You are on page 1of 41

JAZZ CURRICULUM

MB21420

MOVEABLE SHAPES
CONCEPTS FOR REHARMONIZING ii-V-I’s

TM

MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC.


#4 INDUSTRIAL DRIVE

BY SHERYL BAILEY PACIFIC, MO 63069

M el B ay G uitar U niversity Series


JAZZ CURRICULUM
MOVEABLE SHAPES
CONCEPTS FOR REHARMONIZING ii-V-I’s
BY SHERYL BAILEY
M el B ay G uitar U niversity Series

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0

© 2009 SHERYL BAILEY. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.


EXCLUSIVE SALES AGENT MEL BAY PUBLICATIONS, INC. INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED. B.M.I. MADE AND PRINTED IN U.S.A.
No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, or stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form
or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording, or otherwise, without written permission of the publisher.

Visit us on the Web at www.melbay.com — E-mail us at email@melbay.com


Contents
Preface ........................................................................................................................................3

Chapter 1:
Move it or Lose it ....................................................................................................................4

Chapter 2:
A Cut Above ..........................................................................................................................10

Chapter 3:
The Combined Effort..............................................................................................................16

Chapter 4:
A Major Discovery ................................................................................................................22

Chapter 5:
From Major to Minor ............................................................................................................28

Chapter 6:
Tune In....................................................................................................................................34

About the Author ......................................................................................................................39

Acknowledgements
I would like to acknowledge the following colleagues for their inspiration, guidance and work
on this project:

Kyle Clark (Finale Set-up)


Jimmy Wyble
Jack Wilkins
John Maione
Corey Christiansen
Bruce Saunders

I hope the material here will bring you inspiration and spark your creativity to new levels.
Love and Light,
Sheryl Bailey

2
Preface
Introduction:
The fundamental chord progression for jazz improvisors is the II-V-I. It is the bread and
butter of standard and contemporary jazz harmony. This book presents a modern concept for
improvising over this essential chord progression. By superimposing chords and scales onto
the II, V, and I we will create substitutions that alter and extend the basic chord sounds. The
result will be fresh and exotic sounding harmonies.

How the book is organized:


Each chapter focuses on a particular substitution and begins with chord voicing studies. It is
important to play through these studies to learn their unique sound and to open your ear. I
suggest recording a bass line to play along with to fully hear the substitutions. Also use
these chords in comping or chord solos to cement them into your playing.
The latter part of each chapter focuses on single note lines. The first two pages of these
studies clearly outline the substitutions. The second two pages use chromaticism and contain
wider melodic leaps, making the substitutions less obvious.

Comments on chord voicings:


The chord voicings in this book are, for the most part, derived from basic drop-2 and drop-3
voicings. I’ve added extensions to the basic forms. If you are unfamiliar with the basic
drop-2 and drop-3 chord shapes, study them. Drop-2 Concept for Guitar, by Charles H.
Chapman, available at www.melbay.com, is a great place to start.
The extensions available for the basic chord types are listed below for handy reference:
Minor 7: 9, 11, 6, maj7
Dominant 7: f9, 9, s9, 11, s11(f5), f13(s5), 13
Major 7: 9, s11, s5, 6
There are many rules for usage, but, because those rules are derived from how they sound,
my advice is to experiment. You’ll learn much faster by doing than by memorizing rules.
When you discover the ones that sound good to you, add them to your style.

Comments on notation:
I’ve often notated enharmonic notes (notes of the same pitch which are spelled differently) so
they correspond to the chord substitution rather than the original chord. For example, instead
of B on a G7 chord, Cf is used as a part of an Af-(maj7)/G substitution.

Editors Notes:
-7 refers to minor 7th chords. Chord symbols with a slash ( / ) are chords above bass notes.
For example: F-7/G = Fmin7 above a G bass note. In the single note studies keep in mind that
accidentals are in effect for the bar in which they occur, and are cancelled at the following bar
line.

3
Chapter 1: Move it or Lose it
Let’s explore moving -7 chords within the II-V-I progression in the key of C.
Here is the chord progression we will jazz up:
| D-7 | G7 | Cmaj7 | Cmaj7 ||
1) In measure one, use a D-7 arpeggio or the D dorian scale.
2) In measure two, move the D-7 arpeggio up a minor-third to an F-7 arpeggio or the F
dorian scale and play them over a G bass note. The F-7 arpeggio played over G creates
G7(sus4, f9, f13). Using the F dorian scale over G creates G7(sus4, f9, s9, f13).
3) In measures three and four, use any of the following: a Cmaj7 arpeggio, the C ionian scale
(also known as the C major scale), the C lydian scale, or the C bebop scale (a major scale with
a passing note between the 5th and 6th scale degrees).
F-7/G = G7(sus4, f9, f13)
F dorian /G = G7(sus4, f9, s9, f13)
Now our progression looks like this:
| D-7 | G7 | Cmaj7 | Cmaj7 ||
| D-7 or D dorian | F-7 or F dorian | Cmaj7, C ionian, C lydian, or C bebop ||
The following are chord voicings that substitute F-7/G for G7. Having a repetoire of voicings
that apply these substitutions will expand your chord vocabulary and give conviction to the
lines you play. Use these voicings as much as possible. Hearing is believing!

4
D-7(9) F-7/G C6
9
w b b www ww
2134 2 134 2113

& www ww
3fr. 1fr. 1fr.
w

D-7(11) F-7/G Cmaj7


ww w
b b www ww 1314 4121 1 34

& ww 5fr. 6fr. 8fr.


w

D-7(11
9) F-7(9)/G C 69 (# 11)
www ww # ww 21341 3 1114 21131

b b ww ww 3fr. 1fr. 1fr.


