Author: $ -->

<ITEM label="%TAG4% PV-TAG-%TAG%" pgmnm="%TAG4%" param="PV-TAG-%TAG%"/>

<ITEM label="%TAG4% PV-TAG-%TAG1%" pgmnm="%TAG4%" param="PV-TAG-


%TAG1%"/>

<ITEM label="%TAG4% PV-TAG-%TAG2%" pgmnm="%TAG4%" param="PV-TAG-


%TAG2%"/>

<ITEM label="%TAG4% PV-TAG-%TAG3%" pgmnm="%TAG4%" param="PV-TAG-


%TAG3%"/>

<ITEM label="%TAG4% DI-TAG-%TAG%" pgmnm="%TAG4%" param="DI-TAG-%TAG%"/>

<ITEM label="%TAG4% DI-TAG-%TAG1%" pgmnm="%TAG4%" param="DI-TAG-%TAG1%"/>

<ITEM label="%TAG4% DI-TAG-%TAG2%" pgmnm="%TAG4%" param="DI-TAG-%TAG2%"/>

246 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix B System Programs MMIACT

<ITEM label="%TAG4% DI-TAG-%TAG3%" pgmnm="%TAG4%" param="DI-TAG-%TAG3%"/>

</MENU>

label = “...” - String displayed in the menu

pgmnm = “...” - Name of the program to active - use SETPAGE as program name to execute the
load of specified display (in the param field)

param = “...” - Parameters for the activated program

<!-- ... --> - comment line

You can activate the menu described in the example above with following
parameters:
MENU,MenuFile.xml,T=11,T=12,T=13,T=14,T=OPERPA
The results are displayed in the figure below:

Figure 65. MMIACT - Menu format

You can activate the menu decribed in the example above with following
parameters
MenuFile.xml,T=11,T=12,T=13,T=14,T=OPERPA
or
LIST,MenuFile.xml,T=11,T=12,T=13,T=14,T=OPERPA

9AKK101130D1384 247
MMIACT Appendix B System Programs

To obtain this result:

Figure 66. MMIACT - List format

The action linked to the item will be activated by a mouse click.


For all fields of the XML file (label, pgmnm, param) you can use the %TAG%
syntax to change the parameters displayed/activated by menu.
If labels were defined in the multilanguage database, translation will be applied to
the labels in the currently used language.

248 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix C Terminology

The following is a list of terms related to the PGP. The list contains terms and
abbreviations that are unique to ABB or have a usage or definition that is different
from standard industry usage.

Table 43. Glossary of Terms.


Term Definition
Block Address Number that identifies a Function Block in a module.
Advanced communication highway to transfer process
C-Net
data from/to Symphony Rack.
High speed redundant communication.
Controlway In a Process Control Unit is the method to transfer
information between intelligent modules.
In PGP this means a double-computer configuration in
Dual Configuration
redundancy.
Personal Computer to maintain and update the
Engineering Work Station
configuration of the Symphony Rack modules.
Updating information generated when the state and/or
Exception Report
the value of a tag change/s beyond a certain amount.
A function code occurrence in a specific block address
Function Block
of a module.
Algorithm operating on specific functions. These
Function Code
functions are linked together to create a control strategy.
In PGP this means a double-computer configuration in
Master-Slave Configuration
redundancy.
Single identifier of a specific device in a communication
Module Address
channel.
Multiple-loops controller capable of data acquisition and
Multi Function Processor
information processing.

9AKK101130D1384 251
Appendix C Terminology

Table 43. Glossary of Terms.


Term Definition
In PGP this refers to a multiple cooperating computer
Multi-Master Configuration
configuration.
Network Coupler Computer interface unit to the Symphony.
Plant Loop Network 90 communication ring to transfer process data.
System network node containing control modules and
Process Control Unit
I/O modules.
Module reference time for the labelling of exception
Time-Stamp
reports.

252 9AKK101130D1384
Appendix C Terminology Abbreviations and Acronyms

Abbreviations and Acronyms


Table 44. Abbreviations or Acronyms.
Abbreviation or Acronym Definition
CIU Computer Interface Unit.
CO Control Output.
CPU Central Processing Unit.
CTT Configuration and Tuning Terminal.
DAT Digital Audio Tape.
DD Device Driver.
DDE Dynamic Data Exchange.
DI Digital Input tag.
EU Engineering Unit.
EWS Engineering Work Station.
FC Function Code.
ICI C-NET Computer Interface.
LAN Local Area Network.
MFP Multi Function Processor.
MSDD Multi State Device Driver.
NIU Network Interface Unit.
ODBC Open Database Connectivity.
OPC OLE for Process Control.
PCU Process Control Unit.
PV Process Variable.
RCM Remote Control Memory.
RMCB Remote Motor Control Block.
RMSC Remote Manual Set Constant.
RI Ratio Index.
SCSI Small Computer System Interface.
SER Sequence of Events Recorder.
SODG Screen Oriented Display Generator.
SP Set Point.

9AKK101130D1384 253
Abbreviations and Acronyms Appendix C Terminology

254 9AKK101130D1384
INDEX

A FC 253
acknowledge 137, 245 function block 251
action type 90 to 91
AL 134, 163 I
alarm comment 181 ICI 253
alarm condition 26 instrument limit 179
alarm group 119, 169, 179, 245
analog tag 85, 156, 175 L
analog value 68, 174 library 29 to 30, 32 to 33, 40, 69, 105, 109
ASCII 33 to 35, 78, 175, 180
M
B module status 185
bad quality 137, 156, 159, 163 multi-master 252

C N
C-NET 179 to 180, 251, 253 network 117, 252 to 253
computer interface unit 252 to 253
control output 175, 179, 253 O
control station 175 ODBC 253
OJ 242 to 243
D OLE 59, 253
DDE 253 On-line Documentation 23
digital tag 155, 175 OPC 253
display area 38, 51, 245
Documentation, On-line 23 P
PCU 180, 253
E PGP Explorer 25 to 27, 30 to 31, 38, 43, 89, 91, 123
E.U. 101 to 125, 246
EWS 253 PRCMAN 93, 239, 242 to 245
exception report 182 to 185, 251 primary display 239
process control 251 to 253
F process variable 253
faceplate 93, 111 to 112, 114 to 115, 141, 239, 244
to 245

9AKK101130D1384 255
Index

Q
quality 26 to 27, 85, 133, 135, 137, 154, 156, 159,
163, 176, 179 to 180, 182
quality suffix 133

R
radar 26, 129, 164 to 167
ratio index value 180
RCM 176, 182 to 183, 253

S
security 121, 125
sequence of events 253
SER 253
set point 175, 178, 180, 182, 253
SP 178, 180, 253
Symphony 251 to 252

T
tag browser 99, 119
tag type 177
time-stamp 252
toolbar 38 to 46, 50 to 51, 55, 57, 59, 67, 71, 103 to
104, 107, 109, 123
trend 67, 142 to 145, 148, 165

Z
zoom factor 50 to 51, 196 to 197

256 9AKK101130D1384
9AKK101130D1382 Printed in Italy October 2007
Copyright © 2005 by ABB. All Rights Reserved
® Registered Trademark of ABB.
™ Trademark of ABB.

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