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3

ACTIVITIES
Chapter

SECTION

Gloucester County Institute of Technology

NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK


How to use this To assist educators in the alignment of their arts curricula with the standards and
Activities Section indicators, sample activities have been designed by teachers and artists in the arts disciplines.
They are simply suggestions that you may use, modify, or improvise. While the standards and
indicators should be met, schools maintain local control over how they implement them for
the reason that they best know their own teachers’ strengths, available resources, and facili-
ties. These suggested activities are grouped as dance, music, theater and visual arts, from k-
4, 5-8 and 9-12. It is not the intent of the framework to produce a scope-and-sequence cur-
riculum. Scope and sequence for the sample activities are to be developed by the local school
Chapter 3

district. The objective of the framework is to provide some suggestions as starting points.

Interdisciplinary connections are essential to the students’ understanding of the prac-


tical use for the knowledge and skills learned. Samples of activities that connect with differ-
ent arts areas and other subjects are included in this Framework and should be included in the
district curriculum.

A New Requirement in Arts Design is a new standards-based curricular requirement in the arts. Standard 1.6
is different from other arts standards: It is specific to the design of that which is function-
Education in New Jersey:
al—products, systems, structures, places, and events, all of which require the elements and
Design Education principles of art, whether it be visual, audial, kinetic, or performance. Design is so intrinsic to
our lives that it tends to be “invisible.” Yet it is ubiquitous to our daily activities and our
environments.

Design moves us “from the existing to the preferred.” Imagine all of the adaptations
made to the wheel and how civilization has been reengineered because of them. It is the
cycling through of the design process that enables substantive improvements or adaptation,
changing societal needs. Unlike an art object, a design is never “done.” Time and circumstance
change needs. Analysis, synthesis, and evaluation are at the top of Bloom’s taxonomy. The
pedagogical and career value of design is in the lessons learned through evaluating resources
and assessing needs, identifying problems and solving them, mastering technical skills, and
creating and evaluating the project and product-workplace know-how.

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NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
Design awareness is the first step in design education. What do you see? Analyze the
design. What is its history? What has changed or is changing? Describe the problem and devel-
op solutions. Evaluate solutions and synthesize for the best result. Students will be exposed
to process, content and questions and should be given more challenging problems to solve as
their skills grow. Concepts of design include the notion of order and clarity of form, and time
and space. The contexts relating to communication and social relevance can be applied.

Sample design activities in each arts discipline are provided in this chapter to stimulate the
Chapter 3

teaching staff’s creativity as they build the curriculum and develop lesson plans. Chapter 4
provides additional suggestions for design-related activities (Tables 4.1 through 4.3, pp. 146-
148).

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NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
Creative movement class, Pine Grove Manor Elementary
School, Franklin Township, Somerset, New Jersey.
Michele Reilley, instructor.
DANCE Dance is the expression of the intellect, emotions, and the body using energy,
shapes, patterns, actions, and gestures—aesthetically. Personal creativity and imag-
ination develop along with the mental skills of concentration, listening, and timing. Dancers
are students of nonverbal communication through the art of rhythmic bodily movement.
Mental endurance and the skills of concentration, listening and timing sharpen the senses.
Practice, improvement, discipline, and precision enhance personal confidence. Performance in
a group fosters intense cooperation and interpersonal skills.
Chapter 3

Habits of physical skills—endurance, refined kinesthetics, flexibility, and coordination—com-


plete the mind/body connection for gains that translate to other life and work skills. Practice
in dance movements produces numerous anatomical, physiological, and health gains. Dance
offers many opportunities for students to be spectators, critics, and participants.

Choreography structures the intellectual and emotional expression through design of move-
ment. It draws on and reinforces collaborative skills for problem solving, decision making,
evaluating, and goal setting. It requires mental exploration and visualization of the desired
effect. Opportunities for students to create, plan, practice, and perfect their own ideas are
inherent in dance education. Added to learning about grace, rhythm, and form are the joys of
a partnered swirl, a lift perfectly executed, or the flow of aesthetic force.

Dance has a long history as an independent art form that records and celebrates historical,
cultural, and social perspectives. Consider the social climate and historical trends that pro-
duced ballroom dancing, contemporary and modern dance, folk dance, and traditional and
modern ballet. As an interdisciplinary subject, dance connects readily to other subjects such
as social studies and science. While a language in its own right, dance has historical roots and
meanings and has more forms than there are cultures in the world.

(Note: One of the Comprehensive Health and Physical Education Standards focuses on dance for
social and/or recreational purposes. Where similar skill development exists in cumulative
progress indicators, they are considered interdisciplinary.)

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NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: DANCE TALKS
The arts strengthen our apprecia- ■ Students observe, discuss, and mimic how people move/gesture
Standard 1.1 tion of the world as well as our (e.g., wave or shake hands) in everyday life to communicate mes-
All students will ability to be creative and inventive sages (e.g., “hello,” “stop,” “come,” or “go”).
acquire knowledge and decision-makers. The acquisition of ■ Demonstrate abstracting and transforming a gesture into dance
knowledge and skills that con- movements, with changes in rhythm, speed, energy, and space.
skills that increase tribute to aesthetic awareness of
aesthetic awareness in ■ Students practice several gesture transformations. They combine
dance, music, theater, and visual
three transformations into one or more “dance” sentences and then
dance, music, theater, arts enhances these abilities.
perform them individually or in small groups.
and visual arts. ■ The audience (class) decides what body parts were most important
PROGRESS INDICATOR #1 to the messages: torso, face, hands, fingers, legs, etc.
Communicate their responses to ■ The members of the audience then state their preferences for the
dance, music, theater and visual various performances, citing their reactions to the rhythm, speed,
arts with supporting statements energy, and space and saying what they liked or didn’t like and
based on aesthetics. why.

WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:


■ 4.2 Work cooperatively

THINKING SKILLS:
■ observe, decide, synthesize, interpret, problem solve, evaluate

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Arts 1.2, 1.3
■ Language Arts Literacy

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NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: LOCOMOTOR
Through an education in the arts, ■ Students explore the use of four locomotor movements (skip, hop,
STANDARD 1.2 students enhance their perceptual, run, walk) in relation to the use of body parts: then explore the use
All students will refine physical, and technical skills and of body parts in leading, isolating and supporting. Then:
perceptual, physical, and learn that pertinent techniques ❥ add the use of low, medium, and high levels;
and technologies apply to the suc-
technical skills through cessful completion of tasks. The
❥ explore pathways and shapes; and
creating dance, music, development of sensory acuity ❥ create, practice, and perform a dance sequence that incorpo-
theater, and/or (perceptual skills) enables stu- rates changes in level, direction, pathway, and shape.
dents to perceive and acknowledge ■ Students create a dance phrase of four locomotor movements with
visual arts.
various viewpoints. Appropriate variations in space, time, and energy using the basic elements of
physical movements, dexterity, and dance (body, space, time, energy).
rhythm pertain to such activities ■ Practice and perform the dance. Discuss effects of concentration on
as brush strokes in painting, dance performance quality.
movement, fingering of musical
instruments, etc. WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 3.9 Identify patterns
PROGRESS INDICATOR #1
■ 3.11 Identify/evaluate alternative decisions
Demonstrate performance and par- ■ 3.15 Apply problem-solving skills to design projects
ticipation skills by working and ■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
creating individually and with oth- ■ 4.11 Describe how ability, effort and achievement are
ers. interrelated
THINKING SKILLS:
■ decide, create, analyze

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Arts 1.6

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NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: NATURE DANCES
In order to understand the arts, ■ Students explore various design and movement sources in nature
STANDARD 1.3 students must discover the com- and choose preferences with regard to line, color, shape, and
All students will utilize mon elements and properties of rhythm (e.g., rivers, trees, leaves, butterflies). They translate these
arts elements and arts dance, music, theater, and visual design and movement elements to dance movements and create
arts. These arts elements, such as short dances, planning the dance elements. The students practice
media to produce color, line, form, rhythm, space, and perform the dances individually.
artistic products and timing, movement, mood, etc., are ■ Students select a season to design a dance to include the above as
performances. the ingredients from which works well as air movements (breeze, hurricane winds); rain (drizzling,
of art are made. pouring, driving, etc.); snow and ice effects on movement; leaves
drifting, falling, curling. Combine and synchronize students’ indi-
PROGRESS INDICATOR #1 vidual dance ideas to create a group performance.
Apply elements and media common Suggestions:
to the arts to produce a work of
art.
■ Use a selected painting that represents the particular season for
inspiration.
■ Use musical selections such as Verdi’s “Four Seasons” or other
selections representing storm, summer’s day, autumn.
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 3.2 Use models and observations
■ 3.7 Conduct systematic observations
■ 3.15 Problem-solve for design

THINKING SKILLS:
■ identify, compare/contrast, translate, assess

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Arts (Music and Visual Arts) 1.2, 1.6
■ Science
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NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: DANCE NARRATIVES
Art criticism assists in the devel- ■ Provide groups of students with a certain element of a dance per-
STANDARD 1.4 opment of critical thinking skills of formance to specifically focus on: story, roles, choreography, body
All students will observation, description, analysis, language, postures, music, lighting, costumes, special effects, or
demonstrate knowledge interpretation, and evaluation. characters. Discuss audience etiquette and the need to concentrate
Students engage in and evaluate on the element assigned. Students view a narrative dance (or por-
of the process of multisensory learning experiences tion of a video) that is developmentally appropriate, such as the
critique. as both participants and observers. Nutcracker.
The process of critique helps stu- ■ Following the performance or viewing, each student in the group
dents to develop a sense of aes- describes his/her observations to the class, identifying and
thetics and leads to artistic and explaining any likes and dislikes. The students may demonstrate
personal growth. the movements, facial expressions, body stance/posture, etc., if
they choose.
PROGRESS INDICATOR #1
Explain the criteria by which they WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
evaluate the quality of their work ■ 3.7 Conduct systematic observations
and the work of others. ■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
■ 4.6 Describe actions for respect
■ 4.7 Describe roles people play

THINKING SKILLS:
■ concentrate, analyze, recall

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Music
■ Visual Arts
■ Language Arts Literacy (Speaking)

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NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: BIRD DANCE
The history of the world is told ■ Students view the movements of birds through direct observation,
STANDARD 1.5 through the arts. By being able to video, etc.; then view how the movements are recreated in dance
All students will identify identify historical, social, and cul- movement.
the various historical, tural influences related to the arts, ❥ View “Ostrich” (African, Dance Black America). Students com-
students will have a better and municate their responses with supporting reasons for likes and
social, and cultural influ- more complete understanding of dislikes. Expand on responses relating to dance elements.
ences and traditions humankind past, present, and ❥ View “Dying Swan” (Classical Ballet, Pavlova). Students respond
which have generated future and of the arts as forms of
verbally to bird movements in classical style, giving reasons to
human expression.
artistic accomplishments support their comments. Expand on comments as they relate to
throughout the ages, and the elements of the dance.
PROGRESS INDICATORS ❥ View “Eagle Dance” (Native American, Indian Dance Theater).
which continue to shape #1 & #4 Students respond with supporting statements and compare/
contemporary arts. Investigate, experience, and par- contrast it with the Ostrich and Swan presentations.
ticipate in dance, music, theater, ■ Students select a bird they would like to be. They split into groups
and visual arts activities represent- depending upon the dance style preferences they have viewed. By
ing various historical periods and re-creating dance movements in that style, they choreograph a
world cultures. (#1) dance phrase.
Use their senses, imagination, and
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
memory to express ideas and feel-
ings in dance, music, theater, and
■ 2.2 Select appropriate tools (and technology)
visual arts. (#4) ■ 3.7 Conduct systematic observations
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
THINKING SKILLS:
■ identify, decide, compare/contrast, create
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Arts 1.5 and 1.3
■ Language Arts Literacy

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NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: STORY DANCE
The development of knowledge and ■ Students select a favorite story to express in dance. Discuss the
STANDARD 1.6 skills in design produces the power characters, costumes, and props the students will need. Design the
All students will develop to create or to enhance the econo- costumes to suit the characters. Create costumes from available
design skills for planning my and the quality of life. All materials. Students review the story and determine what props and
inventions, everything made by sound effects/music are essential to the performance. Discuss as a
the form and function of human hands, require design skills: group the limitations imposed by space and materials and how to
space, structures, objects, fabric and clothing, landscapes overcome them.
sound, and events. and interiors, residential and cor- ■ Students develop a plan for the choreography that will be expres-
porate architecture, product and sive of the story, then practice and perform it.
package design, video and print ■ Students define the roles of costume designer, stage manager
graphics. Neighborhood and city
(including safety), choreographer, related roles, and dancers in a
planning can be aesthetically
professional production.
improved with skills in the design
of space and form. Staging is WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
essential to the planning of suc- ■ 1.2 Describe the importance of skills (and attitudes)
cessful events, whether personal, ■ 1.5 Identify transferable skills
business, or community. Elements ■ 3.1 Define problem/clarify decisions
of design affect nearly all aspects
of daily living.
■ 3.4 Identify and access resources
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
■ 3.11 Identify/evaluate alternatives
PROGRESS INDICATORS
#1 & #2
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
■ 5.8 Discuss rules to promote safety and health
Identify and state needs and
opportunities for design in the THINKING SKILLS:
contexts of home, school, recre- ■ translate, illustrate, imagine, create, produce, design, decide, evaluate
ation, and play. (#1)
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
Plan and execute solutions to ■ Music
design problems. (#2) ■ Visual Arts
■ Language Arts Literacy
■ Others (depending on the story selection)
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NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: MASTERWORKS I
The arts strengthen our apprecia- ■ Observe and respond to dance masterworks (live or video) such as
STANDARD 1.1 tion of the world as well as our “Waterstudy” by Doris Humphrey, “Riverdance” by Michael Flatley,
All students will acquire ability to be creative and inventive or another choice. Using dance terminology, students critique the
knowledge and skills that decision-makers. The acquisition of use of fundamental elements of dance and their impact on the aes-
knowledge and skills that con- thetic effect.
increase aesthetic tribute to aesthetic awareness of ■ Improvise, based upon one of the works seen, a short dance
awareness in dance, dance, music, theater, and visual emphasizing movement, shape, level, energy, and/or theme, using
music, theater, and arts enhances these abilities. a selected musical work. Students plan the elements to achieve a
visual arts desired aesthetic effect, then practice technique and perform in
PROGRESS INDICATOR #1 groups.
Understand that arts elements,
■ Discuss their personal responses to each group’s plan, the quality
such as color, line, rhythm, space, of the practice sessions, and aesthetic responses to the perfor-
form, may be combined selectively mances.
to elicit a specific aesthetic WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
response. ■ 3.2 Use models and observations
■ 3.7 Conduct systematic observations
■ 3.11 Identify/evaluate alternative decisions
■ 3.15 Apply problem-solving skills to design projects
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
THINKING SKILLS:
■ observe, translate, evaluate
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Arts 1.4, 1.6

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NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: MASTERWORKS II
The arts strengthen our apprecia- ■ Students view masterworks representative of two or three dance
STANDARD 1.1 tion of the world as well as our genres (e.g., ballet, jazz, tap, musical theater, mime, and
All students will acquire ability to be creative and inventive social/cultural). Identify the hallmark characteristics of the differ-
knowledge and skills that decision-makers. The acquisition of ent genres.
knowledge and skills that con- ■ Suggested masterworks videos:
increase aesthetic tribute to aesthetic awareness of
awareness in dance, ❥ La Sylphide (Bournonville); Revelations (Alvin Ailey); and
dance, music, theater, and visual
Dancing (PBS eight-part series)
music, theater, and arts enhances these abilities.
■ Learn, practice, and perform the techniques and hallmarks of two
visual arts. genres.
PROGRESS INDICATORS
■ Analyze the common elements and differences of these genres and
#2 & #3
their effect on aesthetic response.
Understand that arts elements,
such as color, line, rhythm, space, WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
form, may be combined selectively ■ 3.7 Conduct systematic observations
to elicit a specific response. (#2)
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
Communicate about the aesthetic
qualities of art works through oral
■ 4.9 Use time efficiently
and written analysis using appro-
priate technical and evaluative THINKING SKILLS:
terms. (#3) ■ evaluate, analyze, create compare/contrast, judge, identify

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Arts 1.3, 1.4, 1.5
■ Language Arts Literacy

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NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: DANCE MACHINES
Through an education in the arts, ■ Working in small groups, students create a machine (e.g., a wash-
STANDARD 1.2 students enhance their perceptual, ing machine, lawn mower, or conveyor belt) that incorporates the
All students will refine physical, and technical skills and use of body parts, shape, level, movement, and vocalized sound.
perceptual, physical, and learn that pertinent techniques Each group practices and performs the movements for the class.
and technologies apply to the suc- Members of the audience observe each other’s performances and
technical skills through cessful completion of tasks. The identify the dance elements used. The students articulate the
creating dance, music, development of sensory acuity strengths in each performance.
theater, and/or (perceptual skills) enables stu-
dents to perceive and acknowledge
visual arts. WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
various viewpoints. Appropriate ■ 2.1 Understand technological systems
physical movements, dexterity, and
rhythm pertain to such activities
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
as brush strokes in painting, dance ■ 4.5 Provide constructive criticism
movement, fingering of musical
instruments, etc.
THINKING SKILLS:
■ analyze, create, decide, synthesize, evaluate
PROGRESS INDICATORS
#2 & #3
Demonstrate technical skills in LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
dance, music, theater, or visual ■ Arts 1.3, 1.6
arts, appropriate to students’ ■ Language Arts Literacy
developmental level. (#2)
Create, produce, or perform works
of dance, music, theater, or visual
arts, individually and with others.
(#3)