& ww
w w

C 69 (maj7)
b b www ww D-7(9) F-7/G
ww
w ww 2 3334 2 314 1 2344

& ww w 10fr. 9fr. 8fr.


w

D-7(11) F-7(9)/G Cmaj7


ww ww w 1314 2314 2413

& ww www
b b ww
5fr. 5fr. 5fr.
w

5
D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ bœ bœ œ œœœ
4 œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ œÓ
&4 œ œ œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ
1 5 6 4 3
3 5 4 6 6 5 3 5
2 5 4 5 5 5
2 3 3 5 6 7 5
5

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ
& bœ œ œ œ œ œ w ∑

8 5 7 5
6 8 6
7 8 5 7 5
6 9 6 5
8

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
bœ nœ œ œ #œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ Ó
& œ œ œ b œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ
2 3 3
4 5 3 4 5
5 5 3 7 7
7 3 6 5 3 7 9 9 10
7 5 7 10

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ
œ œ œ bœ œ
& œ œ œ bœ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ w
7 8 5 10 11 8
6 5 9 8
7 8 7
7 10 7 9 10 9 10
8 11 10 9 10

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ
œ œ œ œ
& #œ œ Œ Ó

3 4 6 4 3 2 3 5 7 5 3
5 6 6 5 6 6 6 5
7 6 7 7
7
8

6
œ œ bœ œ œ œ
D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ
&œ œ œ œ œ b œ œ Œ Œ ‰ J
œ œ œ œ
œ
7 10 9 7 8
5 8 8 10 8 9
7 10 9 10
7 10
5 5 7 8 8 8 10 11
5 8

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ #œ œ bœ œ
&
œ œ #œ œ nœ œ œ œ bœ œŒ Ó

7 8 6 7 10 9 7 8
10 6 9 6 7 10 9 8
7 6 5 9 8 9
7 7 10 10

D-7
œ œ œ œ œ G7 b œ œ b œ œ b œ œ œ Cmaj7
œ
œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ ˙

&
8 7 8 11 10 6 8
6 10 8 10 6 6 9 9 8 6
7 9
9 10

D-7
b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ w
G7 Cmaj7
œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ # œ œ
&
5 10 8 7 8 5 7
5 6 6 6 8 9 6 7 8
7 5 7 5 7 7 8 8
9

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ bœ œ bœ œ œ
œ œ bœ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
& w
8 5 11 8 6 5
6 8 6 5 6 9 9 8 6 7 8 5
7 7 7 5 5
9 5

7
D-7 G7 Cmaj7
4 œ
œ œ bœ œ
b œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ #œ w
&4 œ œ œ œ œ œ

5 6 5
7 8 5 7 5 4 7 6 4 5 7 8
7 6 8 6
5 4 5 7 8 8

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ œ œ b œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ
œ œ bœ œ œ w
& œ œ bœ œ
7 8 5 8 7 10 8 7
6 5 6 8 9 11 10 9 8 6 5
7 5 8
7 6
8

Cmaj7
D-7
b œ G7
œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ Œ Ó
& #œ
8 11 10 10 8
8 9 8 9 11 11 10 9 8
7 6 7 9 10 9 10 10 9
12 10

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ b œ n œ œ œ bœ bœ œ
bœ nœ œ œ bœ œ
& bœ bœ œ #œ œ œ
œ œ œ
œ w
5 8 6 4
4 5 8 7 6 8 8 6
8 5
8 6 5 4 7 5
7 5
8 5 3

D-7 G7 Cmaj7

œ œ œ b œ œ b œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ nœ œ œ #w
& œ œ œ bœ œ nœ
œ bœ œ
1 2
3 2 3 5
4 5 4 3 2 1 5 4 4 5
3 5 4 3 5
5 3
5 4

8
D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œœ œ œ
& œ #œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ ˙
œ bœ œ bœ œ œ
7 5 3
5 6 3 4 5
4 5 3 4 4 5
7 6 7 7 5 3 5 7
6 3 3 6
6 5 4

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ bœ œ œ œ w
œ œ œ bœ œ œ
& œ bœ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ
bœ bœ œ
8 7 6 5
7 5 5 4 7
9 7 6 5 3 5 7
8 6 5 6 7
8 6 4 3

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ
œ b œ œ œ œ œ
&œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ
œ œ œ Œ Ó

7
11 9 8 10
7 8 10 10 8 7 9 7
7 9 10 9 10 9 10
8 7 8 10 9 10

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ nœ bœ œ œ
œ #œ œ œ œ œ
Œ Ó
&
11 10 13 10 11 12 10
10 13 13 13 11 9 12 14 13
9 10 12 13 10 12 12
12 11 12

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ bœ œ œ # œ œ œ œ w
œ œ bœ œ bœ œ
& bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
7 7 10 7 7
10 8 7 10 7
10 9 7 8 7
10 8 10 9
11 11 10 8 7 10

9
Chapter 2: A Cut Above
Let’s create an altered dominant 7th chord by substituting a -(maj7) arpeggio or melodic
minor scale a half-step above the root.
The chord progression we will create substitutions for remains unchanged throughout the
text, until Chapter 6, when we will transpose it into different keys:
| D-7 | G7 | Cmaj7 | Cmaj7 ||
1) In measure one, use a D-7 arpeggio or the D dorian scale.
2) In measure two, play an Af-(maj7) arpeggio over a G bass note. The Af-(maj7) arpeggio
over G creates G7(f9, f13). Using the Af melodic minor scale over G creates G7(f9, s9, s11,
f13) aka G7alt. Af melodic minor has the same notes as the G altered Scale.

3) In measures three and four, use a Cmaj7 arpeggio, the C lydian scale, the C ionian scale,
or the C bebop scale.
Af-(maj7)/G = G7(f9, f13)
Af melodic minor/G = G7(f9, s9, s11, f13) = G7alt.
| D-7 | G7 | Cmaj7 | Cmaj7 ||
| D-7 or D dorian | Af-(maj7) or Af melodic minor | Cmaj7, C ion., C lyd., or C bebop ||
Beginning in this chapter, the chord voicings, though constructed using substitutions over
bass notes, will be named from the bass note as the root. It is up to you to record a bass line
that contains those roots and to understand the chords from both perspectives.

