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BC4984

Building or renovating
A guide to working with Auckland Council
while building or renovating your home

Find out more: phone 09 301 0101


or visit aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

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If you are planning a building or renovation project for your home, it’s likely you will need to obtain an approved
consent before beginning work. As this process involves a number of legal and regulatory rules, we have produced
this information guide to cover the basics of the resource consent, building consent, and engineering approval
processes, and to give an overview of the building and development rules for a number of common projects.
Depending on the scale of the project and your level of skill and knowledge in these areas, you may be able
to complete some of these steps yourself. However, for most people, and for projects that are more complex,
we strongly recommend engaging a professional (such as a master builder, engineer, planner, surveyor or
architect) for assistance throughout the consenting process.

An overview of this information guide

If you want to know Go to

What is a consent? SECTION 1


How many types of consents are there? Introduction to consents
What is the application process?

What do I need for my project? SECTION 2


What should I consider as part of my Building and renovating projects
project planning?

Would I need a resource consent? SECTION 3


Tell me everything I need to know Obtaining a resource consent

What about a building consent? SECTION 4


Tell me everything I need to know Obtaining a building consent

Do I need an engineering approval? SECTION 5


What is an engineering bond? Obtaining an engineering approval

How much will it cost me? SECTION 6


What are the charges for? Fees and charges

The plans or legislation governing


SECTION 7
development; contact details for
Additional resources
relevant organisations

SECTION 8
Where to find the forms I need
Application materials

DISCLAIMER: Any advice given by Auckland Council in relation to planning or regulatory matters is offered in good faith with every reasonable effort
having been made to ensure that the advice provided is accurate. However, once Auckland Council has comprehensive information on any building or
development proposal, their decision may be amended.
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Contents
Section 1: Introduction to consents 5
1.1 Resource consent..................................................................................................................................................... 6
1.2 Building consent....................................................................................................................................................... 7
1.3 Which consents will I need for my project?.................................................................................................. 7
1.4 An overview of the resource consent process............................................................................................... 8
1.5 An overview of the building consent process................................................................................................ 9
1.6 Where to go for assistance.................................................................................................................................. 10
1.7 Help desk.................................................................................................................................................................... 11

Section 2: Building and renovation projects 13


2.1 What do you want to do?.................................................................................................................................... 14
2.2 Build a new home or home alterations........................................................................................................... 15
2.3 Build a retaining wall.............................................................................................................................................. 17
2.4 Build a garage or carport...................................................................................................................................... 18
2.5 Build a fence or deck.............................................................................................................................................. 19
2.6 Excavating and filling............................................................................................................................................. 20
2.7 Plant, trim, or remove trees ............................................................................................................................... 21
2.8 Install a swimming or spa pool fence............................................................................................................... 22
2.9 Install a satellite dish or aerial............................................................................................................................ 23
2.10 Install drains, septic tanks and/or cesspits..................................................................................................... 24
2.11 Install a water tank................................................................................................................................................. 25
2.12 Install heating, or gas-fitting work.................................................................................................................... 26
2.13 Install a shed, cabin/sleepout or pergola........................................................................................................ 28
2.14 Install a conservatory or enclose a verandah................................................................................................ 29
2.15 Undertake demolition, removal or relocation of a dwelling.................................................................... 30

Section 3: Obtaining a resource consent 31


3.1 Resource consent process..................................................................................................................................... 33
3.2 Responsibilities in the resource consent process......................................................................................... 34
3.3 Pre-application meeting....................................................................................................................................... 35
3.4 Professional consultants....................................................................................................................................... 35
3.5 District, Regional and Unitary plan considerations.................................................................................... 36
3.6 Assessment of environmental effects (AEE).................................................................................................. 37
3.7 Affected persons’ approval................................................................................................................................... 37
3.8 How to apply for a resource consent............................................................................................................... 38
3.9 How to avoid processing delays......................................................................................................................... 38
3.10 Resource consent timeframes............................................................................................................................. 39
3.11 Resource consent fees........................................................................................................................................... 39
3.12 Processing the application.................................................................................................................................... 40
3.13 Duration of resource consent............................................................................................................................... 40
3.14 Resource consent monitoring............................................................................................................................. 40
3.15 Appeals to the Environment Court.................................................................................................................... 40

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Section 4: Obtaining a building consent 41
4.1 Building consent process........................................................................................................................................ 42
4.2 Responsibilities in the building consent process........................................................................................... 43
4.3 Pre-application meeting......................................................................................................................................... 45
4.4 Project Information Memorandum (PIM)........................................................................................................ 46
4.5 Preparing your application.....................................................................................................................................46
4.6 How to reduce your building consent processing fees............................................................................... 47
4.7 How to apply for a building consent................................................................................................................. 48
4.8 Duration of building consent................................................................................................................................ 48
4.9 Building inspections and compliance.................................................................................................................49
4.10 Code Compliance Certificate (CCC).................................................................................................................. 50

Section 5: Obtaining an engineering approval 51


5.1 Engineering approval............................................................................................................................................... 52
5.2 Engineering approval for right of way, shared driveway or common access way............................ 53
5.3 Engineering Local Government Act (LGA).......................................................................................................53
5.4 Engineering bonds.....................................................................................................................................................53
5.5 Codes of practice...................................................................................................................................................... 53

Section 6: Fees and charges 55


6.1 Fees and charges....................................................................................................................................................... 56
6.2 Development contributions fees......................................................................................................................... 57

Section 7: Additional resources 59


7.1 Relevant legislation or regulations..................................................................................................................... 60
7.2 Further contact details............................................................................................................................................60
7.3 Glossary........................................................................................................................................................................ 61

Section 8: Application Links 62

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Section 1:
Introduction to consents

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Why do you need a consent to do some building or development on your property?
Auckland Council is committed to ensuring Auckland is built in the best possible way, with sustainable
development that achieves good environmental outcomes. It requires consents from people planning building or
development activities to ensure these happen in a safe and regulated manner. Building consents are required for
construction activities to ensure buildings are safe, healthy and built right the first time, and resource consents are
needed for many development activities that affect the environment, such as moving earth, discharging into rivers
and streams, building in heritage character areas, and so on.
The council is bound by legislation and regulations to administer and monitor building and resource consents.
The laws they implement are the NZ Building Act 2004, the Resource Management Act (1991), and the Local
Government Act. The regulations they follow are the NZ Building Code, NZ Building Act 2004, the legacy District
and Regional Plans which are still in effect, and the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan (PAUP).
Before you undertake any development or building work on a residential property, you will need to find out what
consents are required and obtain the required consents before work commences. Please contact our Building or
Planning Helpdesk on 09 301 0101 to find out if your proposed work will require a consent.
There are District Plans for different areas within the Auckland region. Depending where you live, different
regulations will apply for building and development activities. The PAUP has been publicly notified, which will
provide one source for regulations across the whole region. We are now in a transition period where there are some
specified rules in the proposed Unitary Plan which are in effect, but the majority of issues are still regulated by
provisions in the legacy district and regional plans. Please contact us on 09 301 0101 or refer to your local service
centre to find out about your specific district plan and PAUP requirements (contact details can be found on
page 10).

1.1 Resource consent


A resource consent is a written approval from Auckland Council allowing you to use, subdivide or modify your
land in a way that contravenes a rule in the relevant plans. These rules are designed to manage the effects of
development on the city, by protecting the environment and other aspects of the area. If your activity is permitted
under the relevant plan rules, you may proceed with your work. Otherwise, you will need a resource consent before
you begin the work. Resource consents must also comply with the Resource Management Act, which is designed to
ensure environmental considerations are included in development decisions.

You may require a resource consent if your project has the potential to have actual adverse effects on the
environment (“the environment” can include air, water, vegetation, soil stability, neighbours, or the character of
an area), e.g. a resource consent may be required if your project involves building a retaining wall, fence or deck,
or involves building in a heritage zone, a coastal zone, diverting water courses, and in many other cases.
Please contact our planning helpdesk on 09 301 0101 to find out if your proposed work will require a
resource consent.

Find out more: Refer to Resource consent fees in section 3.11 and section 6 for more information on the Fees and
charges process.

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1.2 Building consent
A building consent is a written approval from Auckland Council for you to carry out specific building works on
a specific site which, when constructed, are compliant with the NZ Building Act 2004 and the New Zealand Building
Code. Before we issue a building consent, we check to ensure the proposed works will be structurally sound, that
there is sanitary plumbing and drainage, and the minimum fire and other safety standards will be met.
Most building work does require a building consent in order to comply with current regulations. For example, if
you plan to make structural changes, alterations or additions to your building, you will require a building consent.
If your project involves building a fence, deck, garage, retaining wall, or swimming pool, you may also require a
resource consent.
However, not all building work requires a building consent. Basic projects such as laying a patio or installing kitchen
cupboards do not require one. Please refer to section 4 to find out more about the building consent process.

Find out more: For examples which do not require a building consent, please visit the Ministry of Business, Innovation
and Environment website (MBIE - formerly the Department of Building and Housing) and refer to
schedule 1: dbh.govt.nz/bc-no-consent

1.3 Which consents will I need for my project?


The number and type of consents you need will depend on the project you are planning and in many cases you
may need to apply for both resource and building consents. Section 2 of this guide will take you through the
consent process for some common projects.

Top Tip: If you need both building and resource consents, it’s important that both plans match and show the same
development. For this reason we recommend you apply for resource consent first, as this process can be more
complex and may result in alterations to your initial design. By obtaining resource consent first, any required changes
to the building consent can be incorporated before you put in your building consent application, potentially saving
extra money and time.

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1.4 An overview of the resource consent process

Resource consent process

Contact council and/or consultant

Prepare application materials

Lodge application for resource consent

Council decides whether application is


to be non-notified, publicly notified or
notified only to affected parties

Notified Non-notified

Council receives submission Council makes decision


and may hold a hearing, then on consent and includes
makes a decision on consent any conditions
and includes any conditions

Upon decision, a 15-day appeal period follows.


You may object to council over costs or
conditions, or appeal to the Environmental Court

*Note that processing time depends on the quality and completeness of information and documents that have been submitted by the
applicant. If the council requests additional information, the application is put on hold until the requested information has been received.

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1.5 An overview of the building consent process

Building consent process

Pre-lodgement meeting
– special criteria applies

APPLICATION Lodge your consent application


STAGE

*Provide information
required within NO Is the application complete?
48 hours or
application returned
YES

Application accepted by council

Application processing commences

*Provide additional
information YES Additional information required? 20 working days
required within
20 working days
NO
PROCESSING
STAGE Processing is completed

Building consent is issued

Building construction; organise inspections

INSPECTION
STAGE
Address issues raised FAIL
and repeat final
Final inspection undertaken
inspection
PASS

Apply for code compliance certificate

FINAL STAGE
Provide required
documentation NO All documentation supplied 20 working days

YES

Code compliance certificate is issued

PROJECT FINISHED

*Note If the council requests additional information, the application is put on hold until the requested information has been received.

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1.6 Where to go for assistance
We are here to help. If you need any information or assistance, please contact us on 09 301 0101 or visiting any
of the service area locations listed below. The table below shows the general hours of business for the different
service centres.