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NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: PRETZEL DANCE
Through an education in the arts, ■ Students work with a partner. Dancer A creates a shape and freezes.
STANDARD 1.2 students enhance their perceptual, Dancer B then creates a pretzel shape with Dancer A (going
All students will refine physical, and technical skills and through negative shapes, over, under, in front/back, etc.) and also
perceptual, physical, and learn that pertinent techniques freezes.
and technologies apply to the suc- ■ Dancer A carefully “oozes” out of the pretzel shape and creates a
technical skills through cessful completion of tasks. The new pretzel shape with Dancer B, again through the use of the ele-
creating dance, music, development of sensory acuity ment of direction. The partners continue creating and changing
theater, and/or (perceptual skills) enables stu- shapes.
dents to perceive and acknowledge
visual arts. ■ Students create a dance phrase with a series of such movements.
various viewpoints. Appropriate
They select music to establish a rhythm, pace, etc.
physical movements, dexterity, and
rhythm pertain to such activities
as brush strokes in painting, dance
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
movement, fingering of musical ■ 3.1 Define problem/clarify decisions
instruments, etc.
■ 3.9 Identify patterns
■ 3.11 Identify/evaluate alternative decisions
PROGRESS INDICATORS
#2 & #3
■ 3.15 Apply problem-solving skills to design projects
Demonstrate technical skills in
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
dance, music, theater, or visual
arts, appropriate to students’ THINKING SKILLS:
developmental level. (#2) ■ create, decide, identify
Create, produce, or perform works
of dance, music, theater, or visual
arts, individually and with others. LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
(#3)
■ Music

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NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: MODERN DANCE COMBOS
Through an education in the arts, ■ Students learn, practice, and perform modern dance combinations
STANDARD 1.2 students enhance their perceptual, that utilize fundamental modern dance concepts:
All students will refine physical, and technical skills and ❥ spinal contractions; off-balance sustained; parallel; turnout;
perceptual, physical, and learn that pertinent techniques fall and recovery; and limb flexion.
and technologies apply to the suc-
technical skills through cessful completion of tasks. The (Include modern dance vocabulary.)
creating dance, music, development of sensory acuity ■ In groups of four, students change two of the fundamental ele-
theater, and/or (perceptual skills) enables stu-
ments in the combination (e.g., timing, pathway, level, timing,
dents to perceive and acknowledge
visual arts. energy). They perform the movements and critique each other’s
various viewpoints. Appropriate
work.
physical movements, dexterity, and
rhythm pertain to such activities
■ Using videos, the students view/discuss the use of these funda-
as brush strokes in painting, dance mentals in different dance styles and genres.
movement, fingering of musical
instruments, etc.
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 2.3 Access (and use) technology
PROGRESS INDICATORS ■ 3.15 Apply problem-solving skills to design projects
#2 & #3
■ 4.10 Apply study skills
Demonstrate technical skills in
dance, music, theater, or visual
arts, appropriate to students’ THINKING SKILLS:
developmental level. (#2) ■ concentrate, identify, reproduce, apply, demonstrate, design
Create, produce, or perform works
of dance, music, theater, or visual LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
arts, individually and with others. ■ Arts 1.3, 1.6
(#3) ■ Language Arts Literacy

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NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: WITH FEELING!
In order to understand the arts, ■ Students discuss and mimic facial and bodily gestures and move-
STANDARD 1.3 students must discover the com- ments that express the gamut of a human emotion, such as fear,
All students will utilize mon elements and properties of shyness, nervousness, untrusting, joy, or hate. They explore move-
arts elements and arts dance, music, theater, and visual ment, rhythm, timing, shape, etc., that expresses the various sub-
arts. These arts elements, such as tleties and strengths of the emotion.
media to produce artistic color, line, form, rhythm, space, ■ With a partner, students create, practice, and perform a dance
products and timing, movement, mood are the involving the relationship of two emotions, selecting the nuances
performances. ingredients from which works of of each to be depicted.
art are made.

WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:


PROGRESS INDICATOR #2
■ 3.1 Define problem/clarify decisions
Demonstrate appropriate use of
technology, tools, terminology,
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
techniques, and media in the cre- ■ 3.15 Apply problem-solving skills to design projects
Passaic Teen Arts, Spring 1996. ation of dance, music, theater, or ■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
Clifton High School visual arts.

THINKING SKILLS:
■ identify, analyze, problem-solve, interpret

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Theater
■ Science
■ Social Studies

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NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: EVALUATE
Art criticism assists in the devel- ■ Students describe and critique specific dance phrases (video/live/
STANDARD 1.4 opment of critical thinking skills of own/other students’) using criteria such as:
All students will observation, description, analysis, ❥ feeling/emotion; look/shape; dynamics/energy; size; design:
demonstrate knowledge interpretation, and evaluation. line, pattern, color, rhythm, texture, etc.; and aesthetic effects
Students engage in and evaluate (including use of sets, costumes, etc.).
of the process multisensory learning experiences
of critique. ■ Students evaluate all performances in some manner. They support
as both participants and observers.
their critiques and make positive suggestions for improvement or
The process of critique helps stu-
other interpretation. Suggested possibilities:
dents to develop a sense of aes-
thetics and leads to artistic and ❥ Use the computer to create a rubric to include the above
personal growth. criteria for future evaluation purposes; use numbered values on
cards for technical/artistic evaluations at the end of a perfor-
mance, similar to the judging method used for ice skating.
PROGRESS INDICATOR #2 Discuss disparities; and use a “thumbs up or down” evaluation
Offer constructive critique in the (like the Romans did) when evaluating criteria as a class.
evaluation of their own and others’
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
work in dance, music, theater, or
visual arts.
■ 2.9 Use technology to present designs and results of investi-
gations
■ 3.7 Conduct systematic observations
■ 3.12 Interpret data
■ 4.5 Provide constructive criticism
THINKING SKILLS:
■ observe, evaluate/assess/judge, dispute, judge, grade
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Arts 1.1
■ Mathematics

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NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: CONTEMPO
The history of the world is told ■ Students learn the historical, social, and cultural origins of recent
STANDARD 1.5 through the arts. By being able to and contemporary dance genres indigenous to the United States
All students will identify identify historical, social, and cul- (e.g., swing from the 20s and 40s, ballroom/Ginger Rogers and Fred
the various historical, tural influences related to the arts, Astaire, tap/Gregory Hines, jazz, musical theater/film, hip-
students will have a better and hop/Savion Glover) and the artists and times that fostered them.
social, and cultural influ- more complete understanding of ■ Utilizing technology, the students trace the career of at least one
ences and traditions humankind past, present, and of the representative professional dancers or choreographers.
which have generated future and of the arts as forms of ■ Students learn, practice, and perform basic modern dance utilizing
human expression.
artistic accomplishments basic modern dance concepts, principles, skills, and aesthetics.
throughout the ages, and Suggested dancers:
PROGRESS INDICATOR #5 ❥ Doris Humphrey/fall and recovery; Mary Wigman/vibratory
which continue to shape
Identify significant artists and action, swing, percussion; Martha Graham/contraction-release;
contemporary arts. artistic works in dance, music, the- Alvin Ailey; Mark Morris; Lester Horton; Paul Taylor; Merce
ater, and visual arts representing Cunningham; and Alwin Nikolais.
various historical periods, world
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
cultures, and social and political
influences.
■ 1.3 Identify career interests
■ 1.5 Identify transferable skills
■ 2.6 Access information
■ 3.2 Use models and observations
■ 3.5 Use library media center
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
■ 4.10 Apply study skills
THINKING SKILLS:
■ identify, name, record, demonstrate, summarize, abstract, compose
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Social Studies (History)

45
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: DANCE SET
The development of knowledge and ■ Students design a model to scale for an abstract stage set for a des-
STANDARD 1.6 skills in design produces the power ignated dance performance. Scale will be to the area in which a
All students will develop to create or to enhance the econo- dance performance would take place, e.g., in the school auditori-
design skills for planning my and the quality of life. All um, cafetorium, or outside location. Consider where off-stage areas
inventions, everything made by will be.
the form and function of human hands, require design skills: ■ Students consider as an alternative a realistic set that is represen-
space, structures, objects, fabric and clothing, landscapes tative of the theme, time, and place.
sound, and events. and interiors, residential and cor- ■ The class critiques the prototypes by demonstrating movement
porate architecture, product and
paths within the space. They consider both stability and safety.
package design, video and print
graphics. Neighborhood and city
planning can be aesthetically
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
improved with skills in the design ■ 1.1 Demonstrate employability skills
of space and form. Staging is
essential to the planning of suc-
■ 3.2 Use models and observations
cessful events, whether personal, ■ 3.13 Select (and apply) solutions to problem solving
business, or community. Elements (and decision making)
of design affect nearly all aspects ■ 3.15 Apply problem-solving skills to design projects
of daily living. ■ 5.6 Identify common hazards

PROGRESS INDICATOR #3
THINKING SKILLS:
Identify and solve design problems ■ match, imagine, design, select
in space, structures, objects,
sound, and/or events for home and
workplace. LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Music
■ Visual Arts
■ Language Arts Literacy

46
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: DANCE EVENT
The development of knowledge and ■ Students design a dance program to be presented to an audience (other
STANDARD 1.6 skills in design produces the power students, parents, community). The program may be for a specific event,
All students will develop to create or to enhance the econo- an assembly, holiday, celebration, etc. Consider inclusion in a theater pro-
design skills for planning my and the quality of life. All duction or music concert, and work with other arts disciplines.
inventions, everything made by ■ Students then determine the target audience and available locations.
the form and function of human hands, require design skills: They make appropriate dance and musical selections. Students prepare a
space, structures, objects, fabric and clothing, landscapes one-page resume listing the skills they believe will enable them to take
sound, and events. and interiors, residential and cor- the roles of a director, announcer, choreographer, stage manager, public
porate architecture, product and relations, costumer, etc. They share the resumes with the class, and
package design, video and print groups form based on student interest and self-appraisal of skills. The
graphics. Neighborhood and city marketing group uses a computer to generate the dance program, which
planning can be aesthetically they will distribute at the event. They use available technology as appro-
improved with skills in the design priate. The program is videotaped.
of space and form. Staging is ■ Students learn, practice, and perform the program.
essential to the planning of suc-
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
cessful events, whether personal,
business, or community. Elements ■ 1.1 Demonstrate employability skills (and work habits)
of design affect nearly all aspects ■ 1.2 Describe the importance of skills (and attitudes)
of daily living. ■ 1.10 Prepare a resume (and complete job applications)
■ 2.2 Select appropriate tools (and technology)
■ 3.4 Identify and access resources
PROGRESS INDICATOR #3 ■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
Identify and solve design problems ■ 3.15 Apply problem-solving skills to design projects
in space, structures, objects, ■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
sound, and/or events for home and THINKING SKILLS:
workplace. ■ identify, order, investigate, differentiate, categorize, imagine, create, design
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Music
■ Visual Arts
■ Language Arts Literacy

47
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: MASTERWORKS III
The arts strengthen our apprecia- ■ Students discuss the sources of inspiration for the creation of
STANDARD 1.1 tion of the world as well as our dance. They explore movement possibilities given thematic ideas
All students will acquire ability to be creative and inventive taken from preselected masterworks.
knowledge and skills that decision-makers. The acquisition of ■ View and compare/contrast masterworks from multiple dance gen-
knowledge and skills that con- res, such as the following:
increase aesthetic aware- tribute to aesthetic awareness of
ness in dance, music, the- ❥ “Firebird” (Fokine); “Green Table” (Kurt Joos); “Appalachian
dance, music, theater, and visual
Spring” (Martha Graham); “Hard Nut” (Mark Morris); and
ater, and visual arts. arts enhances these abilities.
“Moiseyev in Concert”
■ Students select and research the socio-historical contexts of a
PROGRESS INDICATOR #4 genre and significant choreographers.
Demonstrate an understanding of ■ Student(s) choreograph(s) a dance that demonstrates an evolving
different aesthetic philosophies personal aesthetic and submit(s) a 100-word philosophical state-
through the evaluation and analy- ment supporting it.
sis of artistic styles, trends, and
movements in an art form. WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 3.2 Use models and observations
■ 3.7 Conduct systematic observations
■ 3.11 Identify/evaluate alternatives
■ 3.13 Select (and apply) solutions to problem solving (and
decision making)
THINKING SKILLS:
■ identify, evaluate, analyze, compose, create, judge
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Arts 1.3, 1.4, 1.5
■ Language Arts Literacy
■ Social Studies (History)

48
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: TRAIN 4 DANCE
Through an education in the arts, ■ Students refine skills through experiencing the following:
STANDARD 1.2 students enhance their perceptual, ❥ Alternative training and conditioning methodology for dance
All students will refine physical, and technical skills and (e.g., Pilates Method, Alexander Technique, Barrtenieff Funda-
perceptual, physical, and learn that pertinent techniques mentals, Laban Movement Analysis, Feldenchrist, or yoga); the
and technologies apply to the suc- use of fitness equipment to increase range of movement and
technical skills through cessful completion of tasks. The motion, muscle strength, stretch and tone; and aerobic exer-
creating dance, music, development of sensory acuity cise.
theater, and/or (perceptual skills) enables stu-
dents to perceive and acknowledge
visual arts.
various viewpoints. Appropriate WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
physical movements, dexterity, and ■ 1.5 Identify transferable skills
rhythm pertain to such activities ■ 2.8 Use technology and other tools to produce products
as brush strokes in painting, dance
movement, fingering of musical
■ 3.2 Use models and observations
instruments, etc. ■ 3.11 Identify/evaluate alternative decisions
■ 4.3 Evaluate own (actions and) accomplishments
PROGRESS INDICATOR #4 ■ 5.1 Explain injury prevention
Demonstrate originality, technical ■ 5.3 Demonstrate safe physical movement
skills, and artistic expression in ■ 5.4 Demonstrate safe use of equipment (or tools)
the creation, production, and per- ■ 5.6 Identify common hazards
formance of dance music, theater,
or visual arts. ■ 5.7 Identify and follow safety procedures

THINKING SKILLS:
■ identify, compare/contrast, evaluate

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Health & Physical Education
■ Science (Anatomy & Physiology)

49
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: CONTEMPORARY
Through an education in the arts, ■ Students participate in and demonstrate competency in the execu-
STANDARD 1.2 students enhance their perceptual, tion of contemporary concepts and intermediate-level skills includ-
All students will refine physical, and technical skills and ing the following:
perceptual, physical, and learn that pertinent techniques ❥ Extensions; dynamic alignment; off-center turning; and
and technologies apply to the suc- refined axial center awareness.
technical skills through cessful completion of tasks. The
creating dance, music, ■ The warm-up and combinations should reflect increasing complex-
development of sensory acuity
ity in dance technique, skill level, retention, aesthetic refinement,
theater, and/or (perceptual skills) enables stu-
musicality, and design. Suggested:
dents to perceive and acknowledge
visual arts. ❥ Twyla Tharp (rhythmic complexity/fusion); Mark Morris
various viewpoints. Appropriate
physical movements, dexterity, and (movement invention); Laura Dean; Meredith Monk; and
rhythm pertain to such activities Pina Bausch.
as brush strokes in painting, dance
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
movement, fingering of musical ■ 1.2 Describe the importance of skills (and attitudes)
instruments, etc.
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively

PROGRESS INDICATOR #4
THINKING SKILLS:
Demonstrate originality, technical ■ recall, concentrate, demonstrate
skills, and artistic expression in
the creation, production, and per-
formance of dance, music, theater,
or visual arts.

50
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: DANCE PRODUCTION
In order to understand the arts, ■ In groups, students choreograph, practice, and perform a complete
STANDARD 1.3 students must discover the com- dance work utilizing choreographic elements and principles and
All students will utilize mon elements and properties of refined technical skills. The accompaniment, theme, and style of
arts elements and arts dance, music, theater, and visual the work should reflect students’ consensus, practical experiences,
arts. These arts elements, such as and individual movement vocabularies.
media to produce color, line, form, rhythm, space, ■ Design/create costumes, set, and lighting design.
artistic products and timing, movement, mood, etc., are ■ Create a computer-generated program. Invite and perform for par-
performances. the ingredients from which works
ents, other students, or the community.
of art are made.