10
b
D-7 G7( b13
9) Cma j7(9)
ww ww ww
21314 3 12 4 2143
w
& ww b
b b ww 3fr. 1fr. 2fr.
ww
w

b 13
G7( # 9 )
D-7 b9 Cmaj7
˙
ww ˙ b b www˙ b˙ w
www
2314
6fr.
4231
6fr.
2413
5fr.
&w

#
D-7(11) G7( b 99 ) Cmaj7
ww b ww ww 2413 2143 2314
w
& w b b ww ww 7fr. 9fr. 9fr.

b
D-7(11) G7( #13
9) Cmaj7( # 11)
ww ww # www 1314 2314 2413

& ww b
b b ww 5fr. 4fr. 5fr.
w

# 11
G7( # 9 )
#
b9 Cmaj7( 11
˙ D-7(9) 9 )
˙w b b www ww
ww 2 3334 31411 1 2344

& ww b b ww 10fr. 9fr. 8fr.


w

11
œ nœ bœ œ bœ œ #œ ˙
D-7 G7 Cmaj7
4 b œ b œ b œ œ œ b œ œ
& 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ

6 5 9 6 7 8
6 8 7 6 4 5 7 8
5 7 6 8 9 9 8 6 5
5 7 8 8 7 5

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œœ
œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ bœ œ œ œœŒ Ó
& œ bœ œ
bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ
5
6
7 5 7 4 7 8 4 4 2 5
7 6 5 2 5 5
6 6 5 3 2 3
7 4

D-7
b œ œ œ Cmaj7
G7
œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œœœœ
œ #œ œ œ œ Œ œ Œ
&
15 13 12
13 12 16 15 13 12 15 13 12 10 8
12 14 13 12 13 15 10 9
12 11 12 14 15

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ bœ œ œ œ
& œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ Œ
bœ bœ œ
bœ œ œ bœ œ œ nœ
8 7 6 5
7 5 4 7 6 4 5
9 7 8 5 6 8 5 5
6 5 4 2 3 5 7
7 4 3

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ w
& œ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ

3 3 7 5 5
5 6 3 3 4 3 5
2 5 4 3 3 6 5 4 2
5 6 5 6

12
D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ bœ œ œ
bœ bœ œ œ œ œœ œ
&œ œ œ œ œ b œ
bœ bœ œ œ Œ Ó
œ œ œ bœ
7 10 9 7 8
4 5 8 8
5 3 4 7 4 5
7 6 5 6
8 7 5 6
8 7 5 4

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ
3
œœ œ Œ
& œ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ
bœ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ œ
5 6 5 4 3 3 3
5 4 2 3 4 4 5 5 4
6 5 6 5 2 5 5
6 2 2 5 4 3
4 3

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ bœ #œ œ nœ œ
œ bœ œ bœ
œ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ
&‰ bœ bœ bœ œ œ œœ Œ
bœ œ œ
12 11 9 10 8
12 10 9 8 12 11 10 9 8
8 9 12
9 8 9 12 9 10
11 10 10
11 12

D-7
œ œ œ œ
G7
b œ b œ b œ œ
Cmaj7
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ
œ œ œ œ bœ bœ
& Œ Ó

10 12 9 11 10 8
10 12 13 13 12 10 9 11 12 12 11 9 8 10 12 12 10 9 8

D-7 G7 Cmaj7

œ œ b œ b œ
bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ bœ œ œ w
& œ
11 15 12
11 9 12 15 13 15 12
14 12 14 12
15 12 12 13 14
12 15 14 11 14
15

13
D-7
œ œ œ œ œ
G7
b œ
Cmaj7
œœœ bœ bœ bœ œ
œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ ˙
bœ bœ œ bœ œ nœ œ
& 44
12 15 12 10 8 7
12 13 15 15 14 12 11 12 10
14 13 12 10 9 12 12 11
13 9 12 11 10 12

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ bœ
bœ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ #œ œ œ œ w
& œ #œ
10 8
10 8 12 10 11 9 7
10 9 8 10 8 7 9 7
11 9 10 10 9
11 10 9

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ
œ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ
œ #œ œœœ Œ
&œ œ œ bœ bœ œ
7 5 6 4 6 4 3 3 5 7 8 3
3 6 5 6 5 4 5 6 5 3
5 4 5 3 4 5 4
5

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
bœ bœ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ #œ
œ b œ œ ∑
&œ œ œ œ bœ
11 15 12
12 15 12
12 14 11
10 14 12 10 13 13 12
12 12 14 11 14
10 13

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ bœ œ #œ œ bœ
œ b œ bœ nœ n œ bœ bœ
& #œ bœ œ bœ œ #œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ bœ
˙
3 6 5 2 3 4
5 4 3 5 6 4
6 6 4
6 7 6 3 4 5
7 5 3 3
7 5 4 3

14
D-7
œ b œ b œ œ
Cmaj7
# œ œ œ œ œ œ œ w
G7
bœ bœ œ œ
& œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ bœ
10
11 9 8 8 10 8 10 12
8 10 8 9 11 11
7 10 9 11
7 8 7 8
11 10

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
bœ œ
œ #œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ w
&
9 10 8
10 11 9 12 11 9 8 10 8 12 10 9 8
12 11 10 9 12 10 10 9
12

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ bœ bœ
œ b œ œ œ œ bœ
œ
& #œ bœ œ œ œ
bœ bœ œ #œ bœ œ nœ œ œ œ œ Ó
12 11
15 12
14 12
11 12 14 13 15 13 9 7 10
14 10 6 7 10 10 7
11 7 8 9 10

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ
& bœ œ bœ œ
bœ œ œ œ œ ˙ w
6 5 6 7 8 7 8 7 6
8 4
6 5 5 2
6 5 3 2
7 3

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ œ
œ bœ bœ bœ bœ œ œ
& bœ œ œ œ #œ
œ ˙ w
7 6 5 4
8 7 6 5 4
4 3 6 4 3
6 6 7 5 4
5
5

15
Chapter 3: The Combined Effort
In this chapter I will expand on all the previous concepts by combining them and adding a
new substitution for I, creating fluid motion up in minor-thirds.
1) In measure one, use a D-7 arpeggio or the D dorian scale.
2) In measure two, move up a minor-third to F-7 or F dorian over a G bass note and then up
another minor-third to an Af-(maj7) or Af melodic minor over a G bass note. Using these
substitutions one after the other creates G7(sus4, s9, s13) moving to G7(f9, s9, s11, f13).
3) In measures three and four, move up another minor-third to B-7 over a C bass note. B-7
over C creates Cmaj7(9, s11). The related chord scale is B phrygian, which adds the
additional color of 6 onto Cmaj7. B phrygian contains the same notes as C lydian.
F-7/G or F dorian/G = G7(sus4, f9, f13)
Af-(maj7)/G or Af melodic minor/G = G7(f9, s9, s11, s13) aka G7alt.
B-7/C or B phrygian/C = Cmaj7(6, 9, s11)
| D-7 | G7 | Cmaj7 | Cmaj7 ||
| D-7, D dorian | F-7, F dorian and Af-(maj7), Af melodic minor | B-7, B phrygian ||