Office locations and contact details:


Location Address Service centre Planning helpdesk Building helpdesk
Open hours Open hours Open hours
*Orewa 50 Centreway Rd Monday to Friday Monday to Friday Monday to Friday
Orewa 0949 8am to 5pm 8am to 5pm 8am to 5pm
*Takapuna 1 The Strand Monday to Friday Monday to Friday Monday to Friday
Takapuna 0740 8am to 5pm 8am to 5pm 8am to 5pm
*Auckland 35 Graham St Monday to Friday Monday to Friday Monday to Friday
Central Auckland Central 8am to 5pm 8am to 5pm 8am to 5pm
*Henderson 6 Henderson Valley Rd Monday to Friday Monday to Friday Monday to Friday
Henderson 0612 8am to 5pm 8am to 5pm 8am to 5pm
Helensville 40 Commercial Rd Monday to Friday Monday to Friday
Helensville 8am to 4pm 9am to 4pm
(closed 12pm to 1pm) (closed 12pm to 1pm)
Huapai 296 Main Rd (SH16) Monday to Friday
Huapai 8am to 4.30pm
*Manukau Ground Floor Monday, Tuesday, Monday, Tuesday, Monday, Tuesday,
Kotuku House Thursday and Friday Thursday and Friday Thursday and Friday
4 Osterley Way 8.30am to 5pm 8.30am to 4.45pm 8.30am to 5pm
Manukau City 2104 Wednesday Wednesday Wednesday
8.30am to 4pm 8.30am to 3.45pm 8.30am to 4pm
*Papakura 35 Coles Crescent Monday to Friday Monday to Friday Monday to Friday
Papakura 8am to 5pm 10am to 2pm 8am to 5pm
*Pukekohe 82 Manukau Rd Monday to Friday Monday to Friday Monday to Friday
Pukekohe 8am to 5pm 10am to 2pm 8am to 5pm
Waiuku King St, Waiuku Monday to Friday
9am to 1pm
(On the first and third
Thursday of every
month the hours are
10.30am to 2pm)
*Waiheke 10 Belgium St Monday to Friday Monday to Thursday Monday to Friday
Island Ostend 8.30am to 5pm 8.30am to 4pm 8am to 5pm

Great Barrier Hector Sanderson Rd Monday to Friday


Island Claris 8am to 5pm

*Auckland Council offers a drop-in service for people to speak with planning or building staff about their projects in most service centres
(those asterisked above). You can also make appointments to guarantee availability and minimise waiting times. Please note that, as shown
above, some service centres have shorter hours when planning staff are available to help.

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1.7 Helpdesks
Planning/Resource consents/Engineering
Contact our planning helpdesk on 09 301 0101 to find out if your proposed work will require a resource consent.
Our call centre will transfer your call to the appropriate office to take your enquiry.
Auckland Council Call Centre: 09 301 0101.
If the planning helpdesk staff you are referred to are busy, you can leave a message for them and they will return
your call, usually within a few hours.

Building Helpdesk
For information about general building issues, please contact a building helpdesk.
Auckland region: 09 353 9358.
For all processing-related enquiries about building consents, please contact the Auckland Council call centre on
09 301 0101 to be transferred to the relevant area office.
Manukau area
The lodgement, processing and inspection of building consents in the Manukau area is undertaken by one of three
consultant firms contracted to Auckland Council. These consultants do not take general building enquiries
about potential building projects. For general building enquiries, please contact the Building helpdesk
on 09 353 9358.

For enquiries related to lodged building consents in Manukau, please contact the relevant consultant who is
processing your application:
Compass Building Consultants
2 Bishop Dunn Place, Flat Bush,
Auckland 2013
09 272 2296
Manukau Building Consultants
Level 1, Botany Junction, 277 Te Irirangi Drive, Flat Bush, Auckland
09 272 7890
Professional Building Consultants
Level 1, 83 Springs Road, East Tamaki, Auckland 2013
09 272 3443

Find out more: While this brochure aims to provide you with the basic information necessary to understand the
consenting process, more detailed information on some topics can be found on the Auckland Council website, the
Ministry for the Environment website, and the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment website (which
includes information from the former Department of Building and Housing). See section 7: Additional Resources.

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Section 2:
Building and
renovation projects

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2.1 What do you want to do?
There are a number of improvements you can make to your home, and the required consents can vary
depending on your project. Use this page to help guide you through the consent process for your specific
project. If your project is not listed here, please contact council or speak to a professional consultant.

Project Type Page Image

Build a new home/granny flat/minor 15


dwelling/extension/multiple units/home
alterations

Build a retaining wall 17

Build a garage or carport 18

Build a fence or deck 19

Excavating and filling 20

Plant, trim, or remove trees 21

Install a swimming or spa pool fence 22

Install a satellite dish or aerial 23

Install drains, septic tanks and/or cesspits 24

Install a water tank 25

Install heating, or gas fitting work 26

Install a shed, cabin or sleepout 28

Install a conservatory or enclose a 29


verandah

Undertake demolition, removal or 30


relocation of a dwelling

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2.2 Build a new home or home alterations
Building a new home/minor dwelling
To build a new home or minor dwelling/granny flat, you will definitely need a building consent and you may also
need a resource consent, depending on your proposal and the zoning of your property. It is important to speak to
the relevant council staff for advice and help, and to get details right at the early planning stages. You will also
need to get professional assistance from a consultant.
When building a new home, your proposal must comply with all development and performance standards in the
New Zealand Building Code and all works on site must be in accordance with the approved building consent, plans
and specifications. If you do wish to deviate from the approved plans, you will need to apply for an amendment to
the approved building consent, before undertaking the alteration. Contact the appropriate service centre as listed
on page 10 for more information.

Alterations/extensions to an existing home


Most alterations will require a building consent, including, but not limited to, the following:
• extra storey
• conservatory exceeding 5m2
• extra room or building extension
• fence over 2.5 metres high
• garage
• deck 1.5 metres high or greater
• addition of ensuite/bathroom
• swimming pool or spa pool
• alterations involving a load-bearing wall
• installation of a solid fuel heater
• change of use of room e.g. from a garage to a sleep-out.

You may need a resource consent as well for some of these additions and alterations. Generally, you will not
require a resource consent to restore, repair, or alter the interior of your home, unless the interior of your
home is protected under the relevant District Plan or the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan (most commonly for
historic character homes). To find out if your home is protected, or for more information, please contact us
on 09 301 0101.

Note: If you have a Unit Title or Cross-Lease property, when the additions are completed your unit or cross lease plan
will be different from its description on your certificate of title or lease. In this situation, you will need a subdivision
consent and a legal process to update your certificate of title when it is completed. Please contact your surveyor and
your lawyer for more information.

If your proposal entails building over, or close to, a public drain, you may be required to obtain an engineering approval
to replace or divert the drain, or to obtain approval from Watercare Services Limited, or Veolia Water in Papakura.

A useful document to refer to for stormwater issues is the Stormwater Code of Practice (http://aucklanddesignmanual.
co.nz/design-thinking/InfrastructureCOP ) on the council website, search keywords stormwater, permeable.

See guides on regulations and consents on next page.

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Guide
Regulations Refer to

Building Act 2004 dbh.govt.nz/blc-building-act

New Zealand Building Code dbh.govt.nz/the-building-code

District Plan and Proposed Auckland Go to: aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/districtregionalplans and click on the relevant
Unitary Plan (PAUP) District Plan and the PAUP

Engineering Standards Guidance can be accessed at: aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/engineeringapplications


–Note these vary across the region

Consent that may be required Refer to

Resource consent Section 3 of this guide

Building consent Section 4 of this guide

Subdivision consent Refer to Planning Helpdesk – call 09 301 0101

Engineering approval Section 5 of this guide; and aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/engineeringapplications

Vehicle Crossing Permit at.govt.nz/about-us/working-on-the-road/vehicle-crossing-application/


–Auckland Transport

NEXT STEPS:
1. Read sections 3 and 4 of this guide.
2. Engage a professional consultant for advice and/or assistance.
3. Contact council to see if a pre-application meeting will be useful for you (charges apply).

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2.3 Build a retaining wall
Retaining walls can provide essential support to both your property and that of your neighbours. You must ensure
you obtain the necessary consents and the retaining wall construction is in accordance with the New Zealand Building
Code. You also need to know the requirements of the District Plans, as these vary across different zones in the region.
Retaining walls of a greater height than their distance to the boundary must be designed to carry a weight of
12 kilopascals (this is a unit used to measure pressure; speak to a professional consultant for more information).
To prevent negative effects on neighbouring properties, install your retaining wall immediately after any excavation
has occurred.
If you are carrying out earthworks, excavations or building a retaining wall on your site, you need to be aware of the
consents that must be obtained from us before any work is started.
When building a retaining wall you should also:
• clearly define property boundaries before beginning construction, to prevent incorrect positioning of
retaining walls
• clearly identify and specify the retaining wall when you apply for a building consent
• install it in accordance with the New Zealand Building Code
• install it as soon as excavations are completed and before you begin further construction
• be prepared to provide a design or construction certificate from a chartered professional engineer.

Note: If your proposal involves building over, or close to, a public drain, you may be required to obtain an engineering
approval to replace or divert the drain (see section 5).

Conditions Building consent Resource consent


Wall over 1.5 metres high Yes Depends on the zone: please call 09 301 0101
Wall height is greater than its Maybe Depends on the zone: call 09 3010101
distance to boundary Contact our building helpdesk on
09 353 9358 for assistance
Wall carries load surcharge Yes Depends on the zone: call 09 301 0101

Guide
Regulations Refer to

Building Act 2004 dbh.govt.nz/blc-building-act

New Zealand Building Code dbh.govt.nz/the-building-code


District Plan and Proposed Auckland Go to: aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/districtregionalplans and click on the relevant
Unitary Plan (PAUP) District Plan and the PAUP
Engineering Standards aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/engineeringapplications
– Note that these vary across the region

Consent that may be required Refer to


Resource consent Section 3 of this guide
Building consent Section 4 of this guide
Engineering approval Section 5 of this guide; and aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/engineeringapplications

NEXT STEPS:
1. Read sections 3 and 4 of this guide.
2. Engage a professional consultant for advice and/or assistance.

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2.4 Build a garage or carport
Garages and carports over two metres high are classed as accessory buildings. Accessory buildings are separate from
the main dwelling and used for a different purpose. As the New Zealand Building Code, District Plans and the PAUP
apply to accessory buildings, you will require a building consent and/or resource consent for your project.
Under the Building Act 2004, Schedule 1, certain structures are exempt from requiring a building consent. You will
need to refer to the Building Act 2004 or contact council to see if this is applicable to your garage or carport. Refer
to the publication “A guide to building work that does not require a building consent” on the MBIE website:
dbh.govt.nz/bc-no-consent.

Note: If your proposal involves building over, or close to, a public drain, you may be required to obtain an engineering
approval to replace or divert the drain. See guide below.

Guide
Regulations Refer to

Building Act 2004 dbh.govt.nz/blc-building-act

New Zealand Building Code dbh.govt.nz/the-building-code


District Plan and Proposed Auckland Go to: aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/districtregionalplans and click on the relevant
Unitary Plan (PAUP) District Plan and the PAUP
Engineering Standards aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/engineeringapplications
– Note that these vary across the region

Consent that may be required Refer to


Resource consent Section 3 of this guide
Building consent Section 4 of this guide
Vehicle crossing permit at.govt.nz/about-us/working-on-the-road/vehicle-crossing-application/
(Auckland Transport)
Engineering approval Section 5 of this guide; and aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/engineeringapplications

NEXT STEPS:
1. Read section 3 and 4 of this guide.
2. Engage a professional consultant for advice and/or assistance.