PROGRESS INDICATOR #3 WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:


Demonstrate an understanding of
■ 1.8 Demonstrate occupational skills
technology, methods, materials, ■ 2.8 Use technology and other tools to produce products
and creative processes commonly ■ 3.1 Define problem/clarify decisions
used in dance, music, theater, or ■ 3.15 Apply problem-solving skills to design projects
visual arts.
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively

THINKING SKILLS:
■ decide, create, produce

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Arts (Dance and Visual Arts) 1.6 Design
■ Language Arts Literacy

51
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: MULTIMEDIA / INTRADISCIPLINARY
In order to understand the arts, ■ Students create, rehearse, and perform a multimedia production for
STANDARD 1.3 students must discover the com- a live or taped medium, utilizing the six elements of structure:
All students will utilize mon elements and properties of mass, volume, line, plane, texture, and color.
arts elements and arts dance, music, theater, and visual ■ Students partake in the design and construction of sets, costumes,
arts. These arts elements, such as and properties necessary for production. Include the use of appro-
media to produce color, line, form, rhythm, space, priate technologies (film, video, lighting effects, computer-gener-
artistic products and timing, movement, mood, etc., are ated imagery, soundscapes, etc.) to alter the more conventional
performances. the ingredients from which works materials and expand form relationships.
of art are made. ■ Research concepts for the above from multimedia sources (MTV)
artists (Pina Bausch, Ping Chong, Alwin Nikolais). Describe how
PROGRESS INDICATOR #3 various sources influenced their work.
Demonstrate an understanding of
technology, methods, materials,
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
and creative processes commonly
used in dance, music, theater, or
■ 1.8 Demonstrate occupational skills
visual arts. ■ 2.1 Understand technological systems
■ 2.7 Use technology and other tools to solve problems
■ 3.4 Identify and access resources
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
■ 3.11 Identify/evaluate alternative decisions
■ 3.14 Evaluate solutions

THINKING SKILLS:
■ select, create, apply, translate, compose, design, assess

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Arts 1.6

52
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: GENRE CRITIQUE
Art criticism assists in the devel- ■ Students view live or taped performances (student or professional)
STANDARD 1.4 opment of critical thinking skills of of two genres. In oral or written discussions, students:
All students will observation, description, analysis, ❥ define the genre and style; and
demonstrate knowledge interpretation, and evaluation. ❥ discuss the historical, societal, economic, aesthetic, and
Students engage in and evaluate
of the process multisensory learning experiences
political contents.
of critique. as both participants and observers. ■ Students appraise the level of craftsmanship and technical skill of
The process of critique helps stu- the choreographers and performers as well as the effectiveness of
dents to develop a sense of aes- the communication of the choreographic intent.
thetics and leads to artistic and ■ Students discuss the effectiveness of production values, e.g., the
personal growth. set, costumes, music, lighting.

PROGRESS INDICATOR #3
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
Evaluate and interpret works of art ■ 3.7 Conduct systematic observations
orally and in writing, using appro- ■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
priate terminology.
■ 3.15 Apply problem-solving skills to design projects
Gloucester County Institute of Technology ■ 4.10 Apply study skills
■ 4.11 Describe how ability, effort, and achievement are interrelated

THINKING SKILLS:
■ identify, comprehend, investigate, analyze, appraise

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Arts 1.6
■ Language Arts Literacy

53
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: MASTERWORKS IV
The history of the world is told ■ Students view and compare/contrast, through discussion, master-
STANDARD 1.5 through the arts. By being able to works from multiple dance genres. Suggestions include the follow-
All students will identify identify historical, social, and cul- ing:
the various historical, tural influences related to the arts,
students will have a better and
❥ “Firebird” (Fokine); “Green Table” (Kurt Joos); “Appalachian
social, and cultural more complete understanding of Spring (Martha Graham); “Hard Nut” (Mark Morris); and
influences and traditions humankind past, present, and “Moiseyev in Concert”.
which have generated future and of the arts as forms of ■ Students select and research the socio-historical contexts of a
human expression. genre and professional backgrounds of its significant choreogra-
artistic accomplishments
phers using the media center and the Internet.
throughout the ages, and
PROGRESS INDICATORS ■ Student(s) choreograph(s) a dance that demonstrates an evolving
which continue to shape #8 & #10 personal aesthetic and submit(s) a 100-word philosophical state-
contemporary arts. Demonstrate knowledge of how ment supporting it.
artists and artistic works connect WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
with political, social, cultural, and ■ 1.7 Describe the importance of academic (and occupational) skills
historical events. (#8) ■ 2.5 Access communication and information systems
Create works of art that communi- ■ 3.4 Identify and access resources
cate personal opinions, thoughts, ■ 3.5 Use library media center
and ideas. (#10)
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
■ 3.11 Identify/evaluate alternative decisions
■ 3.14 Evaluate solutions
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
THINKING SKILLS:
■ compare/contrast, evaluate, analyze, compose, create, judge
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Music
■ Language Arts Literacy
■ Social Studies (History)
54
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
DANCE 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: TWO & MORE
The development of knowledge and ■ Students explore various movement and design elements within the
STANDARD 1.6 skills in design produces the power choreographic process by doing one or both of the following:
All students will develop to create or to enhance the econo- ❥ Choreographing a duet emphasizing partnering skills (unison,
design skills for planning my and the quality of life. All weight sharing, spatial and shape design).
inventions, everything made by
the form and function of human hands, require design skills:
❥ Creating an ensemble work with emphasis on manipulating
space, structures, objects, groups and forms of canon/repetition/unison/accumulation of
fabric and clothing, landscapes
movement and space.
sound, and events. and interiors, residential and cor-
porate architecture, product and ■ Finally, students practice, perform, and critique the choreogra-
package design, video and print phies.
graphics. Neighborhood and city
planning can be aesthetically
improved with skills in the design WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
of space and form. Staging is
■ 3.1 Define problem/clarify decisions
essential to the planning of suc- ■ 3.6 Plan experiments
cessful events, whether personal, ■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
business, or community. Elements ■ 3.9 Identify patterns
of design affect nearly all aspects
of daily living. ■ 3.14 Evaluate solutions
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
PROGRESS INDICATOR #4
Identify, plan, and provide solu- THINKING SKILLS:
tions to design problems of space, ■ decide, create, evaluate
structures, objects, sound, and/or
events in a public or private envi-
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
ronment. ■ Arts 1.6
■ Music

55
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
MUSIC Music exalts the human spirit. To quote Aaron Copland, “So long as the human
spirit thrives on this planet, music in some living form will accompany and sus-
tain it to give expressive meaning.” To the Greeks, the word “Quadrivium” defined the
essence of education. The quad included math, geometry, music, and astronomy. Popular music
influences children’s thinking and behavior. Through exposure to various historical, cultural,
and contemporary styles of music, students learn to hear, feel, and examine the thoughts and
feelings of what others have communicated through their music and songs.
Chapter 3

The making of music is a thoughtful practice involving formal and informal knowledge. It
requires the development and practice of sensory skills, the manipulation and translation of
complex symbol systems, and the understanding of the component parts and of the “whole”
within the composition. The continuum and practice of thoughtful synthesis, expressiveness,
dynamics, movement, flow, and timing are essential to success in music and virtually all
aspects of a person’s life.

The production of musical sound creates awareness of the shape, size, physics, and mechani-
cal functioning of the instruments. Personal physical involvement and development of skills in
breathing, voice projection, and intonation are intimate personal activities that most people
give little notice to but which are essential skills.

The ensemble, the orchestra, the band, and the chorus are opportunities for mutual effort and
success. The knowledge that the group’s successful performance is reliant on the practice and
perfection of each individual’s contribution is an asset to the family, the school, and later in
the workplace.

57
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
MUSIC K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: LISTEN
The arts strengthen our apprecia- ■ With their eyes closed, students concentrate on listening to the
STANDARD 1.1 tion of the world as well as our selection “Hoedown” from Aaron Copland’s Rodeo. They visualize a
All students will acquire ability to be creative and inventive “movie” in their mind’s eye that the music suggests.
knowledge and skills that decision-makers. The acquisition of ■ Students then open their eyes and immediately draw or write a
knowledge and skills that con- description of the visualizations the music suggested to them.
increase aesthetic tribute to aesthetic awareness of
awareness in dance, ■ They share their drawings or writings with the class, comment on
dance, music, theater, and visual
what they particularly liked, and give reasons for their preferences.
music, theater, and arts enhances these abilities.
visual arts.
PROGRESS INDICATOR #1 WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
Demonstrate performance and par-
■ 3.10 Monitor own thinking
ticipation skills by working and ■ 3.12 Interpret data
creating individually and with oth- ■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
ers.

THINKING SKILLS:
■ musical, synthesize, create, imagine

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Arts (Music) 1.2, 1.4
■ Visual Arts
■ Language Arts Literacy (Speaking, Listening)

58
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
MUSIC K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: SOUNDS FOR MUSIC
Through an education in the arts, ■ Students brainstorm sounds from nature, e.g., birds, rain, crunch-
STANDARD 1.2 students enhance their perceptual, ing autumn leaves, wind, animals, seashore waves, etc.
All students will refine physical, and technical skills and ■ Introduce Antonio Vivaldi’s “The Four Seasons,” explaining that
perceptual, physical, and learn that pertinent techniques composers often use natural sounds as a basis for their composi-
and technologies apply to the suc- tions. Students discuss the seasons and Vivaldi’s use of specific
technical skills through cessful completion of tasks. The instruments and types of instruments for natural sounds.
creating dance, music, development of sensory acuity ■ Students improvise sounds that represent the seasons and perform
theater, and/or (perceptual skills) enables stu-
for the class.
dents to perceive and acknowledge
visual arts.
various viewpoints. Appropriate
physical movements, dexterity, and
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
rhythm pertain to such activities ■ 3.1 Define problem/clarify decisions
as brush strokes in painting, dance
movement, fingering of musical
■ 3.2 Use models and observations
instruments, etc.
THINKING SKILLS:
PROGRESS INDICATOR #1 ■ musical, know, apply, analyze, evaluate
Demonstrate performance and par-
ticipation skills by working and LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
creating individually and with oth- ■ Arts (Music) 1.3, 1.4
ers.

59
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
MUSIC K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: UNDERSTANDING FORM
In order to understand the arts, ■ Students sing a known song (e.g., ‘Lil Liza Jane) and identify the
STANDARD 1.3 students must discover the com- phrase length through movement. They show understanding of
All students will utilize mon elements and properties of phrase length by moving arms over their heads in an arch or across
arts elements and arts dance, music, theater, and visual their bodies or walking the phrase. Discuss spacing for safety.
arts. These arts elements, such as ■ Through their identification of the phrases, students recognize
media to produce color, line, form, rhythm, space, where to breathe. Utilizing this information, the class performs the
artistic products and timing, movement, mood, etc., are song.
performances. the ingredients from which works
of art are made.
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
PROGRESS INDICATOR #1
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
Apply elements and media common
■ 5.8 Discuss rules to promote safety and health

South Hunterdon High School,


to the arts to produce a work of
Spring 1998
art. THINKING SKILLS:
■ recall, apply, analyze

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Dance
■ Mathematics

60
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
MUSIC K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: RHYTHM
Art criticism assists in the devel- ■ Students identify and pat the beat of a song, (e.g., “Follow the
STANDARD 1.4 opment of critical thinking skills of Yellow Brick Road” from The Wizard of Oz). Lead students to iden-
All students will observation, description, analysis, tify and clap the rhythm of the song and relate to the lyrics.
demonstrate knowledge of interpretation, and evaluation. Students identify and demonstrate (through body movement) the
Students engage in and evaluate upward and downward pitch movement of the song.
the process of critique. multisensory learning experiences ■ As a class or through cooperative groups, students analyze, dis-
as both participants and observers. cuss, and evaluate the use of beat, rhythm, and pitch in the song
The process of critique helps stu- to decide why the composer may have used each of these elements
dents to develop a sense of aes- in a particular way.
thetics and leads to artistic and ■ Students listen to a recording of Leroy Anderson’s “Syncopated
personal growth.
Clock” and identify/discuss the use of beat, rhythm, and pitch.

PROGRESS INDICATOR #1
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
Explain the criteria by which they
evaluate the quality of their work
■ 3.9 Identify patterns
and the work of others. ■ 3.12 Interpret data
■ 3.14 Evaluate solutions

THINKING SKILLS:
■ musical, know, comprehend, synthesize, apply

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Arts (Music) 1.1, 1.3, 1.6

61
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
MUSIC K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: MUSICAL DIFFERENCES
The history of the world is told ■ Students listen to the music of different cultures they may be
STANDARD 1.5 through the arts. By being able to studying, e.g., Native American and Hawaiian. They identify differ-
All students will identify identify historical, social, and cul- ences in the instruments, sound, and purposes.
the various historical, tural influences related to the arts, ■ This activity can be combined with Dance 1.5 to learn the differ-
students will have a better and ent styles of movement and purposes/influences associated with
social, and cultural more complete understanding of the music and related art forms, such as:
influences and traditions humankind past, present, and ❥ invoking rain or good weather for crops; greeting someone; and
which have generated future and of the arts as forms of
storytelling.
human expression.
artistic accomplishments
throughout the ages, and
PROGRESS INDICATOR #1 WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
which continue to shape
Investigate, experience, and par-
contemporary arts. ticipate in dance, music, theater,
and visual arts activities represent-
ing various historical periods and
THINKING SKILLS:
world cultures.
■ identify, memorize/recall, reproduce, compare, differentiate

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Dance
■ Social Studies

62
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
MUSIC K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: UNIVERSAL INSTRUMENTS
The development of knowledge and ■ Students learn about the four types of “universal instruments:”
STANDARD 1.6 skills in design produces the power string, woodwind, brass, and percussion. They view/listen to the
All students will develop to create or to enhance the econo- various sounds. (Other students perform, if possible).
design skills for planning my and the quality of life. All ■ Next, students create their own instruments, selecting one of the
inventions, everything made by four types. (String or percussion can be easily constructed of found
the form and function of human hands, require design skills: materials.) The students:
space, structures, objects, fabric and clothing, landscapes ❥ identify available materials;
sound, and events. and interiors, residential and cor-
porate architecture, product and ❥ create ideas on paper and identify/solve any problems;
package design, video and print ❥ construct the instrument; and
graphics. Neighborhood and city ❥ create sound from the instrument.
planning can be aesthetically
improved with skills in the design
■ Students form ensembles or class orchestra and perform.
of space and form. Staging is ■ Discuss related careers.
essential to the planning of suc-
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
cessful events, whether personal, ■ 1.2 Describe the importance of skills and attitudes
business, or community. Elements
of design affect nearly all aspects ■ 1.5 Identify transferable skills
of daily living. ■ 2.1 Understand technological systems
■ 3.2 Use models and observations
PROGRESS INDICATOR #2 ■ 3.4 Identify and access resources
Plan and execute solutions to ■ 3.15 Apply problem-solving skills to design projects
design problems.
THINKING SKILLS:
■ label, create, translate, produce, differentiate, invent
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Arts (Music) 1.2, 1.3
■ Visual Arts (2-D, 3-D)

63
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
MUSIC 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: EXPRESSIVE ELEMENTS

STANDARD 1.1 The arts strengthen our apprecia- ■ Students listen to an instrumental piece and then:
tion of the world as well as our ❥ Identify and illustrate the musical elements of tone, color,
All students will acquire ability to be creative and inventive melody, rhythm, harmony/texture, and form;
knowledge and skills that decision-makers. The acquisition of ❥ Describe how the mood or feeling was established by the com-
increase aesthetic knowledge and skills that con-
position of elements;
tribute to aesthetic awareness of
awareness in dance, dance, music, theater, and visual ❥ Describe the kind of dance movement the piece suggests; and,
music, theater, and arts enhance these abilities. ❥ If the piece were going to be used as background music in a
visual arts. play or film, students describe what they would imagine about
the story or plot.
PROGRESS INDICATOR #3
Communicate about the aesthetic WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
qualities of art works through oral ■ 3.2 Use models and observations
and written analysis using appro- ■ 3.4 Identify and access resources
priate technical and evaluative ■ 3.7 Conduct systematic observations
terms.
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
■ 3.10 Monitor own thinking
■ 3.12 Interpret data

THINKING SKILLS:
■ recall, apply, analyze, imagine

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Dance, Theater

65
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
MUSIC 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: SCORING EXPRESSIVE ELEMENTS
Through an education in the arts, ■ Remove all expressive markings (dynamics, phrasing, tempo, artic-
STANDARD 1.2 students enhance their perceptual, ulation, etc.) from a piece of printed music, leaving only the sig-
All students will refine physical, and technical skills and nature time and key signatures. The students play or sing the mod-
perceptual, physical, and learn that pertinent techniques ified composition.
and technologies apply to the suc- ■ Discuss the possible addition, notation, and interpretation of
technical skills through cessful completion of tasks. The expressive markings. Once the students understand the notation
creating dance, music, development of sensory acuity and implications of expressive markings, they assign expressive
theater, and/or (perceptual skills) enables stu- elements to appropriate points in the score (a good small-group
dents to perceive and acknowledge
visual arts. activity). Students perform the composition they notated.
various viewpoints. Appropriate ■ After receiving the composer’s notated score, they discuss the com-
physical movements, dexterity, and
poser’s choices of expressive devices and then perform the original
rhythm pertain to such activities
composition.
as brush strokes in painting, dance
movement, fingering of musical ■ Class evaluates each student-developed interpretation, comparing/
instruments, etc. contrasting it with the original printed score. The groups edit their
work and perform it for the class.
❥ Students edit a melody to reflect a specific style, e.g., madri-
PROGRESS INDICATOR #2 gal, swing, or march.
Demonstrate technical skills in ❥ They create an original composition using signs, symbols,
dance, music, theater, or visual terms, and pitch/rhythm notation. They create and perform it
arts, appropriate to students’ with expressive notation and interpretation.
developmental level. ❥ Students use composition software to notate their own
arrangement of existing scores.
❥ Students discuss career possibilities open to the composer of
music.