16
b b
D-7(9) G7( b13
9) G7( #13
9) C 69 (# 11)
ww
w b bb ˙˙˙˙ b bb ˙˙˙˙ ww 2413
10fr.
2413
10fr.
4131
9fr.
23114
7fr.
& w # www

b b #
G7( b13 G7( #13 Cmaj7( 11
˙ ˙ ˙˙ b ˙˙
D-7(9) 9) 9) 9 )
ww b ˙ # ww 2 3334 1314 2114 21431

& ww b ˙˙ ww 10fr. 6fr. 4fr. 2fr.


b ˙
w

b b #
D-7(11) G7( b13
9) G7( #13
9) Cmaj7( 11
9 )
ww b ˙˙ ˙ # ww 2413 2134 2413 2314
w
& w b ˙˙ b b ˙˙˙ ww 7fr. 6fr. 4fr. 4fr.

b9 b # 11
D-7 G7( sus4 ) G7( #13
9) Cmaj7( 9 )
ww ˙˙ b ˙˙
# wwww
6

b ˙˙ b b ˙˙
2314 1234 4231 4231
w
& w
7fr. 6fr. 6fr. 5fr.

b 13 b #
D-7(9) G7 ( b 9 ) G7( b13
9) Cmaj7( 11
9 )
sus4
ww #w
b b ˙˙
˙ ˙˙ www
2314
2fr.
2314
1fr.
2413
1fr.
3 1 2
1fr.
&w ˙
w ˙ b˙ w

17
D-7
œ
G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ œ. œ #œ œ
œ œ b œ # œ œ œ
& 44 œ œ œ œ
œ œ bœ œ œ
œ œ bœ œ bœ J Œ

5 10 7
5 6 7 10 7 8 10 8 7
7 5 8 7 9
7 5 6 6 8 9 9
5 7 8 8

D-7
bœ G7 Cmaj7
œ œ #˙ w
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ
œ
&
11 15 14
10 13 11 12 12 13 15
12 10 9 9 10 12 10 12 13 13
12

D-7
œ œ
G7
œ bœ bœ bœ
œ
Cmaj7
œ œ œ #œ œ œ w
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ #œ
&
8 11 7 10 7 14 12
10 8 9 9 7 10 15
7 7 10 8
7 10 9 10

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œœœœ
œ œ œ œ bœ bœ # œ ˙
& bœ bœ œ œ œ œ

8 12 10 8 10 7 7
10 9 8 7 10 8 10
10 9 10 12 10 8 7 9
9 8 7 9
11 10

œ ˙
œ œ œ œ œ
D-7 G7 Cmaj7

œ œ œ œ œ b œ œ bœ bœ œ #œ œ
& œ œ œ #œ œ œ
10 7 8 10 12
7 10
7 8 7
9 10 7 9 10 6 9 6
8 7 8
10 9 10

18
D-7
œ œ œ bœ œ
G7
bœ œ œ œ bœ œ #œ
Cmaj7
œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ
& œ œ
5
6 5 8 7
7 6 5 8 5 8 4 7 4 5 4
7 6 6 7 7 4 5 4
8 5 8 5 7

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ
‰ # œj œ œ œ bœ bœ œ #œ
&Œ œ œ œ œ b œ bœ œ #œ œ ∑

5 10 7
7
5 8 7
6 7 6 6 9 9
8 7 5 8 6 9
8

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ bœ œ
œ œ bœ œ
b œ bœ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ #w
& œ œ œ #œ œ
7 5
8 7 6 5 7
7 6 5 6 4 7 5
6 5 8 6 7 5 9 7
8 9 7

D-7 G7
œ œ œ. œ Cmaj7
b œ œ œ œ œ # œ œœ
& œ bœ œ œ œ nœ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ b œ œ œ œ J Œ

10 7
7 10 10 8
7 9 7 7 9
7 8 9 11 8 7
10 9 8 7 10 8 11 10 8 11
10

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
b œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ w
œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
& #œ
7 9 7 10 8 12 10 7
8 9 8 11 9 11
7 6 9 7 10 9 10

19
œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ bœ œ #œ œ œ œ
D-7 G7 Cmaj7

& 44 œ bœ bœ bœ bœ œœ j
#œ œ . œ #œ Œ
œ
7 8 7 10 7
11 10 9 8 7 11 9 8 7 7
10 8 9
10 8 6 9 9 7
9 10 9
7

D-7 G7

Cmaj7 œ œ
œ œ bœ œ œ œ
œ bœ bœ bœ œ œ #œ œ œ œ w
& #œ œ œ bœ bœ
10 8 7
8 11 7 8 10
7 6 9 8 7 8 9 7 9
7 8 10 11 9
10 8 11

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
j ˙
œ œ œ
& œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ #œ œ œ œ. œ #œ œ œ
œ
10
7 7 7
9 10 9 7 9 10 9 8 7 9
10 11 10 8 11 10 9 7 10 9 10
10 7

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ
# œ œ œ bœ œ nœ œ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ ∑
& #œ œ œ œ

10 8
6 7 9 8 10 9 8 10 7 8 8
11 9 11 7 9 7
9 7 9
10

D-7
œ œ œ G7 Cmaj7
#
bœ œ œ œ œœ
& œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ bœ œ ∑
œ œ
10 7
7 10
5 8 7 7
7 7 6 9 6 9 9
5 8 5 8 8 6
5 8

20
D-7 G7 Cmaj7 œ w
b œ bœ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ nœ #œ
& bœ nœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ b œ œ

10 7
8 7
8 8 7 9 7
8 7 6 9 5 11 9 10
6 7 8 4 7 6 5 8

œ œ #œ œ œ œ
D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ bœ œ œ œ #w
& bœ œ œ œ bœ œ
bœ œ bœ œ œ œ
10 12 9 12 10
10 7
10 9 8 7
10 7 9
11 8 10 11 7 7
11 7 10 9 8