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2.5 Build a fence or deck
Any boundary fence greater than 2.5 metres in height above natural ground level requires a building consent.
Depending on the zone, some fences over 1.2m in height may require a resource consent.

Note:
A resource consent is required for certain fences less than two metres in height that are located within the front yard
of properties in certain residential zones, such as those with historic character streetscapes. To check if your property is
located in one of these zones, please contact us on 09 301 0101.

Building a fence
A building consent is not required for a fence that is lower than 2.5 metres.
If you wish to build a fence on the boundary of an adjoining property, then you will need your neighbour’s approval.
It’s best to achieve this through friendly discussion and mutual agreement. However, if you cannot reach an
agreement on the proposed fence with your neighbour(s), you can follow the formal procedure below:
• first, serve a Fencing Notice to them, setting out the boundary, the type of fence you wish to erect, the cost
and the consequences of not complying with the notice
• you must allow your neighbour 21 days to object to your proposal or provide a counter-proposal, via a
Cross Notice
• if you receive no Cross Notice, you can assume your neighbour has accepted your proposal. If you can’t agree,
you will have to settle the matter in Court. A useful source of information is this pamphlet on fences and
neighbours which can be found on our website, search fences and neighbours.
Building a deck
When it comes to building a deck, the consents required will depend on how high the deck is and how close it is to
the boundary.
A deck that has a finished level of 1.5 metres or more in height above ground level will require a building consent.
You also need to be aware that if fixed ‘bench seating’ is proposed around the perimeter of the deck, this will increase
the finished level of the deck. The height will then be measured to the top of the ‘bench seating’. For a deck that has a
finished level less than 1.5 metres above ground level, you will not require a building consent, but its construction
will still need to comply with the New Zealand Building Code. For decks where the fall (if someone were to fall) is
greater than 1 metre, the New Zealand Building Code requires a barrier to be in place.

Note: You may also require a resource consent for your proposed deck. Please check by calling us on 09 301 0101.

Guide
Regulations Refer to
Building Act 2004 dbh.govt.nz/blc-building-act
New Zealand Building Code dbh.govt.nz/the-building-code
District Plan and Proposed Auckland Go to: aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/districtregionalplans and click on the relevant
Unitary Plan (PAUP) District Plan and the PAUP
Fencing Act 1978 Go to legislation.govt.nz

Consent that may be required Refer to


Resource consent Section 3 of this guide
Building consent Section 4 of this guide

NEXT STEPS:
1. Read sections 3 and 4 of this guide.
2. Engage a professional consultant for advice and/or assistance.

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2.6 Excavating and filling
Excavating near a boundary
Excavations near a boundary may destabilise land and alter the flow path of water, potentially causing the collapse
of fences, retaining walls, driveways, trees and buildings on neighbouring properties. As a property owner, you have
a legal obligation to maintain support for neighbouring properties so that if excavation is undertaken, either a stable
slope is left or a retaining wall is built.
If you are planning excavations near the boundary, you may be required to submit the following:
• documentation showing the measures to be taken to protect neighbours’ properties and existing building(s) on any
site from the excavation
• a programme for excavation and underpinning, which must be clearly laid out in the plans so that property stability
is ensured during the work
• evidence the applicant has notified the adjoining owner/s of the proposed works.
To find out the specific conditions for when you need to submit this additional information, please contact us
on 09 301 0101.

Large excavation projects


Depending on the zoning of your property and the size of the project, you may require a resource consent for
undertaking earthworks.
Before doing earthwork, you should first check with us to see which District Plan and Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan
rules apply to your property. Phone 09 301 0101 for assistance.

Guide
Regulations Refer to

District Plan and Proposed Auckland Go to aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/districtregionalplans and click on the relevant District
Unitary Plan (PAUP) Plan and PAUP
Bylaws Go to: aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/bylaws
Consents that may be required Refer to
Resource Consent Section 3 of this guide

NEXT STEPS:
1. Read section 3 of this guide.
2. Engage a professional consultant for advice and/or assistance.

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2.7 Plant, trim, or remove trees
You have the right to plant and grow trees on your property. However, problems can arise when trees grow, extend
over boundaries, block drains and views, or even create hazards. If a problem is caused by a neighbour’s tree, or your
tree causes problems for them, the first and best course of action is to discuss any problems with your neighbour(s) to
try to solve the issue amicably.
Some general tips when dealing with trees:
• If any branches or roots from trees on your property cross a boundary, they are considered to be trespassing and
your neighbour has the right to be able to cut or trim them. However, they may still need resource consent to
do so.
• If your tree’s roots block a neighbour’s drains, it is considered a nuisance and we recommend working out a solution
together. As a last resort, your neighbour can apply for a court order to have the drain unblocked.
• If a tree on your property endangers life or property, obstructs views a neighbour would otherwise enjoy or
diminishes their property, they can apply to the courts to have you trim or remove it.
• For trees on Auckland streets or reserves, different rules may apply – please contact us for further advice
and information.
When it comes to trimming or removing trees, it is important to know council protects certain native and exotic
trees through rules in the District Plans (for further details about trees on your property, contact us). You are allowed
to carry out very minor pruning or trimming of protected trees using only hand-operated tools (not a chainsaw),
as long as you do not significantly alter the height or shape of the tree. All other work affecting protected trees,
including earthworks beneath the tree, or any work that may destroy it or cause irreparable damage to it, requires a
resource consent. Failure to obtain a consent may result in a fine.

Guide
Regulations Refer to

District Plan and Proposed Auckland Go to aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/districtregionalplans and click on the relevant
Unitary Plan (PAUP) District Plan and PAUP
Consents that may be required Refer to

Resource Consent Section 3 of this guide

NEXT STEPS:
1. Read section 3 of this guide.
2. Engage a professional consultant for advice and/or assistance.

21
2.8 Install a swimming or spa pool fence
Swimming pools of all types pose a risk to the well-being of children in your neighbourhood. Under the Fencing of
Swimming Pools Act 1987, the Building Act 2004 and the council bylaws, all swimming pools must be fenced. If
you plan on installing a pool, you must apply for, and be granted, a building consent to do so. Your building consent
application must accurately indicate the pool fence location. To gain a Code Compliance Certificate, a pool fence must
be installed. We regularly inspect all pools in the Auckland region to ensure compliance.

The pool fence and/or gate must:


• isolate the immediate pool area from any unrelated parts of your property such as a vegetable garden, clothesline,
sandpit, swing or slide
• be a minimum of 1.2 metres high, non-climbable, and have gates that open outwards and close automatically
• be fitted with a self-latching device
• be made of durable materials and parts constructed so as to prevent any child under six years of age from climbing
over or crawling under the fence from outside the pool

• have a clearance between the ground and the bottom of the fence not exceeding 100mm.
We recommend you read the following document on our website, to answer any questions you have
about swimming/spa pool fencing:
1. Swimming Pool Fencing Code of Practice:
aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/poolsandspas

You may also require a resource consent for your proposed swimming pool.

Note: If your proposal details building over or close to a public drain, you may be required to obtain an engineering
approval to replace or divert the drain.

Guide
Regulations Refer to
Building Act 2004 dbh.govt.nz/blc-building-act
New Zealand Building Code dbh.govt.nz/the-building-code
District Plan and Proposed Auckland Unitary Go to aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/districtregionalplans and click on the relevant
Plan (PAUP) District Plan and the PAUP
Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987 Go to legislation.govt.nz
Engineering Standards Reference to be made under the relevant legacy standards. Guidance can be
– Note that these vary across the region. accessed at: aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/engineeringapplications

Consent that may be required Refer to


Resource consent Section 3 of this guide
Building consent Section 4 of this guide
Engineering approval Section 5 of this guide; and aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/engineeringapplications

NEXT STEPS:
1. Read sections 3 and 4 of this guide.
2. Engage a professional consultant for advice and/or assistance.
22
2.9 Install a satellite dish or aerial
Every satellite and/or telecommunication dish more than two metres wide and located on a building requires a
building consent. Most standard satellite dishes are smaller than this and do not require a consent. If you intend to
install a free-standing satellite dish, you will also need a building consent for the support structure (i.e. the pole) that
the dish is attached to. Installation must meet the requirements of the Building Act 2004 and the New Zealand
Building Code.
Satellite dishes must also comply with the rules in the District Plans and the PAUP relating to yards, height,
and height-in-relation-to-boundary.

Guide
Regulations Refer to
Building Act 2004 dbh.govt.nz/blc-building-act

New Zealand Building Code dbh.govt.nz/the-building-code

District Plan and Proposed Auckland Go to aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/districtregionalplans and click on the relevant
Unitary Plan (PAUP) District Plan and the PAUP

Consents that may be required Refer to


Resource consent Section 3 of this guide

Building consent Section 4 of this guide

NEXT STEPS:
1. Read sections 3 and 4 of this guide.
2. Engage a professional consultant for advice and/or assistance.

23
2.10 Install drains, septic tanks and/or cesspits
Installing Drains
Because drainage is a critical part of the city’s infrastructure, controls are placed on what you may want to do. In
most cases, Auckland Council holds the “as built” drainage plans (showing what has been constructed) drawn by the
drainlayer at the time of installation, as well as details of the approximate location of public sewers that cross your
boundaries. Considerations when undertaking drainage work:
• Before you undertake any drainage work, get a copy of the current “as built” drainage plans from us.
• If you wish to move drains or install new ones, you will need a building consent, and possibly a resource consent.
• Separate drainage systems need to be installed for collecting wastewater and stormwater.
• All work on your wastewater pipes or stormwater drains must be undertaken by a registered drainlayer.
• Surface flooding must not overflow into the wastewater system at a gully trap (a junction of drainage pipes).
• Maintain your private wastewater pipes to minimise see page into, or out of, the public sewer.
• Do not build over, or conceal, any access manholes or connections for public drainage systems on your property.
• Do not discharge any paints, thinners, oil, corrosive chemicals, concentrated fats or other harmful material into
the wastewater or stormwater systems [for more information on what to do with such materials, please go to
our website, key word pollution].
• If you suspect that a public sewer is leaking on your property, contact council immediately. If it is a private
sewer, contact a registered plumber.
Installing Septic Tanks and Cesspits
Septic tanks can be installed only in areas where a wastewater connection is unavailable. You will need a building
consent to install or move a septic tank, and may also require a resource consent.
Cesspits are connected to the stormwater drainage system. They are for intercepting silt and debris to prevent it
entering drains and should not be used to dispose of paint, oil or any other contaminant.

Note: Depending on the location of your property, different rules on drainage and septic tanks may apply. Please contact
our call centre on 09 301 0101 and ask to be directed to your local service centre for queries about your property.
If your proposal includes building over, or close to, a public drain, you may be required to obtain an engineering approval
to replace or divert the drain and an approval from Watercare Services Ltd where a public wastewater pipe is involved.
You will be required to obtain your neighbour’s consent for laying or connecting drainage through or into your
neighbour’s property (under section 461 of the Local Government Act 1974). See our website for a Neighbour’s Consent
form. Works on public drainage systems require engineering approval and may require input from Watercare Services
Limited, or Veolia Water in Papakura. Watercare Services Limited telephone number is: 09 442 2222. Veolia Water’s
telephone number is: 09 295 0515.