(continued on next page)

66
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
(continued from WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 1.3 Identify career interests
previous page)
■ 1.9 Identify job openings
■ 2.8 Use technology and other tools to produce products
■ 3.2 Use models and observations
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
■ 4.3 Evaluate own actions and accomplishments
■ 4.5 Provide constructive criticism

THINKING SKILLS:
■ observe, decide, synthesize, interpret, problem solve, evaluate

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Arts 1.2, 1.3
■ Language Arts Literacy

South Hunterdon High School,


Spring 1998

67
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
MUSIC 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: SOUNDTRACK
In order to understand the arts, ■ Students watch a videotape of a school-produced drama, with no
STANDARD 1.3 students must discover the com- music. Working in small groups, students choose appropriate music
All students will utilize mon elements and properties of (not original) to go with the drama.
arts elements and arts dance, music, theater, and visual ■ Students discuss/resolve limitations for recording the music to cor-
arts. These arts elements, such as relate with the drama and then record the soundtrack.
media to produce color, line, form, rhythm, space,
artistic products and ■ Students explain how the music affected the intent of the drama.
timing, movement, mood, etc., are
performances. the ingredients from which works
of art are made. WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 1.1 Demonstrate employability skills and work habits
■ 1.8 Demonstrate occupational skills
PROGRESS INDICATOR #2 ■ 2.1 Understand technological systems
Demonstrate appropriate use of ■ 2.7 Use technology and other tools to solve problems
technology, tools, terminology,
techniques, and media in the cre-
■ 2.8 Use technology and other tools to produce products
ation of dance, music, theater, or ■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
visual arts. ■ 3.13 Select and apply solutions to problem solving and deci-
sion making
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively

THINKING SKILLS:
■ musical, create, imagine, apply, evaluate, risk-taking

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Theater
■ Visual Arts
■ Language Arts Literacy
■ Other (depending on the dramatic content)

68
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
MUSIC 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: REFINING CRITIQUE
Art criticism assists in the devel- ■ As a group, students identify and list appropriate elements used as
STANDARD 1.4 opment of critical thinking skills of criteria to judge live and recorded musical performances. They use
All students will observation, description, analysis, the computer to design a rubric.
demonstrate knowledge interpretation, and evaluation. ■ Using the student-created rating sheet, the class critiques live and
Students engage in and evaluate recorded performances of various genres. Students write a critique
of the process multisensory learning experiences of two contrasting musical groups: e.g., classical music, chamber
of critique. as both participants and observers. orchestra, and a rock/pop musical such as “Tommy.” When cri-
The process of critique helps stu- tiquing each musical group, students discuss the following:
dents to develop a sense of aes- ❥ balance/blend; ensemble; technical precision; tone color;
thetics and leads to artistic and
intonation; and stage presence.
personal growth.
■ Critique each other’s vocal and instrumental musical works based
on the same rating sheet used for critiquing the professional per-
PROGRESS INDICATOR #2
formances. They share the criticisms.
Offer constructive critique in the
■ Students respond to the question, “Why is it important to analyze
evaluation of their own and others’ the artistic process?”
work in dance, music, theater, or WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
visual arts. ■ 1.1 Demonstrate employability skills and work habits
■ 1.5 Provide constructive criticism
■ 2.8 Use technology and other tools to produce products
■ 3.7 Conduct systematic observation
■ 4.7 Describe roles people play
■ 4.11 Describe how ability, effort, and achievement are interrelated
THINKING SKILLS:
■ analyze, synthesize, evaluate
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Language Arts Literacy

69
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
MUSIC 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: MUSIC, LYRICS, AND SOCIETY
The history of the world is told ■ In small groups, students choose lyrics from a current popular
STANDARD 1.5 through the arts. By being able to music song. They read and study the lyrics, then discuss how their
All students will identify identify historical, social, and cul- meaning relates to the music and to society.
the various historical, tural influences related to the arts, ■ Each group arrives at consensus and produces and presents an oral
students will have a better and report on their song to the class using a music video or audio
social, and cultural more complete understanding of equipment. The class critiques the presentation and offers dissent-
influences and traditions humankind past, present, and ing opinions regarding the lyrics’ meanings.
which have generated future and of the arts as forms of ■ Consider using one video presentation without actually viewing it.
human expression.
artistic accomplishments Students discuss the lyrics, then view the visual portion and dis-
throughout the ages, and cuss how this may change the viewer/listener’s perception of the
meaning.
which continue to shape PROGRESS INDICATORS
■ Students write their own lyrics with original music they audiotape.
contemporary arts. #5, #6, & #7
They discuss the lyrics of the original songs as the lyrics relate to
Identify significant artists and society and culture. They incorporate dance or visual arts to the
artistic works in dance, music, the- original music and lyrics. The dance movement and/or art work will
ater, and visual arts representing correspond to the music and lyrics.
various historical periods, world
cultures, and social and political
influences. (#5) WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
Understand and demonstrate a ■ 2.9 Use technology to present designs (and results of investi-
knowledge of how various artists gations)
and cultural resources preserve our ■ 3.2 Use models and observations
cultural heritage and influence ■ 3.3 Formulate (questions and) hypotheses
contemporary arts. (#6)
■ 3.4 Identify and access resources
Interpret the meaning(s) expressed
in works of dance, music, theater, ■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
and visual arts. (#7) ■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
■ 4.10 Apply study skills

(continued on next page)

70
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
(continued from THINKING SKILLS:
■ musical, know, comprehend, synthesize, apply
previous page)

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Arts (Music) 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.6
■ Dance
■ Visual Arts
■ Language Arts Literacy
■ Social Studies

Long Branch High School,


pit band

71
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
MUSIC 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: DANCE TALKS
The development of knowledge and ■ Students become music program directors for a radio station:
STANDARD 1.6 skills in design produces the power design, plan and evaluate music and other programming for a day’s
All students will develop to create or to enhance the econo- worth of listening including news, commercials, etc. The students
design skills for planning my and the quality of life. All work in small groups to:
inventions, everything made by ❥ Select a local radio station; identify and target the listening
the form and function of human hands, require design skills: audience;
space, structures, objects, fabric and clothing, landscapes ❥ Prepare a list of songs, the artist or group, album, and style;
sound, and events. and interiors, residential and cor-
porate architecture, product and ❥ Evaluate/edit/revise choices for variety in groups and styles of
package design, video and print music;
graphics. Neighborhood and city ❥ Diagram or outline the daily program, including talk segments,
planning can be aesthetically advertisements, newscasts, public service announcements, and
improved with skills in the design talk call-in shows as appropriate to the selected stations;
of space and form. Staging is ❥ Evaluate and revise the final program outline;
essential to the planning of suc-
cessful events, whether personal,
❥ Present the final plans to the class and perform a segment.
business, or community. Elements
of design affect nearly all aspects
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
of daily living. ■ 1.1 Demonstrate employability skills (and work habits)
■ 1.8 Demonstrate occupational skills
PROGRESS INDICATOR #3 ■ 3.11 Identify/evaluate alternative decisions
Identify and solve design problems ■ 3.14 Evaluate solutions
in space, structures, objects, ■ 3.10 Monitor own thinking
sound, and/or events for home and ■ 4.5 Identify transferable skills
workplace.
■ 4.11 Describe how ability, effort, and achievement are interrelated

(continued on next page)

72
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
(continued from THINKING SKILLS:
■ musical, identify, decide, evaluate, logic
previous page)

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ All Music standards
■ Theater
■ Language Arts Literacy
■ Social Studies

Long Branch High School

73
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
MUSIC 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: DISTINGUISH THE ELEMENTS

The arts strengthen our apprecia-


■ Using recorded examples from various historical periods and musi-
STANDARD 1.1 cal genres, students analyze the artistic styles, trends, or move-
tion of the world as well as our
All students will acquire ability to be creative and inventive ments by identifying and describing the distinguishing character-
knowledge and skills that decision-makers. The acquisition of istics of the elements such as: rhythm, melody, pitch, timbre,
knowledge and skills that con- dynamics, and structure. To assist the students, a teacher or class
increase aesthetic generated analysis sheet is prepared in advance.
tribute to aesthetic awareness of
awareness in dance, dance, music, theater, and visual ■ Compare/contrast similarities and differences in the elements and
music, theater, arts enhances these abilities. their aesthetic effects.
and visual arts. ■ Compare/contrast musical characteristics with the characteristics
of another art form from the same or different genre or period.
PROGRESS INDICATOR #4 ■ Relate musical characteristics to the major historical and/or social
Demonstrate an understanding of events of the time, as well as the society in which they were cre-
different aesthetic philosophies ated.
through the evaluation and analy-
sis of artistic styles, trends, and
movements in an art form. WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 3.1 Define problem/clarify decisions
■ 3.7 Conduct systematic observations
■ 3.11 Identify/evaluate alternative decisions
■ 3.12 Interpret data

THINKING SKILLS:
■ audial concentration, identify, analyze, musical, compare/con-
trast, decide

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Other Art Forms, Social Studies

75
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
MUSIC 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: THE STUDENT CONDUCTS
Through an education in the arts, ■ Select a composition that students are familiar with. In turn, each
STANDARD 1.2 students enhance their perceptual, student conductor comes to the front of the group and conducts
All students will refine physical, and technical skills and the ensemble using her/his own considered interpretation of such
perceptual, physical, and learn that pertinent techniques musical elements as dynamics, tempo, and phrasing. The student
and technologies apply to the suc- conductor evaluates pitch as well as rhythmic and melodic accura-
technical skills through cessful completion of tasks. The cy, and makes corrections and adjustments where and when appro-
creating dance, music, development of sensory acuity priate. Encourage students to make considered interpretive deci-
theater, and/or (perceptual skills) enables stu- sions, using their teacher and classmates as possible resources,
dents to perceive and acknowledge before they are scheduled to conduct. Encourage students to be
visual arts.
various viewpoints. Appropriate flexible and experiment with other possibilities.
physical movements, dexterity, and ■ Critique their interpretive choices and those of others, orally or in
rhythm pertain to such activities writing, in narrative form or through use of a cooperatively
as brush strokes in painting, dance designed critique form.
movement, fingering of musical
instruments, etc.
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 3.1 Define problem/clarify decisions
PROGRESS INDICATOR #4 ■ 3.7 Conduct systematic observations
Demonstrate originality, technical ■ 3.11 Identify/evaluate alternative decisions
skills, and artistic expression in ■ 3.12 Interpret data
the creation, production, and per-
formance of dance, music, theater, ■ 3.13 Select and apply solutions to problem solving and deci-
or visual arts. sion making
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
■ 4.4 Describe constructive responses to criticism
■ 4.10 Apply study skills

(continued on next page)

76
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
(continued from THINKING SKILLS:
■ comprehend, translate, design, evaluate
previous page)

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Other Art Forms
■ Social Studies

South Hunterdon High School,


Spring 1998

77
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
MUSIC 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: PRESENTATION PLAN
In order to understand the arts, ■ Students develop a musical performance or multimedia presenta-
STANDARD 1.3 students must discover the com- tion using original or existing music, visual arts, video, literature
All students will utilize mon elements and properties of (poetry or narrative), and dance that revolve around a common
arts elements and arts dance, music, theater, and visual theme or unifying concept.
arts. These arts elements, such as ■ Students organize the materials across the artistic disciplines con-
media to produce color, line, form, rhythm, space, sidering such elements as color, tone, color, line, form, rhythm,
artistic products and timing, movement, mood, etc., are space, timing, tempo, mood, etc. Students combine materials to
performances. the ingredients from which works create a new work of art—a musical performance or multimedia
of art are made. presentation—that includes diverse areas of artistic endeavor.
Related computer technology could include the development of
Hypercard stacks, the use of graphic arts, desktop publishing soft-
PROGRESS INDICATOR #3 ware, and MIDI sequencing techniques.
Demonstrate an understanding of ■ Encourage students to create and develop a sound “kaleidoscope”
technology, methods, materials, that includes environmental sounds, sounds of “found” and creat-
and creative processes commonly ed instruments, as well as a broad palate of electronic and tradi-
used in dance, music, theater, or tional vocal and instrumental sounds.
visual arts. ■ If the activity is intended for public performance, include such
extended activities as budget preparation, publicity, ticket sales,
etc.

(continued on next page)

78
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
(continued from WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 2.2 Select appropriate tools and technology
previous page)
■ 2.9 Use technology to present designs and results of investi-
gations
■ 3.1 Define problem/clarify decisions
■ 3.4 Identify and access resources
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
■ 3.11 Identify/evaluate alternative decisions
■ 3.15 Apply problem-solving skills to design projects
■ 4.1 Set short and long term goals
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively

THINKING SKILLS:
■ musical, synthesize, apply, imagine, logic

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Arts 1.2, 1.3
■ Language Arts Literacy

79
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
MUSIC 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: PROFESSIONAL CRITICISM
Art criticism assists in the devel- ■ Students read two current professional criticisms of the same artist
STANDARD 1.4 opment of critical thinking skills of or performance by two different critics. Students compare and con-
All students will observation, description, analysis, trast the criticisms. They identify personal attitudes or preferences
demonstrate knowledge interpretation, and evaluation. present in these critiques.
Students engage in and evaluate ■ Students write a critique of the same artist/performance, isolating
of the process multisensory learning experiences the criticism of the use of elements. In a later paragraph, students
of critique. as both participants and observers. state their own attitude, opinion, and preferences related to the
The process of critique helps stu- artist/performance.
dents to develop a sense of aes-
thetics and leads to artistic and
personal growth. WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 4.3 Evaluate own actions and accomplishments
■ 4.4 Describe constructive responses to criticism
PROGRESS INDICATOR #3 ■ 4.5 Provide constructive criticism
Evaluate and interpret works of art ■ 4.11 Describe how ability, effort, and achievement interrelate
orally and in writing, using appro-
priate terminology.
THINKING SKILLS:
■ Analyze, evaluate

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Language Arts Literacy (Writing, Reading, Comprehension)

80
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
MUSIC 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: MUSIC PERIODS
The history of the world is told ■ The students work in groups. Each group selects a period of art
STANDARD 1.5 through the arts. By being able to (e.g., Baroque, Impressionist, or Renaissance). Students research
All students will identify identify historical, social, and cul- the styles of music that are related to the works of visual art (e.g.,
the various historical, tural influences related to the arts, painting, sculpture, or architecture). Next, the students identify
students will have a better and and obtain (or record) samples of the music and obtain reproduc-
social, and cultural more complete understanding of tions of the art. Students identify the implications of technology,
influences and traditions humankind past, present, and science, and history, in the music and the visual art.
which have generated future and of the arts as forms of ■ Using Hypercard or other presentation software, student groups cre-
human expression.
artistic accomplishments ate an audiovisual presentation based on the above research pro-
ject and share it with the class.
throughout the ages, and
which continue to shape PROGRESS INDICATORS
contemporary arts. #8 & #9 WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
Demonstrate knowledge of how
■ 1.1 Demonstrate employability skills and work habits
artists and artistic works connect ■ 2.8 Use technology and other tools to produce products
with political, social, cultural, and ■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
historical events. (#8)
Analyze and evaluate how various
THINKING SKILLS:
artists and cultural resources influ- ■ know, apply, evaluate, create
ence student work. (#9)

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Visual Arts
■ Arts 1.6
■ Language Arts Literacy
■ Social Studies (History)

81
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
MUSIC 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: DESIGN A MUSICAL PROGRAM
The development of knowledge and ■ Students design a musical event from beginning to end. They plan
STANDARD 1.6 skills in design produces the power thematic or eclectic program with a multimedia presentation: a cel-
All students will develop to create or to enhance the econo- ebration of an historical or cultural event; or to honor a person.
design skills for planning my and the quality of life. All They select the music, order of the program, the performers,
inventions, everything made by rehearsal schedule, location of the concert, printed program con-
the form and function of human hands, require design skills: tent, target market, marketing program organization, balance of
space, structures, objects, fabric and clothing, landscapes lighting, sound, recording/broadcasting, stage/performance area
sound, and events. and interiors, residential and cor- arrangement and management, student and equipment movement
porate architecture, product and and management, etc.
package design, video and print ■ Suggested Musical Events
graphics. Neighborhood and city
planning can be aesthetically CHAMBER MUSIC concert with performances by duos, trios, quar-
improved with skills in the design tets, double quartets, etc. Small ensembles provide an opportunity
of space and form. Staging is for students to engage in musical decision-making with the teacher
essential to the planning of suc- in the role of coach or mentor rather than director.
cessful events, whether personal,
business, or community. Elements COMMUNITY HIGHLIGHT concert is a performance with an extra-
of design affect nearly all aspects musical purpose that provides a focus for planning, music selec-
of daily living. tion, location, etc.