œ œ œ G7b œ
œ bœ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
D-7 Cmaj7
œ #œ œ œ œ b œ
w
&‰
12 10 8 10 8 7
8 9 10 12 10 11 10 9 8 9 12 11 7 8 10 8
9 7

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ #œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ ˙
œ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ #œ œ œ
& bœ #œ nœ #œ œ
10 9 10 7 8
10 9 7 8 7 8 7 9 7 7
7 9 10 9 7 9 8 9
11 11 9 8 9
11

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
bœ œ bœ nœ nœ œ œ œ
bœ œ
b œ bœ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ w
œ bœ œ #œ
&
8 10 11 8 10 14 12
9 11 12 10 12 9 12 8 10 15 12
12 10 8 10 11

21
Chapter 4: A Major Discovery
This time around let’s use maj7 chord structures and their related scales, as the basis for our
substitutions.
1) In measure one, use Fmaj7 or F lydian over a D bass note. Both substitutions create
D-7(9). The corresponding chord scale is F lydian. F lydian contains the same notes as D
dorian.
2) In measure two, move up a minor-third to Afmaj7 over a G bass note. This creates G7
(sus4, f9, f13). The related chord scale is Af lydian. This scale over a G bass creates G7 (sus4,
f9, s9, f13).

3) In measure three and four, move down a minor-second and play Gmaj7 over a C bass note.
This creates Cmaj7(9, s11). The chord scale is G ionian. G ionian contains the same notes as
C lydian.
Fmaj7/D or F lydian/D = D-7(9)
Abmaj7/G or Af lydian/G = G7(sus4, f9, s9, f13)
Gmaj7/C or G ionian/C = Cmaj7(9, s11)
| D-7 | G7 | Cmaj7 | Cmaj7 ||
| Fmaj7 or F lydian | Afmaj7 or Af lydian | Gmaj7 or G ionian ||

22
b 13 #
G7 ( b 9 ) Cmaj7( 11
b b ww
ww w w
D-7(9)
sus4 9 )
w w # www 2413 2413 2413

& w 6fr. 9fr. 8fr.

#9 #
D-7(11
9) G7( b 9 ) Cm aj7( 11
6)
ww b ww # www
sus4
ww 314211 2143 2143

& ww b ww w 8fr. 10fr. 9fr.

b 13
D-7(9) G7 ( b 9 ) Cmaj7( # 11)
sus4
w ww # ww 4311 2314 2314

& www b b ww ww 5fr. 5fr. 4fr.

b 13
D-7(9) G7( # 9 ) C 69 (# 11)
b9
www b ww # ww 1423 4111 24111

& w b b ww ww 8fr. 8fr. 7fr.


w

D-7 ( 9
b9 ) Cmaj7( # 11)
6) G7( sus4
ww
wwww # www
b ww
2413 1234 1423
6fr. 6fr. 5fr.
& w

23
œ bœ œ #œ œ œ œ
D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œœ bœ œ bœ
œ
4 œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ #˙
&4 œ œ œ œ bœ #œ œ
8 8 11 7 10 14 12 10
10 8 9 7 8 12
9 10 8 7 11
10 10 9
7 8 12 10 11 9 10

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œœ œ bœ #œ œ
œœœ œ bœ œ œ œ #œ
œœ bœ œ œ œ
& œ bœ œ #œ œ œ œ ˙
12 8 15 11 14 10
10 13 12
10 9 13 12 12 11
10 13 12
12 8 15 11 14 10 9 10 9
12 10

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ bœ œ # œ w
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ
&

8 7 10
9 8 8 7 7
10 10 10 10 9 9
12 8 7 8 12 11 10 11 10 9 10

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ
œ œ œ bœ œ w
&œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ
10 8
8 11 12 10 12 10
9 8 10 8 12 11 9
10 12 10 10
7 8 12 12 10 11

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ
& œ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ
#œ nœ w

8 9 8
9 10 9 10 8
12 10 10 8 7 9 7
12 10 8 11 10 9 10 10 8 7

24
D-7
œ œ.
G7
œ œ.
Cmaj7
#œ œ œ œ ˙
& ‰ œj œ œ œ J ‰ œj b œ œb œ J ‰ # œj œ œ œ Ó

8 7 10 8
9 7 8 10 7 9
7 10 10 9
7 8 10 11 9 10

œ œ3 œ # œ w
D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ bœ œ
& ‰ J œ œœœ œ Œ ‰ J œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ
3

8 10 12 10 7 8
9 8 7 9 7
10 7 9 7 10 12 10 8 9 10
8 11 11 10

œ
œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
D-7 Cmaj7 G7
œœ œ b œ b œ
œ b œ
&œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œŒ Ó

7 10 8 7
8 8 11 9 8 7 8 10 8
9 10 8
7 10 10 10
8 7 8 11 10 11

D-7
bœ bœ
Cmaj7 G7w
œ œ œ bœ # œ œ
&œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ

10
11 9 7 8
9 7 8 7
7 7 10 10 10 9 9
8 7 8 11 10 11 10 9 10

D-7 G7 Cmaj7

‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
œ œ w
& œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ
œ œ œ
8 8
9 9 7 8 8 7 7
10 7 10 9
7 8 10 11 10 7 10
10 7 8

25
D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ bœ œ bœ
œœ bœ œ bœ
4 œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ
&4 œ œ œ #œ œ
8 12 11 8
8 11 9 8 7
9 8 7 9 7 7
7 10 10 7 10 9 9 10 9
7 8 11 10 9 10

œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
D-7 G7 Cmaj7

œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ
œ œ œ œ
& œ œ #œ œ w
12 10 11 15 13 11
10 13
9 10 13 12
12 9 10 13 12 9
14 10 12 10 9 12
10

D-7
œ
G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ #œ w
œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ
& œ b
œ œ bœ œœ

10 14 10
10 12 12
12 11 10 9 12 10 11 12
10 13 10 10 9 12
12 8 13 10
11

#œ œ œ œ œ œ
D-7
œ bœ œ bœ œ
G7
œ œ Cmaj7
œ œ œ bœ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ
& Œ Ó

12 11 10 8 15 13 14 17 15
14 13 10 8 11 9 8 17 15
10 9 8 17 16 14
17

D-7
œ œ œ G7
bœ œ
Cmaj7
œ ˙
œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ # œ œ œ œ # œ
& bœ œ bœ œ #œ œ œ œ
œ
12 10 8 10
10 11 8 10 12
9 10 12 10 8 8 11 9 12 11
10 9 12
11 10 12 9 10
11 10

26
œ œ w
D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ
œ œ œ œ # œ
& œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ

10 12
9 12 11 12
7 6 9 7 8 10 8 12 10 12 10 12
8 7 10 8 11 10 11

D-7 G7 œ #œ œ œ œ œ
Cmaj7
œ
œ #œ œ #œ ˙
& ‰ #œ œ bœ œ œ nœ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ
œ
10 14 12 10
10 12 10
11 12 11 7
8 7 7 9 10 9 12
9 10 7 8 11 10 11 10
11 8

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ œ bœ bœ nœ œ #œ œ bœ œ œ #œ œ œ œ #w
&œ œ œ bœ œ.
J
8 7
9 10 7 8 9 10 11 8 9 7
7 10 11 10 9 9
7 8 11 10 9

D-7 G7 Cmaj7

& œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #˙
œ bœ bœ œ œ œ

5 7 4
7 9 7 5 7 6 4 7 5 4 5 7 5 4
8 8 6 8 6 5 5
8 6 4 3 7

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ
œ ˙.
œ œ bœ œ # œ # œ
& œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ #œ œ œ
8 11 10 8 10 7
10 9 8 7 10 8 7
9 10 8 7
10 10 10 8 9
12 11 10 11 10

27
Chapter 5: From Major to Minor
This chapter merges ideas from the previous chapters with a new substitution for I. I like this
particular combination because it lends itself to flowing lines. By following the natural logic
of ideas that move from major to minor you develop smooth transitions and continuous
motion.
1) In measure one, use Fmaj7 or F lydian over a D bass note.
2) In measure two, use F-7 or F dorian over a G bass note.
3) In measures three and four, move the F-7 arpeggio down a half-step to E-7 over a C bass
note. This creates a Cmaj7(9) sound. The chord scale can be E aeolian or E phrygian
depending on what colors use want. These are the same chord scales as C lydian and
C ionian.
Fmaj7/D or F lydian/D = D-7(9)
F-7/G or F dorian/G = G7(sus4, f9, s9,s13)
E-7/C = Cmaj7(9)
| D-7 | G7 | Cmaj7 | Cmaj7 ||
| Fmaj7 or F lydian | F-7 or F dorian | E-7, E aeolian, or E phrygian ||

28
b
D-7(9) G7( b13
9) Cma j7(9)

w b b wwww www
4311 4321 4321

& www w
5fr. 4fr. 3fr.

b
D-7 ( 9 G7( b13
ww 6) 9) Cma j7(9)
ww
wwww b
b ww ww 2413
6fr.
1314
6fr.
2314
8fr.
&

b 13
G7( b 9 ) G7 ( b 9 )
13
w ˙ b ˙˙ ww
D-7(9) Cma j7(9)
ww b ˙˙ ˙˙ ww 1114
sus4
2314
sus4
2314 2314

&w ˙ 10fr. 9fr. 9fr. 8fr.

b 13 #
G7( b 9 ) G7 ( b 9 ) Cm aj7( 11
13
D-7(11
9) 9 )
sus4 sus4
ww ˙˙ b ˙˙˙ # ww 2143 2143 2134 2134

& ww b ˙˙ ˙ ww 7fr. 6fr. 6fr. 5fr.

b 13
D-7(9) G7 ( b 9 ) Cma j7(9)

www b b www
sus4
www
1423 1412 14121
8fr. 8fr. 7fr.
& w w w

29
œ œ bœ œ œ ˙ w
D-7
œ G7
œ Cmaj7
œ
4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
&4
12 11 15
13 13 13 13 12 15
14 14 13 13 12
14 15 15 14 15 15 14

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
#œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ
œ
œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
& œ œ œ œ w

11 12 10 11
13 13
14 12 13 12 15 13 12
15 14 15 15 14 12
14 12 14
15

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ
œ œ œ œ bœ œ
& œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ w
œ œ
8 7 8 8 7 8
10 9
10 9 10 8
10 10 9 9 7
12 11 10 7 10 10
8 7

D-7 œ œ œ G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ
œ œ œ
& bœ œ bœ œ œ œ Œ Ó
œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ
12 10 8
10 8
9 10 10 9 8 4 7 5 4
10 5
11 8 5 7
11 8 4 6 3 7

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œœœ˙
œ bœ œ œ
& œ œ œ
8 12 10 11 8 7 5
10 9 8 8
10 9 12 10 10 8 7 9 9 7
10 9 10 9
11 8 7 10

30
D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ bœ œ bœ
&œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Ó
œ bœ œ
3 5 7 3
5 5 5
5 8 7 6 5 4
7 6 5 3 5
7 8 8 7
8 4 3

D-7
œ œ
Cmaj7 G7
œ œ œ bœ œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ
œ œ bœ œ œœ œœœ
& œœ Œ
15 13 12
13 12 15 14 13 13 13 15 13 12
14 13 13 12 12
15 14 13 15 14 12
14 15 14 12
15

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ Œ b œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ
‰ j œ œ ‰ j œ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œœ
& œ œ œ œœ˙

7 10 8 7
9 7 8 7 7 9 9 7
7 10 6 10 10 8 9 9
7 8 7 8 10 7
10

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ
œ œ b œ œ œœœ Œ
& œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
œ
3 5 2
5 6 5 5 3
2 5 5 4 5 4
2 3 6 3 2 5
3 3 2
3 5 4 3 0 3

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ bœ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ
œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ w
& œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ
7 6 5 6 5 4 7
6 5 6 5 8 5
5 5 5
7 6 5 9
8 8 7
8 7

31
D-7 œ bœ #œ œ œ nœ G7 Cmaj7 w
œ œ bœ œ œ œ # œ œ œ œ
& 44 bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ

10 9 7 8 7 10
11 10 8 7 10 8
10 9 8 10 9 7 9
10 8 10 9
12 11

D-7
œ œ œ bœ œ
Cmaj7
œ œ œ œ G7
œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ œœ œ
œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ ˙
&
12 13 15 11 15 12
13 13 12 15 15 12
12 14 13 12 14 12 14
14 13 14 15 15 13 14 14 12
15

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ w
& œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ bœ bœ œ œ
œ
3 7
6 5 5
7 6 5 4 7
7 5 5 5
8 6 8 6 5 5 7
8 6 4 3

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ b œ œ
œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ
& œ bœ œ bœ nœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Ó

5 8
6 5 8 7 6 5 5 8 7 9 8
5 5
7 6 5 8 7 6 5 9 5
8 7

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ bœ œ bœ œ
œ œ œ bœ œ bœ nœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ
& ‰ Œ Ó

12 11 10 9 8 8 10 10 9 8
10 8 9 11 10 9 11 8 8 12 12 8
10 10 9

32
œ œ bœ œ
œ nœ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ
D-7 G7 Cmaj7
#œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ bœ œ œœœ
& œ˙
15 13 11 14 12
13 15 13 12 15 12
13 14 12 13 14 12 14 12
15 14 12 14 15 12
14 12
15 10

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
#œ œ œ bœ œ œ nœ œ bœ bœ
& œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ b œ œ
Œ
œ œ œ œ
3 2
4 5 6 5 3
5 3 4 2
6 5 3 2 5 3 2 5 5 2 2
6 5 3 2 5 4 3
3

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œœœœ
œ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ nœ bœ œ bœ #œ œ œ œ bœ ˙
& œ œ
bœ œ œ bœ œ œ
5 3
6 5 3
5 4 2 5 3 4 7 6 5
6 7 6 3 7 6 4 5
3 5 4 2 3
4 3

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ
D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ bœ œ #œ
& bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ J
œ
œ œ œ œ.
10 12 10
13 12 13 13 12 11 9 11
12 10 8
10 8 7 9
11 10 10 7 8 10 7 7
8 10 8 3

D-7 G7 Cmaj7
œ œ bœ œ œ nœ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ
& œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ Ó
œ œ ˙
10 9 10 12 11 7
12 12 13 10 9 10
10 7
10 8 9 9
11 10 10 7 10 7
8

33
Chapter 6: Tune In
The final chapter is an etude using all the substitutions. The first five choruses use the
substitutions in the order listed below. The sixth and final chorus combines the substitutions.
| D-7 | G7 | Cmaj7 | Cmaj7 ||
becomes:
| D-7 | F-7 | Cmaj7 | Cmaj7 ||
| D-7 | Af-(maj7) | Cmaj7 | Cmaj7 ||
| D-7 | F-7 & Af-(maj7) | B-7 | B-7 ||
| Fmaj7 | Afmaj7 | Gmaj7 | Gmaj7 ||
| Fmaj7 | F-7 | E-7 | E-7 ||
The etude is based on a well-known jazz tune that works its way through three different keys:
D, C, and Bf. To fit with the keys in the tune, the substitutions are transposed.

34
E-7
œ œ
A7
œ
Dmaj7
œ #œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ bœ
4 œ œœ œ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ œ #œ œ
& 4 œ #œ œ œ
7 12 9 10 9
8 10 8 9 10 12 11
7 9 7 9 7 9 6 7
9 8 10 8 7
7 6 7 10

œ
D-7
œ b œ œ œ b G7
œ œ œ œ œ
Cmaj7 œ œ œ
œ
‰ J œ œ bœ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ
& J
7 8
10 10 9 9 8 8
9 12 11 10 10 10 7 9 7
10 10 9 10 9 10 10
11 10

œ œ œ bœ œ
œ œ œ œ bœ œ
C-7 F7 Bfmaj7 G-7
œ bœ œ b œ œ b œ b œ
&‰ œ bœ œ œ bœ bœ Œ Ó

8 6 8
8 9 7 10 11 8 10
8 8 10 10 8 7 10
10 8 7 8
10 10 9

#œ œ œ œ
E-7 F7
œ bœ
Bfmaj7 E-7 A7
œ œ
#œ œ œ bœ bœ bœ œ #œ
& Œ œ bœ œ Œ Ó œ œ Œ

9 10 7 5
8 7 8 7 8
9 8 7
10 8 6 5 9
9 8 6 5

E-7 œ œ A7 Dmaj7
œ œ œ bœ
&Ó œ œ j œ #œ œ œ Ó
œ
bœ bœ œ œ . œ #œ œ # œ
10 7
8 6
9 6 6 7
7 7 7
8 8 7 5 5 9
9 6 9 9
G7 b œ
D-7
œ œ œ œ b œ bœ œ œ Cmaj7
œ œ œ œ bœ bœ
b œ œ ‰ Jœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ
&
7 8 11 7
10 10 9 9 8
7 7 10 8 7
7 9 9 10 9 7
11 10 10 7 8 10 7

35
C-7 F7 œ bœ Bf œ ˙. G-7
œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ œ nœ œ œ
œ b œ
& bœ œ œ ∑

6 13 9 15 12
8 10 9 7 9 10 10 13
7 8 10
10
6 10

#œ nœ œ bœ œ bœ Bfmaj7
E-7
œ b œ F7
œ œ œ
œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
E-7 A7

& œ b œ œ œ bœ œ Œ Ó

14 13 12 11 10
14 12 11 10 10
10 10 10 12 10
10 10 13 12 13 12
13 12 13 12

œ bœ œ œ #œ œ
E-7 A7 Dmaj7
œ œ œ
œ b œ œ œ bœ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ Œ Ó œ #œ œ œ
& œ
7
10 9 8 7 10
9 10 7 6 10 9 6 7 9 7 6 7 9
9 8 8 7 11 7
10

D-7
bœ bœ bœ
G7 œ
Cmaj7
. œ #œ
œ œ œ œ b œ œ J œ œ œ j
& œ œ œ œ bœ œ #œ. œ ˙
œ
6 7 10 7
10 9 7
10 9 7 8 10 7
7 6 10 9 7
8 7 8 9 10
10 10
bœ œ bœ œ bœ
C-7 œ bœ œ bœ
œ œ bœ bœ œ
F7 Bfmaj7 G-7
œ œ œ œ bœ nœ œœ
œ œ œ œ ‰ œ bœ œ Œ
&
10 11 10 10 11 13 9
14 13 11 10 11 10 10
12 11 10 9 10 8 9 12
12 10 8 12
12 10
12

œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ F7b œ œ œ b œ n œ # œ n œ œ
E-7 Bfmaj7
œ
E-7 A7
&‰ Œ Ó ∑

10 12 8 9 10
9 12 12 11 9 8 10 11 10 8 7

36
E-7
œ
A7 Dmaj7
# œ #œ œ
œ # œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ w
& #œ œ œ œ #œ œ #œ
9
7 8 7 9 10
7 9 10 7 9 9
9 8 7 10 8 7 7 11
9 10 10 11

œ œ œ
D-7 G7
b œ
Cmaj7 œ œ ˙ œ
œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ b œ œ œ # œ
& œ bœ œ œ œ Œ ‰ J

12 10 8 10 7 10
10 11 9 8 7
9 10 10 9 8 10 8 7
10 9
11 10 9

bœ œ bœ
C-7 F7 Bfmaj7
˙ ˙
G-7
œ bœ œ œ
bœ bœ œ nœ œ œ œ
& b œ œ bœ œ œ b œ Ó

11 10 12
11 8 8
8 7 8 6 9 10
8 8 8 9 10
10 9 8 9

E-7 # œ œ œ nœ œ A7 œ b œ œ
œ œ #œ œ œ
F7 Bfmaj7 E-7
œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
œ bœ bœ œ
& œ bœ ‰ œ œ œ ‰

9 10 9 8 7 7 10 9 8
8 5 8 6 7 8 10
10 7 8 10 7 5
10 8 7
9 8 6 7 8

œ
E-7
œ œ œ œ
A7 Dmaj7

& ‰ # Jœ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ nœ
œ #œ œ # œ #œ œ. œ
J #œ œ Œ Ó
7 5
7 8 5 6 7 5
7 7 5 6 7 6
8 7 6 5 9 7 7
9

D-7
œ œ œ œ G7
œ Cmaj7
œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ
& œ Œ Ó

5 8 12 10 5 7 8 7 5 5
5 6 9 6 8 9 6 5 8 8 8 7 8
5 7

37
C-7
œ
bœ œ bœ œ
F7 Bfmaj7 G-7
bœ œ œ
& bœ œ œ œ bœ nœ œ œ œ œ œ . b œJ œ œ Œ Ó
œ œ
10
11 10 9
12 8 7 7 5
10 10 7 8 7 5
9 8 7 6 10 5 5 8
8
E-7 F7 Bfmaj7 E-7 A7
œ # œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ ∑
& œ bœ
bœ bœ w
7
6 7 9 7 6
9 9 10 8 7
9 8 4
6 2 1
E-7
b œ œ n œ œ # œ œ A7œ b œ œ b œ
Dmaj7
#œ œ.
œ #œ œ œ œ œ #˙ œ œ # œ #œ œ bœ œ
& J
7 10 9 7 8 6 9
8 9 11 10 6 8 10 9 8 7 5 9 10 7
7 7 9 8 7

Cmaj7 # œ œ
D-7
b œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
G7
bœ nœ bœ bœ œ œ
œ œ œ œ b œ œ #œ
&‰ œ
œ œ ‰ Œ Œ

9 7 10 14 12
8 9 11 9 10 12 9 10 11 9 8
10 9 7 8 10 11 9
7 10 9

C-7
œ œ œ œ œ b œ œ G-7
F7
œœ Bfmaj7
bœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ
& œ œ œ œ bœ nœ œ œ bœ bœ œ
5 8 7 6 8
6 10 6 8 10 6
8 7 7 7
10 8 7 5 8 8 7 10 8
10 8 7 6 7 8 9 8

E-7 F-7 Bfmaj7 (E-7 A7)


œ bœ w
& #œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ bœ œ œ ∑

10 6 7
9 8 8 10
9 10 9 8 7 10 7 6 8 9

38
About the Author
Guitarist Sheryl Bailey is rated among the
foremost bopbased guitarists to have emerged
in the 1990’s. Her attack can be direct and
hard swinging, but she also exudes subtlety,
elegance of phrase and a pure, warm, liquid
sound. Bill Milkowski has written about her:
“a modernist burner with an abundance of Pat
Martino-style chops, Bailey prefers angular
lines, odd harmonies and the occasional touch
of dissonance as she sails up and down the
fretboard with fluid abandon.”—JazzTimes
Magazine, Februrary 2005
Her musical activities aren’t confined to
groups working strictly in the orthodox, bop
based jazz tradition, as she has toured and
recorded with bassist, Richard Bona and is a
member of David Krakauer’s Klezmer
Madness. Other artists are tenor saxophonist,
Gary Thomas, Urban Folk and Jazz artist, KJ
Denhert, and pop diva, Irene Cara. While her
mid 1990’s CD Little Misunderstood sees her
playing with total familiarity and command of the fusion idiom, her latest releases, Reunion
of Souls, The Power of Three, and Bull’s Eye represent her love of contemporary straight-
ahead jazz.
In 1995 Sheryl was awarded third place in the Thelonious Monk International Jazz Guitar
Competition, and has toured South America on behalf of the US State Department as a Jazz
Ambassador, honoring the music of Duke Ellington. She currently leads her own trio, The
Sheryl Bailey Three (Gary Versace on Hammond B3 and Ian Froman on drums). Her 2002
release, The Power of Three was critically acclaimed and charted in the top 20 of the Jazz
Week radio charts. The trio conjures the essence of the Grant Green / Larry Young / Elvin
Jones band of the late 60’s.
She is also in demand as an educator. Sheryl has been an Assistant Professor of Guitar at the
esteemed Berklee College of Music since 2000, and has been a popular clinician at the
National Guitar Summer workshop, The Stanford Jazz Workshop, The Duquesne Jazz Guitar
Seminar, Uarts in Philadelphia, and at Southern Cross University in Lismore, Australia.
Sheryl’s latest release is titled, Bull’s Eye. The CD features nine new compositions and
tightly woven improvisations from the trio. A track from the disc, “Old and Young Blues” was
featured in the Master Anthology of Jazz Solos, vol. IV (20387BCD) by Mel Bay Publications
Inc. She keeps a hectic itinerary touring, teaching, and recording.

39