Guide
Regulations Refer to
Building Act 2004 dbh.govt.nz/blc-building-act
New Zealand Building Code dbh.govt.nz/the-building-code
Engineering Standards Reference to be made to the relevant legacy standards.
– Note that these vary across the region. aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/engineeringapplications
Consents that may be required Refer to
Resource consent Section 3 of this guide
Building consent Section 4 of this guide
Engineering approval Section 5 of this guide; and aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/engineeringapplications

NEXT STEPS:
1. Read sections 3 and 4 of this guide.
2. Engage a professional consultant for advice and/or assistance.
24
2.11 Install a water tank
You have the right to collect and store rainwater for your own use. If the water is to be used for drinking, it must
reach a drinking water standard (i.e. filtered and/or treated). Your tank supply must be completely separated from the
public water supply and an approved back-flow prevention device must be installed. Overflow shall be connected to an
appropriate outfall.
When installing a water tank for drinking water supply, it is important that you take into consideration council
requirements around gutter guards, debris protection, disinfection, water filters, drinking water standards and
ongoing maintenance.
Please contact an Environmental Health Officer on 09 301 01 01 to find out about these requirements.
Depending on the location of your property, different rules may apply. Please contact our call centre on 09 301 0101
and ask to be directed to your local service centre.

Note: In certain circumstances, you may require a resource consent and/or a building consent for the installation of
your water tank. Please contact us for further assistance.

If your proposal involves building over, or close to, a public drain, you may be required to obtain an engineering
consent to replace or divert the drain.

Guide
Regulations Refer to
Building Act 2004 dbh.govt.nz/blc-building-act
New Zealand Building Code dbh.govt.nz/the-building-code
District Plan and Proposed Auckland Go to aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/districtregionalplans and click on the relevant District
Unitary Plan (PAUP) Plan and the PAUP
Engineering Standards Reference to be made under the relevant legacy standards. Guidance can be accessed
–Note that these vary across at: aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/engineeringapplications
the region.
Consents that may be required Refer to
Resource consent Section 3 of this guide
Building consent Section 4 of this guide
Engineering approval Section 5 of this guide; and aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/engineeringapplications

NEXT STEPS:
1. Read sections 3 and 4 of this guide.
2. Engage a professional consultant for advice and/or assistance.

25
2.12 Install heating, or gas-fitting work
A building consent is required when installing some new heating appliances, such as:
• a solid fuel heater
• wood or coal burning range, or
• a domestic ‘chip’ heater, or
• solar water heaters.

A building consent is also required if you are replacing or repairing an existing heating appliance. You do not require a
building consent for installation of a non-ventilating gas or electric heater.

Notes: A resource consent may be required for solar water heater applications, particularly those installed on roofs,
and in character and heritage areas.

Installing a solar water heating system


All solar water heating systems must be installed by a qualified plumber who should have specialist training in solar
water heating. The installer will also make sure that the system does not compromise the waterproofing of the roof.
You may need a builder to strengthen the roof for a roof-mounted cylinder. A 300 litre system holds 300kg of water,
plus the weight of the empty cylinder and panels. You may also need an electrician to connect an electric booster
system and timer; alternatively, your installer may be able to do this.
Remember that to get the most from a solar water heating system, it will need to be properly designed and installed.
You’ll also need to maintain the system properly and use it efficiently. You’ll get more out of your system if you make
sure you’re using water that’s been heated by the sun and not by your booster system. In some locations within the
region, a resource consent may be required for putting solar panels on the exterior of a building in specific zones.
Please check with us first.
Your building consent may be a part of a larger building or renovation project. Before you apply for the building
consent you need to consider these points:
• the panels have to be firmly fixed so they don’t blow away in strong winds
• the panels shouldn’t block your neighbour’s view or sunlight
• the roof must be able to support the weight of the solar panels and possibly also the cylinder.

Top tip: If you are installing a photovoltaic (PV) panel type system, this particular type does not require a building
consent; however, if the panels also form the roof cladding, then a building consent will be required. All other types
of solar water heater systems will require a building consent.

26
Installing solid fuel heaters
A building consent is required for the installation of a solid fuel heater. The main reasons for this are the penetrations
through the roof for the flue-pipe or chimney which can affect weather-tightness, and the location of the unit against
wall linings which could potentially be a fire hazard.

Under guidelines from the Ministry for the Environment (MfE), specific heater models must meet efficiency ratings,
and emission rates. The MfE website has a list of acceptable models that meet these requirements at:
mfe.govt.nz/laws/standards/woodburners/authorised-woodburners.html
Refer also to a brochure titled “Enjoy the heat, not the smoke!” on our website at:
aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/airquality
Installing other types of burners/heaters

These include:
• coal and wood burners
• chip heaters
• pellet burners
• multi-fuel burners.
To find our which types of woodburners/heaters require a building consent prior to installation, please check our
website: aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/EN/ratesbuildingproperty/consents/heatinginsulation/Pages/solidfuelheating.aspx

Guide
Regulations Refer to

Building Act 2004 dbh.govt.nz/blc-building-act

New Zealand Building Code dbh.govt.nz/the-building-code

Ministry for the Environment mfe.govt.nz/laws/standards/woodburners/authorised-woodburners.html

District Plan and Proposed Auckland Go to aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/districtregionalplans


Unitary Plan (PAUP) and click on the relevant District Plan and the PAUP
Consents that may be required Refer to

Resource Consent Section 3 of this guide

Building Consent Section 4 of this guide

NEXT STEPS:
1. Read section 3 and 4 of this guide.
2. Engage a professional consultant for advice and/or assistance.

27
2.13 Install a shed, cabin or sleepout
A building consent is not required for the installation of a garden shed, cabin or sleep-out, as long as
• the maximum size is less than 10 square metres
• the building is more than its height away from all boundaries and associated dwelling(s), and
• it does not contain cooking or sanitary facilities or a potable (drinkable) water supply.

The District Plans and the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan rules apply to sheds/sleepouts, and pergolas (accessory
buildings), and you may require a resource consent for your project.

Top tip: Remember: the floor area of an accessory building is included in any calculations of maximum permitted
building coverage under the planning rules.

Guide
Regulations Refer to

Building Act 2004 dbh.govt.nz/blc-building-act

New Zealand Building Code dbh.govt.nz/the-building-code

District Plan and Proposed Auckland Go to aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/districtregionalplans


Unitary Plan (PAUP) and click on the relevant District Plan and the PAUP
Consents that may be required Refer to
Resource consent Section 3 of this guide

Building consent Section 4 of this guide

NEXT STEPS:
1. Read section 3 and 4 of this guide.
2. Engage a professional consultant for advice and/or assistance.

28
2.14 Install a conservatory or enclose a verandah
A building consent is not required for the installation of a conservatory or enclosure of a verandah, providing the
floor area does not exceed 5 square metres. Please note that a resource consent may be required, depending upon
the position of the conservatory. If it is located close to a boundary, it may contravene the ‘height-in-relation-to-
boundary’ rules, or the maximum site coverage may be exceeded. Contact the planning helpdesk on 09 3010101
for more information. See page 11 for details.

Guide
Regulations Refer to

Building Act 2004 dbh.govt.nz/blc-building-act


New Zealand Building Code dbh.govt.nz/the-building-code
District Plan and Proposed Auckland Go to aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/districtregionalplans
Unitary Plan (PAUP) and click on the relevant District Plan and the PAUP
Consents that may be required Refer to
Resource consent Section 3 of this guide
Building consent Section 4 of this guide

NEXT STEPS:
1. Read sections 3 and 4 of this guide.
2. Engage a professional consultant for advice and/or assistance.

29
2.15 Undertake demolition, removal or relocation of a dwelling
Under Schedule 1 of the Building Act 2004, a building consent is not required to remove a building from a site if
it is a stand-alone building and is three storeys high or less. This means that if you want to remove or demolish a
building, a building consent is not required – though a resource consent might be, especially if it is a pre-1944 building.
Demolition or removal of pre-1944 buildings requires a resource consent for most areas of Auckland under the
Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan.
If you want to relocate a building to another site, or reposition it on the same site, a building consent will be
required. The building consent ensures such work is done safely.
Before removing or demolishing a building, you need to check if there are any other approvals that may be required,
such as a resource consent, or a permit for over-dimensional load from the New Zealand Transport Agency. Contact
the planning helpdesk on 09 3010101 for more information.

Guide
Regulations Refer to
Building Act 2004 dbh.govt.nz/blc-building-act

New Zealand Building Code dbh.govt.nz/the-building-code


District Plan and Proposed Auckland Go to aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/districtregionalplans
Unitary Plan (PAUP) and click on the relevant District Plan and the PAUP
Consents that may be required Refer to
Resource consent Section 3 of this guide
Building consent Section 4 of this guide

NEXT STEPS:
1. Read sections 3 and 4 of this guide.
2. Engage a professional consultant for advice and/or assistance.

30
Section 3:
Obtaining a resource consent

31
Overview:
The first step in the resource consent process is to contact a professional consultant or Auckland Council about your
plans. We offer a free 15-minute planning information service, either in person or on the phone, where you can discuss
your plans and options to find out what’s possible and what’s not. If your consent issues are complex, you may be
eligible for a pre-application meeting with council staff to clarify issues and information needed (see section 3.3 for
more information on pre-application meetings).
We recommend you will have professional help to prepare your application from a Master builder, surveyor, planner,
architect or engineer. Once you have gathered all the necessary information, you can lodge your application. When
you send it in, we check it to ensure all relevant information is included. Your application won’t be accepted until all
information is provided.
Once your resource consent application has been accepted, our staff evaluate it to determine whether the application
should be notified or non-notified. A non-notified application means the consent process and decision is not publicly
advertised. A notified application is advertised to the public, in either a limited or full way, so affected neighbours or
the general public have the opportunity to make a submission on the application. The decision on whether to notify
or not is governed by legal guidelines relating to the effects on neighbours and the environment.
When a resource consent application is notified, details about that application are publicly advertised and sent
to any relevant interest groups, as well as to anyone identified as being directly affected by the proposal.
Notification is intended to give the public the opportunity to have their say on the activity proposed in the
resource consent application.
Most consent applications are non-notified. They are reviewed by a council planner and any relevant specialists
(such as development engineers, arborists, heritage experts, etc.) before a council officer determines whether consent
should be granted or not, and what conditions should apply to that consent.
Once a decision is made on your consent, you will be informed in writing. If you disagree with the decision, you
have the right of objection (to Auckland Council) or to an appeal (to the Environment Court – see section 3.15).
The length of time taken to process a resource consent application depends on whether it is notified or not. If a
resource consent can be processed without being notified, your application will take approximately one month to
process, provided that all necessary information was submitted with the application. However, if a resource consent
needs to be notified, it will take approximately three months to process. In times of high workload, processing times
may be extended, so please plan ahead.

32
3.1
Resource consent process

Pre-application meeting to discuss


consent options

Lodge your consent application

5 working days
Application
returned to Initial check: is the application complete?
applicant

During processing, if further


information and/or written
Applications Yes If notified or
on hold until approval of affected parties
limited notified
information may be required
10 working days
is supplied

Decision made re-notification or non notification of application

20 working days NOTIFICATION

Submission period
With hearing 25
working days
Period for submissions closes
If non-notified
Non-notified processing
Further information required 20 working days

Pre-hearing
modelling Pre-hearing
Yes
required held

Without
No
hearing 20
Pre-hearing
working days meeting Yes Hearing
required? held

No

15 working
days Decision made on application; if granted, Acceptance
consent will include conditions

15 working Environment Option to Process for


Yes Option to object to Yes objection and
days Court process appeal conditions
and decision decision decision
and for cost

Consent commences
Once consent commences, consent
or consent refused or
conditions change conditions are monitored

33
3.2 Responsibilities in the resource consent process
Different parties are responsible for each stage of the resource consents process. These parties include you
as the owner or developer, the council, and professional consultants.
Owner or developer
The owner or developer is responsible for compiling the proposal for the project and organising the correct
information for the consent application. Once consent has been granted, the owner or developer is responsible for
ensuring works are completed according to their consents and any relevant regulations.
Professional Consultants
Professional consultants are responsible for assisting the owner or developer with the proposal and consent application
and helping make the consent process simpler. See section 3.4
Auckland Council
Council has legal responsibilities and obligations throughout the consent process, which are laid out in the relevant
District and Regional Plans, the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan and the Resource Management Act (RMA). Council
is responsible for processing your consent application and for monitoring the conditions of your consent to ensure
compliance with the RMA and the relevant Plans.

Who is responsible?

Owner/Developer Professional Consultation Council

Proposal (including investigation and design)


and official requirements and obligations

Compiling the correct information for the


consent application (building and resource)
Resource consent process

Assessment of proposal

Apply for resource


Processing consent
consent

Construction to follow resource consent and other acts


and/or regulations

Monitoring of construction

Ongoing monitoring of
conditions of consent

Enforcement of Building Act,


New Zealand Building Code,
Resource Management Act
and District Plan

34
3.3 Pre-application meeting
If you are planning a development, subdivision or building that may need consents or permits, we recommend talking
to us before submitting your application. Early discussions with us will help you make informed decisions about your
application and avoid unnecessary delays in processing.
For simple inquiries, we offer up to 15 minutes of free assistance at most of our service centres (please see list on
page 10). We also offer this service over the telephone or via email for those who cannot come to one of our service
centres. For other applications, especially complex proposals, we offer individually tailored pre-application meetings.
A pre-application meeting is a meeting between you, your professional consultants and council processing staff and
specialists to review your application and provide you with information and advice before you submit your application.
People usually find this to be very beneficial in planning their project.

The pre-application meeting enables us to:


• review your draft application and supporting materials
• identify the complexity and risks of your proposed consent application
• involve the relevant specialists to provide information and advice
• explain our processing timeframes and requirements
• provide you with clear instructions to ensure your application is complete.
Pre-application meetings incur a charge that varies according to how many employees required at the meeting.
For more information on pre-application costs, please see the fees schedule located on our website, search fees
and timeframes.
To enquire about a pre-application meeting, or to book one, please contact us on 09 301 0101 or visit
aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/preapplication

3.4 Professional consultants


For efficient processing of your consent, we strongly recommend you get help from a professional where
appropriate, such as a:
• resource management consultant
• surveyor (in the case of subdivision applications)
• engineer
• landscape architect
• arborist
• archaeologist, heritage specialist, or other specialist adviser
• lawyer.

35
3.5 District, regional and unitary plan considerations
The Auckland region is divided into different areas, each governed by its own District Plan. There are specific zones in
each area, such as residential, commercial, industrial and heritage zones. There are also Regional Plans, and a Proposed
Auckland Unitary Plan (PAUP), which need to be taken into account when planning a development project. The
provisions in the District, Regional and Unitary Plans have legal implications, and need to be followed.
Here are some of the more common planning considerations to take into account when compiling your application:

Flood plains or overland flowpaths


Auckland has a sub-tropical climate and is prone to rainstorms which can flood land, streams and roads. When you
are considering a site for development, you need to be aware of any potential for flooding from floodplains or
overland flowpaths. Potential flooding scenarios throughout the region have been determined by flood modellers, and
flood-hazard and overland flowpath maps can be viewed at your local council service centre. Most urban areas of the
region have established flowpaths and our engineers can advise you on their location. If there is an overland flowpath
or flooding hazard on the site where you want to build or subdivide, you may need to engage an engineer to assess it
and include protection from/of the flowpath in your design. Redirecting a flowpath will require a resource consent.

Heritage and character areas


Heritage, character, and ecological zones, and character and heritage areas have been identified as protected areas in
the various District Plans, and in the PAUP. Since October 2013, the notification of the draft Unitary Plan brought in
a heritage area for the Auckland region, which requires that most buildings constructed before 1944 need resource
consent if they are to be demolished or removed from their site.
There are also specific heritage and character zones in the District Plans. If your development is within a heritage or
character zone, we require information on the building and construction materials you plan to use, including cladding
and window joinery. Traditional materials usually include corrugated steel sheet, timber shingles, horizontal or vertical
timber weatherboards and timber joinery.
Please contact us on 09 301 0101 or visit your local service centre to check if your site is within a heritage or
character zone (contact details can be found in section 1.6).

Protected tree requirements


Many trees of great size and/or significance (such as coastal pohutakawa) are protected due to their historic value,
seasonal beauty and stabilising effect on land and coastal cliffs. Protected trees are specifically listed (or scheduled) in
the relevant District Plans and the PAUP. The zoning of your property determines whether or not a tree, or trees, on
your property are protected.
You are allowed to carry out very minor pruning or trimming of protected trees using only hand-operated tools, i.e.
not a chainsaw, so long as you do not significantly alter the height or shape of the tree. All other work on or around
protected trees requires a resource consent, particularly substantial work that may destroy, or cause irreparable
damage to, the tree. In most cases, there is no fee for these consents.
The council usually only fells protected trees to maintain or restore power and communication links or to safeguard
life or property. You can be fined or even prosecuted if you trim, cut or remove protected trees. Please contact us for
more information.

Special land features and general limitations


In addition to the standard district plan rules that apply to a particular zone, there may be additional rules that
specifically apply to your property, for instance if you have a coastal or wetland property, or if your land has a water
body such as a lake or river, or if it has protected bush or covenanted areas. For further information regarding this
topic, it is recommended that you contact our planning helpdesk on 09 301 0101.

Engaging with Mana Whenua (local Māori)


The RMA recognises that Mana Whenua have a special cultural and spiritual relationship with the environment, and
a role in its protection. The PAUP requires applicants to engage with Mana Whenua about proposals which may have
cultural or environmental implications.
Please contact us on 09 301 0101 or visit your local service centre to find out more about the specific planning
considerations for your project and the zone it is in (contact details can be found in section 1.6).

36
3.6 Assessment of environmental effects (AEE)
Preparing an Assessment of Environmental Effects (AEE) report is the first and most important step when putting
together your resource consent application. The AEE report is required to detail the effects your proposed activity
will have on the environment.
The environment is very broadly defined under the Resource Management Act and includes not only air, land and
water, but also ecosystems, people and communities.

Effects can be positive or negative and may include:


• noise
• increased traffic or parking
• overshadowing of properties
• visual effects (how the development looks)
• reductions in privacy
• character effects (whether it fits with the character of the street or general area)
• infrastructure capacity
• flooding
• stability of land.
Effects can be short- or long-term and will differ for each proposal. The purpose of an AEE is to provide us with
sufficient information to assess the likely impacts of the proposal.
How do I prepare an AEE?
If you are uncertain about this process, you can ask one of our planners for general information. If you need more
specific assistance, please engage a consultant to prepare an AEE for you. More information on preparing an AEE
report can be found on the resource consent application form (see our website).

3.7 Affected persons’ approval


If there are people or property that may be actually or potentially adversely affected by your proposal, you will
need to obtain their written approval before you lodge your application with us. This involves approaching any
relevant landowners and property occupiers with full information and plans of the proposal for their consideration.
If you have undertaken consultation with any person or group, include the details and results of that consultation
in your AEE. If an affected person does not give approval to the proposal, this may impact the way the application
is processed. If you need to do any work on someone else’s property, e.g. build private drainage through a
neighbour’s property, you will be required to supply their approval with your application, and that approval needs
to be unconditional.
If the approval is conditional–for instance, an affected person gives you their written approval and makes that
approval subject to an understanding on another issue, or requires you to change your proposal–this must form a
separate agreement between the two parties. We are not able to accept any form of conditional approval and will
not enforce, or get involved in, any private agreement.
As well as your assessment of any adverse effects, we will also assess if anyone else is adversely affected by
the proposal.

37
3.8 How to apply for a resource consent
To obtain a resource consent, you need to complete a consent application form (available on our website):
aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/consents
Once you have prepared all of the application materials, you can lodge your application with us either by posting it
to us or by dropping it off at your local service centre.
Check your application and documentation against our checklists (see no. 6 in the table below) before you lodge
your application with us. Incomplete applications will not be accepted and the resource consent process will take
longer as a result.

3.9 How to avoid processing delays

How to avoid processing delays

1 Ask us for help or get independent, professional advice before you start
2 Check the relevant District and Regional Plans and the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan to find out if consents or permits
are required
3 Consider the effects on adjoining sites
4 Ensure that calculations and details are correct (e.g. complies with District Plan rules), or
5 Ensure that your site services design is in accordance with our Development and Connection Standards
watercare.co.nz/common-content/development-and-connections/engineering-standards/Pages/default.aspx

6 Supply all required documentation and details of your project in your application, including:
• sufficient copies of plans, in the correct format and showing the full extent of your project
• clearly shown site boundaries on plans
• wastewater, storm water or other drainage details
• Certificate of Title and copies of any legal instruments such as consent notices
• Assessment of Environmental Effects (AEE) report
• flood reports (if necessary)
• soakage reports (if necessary)
• neighbour’s approval (if necessary)
• arborist reports (if necessary for pruning or removal of protected trees)
• vehicle manoeuvring or parking details (if necessary).
7 Apply for a resource consent before applying for your building consent (if applicable)

8 Plan ahead to allow enough time for the consenting process (see 3.10: Resource consent timeframes)

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3.10 Resource consent timeframes
The processing timeframe for non-notified consents is as follows:
• Within five days we will do an initial review of your application to decide if it has the information we need to
make processing decisions; if not, it will not be accepted.
• Within 10 days we will decide if the application needs to be notified or not (approximately 90% of applications
are non-notified).
• Once your application is accepted, we have 20 working days to process your application (including the initial
five days of review).
• If we need further information from you once we begin processing the application, we will let you know, and
put the consent application on hold until you supply the necessary information. You have 15 working days to
provide the information. (These days are not counted as part of our 20-day processing time-frame). For further
information, see mfe.govt.nz about the resource consent process.
• If we take longer than 20 working days to process your consent (excluding any time it may have been on
hold while waiting for further information), you are entitled to a discount of your fees under the Resource
Management Act 1991.

3.11 Resource consent fees


There are different types of fees associated with resource consents applications depending on your project and
the amount of work involved. For example, you may need to pay a deposit, processing fee, inspection fee, final
certificate fee, and development contribution.
The initial deposit for a resource consent application covers the cost of processing, and can be estimated based on
the figures in our fee schedule (see section 6). Once a decision has been made on your application, if the total cost
is more than the deposit, you’ll need to pay the balance. If the total cost is less, you’ll be given a refund.
In addition, there may be other fees and deposits depending on the nature of your application, including:
• damage deposits, for reinstatement of roads, footpaths and berms damaged during the course of construction
(if no damage is caused, we’ll return this deposit after issuing your Code Compliance Certificate)
• levies, for building projects worth $20,000 or more
• compliance and monitoring charges
• development contributions and financial contributions, for infrastructure to support new developments,
including subdivisions
• survey and engineering plan fees, for subdivision consents
• interim invoices for larger projects when the processing fees exceed the initial deposit (these invoices will be
presented in stages and are ongoing throughout the duration of the project)
• notification and hearing fees, if your resource consent application needs to be notified and a hearing held
• annual fees, for some types of regional consents, such as discharges to air and water.
If you are subdividing, development contribution fees will probably be the most significant part of your costs. You
can use our development contribution estimator to calculate a rough estimate of the development contribution
fees which apply to your subdivision. If at any stage you cancel or withdraw your consent application, some fees
may still apply.
Over the page you can find our top tips for keeping consent processing fees as low as possible.

39
Top tip: To keep your consent processing costs as low as possible, we recommend:
• talking to us before preparing your application
• seeking professional help where appropriate
• applying for all required consents in a staged manner
• ensuring all forms are completed, including supporting material
• working closely with our inspection and monitoring officers to minimise additional site visits.
You can also reduce costs by:
• consulting all affected parties
• obtaining written approvals before lodging your application
• attempting to resolve any objections.
For more details, please see section 6- Fees and charges of this booklet, or visit our website:
aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/fees and/or aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/consents

3.12 Processing the application


People often wonder what the processing of consent applications involves, and why it takes time and costs money.
When we process your application, we review:
• how your application relates to the relevant District Plan, Regional Plan and PAUP provisions
• whether your proposal is a permitted, controlled, restricted, discretionary, non-complying or prohibited activity
• whether your proposal is appropriate for its location (there are different rules for different zones)
• what the environmental effects of your proposal may be and how these could be modified
• whether any specialist input is required for any aspect of your consent (earthworks, ecology, land stability and
suitability, water or air quality, flooding issues, heritage etc.)
• whether you have consulted with affected parties (such as neighbours, adjoining landowners, Department of
Conservation, utility providers, special interest groups, etc.) and Mana Whenua (local Māori)
• how serious any infringement of District or PAUP rules is, and what can be done to modify its effects
• whether any specific conditions need to be attached to your consent, and if so, what they should be.

3.13 Duration of consent


A resource consent lapses five years after the date it commences, which is usually the date on which the consent
was granted and processing fees were paid. This means that a consent must be finalised within that five-year
timeframe by completing all the necessary work and complying with all of the conditions of the resource consent.

3.14 Resource consent monitoring


We monitor any resource consent conditions as part of our legal obligation under the RMA. Monitoring resource
consents allows us to determine if resource consent holders are fulfilling the conditions of their consent, and also to
track the impact of development on the environment.
Although we are responsible for ensuring resource consents are monitored, we may not carry out the monitoring
ourselves, depending on the nature and scale of a particular development.

3.15 Appeals to the environment court


If you disagree with the decision on your consent, or your consent conditions, you have the right to lodge an objection
with Auckland Council or to appeal to the Environment Court. The RMA sets out the appeal process if you wish to
appeal against a decision of Council, or any part of the decision. Anyone considering lodging an appeal is encouraged
to obtain legal advice before proceeding.
For more information, refer to the regulations section in the RMA 1991 or visit mfe.govt.nz, the Environment
Court website.
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Section 4:
Obtaining a building consent

41
Do I need a building consent?
Not all building work requires a building consent. However whether or not you need a building consent, your building
work must still comply with the New Zealand Building Code. For example, if you plan to make structural changes,
alterations, or additions to your building, you require a building consent. If your project involves building a fence, deck,
garage, retaining wall, or swimming pool, you may require both a building consent and a resource consent. Please
contact our Building Helpdesk on 09 353 9358 to check whether you need a consent.

Find out more: To find out if you do not need a building consent for a project, we recommend you read the Ministry
of Business, Innovation and Environment (MBIE) publication on “A guide to building work that does not require a
building consent” on their website at: dbh.govt.nz/bc-no-consent

4.1 Building consent process


We recommend you begin your building consent process by contacting us or a professional consultant to discuss
what you want to do. You can have 15 minutes of free advice from a building officer at most Auckland Council service
centres to discuss your plans and options (please see list on page 10). If you meet specific criteria, you may be eligible
for a pre-application meeting where our staff will assess your draft application and identify all appropriate information
which needs to be submitted when you lodge your application. Call us on 09 353 9358, or see section 4.3 for more
information. Please note that we expect you to get professional input into your application from an architect,
builder, engineer, draughtsperson or building surveyor.
The building consent process (outlined on the next page) involves the input of a number of staff who are trained
professionals in a range of building disciplines including architecture, engineering, construction and plumbing.
Using the information provided in your application, we will assess your application for compliance with the Building
Code and Building Act, and will then be able to issue you with a building consent, or advise you of any additional
information needed to approve the application.
You may wish to apply for a Project Information Memorandum (PIM) before your building consent. A PIM is a report
that provides information on any special features of the land and any regulatory requirements affecting your proposed
building work.
The best time to obtain a PIM is early in the design stage of your building project before completing plans and
specifications for the building consent application. Information in the PIM can help designers and developers to modify
initial ideas and avoid costly additional design work and delays.
There are charges involved in processing building consent applications. Please refer to the Fee Schedule in section 6.1
for more information on fees and charges.
Inspections are a crucial part of the building consent process. Each stage of construction needs to be inspected and
approved before you can move on to the next stage. You can organise an inspection within three days of making a
request by phoning us on 09 301 0101. Alternatively you can download the Building Inspection App on your cell
phone and book online.
The last stage of the building consent process is applying for and receiving a code compliance certificate. You need to
ensure that the qualified tradespeople who work on your project, such as your builder, plumber and electrician, fill out
the required paperwork for your certificate once their work is completed.

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Building consent process

Prepare application materials


1
Check documentation for completeness

2 Application lodged and accepted

20 working Application assessed for compliance


days
3 with building code

4 Consent and/or PIM granted

5 Consent and/or PIM issued

If you have a resource consent pending, check


6 for a section 37 certificate to see if building
work can start or not

Building work must start within 12 months of consent being issued

7 Inspections are conducted and approved

8 Final inspections are conducted and approved

Code Compliance Certificate application lodged


9
(Work completed within 24 months of consent granted)

20 working Documentation checked for compliance


days 10 with building consent

11 Code Compliance Certificate issued

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4.2 Responsibilities in the building consent process

Professional
Owner/Developer Council
Consultation

Proposal (including investigation and design) and


official requirements and obligations

Application for Project


Information Memorandum
(PIM) (Optional)

Compiling the correct information for the consent


application (building and/or resource)

Apply for building consent Assessment of compliance


of proposal
Building consent process

Apply for resource consent


(if applicable) Processing consent

Issue consent
Construction to follow building and resource consent
approvals and other acts and/or regulations

Monitoring of construction

Building inspections –
Enforcement of Building Act
and NZ Building code

Compliance Certificate –
Enforcement of Resource
Management Act and
District Plan

Ongoing monitoring of
conditions of consent –
Apply for Code Compliance Enforcement of Resource
Certificate (CCC) Management Act and
District Plan

Provide appropriate documentation and pay outstanding fees

Issue Code Compliance


Certificate

Note: CCC stands for the Code Compliance Certificate (see page 50) and 224c refers to a certificate necessary for
subdivisions, which ensures compliance with section 224 of the Resource Management Act 1991 (refer to the website
for your 224c application form).

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4.2 Responsibilities in the building consent process
If your development involves a building consent, different parties have different responsibilities at each stage of the
project. These parties include you as the owner or developer, us as Auckland Council, and professional consultants.
Owner developer
The owner or developer is responsible for putting together the project proposal and organising the correct
information for the consent applications. Once consent is granted, the owner or developer is responsible for
ensuring works follow the consented plans and are compliant with the New Zealand Building Code.

Professional consultants
Professional consultants are available to assist the owner or developer in the proposal and consent application
stages. There are many types of professional building consultants: architects, engineers, builders, draughtspersons or
building surveyors. While they can assist with the process, the ultimate responsibility for the consent rests with the
owner/applicant.

Auckland Council
We have responsibilities throughout the consent process including processing your consent, carrying out inspections
and reviewing your compliance certification applications. We will also monitor the conditions of your consent to ensure
compliance with the Building Act, New Zealand Building Code, Resource Management Act, and the relevant District
Plan. We may use approved contractors during the assessment and monitoring stages of the application.

4.3 Pre-application meeting


If your project is large or complex, you may be eligible for a pre-application meeting. A pre-application meeting is
a meeting between you, your professional consultants, and our processing staff and specialists, to review your draft
application and provide you with advice before you submit your application.
The pre-application meeting enables us to:
• review your draft application and supporting materials
• identify the complexity and risks of your proposed consent application
• involve the relevant specialists to provide information and advice
• explain our processing timeframes and requirements
• provide you with clear instructions to ensure your application is complete.

Find out more: Pre-application meetings incur a cost.


For more information on pre-application, visit aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/preapplication

You may benefit from a pre-application meeting if:


• the new floor area of proposed works is in excess of 1000m²
• four or more household units are planned for one site
• the application relates to staged works
• the estimated value of proposed works is in excess of $4 million
• re-cladding is involved
• multiple units are involved
• the value/cost of the development is $5 million or more
• you have a commercial application.

Pre-application meetings in the Manukau Area


If your proposed building is to be in the Manukau area and you would like to have a pre-application meeting, you are
advised to make arrangements with the appropriate provider organisation for an appointment. The providers are:
• Compass Building Consultants
• Manukau Building Consultants
• Professional Building Consultants.
Details of the office locations and contact information are outlined on page 11 of this document.
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4.4 Project Information Memorandum (PIM)
A PIM includes information on special land features, including:
• the presence of hazardous contaminants
• information we’ve been given by any statutory organisation – such as the New Zealand Historic Places Trust
or the Department of Conservation
• stormwater or wastewater utility systems related to your proposed building work, or adjacent to your
building site
• authorisations required from you under other relevant Acts which have requirements you need to meet. The
most common authorisation being granted will be resource consents required under the Resource Management
Act 1991.
A PIM will also include either:
• confirmation that you may carry out the building work (subject to the requirements of the building consent and
all other necessary authorisations being obtained), or
• notification that you may not undertake building or work.
A PIM does not give any form of approval under the District Plan. It is your responsibility to determine that your
proposal complies with the District Plan by contacting us or your planning advisor.

Cost
Please visit the fees for building consents page on our website, search fees and timeframes for PIM costs.

4.5 Preparing your application


We can only process your application when all relevant information is provided, so please include all necessary
documentation with your application. This will help to reduce confusion, delay and cost, as we do not accept
applications which have missing information.

How to avoid delays


1 Ask council for help, and/or get independent, professional advice, and get it early
2 Check the relevant parts of the District Plan
3 Consider the effects on adjoining sites (e.g. if you have a related resource consent)
4 Ensure that your site services design is in accordance with our Development and Connection Standards
5 Ensure all calculations and measurements are correct
6 Apply for a resource consent before applying for your building consent (if applicable)
7 Apply for a PIM before the building consent if needed
8 Supply all required documentation and details of your project:
• have enough copies of plans and ensure they are in the correct format
• clearly shown boundaries on plans
• wastewater, storm water or other drainage details
• flood reports
• soakage reports
• neighbours’ approval
• arborists’ reports
• vehicle manoeuvring or parking details.
9 Get the appropriate consents before you start work, and follow their conditions

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4.6 How to reduce your building consent processing fees?
The building consent processing fees vary depending on the size of project, complexity of work to be done and
quality of the application documents submitted.
There are a number of ways you can reduce building consent processing fees and get faster turnaround times for
your consents:
• Provide detailed and high quality documentation by referring to the lodgement checklist (aucklandcouncil.
govt.nz/consents) on our website. If you are unsure what is required, use a qualified building professional e.g.:
architect, engineer, building surveyor, or licensed building practitioner to prepare your consent application.
• Provide a Certificate of Title (CT) less than three months old or an unconditional Sale and Purchase Agreement.
You can order your CT online from Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) website under ‘Survey & Titles’
(linz.govt.nz)
• Describe the work involved – this should be sufficient to demonstrate what building work is being carried out. For
example, ’new single-storey dwelling with attached garage and swimming pool’, rather than just ‘new dwelling’
• If restricted building work (RBW) is involved, provide Memorandum/Certificate of Design Work (dbh.govt.nz)
which is filled out and signed by the designer, licensed building practitioner (designer LBP) or engineer.
• Clearly and comprehensively explain how the proposed building work will comply with the relevant clauses in the
New Zealand Building Code (legislation.govt.nz) and Standards (standards.co.nz).
• Plans showing site and drainage details, foundations, floor, cross-sections, elevations, roof framing, bracing,
electrical and plumbing must be clear, in black and white, and suitable for electronic scanning. Specifications
should detail materials, processes or procedures relating to the proposed building works. For example, sub-floor
and wall-bracing calculations (where proposed), and engineering calculations for all aspects requiring specific
design and supplementary reports, such as fire, acoustic, geotechnical, accessibility.
• Indicate distances from the boundaries on the site plan and location of private drainage in relation to boundaries
and public drainage lines.
• For existing buildings, change of use or alterations must be clearly defined on the plans and the accompanying
specifications. Existing and finished floor levels for the proposed building alteration project must be shown on
elevations and sections of attached documents.
• If applicable, provide critical design calculations, e.g.: bracing, sub-floor and truss design calculations as well as
manufacturer specifications and installation details. For example, cladding system specifications must
be provided.
• Provide E2/AS1 Risk Matrix information (dbh.govt.nz) to check risk associated with external moisture for the
building project. (The E2/AS1 risk matrix is used to identify weather-tightness features and their risk).
• Ensure Producer Statements are correctly filled out and signed by an approved author on the Council-approved
‘Producer statement authors’ register’ (aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/consents).
• Provide any project-specific design calculations or design reports from the building professionals you have
engaged for your project. For example fire, air-conditioning, geotechnical, mechanical ventilation.
• Specify correct wind zone for the proposed building project. Check here (aucklandcouncil.govt.nz)
if you are unsure of the wind zone for the proposed building work.

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4.7 How to apply
To get a building consent, you first need to contact us on 09 353 9358 to check what information is needed, and to
see if a pre-application meeting would be appropriate for your project. After the pre-application meeting (if needed),
your next step is to fill in the consent application form available on aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/consents
Once you have prepared all of the materials for your application, you need to lodge your application
by mailing it or by dropping off the application, or by making an appointment with us at one of our service centres
to lodge it in person and have it checked by a building officer. It is important to note that whatever method
of lodgement you choose, you must check your application and documentation for completeness against our
checklists in the application packs, as an incomplete application or lack of any supporting information will mean
that your application will not be accepted, and this will delay your construction schedule.
Note: The correct deposit amount must accompany all building consent applications or the application will not be
accepted for processing.
Lodging your application by appointment
To book an appointment to lodge your application, please call us on 09 301 0101 and specify the service area
location most convenient for you. We need two working days’ notice to schedule an appointment (Refer to
section 1.6 for service centre locations).
Please allow 45-60 minutes for the lodging process. During your appointment, we will check your consent
application to ensure that you have included all the required information. This screening is not a full technical
assessment but is an initial check that your application contains all the information and detail needed in the
correct format.
Lodging your application by mail/drop-off
You can choose to leave an application with us or to send your application by mail. We will then advise you
whether your consent application is accepted for lodgement or if we need more information from you. If more
information is required, the application may be held or sent back to you (depending on the amount and type of
information requested), with an explanation of what’s needed.
Lodgements in the Manukau area
If your proposed building work is in the Manukau area, you have the option of selecting one of the three
Providers, who will process your building consent and carry out compliance inspections. The options are:
• Compass Building Consultants
• Manukau Building Consultants
• Professional Building Consultants.
Details of the office locations and contact information are outlined on page 11 of this document.

4.8 Duration of building consent


Your building consent is valid for 12 months after the date it is issued or any further period the Building Consent
Authority allows. After this time, the consent lapses and is no longer valid.
You are also need to complete your building works and apply for a Code Compliance Certificate within 24 months
(two years) of the date the building consent was granted.
If you wish to extend either period of validity, you must do so before the consent lapses and pay an application fee.
See section 6: Fees and charges.

48
4.9 Building inspections and compliance
Inspections
Once you have obtained a building consent and have started construction, inspections are carried out during
various stages of the process to ensure that each stage of your project complies with the building consent and the
New Zealand Building Code. Your building consent lists an indicative guide of the number and the types of inspections
you will need. You should plan your building work and book inspections well in advance to avoid delays of your
project. You can book an inspection anytime by calling:
Auckland Central 09 353 9120
All other areas 09 301 0101
Wastewater connection inspections may need to be undertaken by Watercare Services Limited, or in Papakura, by
Veolia Water.
You must book inspections and have them passed before you can start the next stage of your building works.
Depending on your work programme, you may require more inspections. It is recommended you discuss your
building programme with the building inspector at your first inspection.
If your project passes the final inspection, the inspector will forward all documentation to the Building Consent
Authority and you will need to apply for a Code Compliance Certificate (CCC) (see below for the application form).
The CCC is attached to your property report and signifies that your building work complies with the building
consent and New Zealand Building Code. If your property does not have a CCC, your insurance company may not
approve any insurance claims related to that building.
If your project does not pass the final inspection, you may receive a Notice to Fix. If you receive a Notice
to Fix, you are required to rectify the identified defects listed on the notice. Once the defects are rectified,
inspected, approved, and any additional costs paid, you can then apply to get a CCC issued.
If you miss key inspections, it may be difficult us to know whether your works comply with your approved
plans and the New Zealand Building Code. This could prevent you receiving a CCC for your project, which has
implications for your insurance cover and your ability to sell your property in the future.
Please contact us or visit our website for more information about the inspections process:
aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/consents
Compliance
When you are granted a building consent for your project, you will need to comply with any conditions specified by
the consent. If you have also obtained a resource consent for your project, you must provide us with two days’ notice
before you begin building work. You must provide us with a minimum of one day’s notice to have your work inspected
before you cover in, or close, any of the following:
• plumbing or drainage
• excavations and reinforcing steel for foundations
• timber framing and bracing elements
• cladding or insulation material
• other work where your consent is subject to inspection.
When visiting your site, inspectors will look out for any breaches of rules and regulations.
When the final inspection has been undertaken, an application form needs to be submitted for the Code Compliance
Certificate. This form can be found on our website, visit aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/consents
Inspections in the Manukau area
If your building consent has been processed by one of the providers contracted by Council to undertake processing
and inspections in the Manukau area, you will need to contact that provider to undertake your inspections.
Details of the office locations and contact information are outlined on page 11 of this document.

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4.10 Code Compliance Certificate (CCC)
At the end of the project, you need to arrange a final inspection for a Code Compliance Certificate (CCC). A CCC is
issued after we have completed the final inspection of the finished building project and assessed the inspection records
and supporting documentation. The CCC confirms that the Building Consent Authority is satisfied that the completed
building work complies with the building consent. If the new building work does not have a CCC, your insurance
company may refuse building-related insurance claims.
You will need to apply for a CCC for all consented works within 24 months (two years) of your building consent
being granted. A link to the application form is included in section 8 of this information guide. Please send completed
applications to the appropriate service centre (see page 10 for contact details).

Note: The CCC should be issued within 20 working days from the date we receive the CCC application (provided all
required information has been included, all outstanding fees paid and the final inspection was passed). Delays in receiving
information required, money being owed or the failing of the final inspection will cause a delay in issuing the CCC.

50
Section 5:
Obtaining an engineering approval

51
Engineering approval overview
The information below is a high-level guide to Engineering Approval. Our website provides valuable additional
information that is relevant to anyone wishing to undertake a development.
Auckland Council’s development engineering team administers engineering approvals. There are four types of
engineering approvals dealing with different aspects of development:
1. Engineering approvals give permission to property owners and developers to undertake civil engineering works
for infrastructure such as public stormwater pipes which, when completed, will become a public asset under the
control and responsibility of Auckland Council.
2. An engineering approval for right of way, shared driveway or common access way provides permission to
construct common access ways, rights of way and jointly-owned access ways to service a subdivision.
3. Engineering Local Government Act Approvals are used when the Council needs to assist negotiations between
neighbours to obtain permission for stormwater drainage servicing a new development to be laid through
someone’s property. This relates to Sections 460 & 181 of the Local Government Act.
4. Engineering Bonds allow a bond to be held by the Council to release 224c certification, before a developer
completes certain physical works required by a subdivision consent (see 5.4 below for more details).
Engineering approval fees are paid by an initial lodgement deposit. Additional fees will be invoiced if the cost of
processing the approval exceeds the deposit amount. However, if the deposit exceeds final costs, the balance will be
refunded to the customer identified on the application form. For more information on fees and charges, please
see section 6.

5.1 Engineering approval


If your development involves the installation of new public infrastructure, such as stormwater pipes or roads, you
will need to obtain an engineering approval. In some instances this can also be required for private infrastructure
that is required to be built to public standard e.g. piping of watercourses such as streams.
There are three parts to the engineering approval process:
1) The initial approval or consent.
2) Construction works with engineering inspections.
3) As-built checks of the works after completion (which show what has been constructed).
After all three stages are completed to Auckland Council’s satisfaction, the works will be vested in (given over to)
the council, and the Engineering Approval Completion Certificate (EACC) will be issued.

Process
1. Approval Engineering designs and drawings of the works from a chartered professional engineer or licensed
cadastral surveyor are required, along with supporting information and neighbours’ consents, before
lodgement of the application and granting of the approval. Review of the design may involve other
Auckland Council groups and asset owners (such as Watercare), depending on the asset type, and
the extent and complexity of the work.
2. Inspections With a stamped approved plan and set of conditions, your consultant and contractor should liaise
with council’s development engineering inspector to ensure that regular inspections of the works take
place. Our role is to be an inspector at key milestones rather than supervise the works. Supervision
is the responsibility of your consultant and they need to be involved on site to ensure all works are
in accordance with the approved design and council’s standards.
3. ‘As-builts’ As works approach physical completion, you should arrange for them to be surveyed and for the
as-built documentation to be supplied to us for review. This stage is critical to the efficient
completion of your consent, as a lack of attention to detail on the part of your consultants can
result in significant delays in the issuing of the EACC and associated Code Compliance Certificate
and s224c certification.

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5.2 Engineering approval for right of way, shared driveway or common access way
If your development includes an access way serving more than one lot or unit, you will probably need an engineering
approval for a right of way, shared driveway or common access way before construction takes place. As an access way
serves multiple parties, we require minimum design standards are met to protect future owners.
The engineering approval for a right of way, shared driveway or common access way is to be lodged after the legal
access has been defined by the subdivision process and requirements are detailed in the attached conditions.
It is advisable to have your common access way designed by a professional surveyor or engineer as they are best able
to ensure design parameters fall within the requirements of the various District Plans and our design standards i.e. for
grades, widths, pavement strengths and base layer design.
Details of your approved building and resource consents should be provided with your application.

Note: The engineering approval for right of way, shared driveway or common access way does not define or approve
legal boundaries or easements.

5.3 Engineering Local Government Act (LGA)


The LGA approval process is used typically by private entities for constructing public or private drainage for
stormwater on other parties’ private land, usually to facilitate developments. If your development requires stormwater
drains to pass through a neighbour’s property and they are reluctant to give their consent, you should investigate
other alternatives. If none exist and your efforts to obtain your neighbour’s consent have failed, you can apply for the
council to become involved to negotiate a solution. If no amicable agreement is reached, under the LGA the council’s
engineer can present a report with a proposed course of action to an Auckland Council hearing for consideration.

Top tip: As building consents and engineering approvals require that any routing of drains through a neighbour’s property
is supported by written consent from those neighbours, the Engineering LGA application is usually required before the
lodgement of building and engineering approval consents. Please note, this process specifically relates to stormwater works,
as the process for wastewater is administered by Watercare Services Ltd.

5.4 Engineering bonds


224c certification confirms compliance with subdivision consent conditions. In rare instances, it is not possible to
comply with all conditions of subdivision due to extenuating engineering reasons. In these situations, you can apply for
the council to consider bonding the condition instead of completing the physical works. Approval of bonds is given on
a case-by-case basis and we are strict about using bonding sparingly and appropriately. Applications for engineering
bonds should not be made simply to speed up the 224c process, as they will be declined.
We advise you to discuss bonding with a development engineer before making a formal application. At this time you
will be advised of the details of the process and what’s required for an application.

5.5 Codes of practice


Detailed information on engineering standards for development projects is found in different codes of
practice, including:
Auckland Council Stormwater Code of Practice:
aucklanddesignmanual.co.nz/design-thinking/InfrastructureCOP
Watercare Engineering Standards:
watercare.co.nz and search ‘Engineering Standards.’
Auckland Transport Code of Practice
at.govt.nz and search ‘Code of Practice.’

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Section 6:
Fees and charges

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6.1 Fees and charges
There are specific charges for resource and building consents*. To avoid surprises, please contact us before starting
your building or development project to find out what the different charges may be. In many cases we will be able to
provide an estimate for you.
All resource consent costs are charged by the hour. In some cases, such as when a resource consent needs to be
notified, when specialist input is required, or when a hearing needs to be held, additional deposits will be required. The
more complex and involved the application, the higher the processing charges. We will inform you of these as your
application progresses so you are aware of upcoming charges.
With subdivisions, or projects which create a new ‘household unit equivalent’ (such as the construction of a new
dwelling, or an extension with an additional kitchen), development contributions fees will be levied, as these projects
require new, or greater use of, infrastructure. These fees may be the most expensive part of your consent. You can ask
us for an estimate before beginning work.
Some further considerations:
• You will usually pay an initial deposit for processing costs on lodgement of your consent. Additional charges are
based on the actual hours required to process, monitor or inspect the consent work.
• Some applications for a building consent may also require a resource consent, incurring additional fees.
• Additional building inspections or re-inspections when work is not ready or is non-complying will be
charged separately.
• Any application which is staged, or seeks multiple consents, will have fees charged for each stage or consent.
• If you substantially amend your consent application, you will have to re-lodge it.
For a detailed schedule of fees and charges, visit aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/fees

*The RMA allows councils to charge for resource consents. See section 36 of the RMA legislation.

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6.2 Development contributions fees
Auckland’s growth can only occur on the foundation of sufficient, sustainable infrastructure, which requires funding.
Most of these costs are met from three complementary funding sources:
• rates (from residents)
• development contributions fees (from developers) and
• financial contributions fees (from developers).
Development contributions are required by Auckland Council for capital expenditure on infrastructure needs related to
new development, such as stormwater systems, roads, parks, etc. (These contributions exclude waste water and water
supply. Watercare charges separate fees for this infrastructure).
New developments include:
• the creation of new lots, and
• the construction of new dwellings (including accessory buildings – See section 2.2, 2.4 and 2.13) and extensions
or alterations (such as an additional kitchen) that allow for the potential of an additional household in
the dwelling.
Any of these activities will trigger a development contribution fee.
In addition to development contribution fees, we require financial contributions fees to be paid for some aspects
of developments (where they do not duplicate development contribution fees) under rules in the District Plans, as
provided for in the Resource Management Act 1991.
If you are considering any development work, we recommend that you or your professional advisers
consult the relevant policy on development fees to ensure you understand how development contributions
may be applied.
What are the charges?
Contribution amounts are set out clearly in our policy, to help those undertaking development to assess the
financial viability of their projects early in the process. Visit aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/contributions
What will the contributions be spent on?
Revenue from development contributions will be spent solely on infrastructure projects across the region which
provide additional capacity to meet the demands of population growth. This can include costs for:
• stormwater e.g. new and upgraded storm water drains
• community facilities e.g. community centres, libraries, cultural facilities
• open space e.g. the purchase of land for parks and reserves
• transport e.g. providing more lanes for cars and buses, and providing cycle ways and walkways.

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58
Section 7:
Additional resources

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7.1 Relevant legislation or regulations
Below is a list of legislation or regulations you may have to consider as part of your project. You can view these acts
online at legislation.govt.nz, at your local library, or from the Citizen’s Advice Bureau.

Auckland Council’s A set of maps, policies and rules which detail what is permitted on any land in the Auckland region,
various District and and the conditions under which these activities are permitted.
Regional Plans and the
Proposed Auckland
Unitary Plan
Building Act 2004 The law on building work applying to the construction of new buildings and to the alteration,
demolition and maintenance of existing buildings.

Building Regulations These contain the mandatory New Zealand Building Code, and also the rules about building
1992 consents and building inspections.

New Zealand Sets out performance standards that all building work must meet, and gives acceptable solutions
Building Code for achieving compliance. building.govt.nz/the-building-code
Resource Management The RMA is the legal framework for the sustainable management of natural and physical resources.
Act 1991 This Act governs decisions on how to manage the use, development and protection of air, land and
water, and considers effects of development on the environment.
Auckland Council Policies and procedures relating to land development.
Codes of Practice aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/engineeringapplications
Other related Acts Fencing Act 1978
Property Law Act 2007
Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987
Unit Titles Act 2010
Local Government Acts 1974 and 2002
Public Works Act 1981

7.2 Further contact details

Auckland Council aucklandcouncil.govt.nz 09 301 0101

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment dbh.govt.nz 0800 24 22 43


(includes the former Department of Building and
Housing)
Ministry for the Environment mfe.govt.nz 0800 499 700

Watercare Services Limited watercare.co.nz 09 442 2222

Veolia Water (for water services in Papakura) veoliawater.com.au 09 295 1515

Legislation New Zealand legislation.govt.nz 04 472 9639

Heritage New Zealand heritage.org.nz 04 472 4341

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7.3 Glossary

Accessory building A building or structure (such as a garage or sleepout) detached from the principal building on the
site. A fence/free-standing wall higher than 2m is also classified as an accessory building.

Activities Refers to what is done on your land. Under the various District Plans and the Proposed Auckland
Unitary Plan, these uses are classified according to their effects on the environment.

Building Consent A BCA is responsible for processing consents, inspecting work and issuing a Code Compliance
Authority (BCA) Certificate at the end of the work, if approved.

Building Consent A written approval from Council for you to carry out specific building works on a specific site.
A building consent ensures compliance with the Building Act 2004 and the New Zealand
Building Code.

Certificate of This form is required if:


Acceptance • the owner or the owner’s predecessor carried out building work for which a building consent was
required, but not obtained;
• for some reason a building consent could not practicably be obtained in advance because the
building work had to be carried out urgently;
• the Building Consent Authority that granted the building consent is unable, or refuses, to issue
a Code Compliance Certificate in relation to the building work and no other Building Consent
authority will agree to issue a Code Compliance Certificate for the building work.

Code Compliance A certificate issued by a Building Consent Authority (usually a council) at the completion of
Certificate (CCC) building work and approval of all inspections, confirming that the building work under the building
consent complies with the relevant provisions of the Building Code.

Contour A line drawn on a plan connecting ground-level points of equal height. (See definition of ground
level below).
Development fee A fee or payment which is used by the council to recover the costs of providing increased
Contribution community infrastructure and transport networks, as a result of increased growth. It is payable at
either the resource or building consent stage.

District Plan and the Council’s District Plans and the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan are a set of maps, policies and
Proposed Auckland rules, which detail the activities permitted on in the region, and the conditions under which these
Unitary Plan (PAUP) activities are permitted.
aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/districtregionalplans
aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/unitaryplan
Engineering Approval A written authority to undertake specific engineering works in accordance with the appropriate
engineering standards.

Ground Level The definition in the District Plan states ‘ground level’ shall be deemed to be the finished level of
the ground at the time of the completion of the most recent subdivision in which additional lots
were created. An exception is where no such subdivision has occurred since January 1975; ground
level shall be deemed to be the finished level of the ground on 5 January 1975.

Land Information A document issued (normally on payment of a fee) by a Territorial Authority (council). Anyone
Memorandum (LIM) may apply for a LIM, which gives information on any land within the Territorial Authority district,
including (among other information) any building consents or other authorisations applying to
buildings on the land (see Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act section 44A).

Notice to Fix (NTF) A document issued by council requiring identified defects or non-compliance in building work to be
rectified, inspected and approved.

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Overland Flow path The route taken by excess water when rainfall exceeds the capacity of the storm water system and
begins to flow across the ground. By-laws protect overland flow paths by requiring property owners
not to obstruct them with buildings, fences, or retaining walls.

Project Information A report issued at your request by council prior to, or in conjunction with, a building consent.
Memorandum (PIM) It provides information known to council which is relevant to your building proposal, such as
location of underground services, and the likelihood of flooding and subsidence. A PIM will also
advise whether any other consents are required (e.g. a resource consent).

Publicly notified Applications are publicly advertised and sent to any relevant interest groups, as well as anyone
Resource Consent who has been identified as being directly affected by the proposal.

Resource Consent A written approval from council to use, subdivide or modify your land in a manner that
contravenes the Plan rules.

Zone The designation of types of land within a region for land use planning purposes.
Types of zones include Residential, Business, Commercial, Rural, and Heritage.

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Section 8:
Application links

The following forms and publications are available online. Use the appropriate
link to download the latest version of these documents from the following sites:
Auckland Council – aucklandcouncil.govt.nz
For Building, Resource Consent and Engineering forms, visit aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/consents
For information about domestic fires and woodburners, visit aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/airquality
For swimming pools, visit aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/poolsandspas
Auckland Transport – at.govt.nz
For vehicle crossing, search: Vehicle crossing application
Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment – dbh.govt.nz
For building work that does not need a consent: dbh.govt.nz/bc-no-consent

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Find out more: phone 09 301 0101
or visit aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Related Interests