CONTEMPORARY MUSIC may use traditional presentations such as


audience/ performance in the round; multimedia presentation on
PROGRESS INDICATOR #4
the walls or ceiling; use of recorded music with live music; use of
Identify, plan, and provide solu- props, live dance or drama.
tions to design problems in space,
structures, objects, sound, and/or VIDEO PRESENTATION may be student designed, planned, and
events in a public or private envi- performed and may include commercials for the program that could
ronment. be aired on the school’s public announcement system, radio sta-
tion, or community access channel.

(continued on next page)

82
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
(continued from WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 2.1 Understand technological systems
previous page)
■ 2.2 Select appropriate tools and technology
■ 2.3 Access and use technology
■ 2.5 Access communication and information systems
■ 2.7 Use technology and other tools to solve problems
■ 2.8 Use technology and other tools to produce products
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
■ 3.15 Apply problem-solving skills to design projects
■ 4.1 Set short and long term goals
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
■ 4.5 Provide constructive criticism
■ 4.9 Use time efficiently

THINKING SKILLS:
■ observe, decide, synthesize, interpret, problem solve, evaluate

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Arts 1.2, 1.3
■ Language Arts Literacy

83
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
Steven Lloyd and Danielle Drakes
Background: Suzanne Kriessler and Dylan Smith
Long Branch High School
Child’s play is rehearsal for “real life.” The art of the play, theater, continues that rehearsal or
THEATER preparation for adult roles. These roles are not only the ones that actors play; they include
preparation for a variety of adult roles: the sound technician, the set designer, the producer,
director, marketing agent, financial backers, and a cast of others. Play itself, as students’
knowledge of theater expands, becomes improvisation, then creative drama and social drama.
Rehearsal for real life is lifelong.
Children at play write their own scripts. Through study and participation in theater, they are
Chapter 3

exposed to how other children, adults, and those from other times, places, and societies have
scripted their lives. They also observe the nature of adversity and how individuals overcome
tragedy; the opportunities life offers or denies; and the humor in being human.
Skills very basic to many types of performances are developed through both the doing and
viewing of theater such as:
■ voice projection, intonation, and inflection;
■ posture, poise, and body language;
■ convincing and confident oral presentation;
■ cooperation with a crew;
■ technological potential;
■ budget management;
■ targeting the audience; and
■ audience etiquette.
Possibly the most important knowledge students gain is how their individual performance
impacts positively or negatively on the success of the group effort.
Theater works both sides of the brain. It is sequential and creative. Theater is a potential vehi-
cle for teaching virtually all other subjects, along with incorporating all of the arts.

85
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
THEATER K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: WHAT DO YOU LIKE? WHY?
The arts strengthen our apprecia- ■ Prior to viewing a play or video, discuss the elements of a play or
STANDARD 1.1 tion of the world as well as our movie, such as: actors, props, setting, sound and lighting effects.
All students will acquire ability to be creative and inventive Explain the reasons for appropriate audience etiquette. Have
knowledge and skills decision-makers. The acquisition of selected students observe specifically one artistic element while
knowledge and skills that con- viewing (only one element so they can still follow the story.) For
that increase aesthetic tribute to aesthetic awareness of example, ask certain students to determine what sound effects are
awareness in dance, dance, music, theater, and visual used or to note the music, weather or animal sounds. Other stu-
music, theater, and arts enhances these abilities. dents could attend to the stage settings or the props. While view-
ing, each student should think about how his/her assigned element
visual arts.
impacts the story.
PROGRESS INDICATOR #1 ■ Students report on their assigned element. They discuss their reac-
tions to the play (Did they like it or not?), giving reasons for their
Communicate their responses to
response.
dance, music, theater and visual
arts with supporting statements
based on aesthetics. WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 3.1 Define problem/clarify decisions
■ 3.7 Conduct systematic observations
■ 3.12 Interpret data
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
■ 4.5 Provide constructive criticism

THINKING SKILLS:
■ Identify, recall, illustrate, classify, infer, decide, evaluate

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Arts 1.3, 1.4

86
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
THEATER K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: DID YOU EVER NOTICE ABOUT MAX?
Through an education in the arts, ■ The students act out an improvisatory prompt. In rotation, each
STANDARD 1.2 students enhance their perceptual, student is given an improvisatory prompt; ‘enters’ and acts out the
All students will refine physical, and technical skills and prompt (e.g., prepare breakfast, do homework, or put together a
perceptual, physical, and learn that pertinent techniques puzzle). The character is “Max.”
and technologies apply to the suc- ■ The other students complete a statement that begins with “Did you
technical skills through cessful completion of tasks. The ever notice about Max...?” Each time a statement is made, it must
creating dance, music, development of sensory acuity refer to something that “Max” does (a mannerism, movement, ges-
theater, and/or (perceptual skills) enables stu- ture, manner of speaking, etc.).
dents to perceive and acknowledge
visual arts. ■ After three statements have been made about Max, the actor car-
various viewpoints. Appropriate
ries out the improvisatory prompt incorporating the statements
physical movements, dexterity, and
made about Max. Through discussion, the rest of the class (the
rhythm pertain to such activities
audience) evaluates whether or not these mannerisms are really
as brush strokes in painting, dance
reflective of Max.
movement, fingering of musical
instruments, etc.
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 3.1 Define problem/clarify decisions
PROGRESS INDICATOR #1 ■ 3.13 Select and apply solutions to problem solving and deci-
Demonstrate performance and par- sion making
ticipation skills by working and ■ 3.14 Evaluate solutions
creating individually and with oth-
ers. ■ 4.5 Provide constructive criticism
■ 4.11 Describe how ability, effort, and achievement are inter-
related
THINKING SKILLS:
■ create
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Language Arts Literacy

87
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
THEATER K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: WHAT ARE YOU DOING HERE?
In order to understand the arts, ■ Using a prompt (e.g., “What are you doing here?” or “I knew you
STANDARD 1.3 students must discover the com- would come back”), the students work in small groups to brain-
All students will utilize mon elements and properties of storm how to express these simple phrases in different ways if they
arts elements and arts dance, music, theater, and visual are angry, happy, worried, sad, or suspicious. They practice varying
arts. These arts elements, such as attitude and emphasis, e.g., “I knew you would come back,” or “I
media to produce color, line, form, rhythm, space, knew you would come back.”
artistic products and timing, movement, mood, etc., are ■ Tape-record and then play back the students’ efforts. We naturally
performances. the ingredients from which works alter the pitch, rhythm, loudness, and color of our voices to com-
of art are made. municate emotion. How we change our voice on a certain word is
called inflection. An actor uses these elements to communicate
how a make-believe character feels.
PROGRESS INDICATOR #1 ■ Students write or tell a short story showing how one of these
Apply elements and media common inflections might be used to start a “plot.” They explain where the
to the arts to produce a work of story is taking place and who the characters are. They share the
art. stories with the class.

WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:


■ 3.2 Use models and observations
■ 3.9 Identify patterns
■ 3.14 Evaluate solutions
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively

THINKING SKILLS:
■ comprehend, analyze, synthesize, create

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Language Arts Literacy

89
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
THEATER K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: PRIMARY CRITIQUE
Art criticism assists in the devel- ■ Usually a young student’s critique starts with “I like it (or don’t like
STANDARD 1.4 opment of critical thinking skills of it) because ...” The reasons given are personal preferences based
All students will observation, description, analysis, on how the art work makes them feel. Students say what they like
demonstrate knowledge interpretation, and evaluation. or don’t like, but more importantly, why. Such statements are the
Students engage in and evaluate beginning of analysis for critical appraisal.
of the process multisensory learning experiences ■ Students view a theater presentation, a video of their own presen-
of critique. as both participants and observers. tation, or a video by other students. After viewing, they describe
The process of critique helps stu- the plot or scenes, saying what they like and what they don’t like-
dents to develop a sense of aes- and explaining why. They list their reasons under two categories or
thetics and leads to artistic and headings: technical skill and use, and artistic presentation. As the
personal growth. lists grow, the students learn to name and evaluate other items
PROGRESS INDICATOR #1 under those categories for more sophisticated and positive criti-
cism. Point out differences in what people notice. Emphasize audi-
Explain the criteria by which they ence etiquette as the behavioral basis for being able to critique a
evaluate the quality of their work theater presentation.
and the work of others.
■ Students view a play, monologue, or a video and evaluate it using
their growing list of criteria and their personal preferences. Sample
critiques include the following:

❥ “I like the red color. The red color was so bright it made me
feel warm.”
❥ “The music was scary.”
❥ “The little boy was so brave, I liked him best.”

(continued on next page)

90
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
(continued from WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 3.10 Monitor own thinking
previous page)
■ 4.5 Provide constructive criticism
■ 4.6 Describe actions which demonstrate respect
■ 4.11 Describe how ability, effort, and achievement are inter-
related

THINKING SKILLS:
■ analyze, express feelings, evaluate
“H.M.S. Pinafore”
Conerly Road Elementary School, LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
Franklin Township, Somerset, NJ ■ Language Arts Literacy (Speaking)

91
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
THEATER K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: DIFFERENT FACES AND PLACES
The history of the world is told ■ Provide an historical/cultural background to the use of masks in a
STANDARD 1.5 through the arts. By being able to society, e.g., Eskimo, Indian, or African. Describe why and how
All students will identify identify historical, social, and cul- masks were used in the ways and rituals of those who created
the various historical, tural influences related to the arts, them.
students will have a better and ■ Students design and construct masks and then create a skit in
social, and cultural more complete understanding of which they wear and use their masks in the same way as the native
influences and traditions humankind past, present, and people did.
which have generated future and of the arts as forms of ■ Obtain an English translation of a fairy tale or children’s story from
human expression.
artistic accomplishments the World Language teacher in the non-native language the chil-
throughout the ages, and dren are learning. Students create and perform a skit based on the
fairy tale or story, using some of the words or phrases from the
which continue to shape PROGRESS INDICATOR #1 non-native language.
contemporary arts. Investigate, experience, and par-
ticipate in dance, music, theater,
and visual arts activities represent- Note: The World Language teacher can assist with the pronunciation of
ing various historical periods and non-native words.
world cultures.
■ Students videotape or audiotape and view/listen to the taped per-
formance. Consider cultural background music.

(continued on next page)

92
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
(continued from WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 3.13 Select and apply solutions to problem solving and deci-
previous page)
sion making
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
■ 4.7 Describe roles people play
■ 4.10 Apply study skills
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
■ 3.15 Apply problem-solving skills to design projects
■ 2.7 Use technology and other tools to solve problems
■ 2.9 Use technology to present designs and results of investi-
gations

THINKING SKILLS:
■ know, synthesize, apply

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Visual Arts
■ Language Arts Literacy: (Speaking, Listening, Reading)
■ World Languages

Suzanne Kriessler,
Lang Branch High School

93
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
THEATER K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: SPACE AND HOW WE USE IT
The development of knowledge and ■ Students learn the basic design of the theater by visiting the
STANDARD 1.6 skills in design produces the power school theater or auditorium. (If there is no school theater or audi-
All students will develop to create or to enhance the econo- torium, show visuals, diagrams, and/or photos of the various
design skills for planning my and the quality of life. All aspects of the theater.) Elicit discussion of the functions each of
inventions, everything made by the following serves:
the form and function of human hands, require design skills: ❥ the lobby; the “house” or auditorium; the stage house; the trap
space, structures, objects, fabric and clothing, landscapes room; the orchestra pit; the curtain; and lighting, etc.
sound, and events. and interiors, residential and cor- ■ Using what they have learned, the students brainstorm how their
porate architecture, product and
classroom can be redesigned for classroom performances based on
package design, video and print
the functions the theater serves. Topics may include use of space,
graphics. Neighborhood and city
furniture, seating, etc. Students then execute the plausible and
planning can be aesthetically
safe solutions.
improved with skills in the design
of space and form. Staging is
essential to the planning of suc-
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
cessful events, whether personal, ■ 2.10 Discuss problems related to technology
business, or community. Elements
of design affect nearly all aspects
■ 3.2 Use models and observations
of daily living. ■ 3.4 Identify and access resources
■ 3.11 Identify/evaluate alternative decisions
■ 5.3 Demonstrate safe physical movement
PROGRESS INDICATORS
#1 & #2
Identify and state needs and THINKING SKILLS:
opportunities for design in the
■ observe, know, apply, create
contexts of home, school, recre-
ation, and play. (#1) LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
Plan and execute solutions to ■ Visual Arts
design problems. (#2)

94
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
THEATER 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: ANALYZING THE AESTHETIC ELEMENTS
The arts strengthen our apprecia- ■ Orally or in writing, the students analyze the aspects of a play.
STANDARD 1.1 tion of the world as well as our They describe the following elements and evaluate their level of
All students will acquire ability to be creative and inventive importance to the success of the play:
knowledge and skills that decision-makers. The acquisition of ❥ theme/plot; characters/setting; structure/form;
knowledge and skills that con- movement/pace; conflict/resolution; and interpretation.
increase aesthetic tribute to aesthetic awareness of
awareness in dance, ■ Students do a Siskel and Ebert review of the play or write a review
dance, music, theater, and visual
for the “arts and entertainment” section of a newspaper.
music, theater, and arts enhances these abilities.
■ Create a “telephone” monologue telling a friend about the play.
visual arts. ■ Students write a synopsis of several reviews in which they state
PROGRESS INDICATORS their agreement/disagreement with the issues.
#2 & #3
Understand that arts elements,
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
such as color, line, rhythm, space, ■ 1.1 Demonstrate employability skills and work habits
form, may be combined selectively
to elicit a specific aesthetic ■ 1.5 Identify transferable skills
response. (#2) ■ 1.8 Demonstrate occupational skills
Communicate about the aesthetic
qualities of art works through oral THINKING SKILLS:
and written analysis using appro- ■ analyze, compare/contrast, evaluate, summarize
priate technical and evaluative
terms. (#3)
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Language Arts Literacy (Speaking, Writing, Reading)

95
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
THEATER 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: CREATE A CHARACTER
Through an education in the arts, ■ Students select an object from a collection of natural objects (e.g.,
STANDARD 1.2 students enhance their perceptual, a smelly old onion, a sharply pointed chestnut casing, Queen
All students will refine physical, and technical skills and Anne’s Lace, a rose, or a seashell). They prepare a list of adjectives
perceptual, physical, and learn that pertinent techniques describing their object’s qualities. Imagine that these adjectives
and technologies apply to the suc- described a person. What would their personality be like? What
technical skills through cessful completion of tasks. The would be their age and gender? How would they dress, walk, and
creating dance, music, development of sensory acuity talk? What do they do?
theater, and/or (perceptual skills) enables stu- Students draw the character.
dents to perceive and acknowledge
visual arts. ■ Imagine their character was telling them about a significant event
various viewpoints. Appropriate
in their life. Students write down the conversation of what the
physical movements, dexterity, and
character might tell them.
rhythm pertain to such activities
as brush strokes in painting, dance ■ Students become their character and have a dialogue with another
movement, fingering of musical student using voice characterization. Students tell each other their
instruments, etc. significant event stories (taking a minute each). The partners pro-
vide positive criticism to each other.
■ Each student then performs his/her significant story as a mono-
PROGRESS INDICATOR #3 logue before the entire class. Afterward, the class assesses how the
Create, produce, or perform works monologue relates to the written piece.
of dance, music, theater, or visual
arts, individually and with others.

(continued on next page)

96
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
(continued from WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 3.7 Conduct systematic observations
previous page)
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
■ 3.9 Identify patterns
■ 3.12 Interpret data
■ 3.13 Select and apply solutions to problem solving and deci-
sion making
■ 4.4 Describe constructive responses to criticism
■ 4.5 Provide constructive criticism

THINKING SKILLS:
■ knowledge, comprehension, transfer, decide, apply, evaluate, cre-
ative

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Language Arts Literacy (Speaking, Writing)
■ Social Studies (Psychology)

Gloucester County Institute of Technology


An historical theatrical production

97
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
THEATER 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: CLAP IT
In order to understand the arts, ■ Students memorize and use CLAP IT! Brainstorming, students select
STANDARD 1.3 students must discover the com- an act from a play for which they will design a stage set using the
All students will utilize mon elements and properties of C-L-A-P method:
arts elements and arts dance, music, theater, and visual ❥ Collect information
arts. These arts elements, such as ❥ Look at your Limitations
media to produce color, line, form, rhythm, space,
artistic products and ❥ Consider your Audience
timing, movement, mood, etc., are
❥ Develop a Plan
performances. the ingredients from which works
of art are made. ■ Students collect information about what items must be on stage
(i.e., items mentioned in the text or discovered through research-
ing the historical period).
PROGRESS INDICATOR #2 ■ Brainstorm what their limitations are: size of space, time dead-
line, budget, materials, etc.
Demonstrate appropriate use of
technology, tools, terminology,
■ Determine what they want the audience to know about the play
techniques, and media in the cre- through the set design.
ation of dance, music, theater, or ■ Singly or in small groups, students plan a set design for the cho-
visual arts. sen act.
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 3.4 Identify and access resources
■ 3.7 Conduct systematic observations
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
■ 3.12 Interpret data
■ 3.15 Apply problem-solving skills to design problems
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
THINKING SKILLS:
■ comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, evaluation
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Visual Arts, Mathematics

98
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
THEATER 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: INTERMEDIATE CRITIQUE
Art criticism assists in the devel- ■ Students offer useful criticism in both written and oral form of
STANDARD 1.4 opment of critical thinking skills of their own work, the work of other students, and works of theater
All students will observation, description, analysis, with which they come in contact. To produce useful criticism that
demonstrate knowledge interpretation, and evaluation. has value to the listener, students do the following:
Students engage in and evaluate ■ Avoid value based upon familiarity and leave personal preference
of the process multisensory learning experiences behind. Define the playwright’s intent.
of critique. as both participants and observers. ■ Evaluate the use of theater elements in support of the intent, what
The process of critique helps stu-
worked, and what did not.
dent to develop a sense of aes-
thetics and leads to artistic and ■ Recommend changes that will lead to improvement (constructive
personal growth. criticism).
■ Students enter their style preferences in a journal, poem, essay,
etc., to assist in development of a personal style.
PROGRESS INDICATOR #2
Offer constructive critique in the
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
evaluation of their own and others’ ■ 3.2 Use models and observations
work in dance, music, theater, or
visual arts. ■ 3.7 Conduct systematic observations
■ 3.11 Identify/evaluate alternative decisions
■ 4.3 Evaluate own actions and accomplishments

THINKING SKILLS:
■ observe, analyze, evaluate, decide

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ An analysis/criticism of a theater piece may involve any subject
area and any of the arts disciplines depending on the presentation.

99
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
THEATER 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: PLAY FROM THE INSIDE-OUT
The history of the world is told ■ Students choose a significant speech dealing with an important
STANDARD 1.5 through the arts. By being able to social or historical event. If possible, they view a film/movie of the
All students will identify identify historical, social, and cul- speech presentation and/or the speaker.
the various historical, tural influences related to the arts, ■ Research the historical period through media centers, libraries, cul-
students will have a better and tural/historical museums, other community resources, or the
social, and cultural more complete understanding of Internet. Then select props appropriate to the historical period,
influences and traditions humankind past, present, and including photos, painting reproductions, and political cartoons.
which have generated future and of the arts as forms of ■ Students memorize their speech and perform it as a monologue
human expression.
artistic accomplishments (acting the role of the speaker).
throughout the ages, and ■ Students produce a video on a selected socially or historically
important speaker/speech. Working in groups, they develop the
which continue to shape PROGRESS INDICATORS script. To create background to enhance the video, they research
contemporary arts. #5, #6, & #7 and compile a “catalog” of photo reprints, pictures, and newspaper
Identify significant artists and articles of the area, the era, and its fashion; props; and music.
artistic works in dance, music, the- Advise them to identify and give credit to the artists whose works
ater, and visual arts representing are used.
various historical periods, world
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
cultures, and social and political
influences. (#5)
■ 2.1 Understand technological systems
■ 2.7 Use technology and other tools to solve problems
Understand and demonstrate a
knowledge of how various artists
■ 3.2 Use models and observations
and cultural resources preserve our ■ 3.4 Identify and access resources
cultural heritage and influence ■ 3.5 Use library media center
contemporary arts. (#6) ■ 3.13 Select and apply solutions to problem solving and deci-
Interpret the meaning(s) expressed sion making
in works of dance, music, theater,
THINKING SKILLS:
and visual arts. (#7)
■ comprehend, apply, analyze, synthesize, create
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Visual Arts, Language Arts Literacy, Social Studies (History)
100
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
THEATER 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: RADIO STATION
The development of knowledge and ■ Students work in small groups to create a 30-minute radio program
STANDARD 1.6 skills in design produces the power on tape. They combine musical selections, public service announce-
All students will develop to create or to enhance the econo- ments, and commercials with the connecting narrative. They con-
design skills for planning my and the quality of life. All sider air time (time of day) and target audience. After familiarizing
inventions, everything made by themselves with this activity, students create a workspace in the
the form and function of human hands, require design skills: school conducive to successful achievement.
space, structures, objects, fabric and clothing, landscapes ■ At this stage of their development, students need to emulate work
sound, and events. and interiors, residential and cor- skills and habits that will be necessary in the workplace.
porate architecture, product and
package design, video and print
graphics. Neighborhood and city WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
planning can be aesthetically ■ 1.8 Demonstrate occupational skills
improved with skills in the design ■ 2.1 Understand technological systems
of space and form. Staging is
essential to the planning of suc-
■ 2.8 Use technology and other tools to produce products
cessful events, whether personal, ■ 3.5 Use library media center
business, or community. Elements
of design affect nearly all aspects
of daily living. THINKING SKILLS:
■ apply, synthesize, create

PROGRESS INDICATOR #3
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
Identify and solve design problems ■ Music
in space, structures, objects, ■ Language Arts Literacy
sound, and/or events for home and
workplace. ■ Social Studies

101
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
THEATER 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: AESTHETICALLY DIFFERENT

The arts strengthen our apprecia-


■ Identify and compare two plays, or two versions of the same play,
STANDARD 1.1 e.g. compare a Greek play to Shakespeare or a 21st century piece,
tion of the world as well as our
All students will acquire ability to be creative and inventive or Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” with West Side Story.”
knowledge and skills that decision-makers. The acquisition of Alternately, students identify two versions of the same play that
knowledge and skills that con- exhibit differing philosophies.
increase aesthetic
tribute to aesthetic awareness of ■ Analyze and compare the two plays viewed as to speech, pace, set-
awareness in dance, dance, music, theater, and visual tings, time, use of color, shape/form lighting, sound effects, cos-
music, theater, arts enhances these abilities. tumes, mood, etc.
and visual arts. ■ Students categorize these observations into similarities and differ-
ences. After drawing conclusions, the students present their analy-
PROGRESS INDICATOR #4 sis orally or in writing.
Demonstrate an understanding of
different aesthetic philosophies
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
through the evaluation and analy-
sis of artistic styles, trends, and
■ 3.1 Define problem/clarify decisions
movements in an art form. ■ 3.7 Conduct systematic observations
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
■ 3.12 Interpret data

THINKING SKILLS:
■ know, comprehend, compare/contrast, analyze, evaluate, conclude

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Music (Sound)
■ Visual Arts
■ Language Arts Literacy (Speaking)

102
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
THEATER 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: READING VISUAL PROMPTS
Through an education in the arts, ■ Students do background research on a well-known, contemporary,
STANDARD 1.2 students enhance their perceptual, prominent person through biographies, newspaper articles, televi-
All students will refine physical, and technical skills and sion clips, etc. They study the person’s:
perceptual, physical, and learn that pertinent techniques ❥ Body: Posture, movement, rhythms, pace, gestures, poise;
and technologies apply to the suc-
technical skills through cessful completion of tasks. The
❥ Face: Expression, use of facial features/gestures, tilt of head,
creating dance, music, development of sensory acuity etc.; and
theater, and/or (perceptual skills) enables stu- ❥ Voice: Pitch, dynamics, pace (the music of the voice as well
dents to perceive and acknowledge as the words).
visual arts.
various viewpoints. Appropriate ■ Each student writes a synopsis of the elements an actor would use
physical movements, dexterity, and to characterize the celebrity and then writes a brief monologue
rhythm pertain to such activities appropriate to that individual, using quotes from him or her (if
as brush strokes in painting, dance possible). Students rehearse with partners in actor/coach roles.
movement, fingering of musical ■ Each student performs his/her monologue for the class, using as
instruments, etc.
many props as possible that identify with the character. (If appro-
priate, a student may pair with a compatible character for a dia-
logue.) The class attempts to identify each prominent individual.
PROGRESS INDICATOR #4
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
Demonstrate originality, technical ■ 2.5 Access communication and information systems
skills, and artistic expression in
the creation, production, and per- ■ 2.6 Access information
formance of dance, music, theater, ■ 3.1 Define problem/ clarify decisions
or visual arts. ■ 3.4 Identify and access resources
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
THINKING SKILLS:
■ identify, memorize, recall, create, demonstrate, compose
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Language Arts Literacy (Speaking, Writing, Reading)
■ Social Studies (Psychology)
103
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
THEATER 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: THE PRODUCTION
In order to understand the arts, ■ Working in teams of five or six, students write a scene that subtly
STANDARD 1.3 students must discover the com- utilizes issues in a current news event. First, they determine the
All students will utilize mon elements and properties of time, place, etc., for their scene and utilize appropriate tools, arts
arts elements and arts dance, music, theater, and visual elements, and media to give force to the scene. Students use tech-
arts. These arts elements, such as nological tools such as the computer to draft the script or to
media to produce color, line, form, rhythm, space, design lighting, music, sound effects, visual effects, costumes,
artistic products and timing, movement, mood, etc., are props, etc.
performances. the ingredients from which works ■ Each group will design and publish their own “organizational
of art are made. chart” and “program” outlining their individual (or multiple)
role(s) within the group: director, actor(s), technicians, etc.
■ As each group performs, the rest of the class (the audience) eval-
PROGRESS INDICATOR #3 uates the production. Using predetermined criteria regarding con-
Demonstrate an understanding of tent and technical and artistic efforts, the audience also rates each
technology, methods, materials, participant’s contribution and makes positive recommendations for
and creative processes commonly improvement.
used in dance, music, theater, or ■ Students rate and record in their resume, in order of importance,
visual arts. the transferability of the skills applicable to future work require-
ments in their selected fields of interest. They write an appraisal
of the efforts of their group: how they allocated and used their
time and talents.

(continued on next page)

104
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
(continued from WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
previous page) ■ 1.1 Demonstrate employability skills and work habits
■ 1.3 Identify career interests
■ 1.10 Prepare a resume and complete job applications
■ 2.1 Understand technological systems
■ 2.8 Use technology and other tools to produce products
■ 3.1 Define problem/clarify decisions
■ 3.14 Evaluate solutions
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
■ 5.4 Demonstrate safe use of equipment or tools

THINKING SKILLS:
■ flexibility, elaborate, imagine, problem-solve, opine

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Music
■ Visual Arts
■ Language Arts Literacy (Speaking, Writing, Reading)
■ Social Studies
■ Others (depending on the topic selected)

Theatrical production at
Gloucester County Institute of Technology

105
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
THEATER 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: ADVANCED CRITIQUE
Art criticism assists in the devel- ■ Students summarize, compare, and contrast at least two theater
STANDARD 1.4 opment of critical thinking skills of works from either two different artistic styles/genres or two dif-
All students will observation, description, analysis, ferent social or historical eras. They include commentary on how
demonstrate knowledge interpretation, and evaluation. they would change an aspect of the theatrical works.
Students engage in and evaluate ■ The students brainstorm examples of how they will transfer this
of the process multisensory learning experiences process of critique to the workplace in various careers. The ability
of critique. as both participants and observers. to evaluate the work of others and to objectively assess one’s own
The process of critique helps stu- ideas is important to later success in the workplace. All places of
dents to develop a sense of aes- business strive to do better or they will fail in the marketplace.
thetics and leads to artistic and Theater organizations are no different. Those who can improve
personal growth. upon the operations of the business and their part in it become
valued employees.
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
PROGRESS INDICATOR #3
■ 1.1 Demonstrate employability skills and work habits
Evaluate and interpret works of art
orally and in writing, using appro-
■ 1.2 Describe the importance of skills and attitudes
priate terminology. ■ 1.5 Identify transferable skills
■ 1.7 Describe the importance of academic and occupational skills
■ 1.8 Demonstrate occupational skills
■ 3.1 Define problem/clarify decisions
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
■ 3.15 Apply problem-solving skills to design projects
■ 4.5 Provide constructive criticism
THINKING SKILLS:
■ Comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, evaluation
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Language Arts Literacy

106
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
THEATER 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: UNIVERSAL THEMES
The history of the world is told ■ Identify an artist or a theatrical work that connects with a politi-
STANDARD 1.5 through the arts. By being able to cal, social, cultural, or historical event/issue. Examples include the
All students will identify identify historical, social, and cul- following: scientific discoveries or inventions and their social
the various historical, tural influences related to the arts, impact; the women’s movement; and two people of diverse cultures
students will have a better and meeting. Analyze and state the artist’s or work’s viewpoint regard-
social, and cultural more complete understanding of ing the event/issue and then present their analysis orally or in
influences and traditions humankind past, present, and written form.
which have generated future and of the arts as forms of ■ Using a word-processing system, students write a scene that com-
human expression. municates their personal opinion or ideas concerning an
artistic accomplishments
event/issue that they feel strongly about. These opinions may be
throughout the ages, and subtly or strongly expressed in the scene. Instruct the students to
which continue to shape PROGRESS INDICATORS number the lines and pages for easier referencing. Remind them
contemporary arts. #8, #9, & #10 that a first draft is seldom accepted and rewrites may be necessary.
Demonstrate knowledge of how
■ Write a brief statement concerning how another playwright,
artists and artistic works connect research, critique of your work may have influenced the way the
with political, social, cultural, and scene was written.
historical events. (#8)
■ Students perform their edited version of the scene for the class.
Analyze and evaluate how various WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
artists and cultural resources influ- ■ 2.8 Use technology and other tools to produce products
ence student work. (#9) ■ 3.4 Identify and access resources
Create works of art that communi- ■ 3.5 Use library media center
cate personal opinions, thoughts, ■ 3.11 Identify/evaluate alternative decisions
and ideas. (#10) ■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
■ 4.4 Describe constructive responses to criticism
THINKING SKILLS:
■ identify, decide, evaluate, analyze, create, express, risk-taking
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Language Arts Literacy (Speaking, Writing, Reading)
■ Social Studies (History)
107
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
THEATER 9-12 DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: TOTAL DESIGN
The development of knowledge and ■ Students choose a play production currently done at a chosen grade
STANDARD 1.6 skills in design produces the power level.
All students will develop to create or to enhance the econo- ■ They identify all the design tasks associated with this production
design skills for planning my and the quality of life. All (e.g., playbill, sets, costumes, and lights). They create and submit
inventions, everything made by resumes to apply for design functions such as the following:
the form and function of human hands, require design skills:
space, structures, objects, fabric and clothing, landscapes
sound, and events. and interiors, residential and cor- ❥ Director ❥ Public Relations ❥ Makeup
porate architecture, product and ❥ Designers ❥ Dressers ❥ Performers
package design, video and print ❥ Crew ❥ Managers
graphics. Neighborhood and city
planning can be aesthetically
improved with skills in the design ■ Several experienced theater students review the computer-generat-
of space and form. Staging is ed resumes/portfolios and “hire” for these functions and audition
essential to the planning of suc- for roles. All students will be given a role based on abilities spec-
cessful events, whether personal, ified in the resume and experience.
business or community. Elements ■ Members of this company work cooperatively to produce the play.
of design affect nearly all aspects They observe all safety precautions.
of daily living.

PROGRESS INDICATOR #4
Identify, plan, and provide solu-
tions to design problems of space,
structures, objects, sound, and/or
events in a public or private envi-
ronment.

(continued on next page)

108
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
(continued from WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 1.1 Demonstrate employability skills and work habits
previous page)
■ 1.7 Describe the importance of academic and occupational
skills
■ 2.2 Select appropriate tools and technology
■ 2.3 Access and use technology
■ 2.7 Use technology and other tools to solve problems
■ 2.9 Use technology to present designs and results of investi-
gations
■ 3.1 Define problem/clarify decisions
■ 4.1 Set short and long term goals
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
■ 4.7 Describe roles people play
■ 4.9 Use time efficiently
■ 5.1-5.9 All safety standards: prevention, movement, equipment,
devices, hazards procedures, rules, first aid

THINKING SKILLS:
■ comprehend, analyze, apply, synthesize

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Visual Arts
■ Mathematics
■ Science
Gloucester County Institute of Technology
■ Technology
An historical theatrical production

109
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
Newton State School, Newark, NJ
Keason Johnson
Vision and Visionaries wanted! There has been a major shift in the world from a pre-
VISUAL ARTS ponderance of print to visual communication: television, web sites, video, teleconferencing,
etc. The American public that used to see an occasional movie at the local theater has night-
ly television viewing in the home. Whole industries have grown up with the shift to more visu-
al communication. We came into this world as visual thinkers—thinking in pictures or images.
Our dreams are just another mode of visual thinking. Visualization is our primary means for
processing thought. Electronic visual processing has the capability of creating what is called
“virtual reality,” which must be distinguished from the real. This is an increasingly visually ori-
Chapter 3

ented world calling for a workforce of visually educated, dimensional thinkers in nonart as well
as art careers. Businesses rely heavily on visual communication: logos, advertising, packaging,
product design, etc. Visual cognitive myopia is no longer an option. There is a necessary focus
on the students’ use of metacognition and the higher-order thinking skills to know, under-
stand, and use their full brain/mind potential. Performance in any area of life is strengthened
through visual acuity and visualization techniques. Visual practice is used in business the
same as Olympic athletes use it to improve performance.

Accept the technological challenge! There are few tasks that are not done by some form
of technology. We can prepare the students for personal living and the workplace of today only
by relying on technology to access the enormous amount of information available and acces-
sible—if we know how. We can only envision the workplace 10, 20, 30 years from now. The
transmittal of knowledge is no longer an adequate education. Students must learn to use and
understand technology in a variety of personal and professional situations. Visual arts educa-
tors must provide exposure to technology and its possibilities. Changing technology has his-
torically imprinted the visual arts as new materials and techniques become possible—new
media, new tools, new architectural designs (from thatched roofs and primitive brick-making
to molded steel and glass structures).

111
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
Maple Avenue School, Newark, NJ
Alexander DeJoie
VISUAL ARTS ‘See’ what we mean. Learning cannot take place in a vacuum. Students need to “see” that
(continued) art is pervasive in the lives of everyone. There is a new requirement in arts education for chil-
dren: learning about design and how it impacts our lives. New products can be invented; and
old items and processes (including our cities and towns) improved functionally or aestheti-
cally. Interdisciplinary experiences in the arts provide linkages to learning in context.
Incorporating linkages into the students’ fine art and design experiences will enable students
to understand why art is practiced in any era, in any place on the globe and what thought
processes, ideas, philosophies, and messages it sends. For more help on the design standard,
Chapter 3

see Chapter 4, which follows the visual arts activities. While mentioned last, it is probably
foremost in importance that students learn to express themselves in as many ways as possi-
ble—to learn what they think, see who they are, and envision what they would like to be.

Chancellor Avenue Annex, Newark Public Schools, Newark, NJ


Amir Saunders

113
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
VISUAL ARTS K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: ART SUPERLATIVES
The arts strengthen our apprecia- ■ Display a variety of works of art. Consider that art can be beauti-
STANDARD 1.1 tion of the world as well as our ful, expressive, functional, etc.
All students will acquire ability to be creative and inventive ■ Working in small groups, students discuss each artwork, compar-
knowledge and skills that decision-makers. The acquisition of ing it to the criteria listed below. Provide each group with a set
knowledge and skills that con- of “awards ribbons” labeled as follows:
increase aesthetic tribute to aesthetic awareness of
awareness in dance, ❥ Most Beautiful;
dance, music, theater, and visual
music, theater, and arts enhances these abilities. ❥ Most Useful;
visual arts. ❥ Most Realistic;
PROGRESS INDICATOR #1 ❥ Most Original;
Communicate their responses to ❥ Most Expressive;
dance, music, theater and visual ❥ Best Composition;
arts with supporting statements ❥ Took the Longest to Make; and
based on aesthetics.
❥ Imitates Nature.
■ Each group decides which artwork gets which award. Each group
member is responsible for taping the appropriate award next to an
artwork and giving a supporting reason for that award. Disparity in
choices can be further evaluated but need not be resolved.

Permission to use the above activity granted by Professors Eldon Katter


and Mary Erickson, Kutztown University, Kutztown, PA.

(continued on next page)

114
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
(continued from WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 3.1 Define problem/clarify decisions
previous page)
■ 3.3 Formulate questions and hypotheses
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
■ 3.10 Monitor own thinking
■ 3.14 Evaluate solutions
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively

THINKING SKILLS:
■ analyze, decide, recommend

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Language Arts Literacy (Speaking)

By permission of
Eldon Katter/Mary Erickson, professors
Kutztown University, Kutztown, PA

Montclair State University,


Spring 1998

115
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
VISUAL ARTS K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: A DAY AT THE BEACH
Through an education in the arts, ■ Students listen to selections of Impressionist music (e.g., Debussy,
STANDARD 1.2 students enhance their perceptual, Holst, Grite, Grieg) and observe works of Impressionist artists
All students will refine physical, and technical skills and (e.g., Van Gogh or Monet).
perceptual, physical, and learn that pertinent techniques ■ Demonstrate dexterity and rhythm through a variety of movements
and technologies apply to the suc- and brush strokes with a large brush. Allow student practice time.
technical skills through cessful completion of tasks. The Then, on a large sheet of paper the size of a beach towel, students
creating dance, music, development of sensory acuity paint in the colors and movements the music suggests to them.
theater, and/or (perceptual skills) enables stu- Students may fringe the edge of the paper to create a “beach
dents to perceive and acknowledge
visual arts. towel” effect.
various viewpoints. Appropriate ■ Distribute a second large sheet of paper, which students will use to
physical movements, dexterity, and
create a cutout of a human figure. Working in pairs, students trace
rhythm pertain to such activities
their own bodies on this paper as if lying on a beach towel.
as brush strokes in painting, dance
Students first observe details of shape, clothing, facial features,
movement, fingering of musical
hair shape, etc., then execute with colored media. (Suggested
instruments, etc.
motivator: read aloud the book Tar Beach by Faith Ringgold.) Allow
creativity of added items, e.g., jewelry, a pair of flip-flops on the
PROGRESS INDICATOR #1 towel, a bottle of sun block, or beach ball.
Demonstrate performance and par-
■ Students work with the teacher to plan and arrange an exhibition
ticipation skills by working and of the class’s results. (This activity may be combined with the “Go
creating individually and with oth- Fish” visual arts activity suggested for Standard 1.3.) Invite stu-
ers. dents to bring in items to add to the exhibition, such as beach
umbrellas or a real beach ball.

(continued on next page)

116
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
(continued from WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
previous page) ■ 1.8 Demonstrate occupational skills
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively

THINKING SKILLS:
■ translate, apply, create, plan, synthesize

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Music
■ Language Arts Literacy
■ Science (physical proportions)

Montclair State University,


Spring 1998

117
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
VISUAL ARTS K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: GO FISH!
In order to understand the arts, ■ Students select the type of fish they want to create and its size:
STANDARD 1.3 students must discover the com- large, medium, or small. They create the outline on paper by draw-
All students will utilize mon elements and properties of ing it by hand or using computer software. This activity may be
arts elements and arts dance, music, theater, and visual tied to a science lesson.
arts. These arts elements, such as ■ They design the fish using hot, warm, cool, or cold color combina-
media to produce color, line, form, rhythm, space, tions and lines, patterns, and shapes. Media preferences might be
artistic products and timing, movement, mood, etc., are iridescent, glow colors, or wax resist. Students discuss reasons for
performances. the ingredients from which works their choices. See the work of Paul Klee.
of art are made. ■ The class, using the elements of composition, designs an underwa-
ter environment (including schools of fish, shells, etc.) Combine
PROGRESS INDICATOR #1 with the exhibition of the Standard 1.2 visual arts activity entitled
“A Day at the Beach.”
Apply elements and media common
to the arts to produce a work of
■ Using a computer, students create an invitation announcing the
art. exhibition to send to guests. Decide who should receive the invi-
tations. Host an “Opening”.
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 2.7 Use technology and other tools to solve problems
■ 2.8 Use technology and other tools to produce products
■ 3.2 Use models and observations
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
■ 3.15 Apply problem-solving skills to design projects
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
■ 4.10 Apply study skills
THINKING SKILLS:
■ observe, decide, research
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Science, Language Arts Literacy
118
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
VISUAL ARTS K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: CREATE A GALLERY
Art criticism assists in the devel- ■ Each student chooses a work from a selection of
STANDARD 1.4 opment of critical thinking skills of reproductions/photos or student artwork of various media. The stu-
All students will observation, description, analysis, dents categorize the works as landscape, seascape, portrait,
demonstrate knowledge interpretation, and evaluation. abstraction, etc., and arrange them in their classroom “gallery.”
Students engage in and evaluate ■ The class holds an auction. Using play money, the students bid and
of the process of multisensory learning experiences “purchase” one of the artworks. Following the auction, the stu-
critique. as both participants and observers. dents discuss why they liked their particular purchase and how
The process of critique helps stu- much they “paid.”
dents to develop a sense of aes- ■ Students explore the various career functions of selecting, collect-
thetics and leads to artistic and
ing, exhibiting, and being a gallery owner, docent, etc.
personal growth.

WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:


PROGRESS INDICATOR #1 ■ 1.12 Demonstrate consumer and other financial skills
Explain the criteria by which they ■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
evaluate the quality of their work ■ 3.9 Identify patterns
and the work of others.
■ 3.10 Monitor own thinking
■ 3.12 Interpret data
■ 4.4 Describe constructive responses to criticism
■ 4.5 Provide constructive criticism
■ 4.11 Describe how ability, effort, and achievement are
interrelated
THINKING SKILLS:
■ analyze, decide, recommend
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Language Arts Literacy (Speaking)
■ Mathematics

119
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
VISUAL ARTS K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: MASKS AND PUPPETS
The history of the world is told ■ Students investigate the influences in the life of the Eskimo: cold
STANDARD 1.5 through the arts. By being able to weather, snow, scarcity of vegetation, reliance on animals for
Students will identify the identify historical, social, and cul- food/warmth, limited resources, respect for the environment. They
various historical, social, tural influences related to the arts, also view photos, etc., of the daily life of Eskimos (also referred to
students will have a better and as the Innuit).
and cultural influences more complete understanding of ■ Display reproductions of Eskimo masks that have movable parts.
and traditions which have humankind past, present, and Discuss why/how they were made and the nature (and scarcity) of
generated artistic future and of the arts as forms of the materials available for their artistic efforts.
human expression. ■ Students brainstorm ideas for 3-minute puppet shows based on
accomplishments
Eskimo life. They create cardboard-and-stick puppets of Eskimo
throughout the ages,and families with movable appendages. Discuss with them the materi-
which continue to PROGRESS INDICATOR als they have to work with. Brainstorm ideas on how to replicate
shape contemporary #1 & #4 the faces, parkas, mukluks, and other features (e.g., using copy
arts. Investigate, experience, and par- machines, enlargers, tracings, drawings, or collage).
ticipate in dance, music, theater, ■ Create and perform 3-minute skits. Support the skits with Eskimo music.
and visual arts activities represent-
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
ing various historical periods and
world cultures. (#1)
■ 2.7 Use technology and other tools to solve problems
■ 2.8 Use technology and other tools to produce products
Use their senses, imagination, and ■ 3.2 Use models and observations
memory to express ideas and feel-
ings in dance, music, theater, and
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
visual arts. (#4) ■ 3.15 Apply problem-solving skills to design projects
■ 4.10 Apply study skills
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
THINKING SKILLS:
■ know, apply, create, decide
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Language Arts Literacy
■ Science
■ Social Studies (geography)
120
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
VISUAL ARTS K-4: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: BOX CARS
The development of knowledge and ■ Students will design a vehicle. Consider the varied uses of vehicles,
STANDARD 1.6 skills in design produces the power such as automobiles, boats (all kinds), buses, planes, trains,
All students will develop to create or to enhance the econo- trucks, futuristic vehicles, etc. They also discuss bumper cars, all-
design skills for planning my and the quality of life. All terrain vehicles, rafts, hot-air balloons, etc. Bring in model or toy
inventions, everything made by vehicles to display. Students learn that “Form follows function” so
the form and function of human hands, require design skills: they must decide:
space, structures, objects, fabric and clothing, landscapes ❥ What will their vehicle be used for?
sound, and events. and interiors, residential and cor- ❥ Who and how many will use it? How old are they?
porate architecture, product and
package design, video and print ❥ What does the vehicle need?
graphics. Neighborhood and city ❥ What will make it safe? (Develop through discussion.)
planning can be aesthetically ❥ How will the exterior be designed?
improved with skills in the design
of space and form. Staging is
■ Students select from a variety of boxes, such as shoe boxes, cereal
essential to the planning of suc- boxes, egg cartons, and appliance cartons (for group project). They
cessful events, whether personal, also select from various media.
business, or community. Elements WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
of design affect nearly all aspects ■ 3.1 Define problem/clarify decisions
of daily living. ■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
■ 3.12 Interpret data
PROGRESS INDICATOR #2 ■ 3.15 Apply problem-solving skills to design projects
Plan and execute solutions to ■ 5.1 Explain injury prevention
design problems. ■ 5.6, 5.7, 5.8 Identify common hazards, safety procedures, and
rules
THINKING SKILLS:
■ observe, decide, problem-solve, define, create
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Science

121
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
Brunswick Acres School,
Kendall Park
VISUAL ARTS 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: ARTS ELEMENTS

The arts strengthen our apprecia-


■ Students analyze the elements of art in two and three-dimension-
STANDARD 1.1 al art forms including their own work and the works of other stu-
tion of the world as well as our
All students will acquire ability to be creative and inventive dents/artists.
knowledge and skills that decision-makers. The acquisition of ■ Orally or in writing, compare and contrast the varied use and
increase aesthetic knowledge and skills that con- results obtained by arts elements in two disparate art works. They
tribute to aesthetic awareness of consider different artists or styles of art for comparison. They
awareness in dance, dance, music, theater, and visual describe how the elements are used to support the artist’s intent
music, theater, and arts enhances these abilities. or the specific effect achieved. They consider realistic, abstract,
visual arts. and/or nonrepresentational art forms.

PROGRESS INDICATORS
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
#2 & #3
■ 3.1 Define problem/clarify decisions
Understand that arts elements,
such as color, line, rhythm, space,
■ 3.2 Use models and observations
form, may be combined selectively ■ 3.12 Interpret data
to elicit a specific aesthetic ■ 3.7 Conduct systematic observations
response. (#2) ■ 4.3 Evaluate accomplishments
Communicate about the aesthetic
qualities of art works through oral
and written analysis using appro- THINKING SKILLS:
priate technical and evaluative ■ decide, recommend
terms. (#3)
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Language Arts Literacy (speaking)

123
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
VISUAL ARTS 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: CHIAROSCURO
Through an education in the arts, ■ Students observe works by Caravaggio, de Chirico, Rembrandt,
STANDARD 1.2 students enhance their perceptual, Vermeer, Raphael, and Velazquez, with attention to rendering of
All students will refine physical, and technical skills and form and light/dark areas. Use a student-model and a collection of
perceptual, physical, and learn that pertinent techniques props, e.g. hats, glasses, cloak etc. to create interest in the pose.
and technologies apply to the suc- The students render the subject in at least three tones, black to
technical skills through cessful completion of tasks. The white utilizing black or gray paper and/or white/black/gray chalk,
creating dance, music, development of sensory acuity or pastels. Darken the room or use a dark area of the school such
theater, and/or (perceptual skills) enables stu- as the stage. Add lighting to create highlights.
dents to perceive and acknowledge
visual arts. ■ The students bring a white object to school; e.g., a flower, a shell,
various viewpoints. Appropriate a white china cup, fabric, a white onion, etc., that can be added
physical movements, dexterity, and to a class-created still life. Encourage creative selection. Begin
rhythm pertain to such activities with one student who places the first object on a white surface,
as brush strokes in painting, dance cloth or paper. One at a time, the students proceed to add their
movement, fingering of musical object, perhaps rearranging the others until all have placed their
instruments, etc. contribution to the still life. Develop through discussion, the dif-
ferences in the whiteness of the objects. Some will be dove gray,
pure white, ivory, off-white, etc. Determine if any part of the still
PROGRESS INDICATORS life should be rearranged for balance, positive/negative, etc.
#2 & #3 ■ Students will render the tones of the still life or a portion of it
Demonstrate technical skills in using white, light gray or off-white paper. Compare the drawings
dance, music, theater, or visual for three-dimensionality, space, form, and color as well as the
arts, appropriate to students’ angle of the student’s perception.
developmental level. (#2)
Create, produce, or perform works
of dance, music, theater, or visual
arts, individually and with others.
(#3)

(continued on next page)

124
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
(continued from WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 3.2 Use models and observations
previous page)
■ 3.7 Conduct systematic observations
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
■ 4.5 Provide constructive criticism

THINKING SKILLS:
■ observe, perceive, transfer, select

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Science (effects of light on color)

Montclair State University,


Spring 1998

125
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
VISUAL ARTS 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: FOOD FOR THOUGHT
In order to understand the arts, ■ Food is often the inspiration for artistic effort. Presentation of
STANDARD 1.3 students must discover the com- “haute cuisine” is a commercial aspect of art akin to sculpture with
All students will utilize mon elements and properties of color. Some contemporary artists have used sculpture to represent
arts elements and arts dance, music, theater, and visual plain or fast food; others have provided comic relief with food as
arts. These arts elements, such as subject (a la Claes Oldenberg’s work)—what one might call the
media to produce color, line, form, rhythm, space, “blue plate specials.”
artistic products and timing, movement, mood, etc. are ■ Using technology and media, the students research a selected
performances. the ingredients from which works “food” theme as a subject for representation in clay. The assem-
of art are made. blage of forms requires a wide variety of skills in hand building
techniques and use of tools. The plate or platter can be wheel
thrown. Alternately, another medium or process can be used for
PROGRESS INDICATOR #1 plates. For a successful product, timing and security of the work in
Demonstrate appropriate use of progress must be self-monitored. Use glazes or mix paints to repli-
technology, tools, terminology, cate the food colors on the kiln-fired clay.
techniques and media in the cre- ■ Alternatively, students try “wacky sandwiches” filled with unex-
ation of dance, music, theater, and pected items such as a frog, flowers, or pencils.
visual arts. ■ The class creates a display in the cafeteria with “menu,” place
mats, and settings.

(continued on next page)

126
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
(continued from WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 2.7 Use technology and other tools to solve problems
previous page)
■ 2.8 Use technology and other tools to produce products
■ 3.2 Use models and observations
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
■ 3.15 Apply problem-solving skills to design projects
■ 4.10 Apply study skills
■ 4.1 Set short and long term goals
■ 4.9 Use time efficiently
■ 5.4 Demonstrate safe use of equipment or tools
■ 5.5 Identify and demonstrate use of safety and protective
devices

THINKING SKILLS:
■ observe, decide, evaluate, synthesize, create

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Science

Egg Harbor Township,


Students operating an in school
T.V. studio.

127
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
VISUAL ARTS 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: ART CRITIC
Art criticism assists in the devel- ■ Each student reports to the class, in the role of a professional art
STANDARD 1.4 opment of critical thinking skills of critic, on works of art that she/he has viewed at an art event: a
All students will observation, description, analysis, student or community show, an ethnic/cultural festival, a museum,
demonstrate knowledge interpretation, and evaluation. etc. Integrate art vocabulary. A good review includes the following
Students engage in and evaluate criteria: a reproduction or photograph of the work, the handling of
of the process multisensory learning experiences the elements of art, technical skill and technique, successful rep-
of critique. as both participants and observers. resentation of the intent. Presentations should be timed.
The process of critique helps stu- ■ A videotape or audiotape of the review, allows for a “playback” and
dents to develop a sense of aes- critique of the review.
thetics and leads to artistic and
personal growth.
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 1.1 Demonstrate employability skills and work habits
PROGRESS INDICATOR #2 ■ 1.5 Identify transferable skills
Offer constructive critique in the ■ 2.3 Access and use technology
evaluation of their own and others’ ■ 2.6 Access information
work in dance, music, theater, or
visual arts.
■ 3.1 Define problem/clarify decisions
■ 3.4 Identify and access resources
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
■ 4.7 Describe roles people play
■ 4.9 Use time efficiently
THINKING SKILLS:
■ know, comprehend, analyze, synthesize, apply, imagine
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Language Arts Literacy (speaking)

129
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
VISUAL ARTS 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: COSTUME MUSEUM
The history of the world is told ■ Working in small groups, students select from a varied group of histor-
STANDARD 1.5 through the arts. By being able to ical periods e.g., Victorian, the 1960s, Renaissance, or Medieval, to
All students will identify identify historical, social, and cul- identify a fashion style or outfit from the period (for male or female).
the various historical, tural influences related to the arts, Each group researches the costume/style and reports on the social class,
students will have a better and mores, and events of the time, etc., and how they contribute to style
social, and cultural more complete understanding of and design.
influences and traditions humankind past, present, and ■ Each group constructs a “boardwalk” (faceless, with oval cutout), life-
which have generated future and of the arts as forms of size, standing image wearing the period costume, hairstyle, etc.
human expression.
artistic accomplishments Brainstorm solutions to design problems. For example, discuss the use
of technology in re-creating the details of the costumes: overhead
throughout the ages, and
enlargements, copy machine for repetitive pattern, computer-generated
which continue to shape PROGRESS INDICATOR #6 parts, addition of collage materials, etc. The images can be used to pro-
contemporary arts. Understand and demonstrate a duce photographs of students in the costumes by adding their faces to
knowledge of how various artists these constructions. Use heavy appliance-box cardboard or lightweight
and cultural resources preserve our wood.
cultural heritage and influence ■ Display the above as a Costume Museum. Discuss museum-related
contemporary arts. careers such as fashion/costume designer, fashion historian, historical
films consultant, museum docent, and photographer. If added to, annu-
ally, the museum will grow to serve other educational needs. Display the
exhibits in other schools or in the community.

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NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
(continued from WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 1.3 Identify career interests
previous page)
■ 1.5 Identify transferable skills
■ 2.7 Use technology and other tools to solve problems
■ 2.8 Use technology and other tools to produce products
■ 3.2 Use models and observations
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
■ 3.15 Apply problem-solving skills to design projects
■ 4.10 Apply study skills
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively

THINKING SKILLS:
■ know, apply, decide, create

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Arts 1.3
■ Social Studies

Egg Harbor Township Middle School,


Anchors on their own T.V. show (cable).

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NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
VISUAL ARTS 5-8: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: LANDSCAPE
The development of knowledge and ■ Before designing a 3-D model of their ideal backyard, students con-
STANDARD 1.6 skills in design produces the power sider the site and its size, terrain, orientation to sun/shade, uses,
All students will develop to create or to enhance the econo- and what should be included: pool, deck, gazebo, fencing, lighting,
design skills for planning my and the quality of life. All and/or sports or game courts. Students determine local laws relat-
inventions, everything made by ing to such items as permits and approvals, and safety require-
the form and function human hands, require design skills: ments. They identify plantings, flower gardens, etc. They prepare
of space, structures, fabric and clothing, landscapes several sketches. Their final plan on paper includes notations as to
objects, sound, and interiors, residential and cor- what permits and approvals are required.
porate architecture, product and
and events. ■ Finally, the students construct a 3-D model to scale using a variety
package design, video and print of materials. Identify software, magazines, and community
graphics. Neighborhood and city resources that would assist in this project.
planning can be aesthetically
improved with skills in the design
of space and form. Staging is WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
essential to the planning of suc- ■ 3.1 Define problem/clarify decisions
cessful events, whether personal, ■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
business, or community. Elements
of design affect nearly all aspects
■ 3.12 Interpret data
of daily living. ■ 3.15 Apply problem-solving skills to design projects
■ 5.1 Explain injury prevention
■ 5.6, 5.7, 5.8 Identify common hazards, safety procedures, and
PROGRESS INDICATOR #1 rules
Identify and solve design problems
in space, structures, objects, THINKING SKILLS:
sound, and/or events for home and
■ research, observe, decide, problem solve, create
workplace. LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Science
■ Social Studies

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NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
VISUAL ARTS 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: ART MANIFESTO
The arts strengthen our apprecia- ■ Before creating a “public work of art,” students survey a sampling
STANDARD 1.1 tion of the world as well as our of community members to determine their beliefs/feelings toward
All students will acquire ability to be creative and inventive a sampling of subjects and aesthetic qualities for a community
knowledge and skills that decision-makers. The acquisition of work of art. They also ask them what purpose the art work should
knowledge and skills that con- serve, where it should be exhibited, and therefore what size it
increase aesthetic tribute to aesthetic awareness of should be. Students write an art manifesto (a public declaration of
awareness in dance, music, dance, music, theater, and visual intentions, opinions, objectives, or motives) that reflects the
theater, and visual arts. arts enhances these abilities. artists’ and the community’s aesthetic view/philosophy/aesthetic
values.
■ They use the survey results to design the art work (2-D or 3-D).
PROGRESS INDICATOR #1 Upon completion of the design replica, they determine if the artis-
Demonstrate an understanding of tic elements created the predetermined aesthetic qualities and
different aesthetic philosophies effect.
through the evaluation and analy-
sis of artistic styles, trends, and
movements in an art form. WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 3.1 Define problem/clarify decisions
■ 3.2 Use models and observations
■ 3.7 Conduct systematic observations
■ 3.12 Interpret data
■ 4.3 Evaluate own actions and accomplishments
THINKING SKILLS:
■ analyze, decide, recommend
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Language Arts Literacy (speaking, writing, interviewing)

133
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
VISUAL ARTS 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT VISUAL ARTS ACTIVITY: CREATIVITY AND ABSTRACTION
Through an education in the arts, ■ In this activity, each student produces a series of works related to
STANDARD 1.2 students enhance their perceptual, one subject.
All students will refine physical, and technical skills and ■ The first assignment in the series is the completion of a creative,
perceptual, physical, and learn that pertinent techniques realistic rendering of a subject. The students should make any fur-
and technologies apply to the suc- ther decisions regarding how this task is accomplished. (It’s the
technical skills through cessful completion of tasks. The marriage of realism and creativity, plus the decision-making
creating dance, music, development of sensory acuity process that the students must struggle with.)
theater, and/or (perceptual skills) enables stu- ■ The second in the series should abstract the form of the subject in
dents to perceive and acknowledge
visual arts. some way-its line, shape, colors, its place or experience in its exis-
various viewpoints. Appropriate
tence.
physical movements, dexterity, and
rhythm pertain to such activities ■ The third abstraction should give the appearance of being nonrep-
as brush strokes in painting, dance resentational.
movement, fingering of musical
instruments, etc.
WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 3.2 Use models and observations
PROGRESS INDICATOR #4 ■ 3.7 Conduct systematic observations
Demonstrate originality, technical ■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
skills, and artistic expression in ■ 3.12 Interpret data
the creation, production, and per-
formance of dance, music, theater, THINKING SKILLS:
or visual arts. ■ observe, perceive, create, select
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Depends on student’s choice of subject. See related vignettes on
next page.

(continued on next page)

134
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
(continued from EXAMPLE:
previous page) Students, given an apple as their subject, produced boring com-
positions of red whole apples—as were handed to them. They were
told their drawings did not fulfill the “creative” part of the assign-
ment. In return they complained that the teacher was not telling
them what she wanted them to do. “No,” said the teacher,”you are
not doing what I asked you to do.” One student, in frustration,
took a bite from the apple. “Aha!” said the teacher. “Ah!” said the
student as he erased the rounded edge and penciled teeth marks
on the drawing. The others caught on and produced realistic ren-
derings of apples: with curled peel, disassembled and reorganized,
and cut crosswise with the interior structural design showing.
Some were later baked with the crosscut design on the top crust,
candied and placed in a student-designed display box.
Illustrations could include the mythologies of Johnny Appleseed,
the symbol of the matriarchal religions, the poisoned apple of the
wicked witch, sculpted from clay with the serpent plunging out
and entitled, “The Garden of Eden.”
EXAMPLE:
A student’s rendering of a pheasant as subject produced the iri-
descent colors. While contemplating the beauty of the bird’s
feathers, the student realized that this bird’s beautiful feathers
did not compensate for its awkward shape and poor flying capa-
bility. The first abstraction produced was a collage that expressed
the fragility of this bird’s existence. Weather, the hunter, and for-
est fire made it vulnerable. Burnt paper was part of the media used
to express the violence in nature that threatens its life. Another
abstraction was a large, strong bird soaring over city and country-
side with the words, “I’d rather have strong wings than fine feath-
ers.” The final work was a linear, abstract expression of “Flight on
Wing and Wind.”

135
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
VISUAL ARTS 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: PORTRAITS WITH FEELING
In order to understand the arts, ■ Using a mirror to draw a self-portrait, or a partner/model, students
STANDARD 1.3 students must discover the com- complete a series of portraits depicting several emotional states in
All students will utilize mon elements and properties of facial drawings. These various emotional expressions may be subtle
arts elements and arts dance, music, theater, and visual or strong. Use several facial angles. See page 5 for helpful hints on
arts. These arts elements, such as learning to do portraiture.
media to produce color, line, form, rhythm, space, ■ Students select one of the portraits and abstractly apply a color
artistic products timing, movement, mood, etc. are (e.g., some associate red and black with anger, yellow might be
and performances. the ingredients from which works chosen to represent a glowing happiness, etc.). Selections and vol-
of art are made. ume of color are personal choices.
■ Students select a second portrait portraying a different emotion.
They add a body to the drawing that depicts, through body lan-
PROGRESS INDICATOR #3
guage, the same emotional state as the face. (The body might be
Demonstrate an understanding of done cartoon-like.)
technology, methods, materials ■ Students exhibit their work and compare/contrast the same emo-
and creative processes commonly tions and dissimilar ones for the use of line, color, space, etc.
used in visual arts.

WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:


■ 3.2 Use models and observations
■ 3.9 Identify patterns
■ 3.11 Identify/evaluate solutions
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
THINKING SKILLS:
■ concentration/focus, attention to detail, hand/eye coordination,
select, solve problems
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Social Studies (psychology)

137
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
VISUAL ARTS 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: EVALUATING THE CRITICS
Art criticism assists in the devel- ■ Students view the works of a specific artist and analyze the use and
STANDARD 1.4 opment of critical thinking skills of composition of the elements, technique, technology, and intent of
All students will observation, description, analysis, the artist. In the analysis, they include the individual influences
demonstrate knowledge interpretation, and evaluation. that impacted the work of the artist.
Students engage in and evaluate ■ Students, using the Internet, library, and/or media center, review
of the process multisensory learning experiences published professional criticisms of the artist’s work. They express
of critique. as both participants and observers. their own agreements and/or disagreements with the view of the
The process of critique helps stu- professional critics and identify any biases/inflammatory language
dents to develop a sense of aes- in the professional criticisms.
thetics and leads to artistic and ■ Based upon the students’ critiques, the class isolates the factors
personal growth.
analyzed and develops a rubric (using word-processing tools) for
analyzing and critiquing their own work. For example the students
PROGRESS INDICATOR #3 isolate the elements by discussing the use of positive/negative
Evaluate and interpret works of art space, color, texture, technical skill, technology, composition,
orally and in writing, using appro- visual perspective, etc.
priate terminology.

WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:


■ 1.1 Demonstrate employability skills and work habits
■ 2.8 Use technology and other tools to produce products
■ 3.2 Use models and observations
■ 3.5 Use library media center
■ 3.10 Monitor own thinking
THINKING SKILLS:
■ comprehend, analyze, compare/contrast, synthesize, apply
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Language Arts Literacy (writing, reading)

138
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
VISUAL ARTS 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: GENOCIDE & ARTISTIC EXPRESSION
The history of the world is told ■ Students select and research the historical events of genocide, such
STANDARD 1.5 through the arts. By being able to as the European witch hunts, slavery, the Holocaust, Bosnia and
All students will identify identify historical, social, and cul- “ethnic cleansing.”
the various historical, tural influences related to the arts, ■ Students prepare oral or written reports that include applicable
students will have a better and economic and political causes and identify the “players” involved.
social, and cultural more complete understanding of The students include artistic representations (e.g., film, news film
influences and traditions humankind past, present, and clips) of the event by artists of note and at least one of their own
which have generated future and of the arts as forms of related art works. Students utilize the Internet, a library, a muse-
human expression.
artistic accomplishments um to collect information; the computer to prepare the art and a
written draft; and other technology to reproduce the art/photos.
throughout the ages, and
■ The class exhibits the art works/reproductions as an historical time
which continue to shape PROGRESS INDICATOR #8 line.
contemporary arts. Demonstrate knowledge of how
artists and artistic works connect WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
with political, social, cultural, and
■ 2.5 Access information and communication systems
historical events. ■ 2.7 Use technology and other tools to solve problems
■ 2.8 Use technology and other tools to produce products
■ 3.2 Use models and observations
■ 3.4 Identify and access resources
■ 3.5 Use library media center
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
■ 4.2 Work cooperatively
■ 4.10 Apply study skills
THINKING SKILLS:
■ know, apply, select, decide, create
LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:
■ Social Studies

139
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
VISUAL ARTS 9-12: DESCRIPTIVE STATEMENT ACTIVITY: INTERIOR DESIGN
The development of knowledge and ■ When redesigning a room in their home to make better use of
STANDARD 1.6 skills in design produces the power space, provide more storage, and/or modernize, students begin
All students will develop to create or to enhance the econo- with an in-scale floor plan. Using CAD if available, they choose a
design skills for my and the quality of life. All color plan starting with the larger area (floor/walls) and select the
inventions, everything made by following items from magazines, other sources, their own samples,
planning the form human hands, require design skills: or models:
and function of space, fabric and clothing, landscapes • the furnishings;
structures, objects, and interiors, residential and cor-
• fabric samples;
porate architecture, product and
sound, and events. • lighting; and
package design, video and print
graphics. Neighborhood and city • window treatments.
planning can be aesthetically ■ Students create 2-D representations of the newly designed room
improved with skills in the design with measurement notations to ensure safe/comfortable move-
of space and form. Staging is ment. They include swatches in their presentation.
essential to the planning of suc-
cessful events, whether personal,
■ Students estimate the budget required to cover the cost of the ren-
business, or community. Elements ovation/redecorating. They provide a basis for the costs listed.
of design affect nearly all aspects ■ Students define the reasons for keeping certain features and dis-
of daily living. posing of others. They identify changes made to the electrical,
plumbing, and heat/air systems.

PROGRESS INDICATOR #4
Identify, plan, and provide solu-
tions to design problems of space,
structures, objects, sound, and/or
events in a public or private envi-
ronment.

(continued on next page)

140
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
(continued from WORKPLACE READINESS SKILLS:
■ 1.12 Demonstrate consumer and other financial skills
previous page)
■ 2.0 Understand technological systems
■ 3.1 Define problem/clarify decisions
■ 3.7 Conduct systematic observations
■ 3.8 Organize, synthesize, and evaluate information
■ 3.11 Identify/evaluate alternative decisions
■ 3.12 Interpret data
■ 3.13 Select and apply solutions to problem solving and deci-
Lacey students in the background of the
sion making
set of “Snake Eyes” in Atlantic City, NJ
■ 3.15 Apply problem-solving skills to design projects
■ 5.3 Demonstrate safe physical movement

THINKING SKILLS:
■ research, observe, decide, problem-solve, create

LINKS TO OTHER STANDARDS & SUBJECTS:


■ Mathematics

141
NEW JERSEY VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK