You are on page 1of 194

Healthcare

Time to realise true potential


October 7, 2016

N KS
BA

Deepak Malik Rahul Solanki Archana Menon


+91 22 6620 3147 +91 22 6623 3317 +91 22 6620 3020 Edelweiss Securities Limited
deepak.malik@edelweissfin.com rahul.solanki@edelweissfin.com archana.menon@edelweissfin.com
Healthcare

Executive Summary 
The investment thesis for Indian healthcare delivery models has always 
had a flawless appeal from the vantage of demand. However, the sector 
is  now  ripe  to  realise  its  true  potential.  Increase  in  insurance 
penetration,  along  with  reforms  in  healthcare  and  REIT  policies  can 
  unlock  the  sector’s  potential.  We  believe  that  sector’s  capex  cycle  is 
(Click here for  now coming to an end, with annual capex to nearly halve over the next 
video clip) 
5 years versus ~2.5x increase in the last 5 years. Players are now on the 
cusp of EBITDA margin and RoCE expansion. Efficacious models that can widen access with 
quality  while  maintaining  affordability  will  inevitably  scale  up  rapidly  and  deliver 
attractive RoCEs, and attractive returns for shareholders. All the companies in the sector 
will start generating FCF FY19 onwards. We initiate coverage on Fortis, Max, HCG, Dr Lal 
and Thyrocare with ‘BUY’, and maintain ‘BUY’ on Apollo. Max and HCG are our top picks in 
the sector. 
 
Healthcare infrastructure: Under‐served 
India’s healthcare space is majorly under‐served due to absence of credible infrastructure. 
The system has several inherent weaknesses: (1) funding allocated for healthcare nationally 
is a paltry 4.1% of GDP primarily due to low government contribution (~1% of GDP); and (2) 
domestic healthcare delivery infrastructure is skewed with a substantial 75% catered to by 
the organised private sector, which is primarily confined to state capitals or tier‐I cities and 
tilted in favour of secondary/tertiary/quaternary care. 
 
Income inequalities lead to under‐consumed healthcare 
In India, the flip side of economic development has been rising income level inequalities that 
have  thus  led  to  healthcare  being  under‐consumed  in  the  country.  Ergo,  the  divergence 
between healthcare expenditure of the top and bottom quintile of population in urban and 
rural  areas  has  widened  ~10x.  Moreover,  during  FY00‐15,  the  government’s  real 
expenditure  on  healthcare,  insurance  policies  and  real  per  capita  income  clocked  a  mere 
~10‐11% CAGR, leading to 11‐12% growth in per capita healthcare expenditure. 
 
Sector growth levers: Insurance penetration, healthcare & REIT policy 
Sector  potential,  despite  under  investment  and  government  apathy,  was  never  in  doubt. 
Growth drivers seem to be perfectly aligned now more than ever, owing to reforms and a 
promising healthcare policy. Going ahead, the sector will witness: (1) increase in insurance 
penetration in the most promising middle income segment (~60% of total population) from 
current <10%; (2) higher fund allocation by government towards healthcare from current 1% 
of  GDP.  Every  100bps  incremental  spend  (of  GDP)  by  government  could  boost  healthcare 
spend  growth  300bps;  and  (3)  models  like  REIT  could  help  segregate  real  estate  and 
healthcare management, thus lowering the cost of capital. 
 
Outlook for players: Pick up in margin and expansion in RoCE 
We  believe  that  structural  drivers  and  business  models  are  now  in  place.  Post  increasing 
~2.5x in last 5  years, capex cycle is now coming to an end  with overall quantum to nearly 
halve over the next 5 years, leading to improving asset turnover. As players look to sweat 
their  infrastructure  and  focus  on  business  mix,  the  sector’s  EBITDA  margin  will  inch  up 
steadily. The net result will be a directional improvement in the sector’s RoCE. Our analysis 
indicates ~700‐900bps RoCE expansion for all players over the next 5 years.  

1  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Contents 
 
Executive summary .................................................................................................................. 1 

Investment Rationale ............................................................................................................... 4 

Healthcare in India: Under‐Served, Under‐Consumed .......................................................... 10 

Healthcare Infrastructure: Under‐Served .............................................................................. 15 

Income Inequalities Lead to Under‐Consumed Healthcare ................................................... 24 

Sector Growth Levers: Insurance Penetration, Healthcare & REIT Policy .............................. 29 

Outlook for players: Pick up in margin and expansion in RoCE .............................................. 36 

Conclusion: Choosing Right Model Key .................................................................................. 42 

Appendix I: The Diagnostics Industry ..................................................................................... 40 

Appendix II: Health Insurance Sector in India ........................................................................ 43 
 
 
Companies  
Apollo Healthcare Enterprises ............................................................................................ 45 

Dr Lal PathLabs ................................................................................................................... 63 

Fortis Healthcare ................................................................................................................ 85 
Healthcare Global Enterprises .......................................................................................... 111 

Max India .......................................................................................................................... 137 

Thyrocare Technologies ................................................................................................... 161 

2  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare

Companies mentioned in this report: 
Apollo Healthcare Enterprises – Apollo 

Fortis Healthcare – Fortis 

Super Religare Laboratories ‐ SRL 

Max India – Max 
Healthcare Global Enterprises – HCG 

Narayana Hrudayalaya – Narayana 

Dr. Lal PathLabs – Dr Lal 

Thyrocare Technologies – Thyrocare 

Nueclear Healthcare Limited ‐ Nueclear 
 
Acronyms used in this report: 
Average Length of Stay ‐ ALOS 

Average Revenue per Operating Bed ‐ ARPOB 
Outpatient ‐ OP 

Inpatient ‐ IP 

Universal Health Coverage ‐ UHC 

Gross Written Premium ‐ GWP 

Real Estate Investment Trust ‐ REIT 

National Capital Region ‐ NCR 
EBITDA before net business trust (BT) Costs ‐ EBITDAC 

   

3  Edelweiss Securities Limited 

 
Table 1: Valuation and recommendation snapshot

 Mcap  EBITDA (INR mn)   P/E (x)   EV/ EBITDA (x)  ROACE (%)*  Net Debt 


CMP  Target Reco
(USD bn) 
INR Price FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY17E FY18E FY19E FY16E FY17E FY18E FY19E FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY17E
Apollo Hospitals     1,320     1,740 BUY         2.8 7,823 9,031 11,055 13,320 46.9 32.6 24.8 26.2 22.7 18.5 15.4    10.0    10.4    12.6    14.3    22,683
Fortis Healthcare        173        265 BUY         1.2 6,739 8,429 7,502 8,909 139.7 155.6 54.3 17.5 14.0 15.7 13.2      2.2      4.5      4.4      6.4    17,922
Healthcare 

Max India (MHC network)        142        175 BUY         0.6 2,147 3,030 3,810 4,560 114.8 107.8 70.7 32.5 23.0 18.3 15.3      6.7      9.2    10.0    11.0       4,546
HCG        227        310 BUY         0.3 897 1,099 1,344 1,714 190.3 197.8 68.7 23.9 19.5 15.9 12.5      6.7      5.6      6.4      9.9       4,032
Narayana Hrudayalaya *        334 NC         1.0 1,743 2,473 3,051 3,765 89.0 63.4 40.5 28.6 23.1      2.3      7.8    10.5    12.8       2,335
Kovai Medical *        801 NC         0.1 991 1,176 1,341 17.1 14.6 9.6 8.1 7.1    25.8    22.5    21.2          753
Indraprastha Medical Corporation *           55 NC         0.1 968 1,111 1,187 10.5 10.3 5.6 4.9 4.6    14.2    21.9    19.6          408
Hospitals ###### ###### 23,712
   28,503 59.6 45.4 30.5 20.3 16.5 15.0 12.5      5.9      7.2      8.3    10.6    49,182
Dr Lal Pathlabs     1,050     1,180 BUY         1.3 2,097 2,489 3,045 3,706 54.1 43.0 33.4 40.0 33.7 27.5 22.6    43.5    37.6    36.9    36.8     (3,946)
Thyrocare        616        700 BUY         0.5 935 1,166 1,475 1,797 47.1 36.6 29.1 34.3 27.5 21.8 17.9    23.8    26.9    31.2    34.7     (1,132)


Diagnostics   3,032   3,654    4,520    5,504 52.0 41.0 32.1 38.2 31.7 25.7 21.1    35.1    33.8    35.4    36.7     (5,078)
Overall ###### ###### 31,283
   37,772 60.2 46.0 32.3 24.3 19.6 17.4 14.4      7.5      8.8    10.1    12.7    44,104
Source: Company, Bloomberg, Edelweiss research
Note: * Not covered
Note: RoE estimates for Narayana Hrudayalaya, Kovai Medical and  Indraprastha Medical Corporation as RoCEs are not available

Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare

Investment Rationale 
 
The  investment  thesis  for  Indian  healthcare  delivery  models  has  always  had  a  flawless 
appeal  from  the  vantage  of  demand.  However,  the  sector  is  now  ripe  to  realise  its  true 
potential.  Increase  in  insurance  penetration,  along  with  reforms  in  healthcare  and  REIT 
policies  can  unlock  the  sector’s  potential.  We  believe  that  sector’s  capex  cycle  is  now 
coming  to  an  end,  with  annual  capex  to  nearly  halve  over  the  next  5  years  versus  ~2.5x 
increase  in  the  last  5  years.  Players  are  now  on  the  cusp  of  EBITDA  margin  and  RoCE 
expansion.  Efficacious  models  that  can  widen  access  with  quality  while  maintaining 
affordability  will  inevitably  scale  up  rapidly  and  deliver  attractive  RoCEs,  and  attractive 
returns  for  shareholders.  All  the  companies  in  the  sector  will  start  generating  FCF  FY19 
onwards.  We  initiate  coverage  on  Fortis,  Max,  HCG,  Dr  Lal  and  Thyrocare  with  ‘BUY’,  and 
maintain ‘BUY’ on Apollo. Max and HCG are our top picks in the sector. 
 
Healthcare infrastructure: Under‐served 
India  lacks  an  overall  robust  healthcare  infrastructure  and  its  system  is  characterised  by 
several  inherent  weaknesses.  Funding  allocated  for  healthcare  nationally  is  abysmally  low 
(4.1% of GDP) primarily due to low contribution from the government (1% of GDP). Around 
75% of India’s total healthcare delivery market is catered to by the private sector. This has 
resulted  in  most  organised  private  infrastructure  being  confined  to  state  capitals  or  tier‐I 
cities and skewed towards secondary/tertiary/quaternary. 
 
Decades  of  under‐investment  in  the  health  sector  has  led  to  immense  deficiency  in 
infrastructure.  India  is  the  poorest  performer  on  the  health  front  among  5  BRICS  (Brazil, 
Russia,  India,  China  and  South  Africa)  nations.  Despite  higher  income  per  head  and  2 
decades of sustained economic growth, the country has fallen behind even several ASEAN 
countries on many health indicators. 
 
Private  investments  have  largely  focused  on  urban  areas  that  have  comparably  shorter 
gestation  period  compared  to  rural  areas.  The  unorganised  sector  covers  majority  of  the 
market and has created relatively fragmented capacity across the country. 
 
Chart 1: Indian healthcare system lags in most parameters compared to other countries 
8,895 

85
1,440 

2.5
3.9

1.9
3.0
(USD)
(USD)

(x)

(%)
(x)

0.7

25
0.9
90 

15 
322 

58 

China

India
US

China

India
US
China

India
US
China

India
US

India
US

Per capita spending 
on pharma products 
Per capita healthcare  and medical devices  Hospital beds per  Doctors per 1000 
expenditure (2012) (2013) 1,000 people (2012) % insured (2012)
 
Source: WHO‐World Health Statistics 2013, Edelweiss research 

5  Edelweiss Securities Limited 

Healthcare 

Chart 2: Healthcare supply skewed towards urban geographies and highly unorganised across different formats 
100.0 100.0 

80.0 
80.0
60.0 

(%)
60.0 40.0 
(%)

40.0 20.0 

0.0 

Pathology
Multispeciality

Eye care

Imaging
20.0

hospitals
0.0
Population Hospitals Doctors Hospital 
beds
Rural Urban Organised players Unorganised players
  
Source: Census 2011 data; Central Bureau of Health Intelligence (CBHI); Bain analysis, Edelweiss research 
 
Income inequalities lead to under‐consumed healthcare 
As development proceeds, earnings of different classes rise asymmetrically in India. Income 
levels  of  the  upper  and  middle‐income  classes  are  rising  more  rapidly  than  those  of  the 
lower‐income  classes.  In  addition  to  continuing  globalisation  and  technological  changes, 
there  are  3  factors  intensifying  India’s  inequality  problem,  viz.,  unequal  asset  distribution, 
inadequate  job  creation  and  lack  of  political  will.  These  have  cumulatively  led  to  ~10x 
difference  between  healthcare  expenditures  of  the  top  and  bottom  quintile  of  urban  and 
rural  populations.  Moreover,  during  FY00‐15,  the  government’s  real  expenditure  on 
healthcare,  insurance  policies  and  real  per  capita  income  clocked  a  mere  ~10‐11%  CAGR, 
leading to 11‐12% growth in per capita healthcare expenditure. 
 
Chart 3: Per capita private healthcare expenditure has grown  Chart 4: This has resulted in decline in healthcare 
at 9%, lagging GDP per capita growth of 11%  expenditure, as a % of GDP 
CAGR 11% Healthcare spend as a % of GDP‐India

CAGR 9% 4.5  4.5 


CAGR 9% 4.4 
4.3 
4.1 
(x)

4.1 
3.9 
(%)

3.8 

2000 2005 2010 2012


Urban private healthcare expenditure per capita
2000

2002

2004

2006

2008

2010

2012

2014

Rural private healthcare expenditure per capita
GDP per capita
    
Source: Government of India (PFCE data), National Sample survey, Edelweiss research 
 
   

6  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare

Sector growth levers: Insurance penetration, Healthcare & REIT policy 
Sector  potential,  despite  under  investment  and  government  apathy,  was  never  in  doubt. 
Growth drivers seem to be perfectly aligned now more than ever, owing to reforms and a 
promising healthcare policy. Going ahead, the sector will witness: (1) increase in insurance 
penetration in the most promising middle income segment (~60% of total population) from 
current <10%; (2) higher fund allocation by government towards healthcare from current 1% 
of  GDP.  Every  100bps  incremental  spend  (of  GDP)  by  government  could  boost  healthcare 
spend  growth  300bps;  and  (3)  models  like  REIT  could  help  segregate  real  estate  and 
healthcare management, thus lowering the cost of capital. 
 
Total healthcare expenditure in India is USD85bn, having clocked 13% CAGR during FY00‐15. 
While  private  expenditure  jumped  ~12%,  expenditure  by  government/insurance  rose 
14%/12%.  Going  forward,  assuming  GDP  growth  of  8%  over  FY16‐22,  there  could  be  3 
scenarios for healthcare expenditure: 
 
(a) In base case scenario, if we assume government expenditure to remain at current level 
of  1%  of  GDP  and  private/insurance  expenditure  to  increase  at  14%/10%  CAGR,  it 
suggests  total  healthcare  expenditure  will  clock  13%  CAGR  to  ~USD160bn  by  FY21E 
Going  forward,  the  sector  will 
versus ~USD85bn currently. 
witness:  (i)  increase  in  insurance 
penetration;  (ii)  higher  fund  (b) Maintaining similar assumptions for private and government expenditure as base case, 
allocation  by  the  government  if we assume that universal health coverage (UHC) will map all the currently uninsured 
towards  healthcare;  and  (iii)  ~188mn BPL (below poverty line) individuals and the claim ratio is ~50% by FY21, total 
models  like  REIT  could  help  lower  healthcare expenditure would rise to ~USD190bn (17% CAGR). 
the cost of capital. 
(c) Keeping similar assumptions for private and insurance expenditure as base case, if one 
were to assume that government expenditure on healthcare will rise gradually from 1% 
to 3% of GDP, total healthcare expenditure would rise to ~USD200bn (19% CAGR). 
 
Chart 5: Healthcare expenditure growth can be boosted by government (USD bn) 
210

168

Government expenditure 
increased to ~3% of GDP
Universal Healthcare 

126
(USD bn)

launched

84
Government 
expenditure 
remains at 
~1% of GDP

42

0
FY16 base FY21 FY21 FY21
base case UHC case 3% of GDP case
 
Source: Government of India (PFCE data), Edelweiss research 
   

7  Edelweiss Securities Limited 

Healthcare 

Outlook for players: Pick up in margin and expansion in RoCE 
Key trends which will dominate the healthcare space going forward are: 

 Shift from unorganised to organised players: We believe structural drivers and strong 
business  models  are  in  place  to  propel  mid  teens  overall  growth.  However,  private 
Sector capex has jumped to ~2.5x 
over the last 5 years, to halve  over 
players in the sector will witness faster growth over next 5 years. The healthcare sector 
next 5 years (INR bn)  has  one  of  the  least  penetration  of  organised  players.  As  organised  players  become 
30  more  customer‐centric,  outcomes‐driven  and  prevention‐focused  and  customers 
24  become  more  brand  conscious,  organised  players  will  gain  market  share  steadily  and 
grow 300‐400bps faster than the overall sector (13% base case). 
18 
12   Decline of cost of capital: Macro trends indicate that interest rates are on a downward 
6  trajectory. Moreover, REIT and other models will help hospital players tap markets for 
0  cheaper  capital.  We  believe,  over  the  next  5  years,  cost  of  capital  for  the  sector  will 
FY17E
FY18E
FY19E
FY20E
FY21E
FY12
FY13
FY14
FY15
FY16

plummet to 7‐8% from 13‐14% currently. 

 RoCE/ RoE expansion for the sector: Capex has jumped to ~2.5x over the past 5 years. 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research  We believe the aggressive investment phase in the healthcare sector is now coming to 
an end and most players are now looking to sweat their land banks through brownfield 
expansion.  Over  the  next  5  years,  overall  quantum  will  fall  to  nearly  half,  thereby 
improving  asset  turnover.  As  players  look  to  sweat  their  infrastructure  and  focus  on 
business  mix,  the  sector’s  EBITDA  margin  will  inch  up  steadily.  The  net  result  of 
improved  asset  turnover  and  EBITDA  margin  will  be  a  directional  improvement  in  the 
sector’s RoCE. Our analysis indicates ~700‐900bps RoCE expansion for all players over 
the next 5 years. 
 
Chart 6: EBITDA Margin and RoCE for the sector to increase over next 5 years 
19.5 20.0 

18.0 16.0 

16.5 12.0 
(%)

(%)

15.0 8.0 

13.5 4.0 

12.0 0.0 
FY17E

FY18E

FY19E

FY20E

FY21E
FY12

FY13

FY14

FY15

FY16

FY17E

FY18E

FY19E

FY20E

FY21E
FY13

FY14

FY15

FY16

EBITDA Margin RoCE
  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
   

8  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare

Conclusion: Choosing right model key 
We believe that with sector at the cusp of EBITDA margin and RoCE expansion, now is the 
time for the sector to realise its true potential. Efficacious business models that can widen 
access  with  quality  whilst  maintaining  affordability  will  inevitably  scale  up  rapidly  and 
deliver attractive returns for shareholders. 
 
Single specialty hospitals preferred over multi‐specialty for faster scale up, breakeven 
Over  the  past decade,  growth  capital  has  steadily  flocked  to  more  efficacious  models  that 
Single specialty hospitals are able  seek  to  breakeven  sooner  as  well  as  provide  better  clinical  outcomes  for  patients.  Single 
to scale up better and utilise  specialty  hospitals  have  trumped  multi‐specialty  hospitals  due  to  numerous  inherent 
capital more efficiently due to  advantages. These models are able to scale up better and utilise capital more efficiently due 
lower capital requirement and  to  lower  capital  requirement  and  superior  therapeutic  focus.  They  avail  advantage  of 
superior therapeutic focus.  economies  of  scale.  They  are  also  able  to  offer  best‐in‐class  clinical  tertiary/quaternary 
protocols to patients due to the vast knowledge repository that they are able to create over 
time on a specific specialty. 
 
We like HCG’s single specialty model which focuses on addressing high potential therapies 
like  oncology  and  fertility.  The  company’s  recent  ventures  have  turned  profitable  within 
~12‐18 months. We initiate coverage on HCG with ‘BUY’. 
 
Long‐term structural story of multi‐specialty hospitals remains attractive 
The multi‐specialty space offers a variety of themes which suit diverse investment criteria. 
Most  multi‐specialty  hospitals  in  India  are  focused  on  top‐end  of  the  pyramid.  Instead  of 
targeting bottom of the pyramid or mass markets, these hospital chains target the top end 
with prices that are high enough to avoid the mass market tag, while being low enough to 
attract  middle/higher  middle  class  consumers,  whose  ranks  are  expected  to  swell  as  India 
moves into accelerated growth trajectory of >8%. 
 
Fig 1: Addressable markets for multispecialty hospitals 

Fortis Globals & Strivers
15% of population

3 mn households, 16mn population
Apollo
>INR 1.7mn/ year
Max
HCG

Fortis Seekers
Apollo 31mn households, 160mn population
Max INR 340k ‐ 1.7mn/year
HCG

Aspirers
Narayana 71mn households, 360mn population
Government facilities INR 150k ‐ 340k/year

Deprived
135mn households, 680mn population
Government facilities <INR 150k/year

 
Source: Industry reports, Edelweiss research  

9  Edelweiss Securities Limited 

Healthcare 

Apollo, Fortis and Max are focused on the top end of the pyramid, whereas Narayana has 
carved  a  niche  at  the  mid  level  of  the  pyramid,  leaving  the  bottom  level  space  for 
government hospitals. 
 
Further,  hospital  chains  in  the  top  end  also  provide  different  flavours  to  suit  diverse 
investment tastes and styles. Within multi‐specialty hospitals we believe investors will need 
to cherry pick according to their respective investment criteria. 

(a) For growth conscious investors, Max provides best visibility in terms of EBITDA growth 
with  an  aggressive,  yet  balanced  growth  plan.  Its  EBITDA  is  estimated  to  clock  25% 
Apollo, Fortis and Max are focused  CAGR over FY16‐21 compared to Apollo’s 20% and Fortis’ 13% (EBITDAC). We believe, 
on  the  top  end  of  the  pyramid,  Max  is  a  compelling  bet  on  the  tertiary  care  opportunity  in  the  NCR  market,  which 
whereas  Narayana  has  carved  a  could have upsides from investments in health insurance. 
niche  at  the  mid  level  of  the 
(b) For  value  conscious  investors,  Fortis  is  the  best  bet.  It  is  on  the  cusp  of  unlocking 
pyramid,  leaving  the  bottom  level 
significant  value  by:  (i)  demerging  its  56%  subsidiary  SRL  which  can  unlock  value  of 
space for government hospitals 
~INR57/share; and (ii) partially unwinding its REIT capital structure, which we believe is 
inefficient. 

(c) For conservative and return‐on‐capital conscious investors, Apollo is the best bet. It is 
equipping  itself  to  successfully  battle  the  anticipated  disruption  in  the  healthcare 
sector. Going forward, it is targeting select tertiary care focused greenfield investments 
and  focus  on  improving  operating  metrics  for  the  capacity  it  has  rapidly  created  over 
the past 5 years. Under AHLL, it is adding a number of new healthcare delivery formats 
focused  on  primary  and  secondary  care  that  are  bound  to  bolster  its  patient 
engagement early in the lifecycle. 
 
Table 2: Operating metrics 
Apollo Fortis Max HCG Narayana
Increase in number of beds over 5 years (FY16‐FY21E)                 945            1,450               724               611 NA
Revenue growth CAGR (FY16‐FY21E)                15.6              11.4              16.3              19.2 NA
EBITDA growth CAGR (FY16‐FY21E)                20.4              12.8              24.6              22.3 NA
RoCE improvement  (FY16‐FY21E) 955bps 837bps 730bps 882bps NA
RoCE (FY21E)                19.5              10.6              14.0              15.5 NA

Efficiency parameters (FY16)
ALOS                   4.2                3.6                3.3                2.9                4.3
occupancy (%)                63.0              72.0              71.1              51.0              54.2
ARPOB (INR/day)            28,036         37,534         30,334         26,592         17,534
outpatient/in patient volume                   3.5                9.0              27.8 NA                9.7
no of doctors/bed                   1.3                0.7                1.3                0.6                0.5
no of support staff/doctor                   1.7 NA                2.6                2.6                4.2  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
   

10  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare

Diagnostics has advantage of scaling up faster with better RoCE  
Investment  case  for  diagnostics  is  that  it  is  still  a  largely  under‐consumed  module  of 
treatment  and  demand  has  significant  room  to  grow.  As  evidence‐based  treatments  gain 
ground,  growth  drivers  for  diagnostics  will  remain  upbeat.  Even  as  India  continues  to 
grapple with the burden of communicable diseases, a wave of non‐communicable diseases 
has  flooded  the  country  with  ailments  like  diabetes,  obesity  and  cancer,  among  others. 
Hence,  preventive  healthcare  diagnosis  (wellness)  will  continue  to  gain  popularity.  Also, 
current  market  share  of  organised  chains  is  fairly  low,  boosting  their  long‐term  growth 
visibility.  The  diagnostics  industry  also  offers  the  best  returns  on  capital  within  healthcare 
services due to its asset‐light reagent rental model and low gestation period. 
 
The  diagnostics  space  has  the  The most significant risk with diagnostics is that it is a low‐entry barrier business, with low 
advantage  of  faster  scale  up  and  capex  requirement  and  fewer  regulatory  hurdles.  Attracted  by  high  growth  rate  and 
better  RoCE.  While  it  has  same  lucrative  returns,  competitive  intensity  in  the  space  could  rise  going  ahead,  be  it  among 
growth drivers as hospitals, due to  incumbents  of  the  organised  market  or  individually‐owned  labs  offering  personalised 
low  entry  barriers  and  stretched  customer‐centric services or the new startup labs that are focusing on specific tests such as 
valuations  we  prefer  the  hospitals  new‐born screening or genomics. In fact, already a number of private equity backed regional 
space.  players  have  started  aggressively  expanding  their  operations.  Another  factor  is  the 
reinvestment  risk  of  business  cash  flow.  While  RoCE  of  the  business  is  currently  high,  it 
could dilute if incremental capital employed does not generate similar returns. 
 
The  diagnostics  space  has  the  advantage  of  faster  scale  up  and  better  RoCE.  While  it  has 
same  growth  drivers  as  hospitals,  due  to  low  entry  barriers  and  stretched  valuations  we 
prefer  the  hospitals  space.  However,  in  the  diagnostic  space,  we  prefer  Dr  Lal  over 
Thyrocare  for  its  strong  brand  and  B2C  model.  We  estimate  Dr  Lal  and  Thyrocare  to  post 
25%  profit  CAGR  over  the  next  5  years  on  account  of  rising  prevalence  of  evidence‐based 
treatment, shift in favour of unorganised players and expanding product portfolio. Both the 
players  are  in  a  strong  FCF  generation  phase  owing  to  low  capex  requirements,  which  is 
envisaged  to  sustain  high  valuations  in  the  medium  term.  We  initiate  coverage  on  Dr  Lal 
and Thyrocare with ‘BUY’ recommendations. 
 
   

11  Edelweiss Securities Limited 

Healthcare 

Table 3: Indian healthcare services ‐ Valuation and recommendation snapshot 
CMP  Target  Mcap P/E (x)  EV/ EBITDA (x)  RoCE (%)
INR Price Reco (USD bn)  FY17E FY18E FY19E FY16E FY17E FY18E FY19E FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E
Apollo Hospitals     1,320     1,740 BUY         2.8 46.9 32.6 24.8 26.2 22.7 18.5 15.4    10.0    10.4    12.6    14.3
Fortis Healthcare        173        265 BUY         1.2 139.7 155.6 54.3 17.5 14.0 15.7 13.2      2.2      4.5      4.4      6.4
Max India (MHC network)        142        175 BUY         0.6 114.8 107.8 70.7 32.5 23.0 18.3 15.3      6.7      9.2    10.0    11.0
HCG        227        310 BUY         0.3 190.3 197.8 68.7 23.9 19.5 15.9 12.5      6.7      5.6      6.4      9.9
Narayana Hrudayalaya *        334 NC         1.0 89.0 63.4 45.2 40.5 28.6 23.1 18.8      2.3      7.8    10.5    12.8
Kovai Medical *        801 NC         0.1 17.1 14.6 9.6 8.1 7.1    25.8    22.5    21.2
Indraprastha Medical Corporation *           55 NC         0.1 10.5 10.3 5.6 4.9 4.6    14.2    21.9    19.6
Hospitals 59.6 45.4 30.5 20.3 16.5 15.0 12.5      5.9      7.2      8.3    10.6
Dr Lal Pathlabs     1,050     1,180 BUY         1.3 54.1 43.0 33.4 40.0 33.7 27.5 22.6    43.5    37.6    36.9    36.8
Thyrocare        616        700 BUY         0.5 47.1 36.6 29.1 34.3 27.5 21.8 17.9    23.8    26.9    31.2    34.7
Diagnostics 52.0 41.0 32.1 38.2 31.7 25.7 21.1    35.1    33.8    35.4    36.7
Overall 60.2 46.0 32.3 24.3 19.6 17.4 14.4      7.5      8.8    10.1    12.7  
Source: Company, Bloomberg, Edelweiss research 
Note: * Not covered 
Note: RoE estimates for Narayana Hrudayalaya, Kovai Medical and Indraprastha Medical 
Corporation as RoCEs are not available 
 

   

12  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare

Healthcare in India: Under‐Served, Under‐Consumed 
 
India is at the crossroads of an exciting and challenging period in its history. While the 
investment  thesis  for  Indian  healthcare  delivery  models  does  have  a  flawless  appeal 
from  the  vantage  of  demand,  a  number  of  affordability  and  supply  constraints  curb 
enthusiasm. Nathealth’s 2025 Healthcare roadmap aptly infers that India’s healthcare 
is under‐served because of suboptimal infrastructure and under‐consumed because of 
lack of affordability. 
 
India’s demographic, economic and cultural factors render it a perfect ecosystem for a large 
Current  healthcare  standards  in  and quickly growing goldmine for healthcare producers and providers. It is the second most 
India  are  way  below  global  populous  country  in  the  world  and  predicted  to  become  the  most  populous  in  the  future. 
standards in terms of:  With bulk of the populace living in sub‐optimal sanitation conditions, without safe drinking 
(i)  capacity  and  geographic  reach  water  and  in  a  largely  tropical  climate,  communicable  diseases  will  keep  driving  demand. 
(accessibility)  Moreover,  demand  is  expected  to  burgeon  as  high  number  of  citizens  age,  income  levels 
(ii) quality  rise, non‐communicable  lifestyle ailments increase, healthcare awareness improves,  health 
(iii) affordability  insurance  penetration  deepens,  medical  tourism  increases  and  a  number  of  drug‐resistant 
diseases develop. Advocacy of healthcare as a basic human right is on the rise in India and a 
potent consumption driver. 
 
The  current  report  card  on  all  the  3  critical  tenets  in  the  healthcare  sector  is  much  below 
global  standards:  not  just  (i)  capacity  &  geographical  access  (accessibility);  and  (ii)  quality; 
but also (iii) affordability. 
 
The overall low expenditure combined with disproportionate private contribution to capital 
investment has led to an inherently weak healthcare system reflected in: (i) overall low bed 
density;  (ii)  infra  skew  towards  urban  versus  rural;  and  (iii)  infra  skew  towards  secondary/ 
tertiary  versus  primary.  While  healthcare  in  the  country  is  under  served  (sub‐optimal 
infrastructure), it is also under consumed because of several factors that make affordability 
and access a challenge for the population, especially at the bottom of the pyramid. Demand 
solely cannot drive healthcare commerce. Expenditure on healthcare is abysmally low at just 
4.1% of GDP, primarily due to low government funding (1% of GDP). 
 
Chart 7: Healthcare infrastructure is under‐served 
Total healthcare expenditure as a % of GDP (2014)
US 17.1
Switzerland 11.7
Germany 11.3
Japan 10.2
World avg 9.9
Australia 9.4
UK 9.1
South Africa 8.8
Brazil 8.3
Russia 7.1
Thailand 6.5
Nepal 5.8
China 5.5
Philippines 4.7
India 4
 
Source: PFCE, WHO‐World Health Statistics 2013, Edelweiss research 

13  Edelweiss Securities Limited 

Healthcare 

Healthcare ecosystem in India 
India’s  healthcare  market  is  experiencing  a  wave  of  accelerated  growth  currently  with  the 
Total spending on healthcare 
total  spending  on  healthcare  services  expected  to  clock  13%  CAGR  over  FY16‐21  to 
services estimated to clock 13% 
~USD160bn.  Making  healthcare  affordable  and  accessible  for  all  citizens  is  one  of  the  key 
CAGR over FY16‐21 to ~USD160bn 
focus areas of the government. Never before has the healthcare industry offered so much 
hope amidst so much uncertainty. Yes, we are living in a time of great economic and social 
upheaval, with new healthcare models and formats exerting pressure on traditional delivery 
models. This is a sector that is highly unorganised and lacks transparency. 
 
In the US, the healthcare industry makes up an astonishing 17.3% of the nation’s economy, 
whereas  in  India  it  contributes  only  4.1%.  As  the  country  moves  forward  on  the  path  of 
development, healthcare is moving up the government’s priority list.  
 
Investors  have  multiple  options  to  invest  in  different  segments  of  the  healthcare  value 
chain, where overall growth drivers are the same, but models differ in terms of regulatory 
and  financial  challenges.  Before  we  deep  dive  into  the  hospital  and  diagnostic  space,  let’s 
understand the overall healthcare space in India. 
 
India’s  healthcare  ecosystem  encompasses  following  industries:  (a)  hospitals;  (b) 
pharmaceuticals;  (c)  diagnostics;  (d)  medical  insurance;  (e)  healthcare  industrials;  and  (f) 
medical  devices  &  surgical  supplies.  Our  report  focuses  primarily  on  hospitals  and 
diagnostics. 
 
Fig 2: Hospitals make up ~75% of India’s overall healthcare market  
Indian Healthcare market‐ USD 85bn
USD 63bn USD 15bn USD 4bn USD 3bn
100%

Govt
Private

80%

Group Insurance
Apollo
Fortis
Others
Max
60%
Narayana
Hrudayalaya
HCG
Sun Pharma

40% Abbott
Cipla Dr Lal Pathlabs
Thyrocare
Zydus Cadila
Metropolis
20% SRL
Individual

Public Lupin

0%
Hospitals Pharma Diagnostics Insurance

Source: Industry, Edelweiss research 
 
   

14  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare

Healthcare delivery market (USD bn)  Healthcare delivery (hospitals): 75% of market, growing at 12% 
Hospitals  is  the  biggest  segment  and  contributes  ~75%  to  India’s  healthcare  market.  The 
segment  clocked  ~12%  CAGR  during  2012‐15  to  ~USD63bn.  Private  healthcare  system 
comprises  ~75%  of  total  healthcare  market,  implying  ~USD48bn  opportunity  for  private 
63 players who have put up ~185,000 beds across the country. 
46 
 

 
2012 2015  

Source: Industry reports,    
Edelweiss research 
 
Indian pharmaceuticals market (USD bn)
Pharmaceuticals: 18% of overall market, growing at 13% 
At  ~USD15bn,  pharmaceuticals  is  the  next  biggest  opportunity  within  healthcare  and  has 
grown at 13% during 2012‐15. Pharmaceutical consumables make up a significant ~25% of 
15 end‐user expenditure in healthcare delivery. 
10 
 
 
 
2012 2015  
 
Source: Industry reports,  
Edelweiss research  
Diagnostics market (USD bn) Diagnostics: 4% of overall market, growing at 14% 
In the past, the style of treatment relied less on evidence‐based approaches. However, this 
trend  witnessed  a  quick  turnaround  in  the  previous  decade.  The  diagnostics  industry  has 
started playing a key role in the healthcare value chain and clocked ~14% CAGR during 2012‐
3.5  15  to  ~USD4bn.  Though  there  is  much  fragmentation  with  >100k  labs  in  the  country, 
2.4  demand for institutionalised services has led to organised players becoming more relevant 
in the system. Organised players in this sunrise sector have hence benefited from this trend. 
SRL, Metropolis, Dr Lal, Thyrocare and Medall, among others, are major organised players in 
2012 2015
the segment. 
Source: Industry reports,    
Edelweiss research  
 
Health insurance market (USD bn) Medical insurance: 4% of overall market, growing at 16%  
Affordability  of  healthcare  services,  especially  secondary  care  and  higher,  increases 
dramatically with improvement in insurance coverage. While the government needs to do 
10.9 much more to boost consumer uptake of private insurance as well as lend higher support to 
8.2
social  health  security,  medical  insurance  premiums  posted  ~16%  CAGR  during  2012‐15  to 
3.1  ~USD3bn  as  the  number  of  policies  clocked  10%  CAGR  over  the  same  period.  However, 
2.0 
penetration is still barely at ~25%, implying humungous headroom for growth. 
2012 2015  
Premium Policies (mn)  
Source: CRISIL, IRDA Annual Reports 
 
   

15  Edelweiss Securities Limited 

Healthcare 

Healthcare Infrastructure: Under‐Served 
 
India’s  healthcare  space  is  majorly  under‐served  due  to  absence  of  credible 
infrastructure.  The  system  has  several  inherent  weaknesses:  (1)  funding  allocated  for 
healthcare  nationally  is  a  paltry  4.1%  of  GDP  primarily  due  to  low  government 
contribution  (~1%  of  GDP);  and  (2)  domestic  healthcare  delivery  infrastructure  is 
skewed  with  a  substantial  75%  catered  to  by  the  organised  private  sector,  which  is 
primarily  confined  to  state  capitals  or  tier‐I  cities  and  tilted  in  favour  of 
secondary/tertiary/quaternary care. 
 
 
Deficient infrastructure 
India  is  behind  the  global  curve  in  providing  healthcare  access.  Making  healthcare 
affordable and accessible to all citizens is one of the government’s key focus areas currently. 
The challenge is huge, as nearly 67% of the population lives in rural areas and ~26% is below 
Decades of under‐investment in  the  poverty  line.  Not  only  does  the  country  lack  strong  healthcare  infrastructure,  it  has 
the health sector has led to  several inherent weaknesses in the system as well. Even in terms of metrics, be it per capita 
immense deficiency in  number of beds or doctors, India lags developed as well as developing peers. 
infrastructure. India is the poorest   
performer on the health front  Decades  of  under‐investment  in  the  health  sector  has  led  to  immense  deficiency  in 
among the 5 BRICS (Brazil, Russia,  infrastructure. India is the poorest performer on the health front among the 5 BRICS (Brazil, 
India, China and South Africa)  Russia,  India,  China  and  South  Africa)  nations.  Despite  higher  income  per  head  and  2 
nations.  decades of sustained economic growth, the country has fallen behind even several ASEAN 
countries on many health indicators.  
 
Chart 8: Healthcare infrastructure is under‐served 
8,895 

85
1,440 

2.5
3.9

1.9
3.0
(USD)
(USD)

(x)

(%)
(x)

0.7

25
0.9
90 

15 
322 

58 

China

India
US

China

India
US
China

India
US
China

India
US

India
US

Per capita spending 
on pharma products 
Per capita healthcare  and medical devices  Hospital beds per  Doctors per 1000 
expenditure (2012) (2013) 1,000 people (2012) % insured (2012)
 
Source: WHO‐World Health Statistics 2013, Edelweiss research

16  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare

Urban versus rural infrastructure  Infrastructure skewed towards urban areas 
The health care delivery segment is dominated by the private sector, with 75% of the total 
34.0 market catered to by it. However, private investments have largely focused on urban areas 
Beds per 10,000

that  have  comparably  shorter  gestation  period  compared  to  rural  areas.  As  such,  urban 
infrastructure  is  still  respectable  versus  global  standards.  Further,  major  part  of  the 
organised private infrastructure is confined to state capitals or tier I cities, with tier II and III 
cities  left  far  behind.  In  fact,  some  metro  territories  are  likely  to  be  saddled  with  over 
2.5 9.0 capacity going ahead. 
 
Rural  infrastructure  has  largely  been  supported  by  public  investments,  though  fairly 
urban

India

India
rural
India

inadequate. While majority of the country’s population lives in rural areas, access in these 
areas  trails  access  in  urban  areas  significantly.  If  we  dissect  the  infrastructure  across 
Source: Department of Health Services,  geographies,  it  is  clearly  skewed  towards  urban  areas.  Though  a  major  chunk  (~67%)  of 
World Bank WDI
India’s  population  stays  in  rural  areas,  just  ~30%  of  the  ~55,000  hospitals  are  situated  in 
these areas; the share is even lower in terms of beds, as urban hospitals tend to have more 
beds.  In  fact,  bed  density  increases  or  decreases  proportionally  to  affluence.  For  instance, 
there  are  ~40  beds  per  10,000  people  in  metros,  but  the  number  falls  to  ~25  beds  per 
Urban spread  10,000 people in a tier‐IV city (~10,000‐20,000 population). 
 
52

50
47
Beds per 10,000

45

Key reasons for this disparity: 
32
31

31

1. Per capita income and expenditure on healthcare are lower in rural than urban areas. 
24

2. The ratio of doctors between urban and rural areas is ~2.5x. 
3. Insurance penetration in rural is much lower than urban. 
 
Chennai
Ahmedabad
Bengaluru

Hyderabad

Pune
Mumbai
NCR
Kolkata

Most  rural  practitioners  are  government  employees  sans  specialisation.  Doctors  in  urban 
areas tend to be equipped with specific specialisation. More than 8% of primary healthcare 
centres in India do not have doctors. Absenteeism is another issue. 
 
Source: CRISIL, Apollo One  of  the  most  under‐served  segment  within  the  sector  is  primary  care.  Private 
investments  are  not  only  skewed  towards  urban  areas,  they  are  also  skewed  towards 
curative care (tertiary/quaternary) rather than preventive care (primary/ secondary). 
 
Chart 9: Healthcare supply skewed towards urban areas 
100.0

80.0

60.0
(%)

40.0

20.0

0.0
Population Hospitals Doctors Hospital beds
Rural Urban
 
Source: NatHealth, Bain Capital, Edelweiss research 

17  Edelweiss Securities Limited 

Healthcare 

This presents both a challenge and opportunity. Rising penetration of quality health services 
in rural areas can not only boost healthcare access, but also be a growth driver. 
 
Delivery highly unorganised across different formats 
Healthcare  infrastructure  in  India  is  also  characterised  by  fragmentation.  The  unorganised 
sector covers majority of the market and has created relatively fragmented capacity across 
the country. 
 
On an average, the number of beds in Indian hospitals is typically ~1/3rd of US and very few 
hospitals have >200 beds. The share of organised sector within the multi‐specialty hospitals 
segment  is  <20%.  The  largest  of  these  organised  players  are  Apollo,  Fortis  and  Narayana. 
The share of organised players is even smaller in single specialty segment, as a large number 
of  doctors  in  India  have  created  standalone  single  specialty  hospitals  in  their  respective 
The share of organised sector  geographies. 
within the multi‐specialty hospitals   
segment is <20%. The largest of  Across  diagnostics,  market  share  of  organised  players  is  even  lower.  While  organised 
these organised players are Apollo,  pathology  players  make  up  ~15%  of  the  market,  in  radiology  they  constitute  <10%.  The 
Fortis and Narayana.  pathology model is more conducive to an organised nation‐wide player. SRL is the biggest 
player with ~40% share, followed by Dr Lal, Metropolis and Thyrocare. 
 
This is already evident in the diagnostics space where the organised segment is growing at a 
much faster clip than the overall market. 
 
Chart 10: Delivery highly unorganised across different formats 
USD23bn USD4.5bn USD3.5bn USD600mn USD2.2bn USD400mn USD1.8bn USD175mn
100.0
Medfort Thyrocare
Others Maxvision Others
Lotus
80.0 Eye Q Metropolis
Care Centre  Mahajan 
Global
for Sight Imagins
60.0 Dr Lal  Arthi 
Manipal
Dr Aggarwal Pathlabs Diagnostics
(%)

Narayana Vijaya 
40.0 Diagnostic
Pvt Ltd
Fortis
20.0 Vasan SRL
Apollo Medall
0.0
Market Size # beds (%) Market Size # clinics (%) Market Size Organised Market Size Organised Market Size
Revenues
Revenues
Multispeciality  Eye care Pathology Imaging Other formats 
hospitals (<5% 
organised)
Organised players Unorganised players
 
Source: NatHealth, Bain Capital, Edelweiss research 
 

 
   

18  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare

“India today possesses, as never 
Income Inequalities Lead to Under‐Consumed Healthcare 
before, a sophisticated arsenal of  In  India,  the  flip  side  of  economic  development  has  been  rising  income  level 
interventions, technologies and  inequalities  that  have  thus  led  to  healthcare  being  under‐consumed  in  the  country. 
knowledge required for providing  Ergo, the divergence between healthcare expenditure of the top and bottom quintile of 
health care to her people. Yet, the  population in urban and rural areas has widened ~10x. Moreover, during FY00‐15, the 
gaps in health outcomes continue  government’s  real  expenditure  on  healthcare,  insurance  policies  and  real  per  capita 
to widen.”  income  clocked  a  mere  ~10‐11%  CAGR,  leading  to  11‐12%  growth  in  per  capita 
  healthcare expenditure.
 
National  Draft  Health  Policy 
 
35 
Automobile penetration  While  India’s  healthcare  service  infrastructure  is  under  served,  low  affordability  has  also 
(% of households) resulted in these services being under‐consumed. While the healthcare opportunity entails 
immense potential due to sheer population size, it is pertinent to note that the addressable 
population  is  much  smaller  as  affordability  is  an  issue  at  the  bottom  of  the  economic 
pyramid. Vehicle penetration in India can give a sense in terms of spending power—only 9% 
of the population or 35% of households owns one 2‐wheeler and only 2% of the population 

or 7% of households owns a 4‐wheeler. Auto industry demand has been growing at 9‐10% 
over the past 5 years. 
Two wheeler  4 wheeler   
penetration penetration  Addressable market is small due to following factors: (1) low per capita incomes; (2) huge 
income disparity; (3) low government spending; and (4) low insurance penetration. 
Source: Edelweiss research
 
1. Low per capita income 
India has emerged as the fourth largest economy globally with a high growth rate and 
has also improved its global ranking in terms of per capita income. While the previous 
decade  saw  healthy  growth  in  India’s  economy,  its  per  capita  income  remains  in  low 
tiers  compared  to  global  peers.  US’  per  capita  income  stands  at  ~USD55k/year  and 
China’s  at  ~USD8k/year.  Comparatively,  India’s  per  capita  income  is  far  lower  at 
~USD1.6k/year. 
 
Chart 11: India’s per capita income low versus peers, but its growth is encouraging 
Per capita income in India (USD) Per capita income in 2015
55,837 
1,581 

334 
7,925 
1,581 

2000 2015 US China India


  
Source: World Bank data, Edelweiss research 
 
 
 

19  Edelweiss Securities Limited 

Healthcare 

2. Huge income disparity 
Low per capita income is not the only issue, inequality makes the situation grimmer. It 
is estimated that the top 1% in India own more than half of the country’s total wealth. 
While the richest 5% own 68.6% of the country’s wealth, the share of top 10% stands at 
 It is estimated that the top 1% in 
76.3%. At the other end of the pyramid, the poorer half jostles for 4.1% of the nation’s 
India own more than half of the 
wealth. 
country’s total wealth. While the 
 
richest 5% own 68.6% of the 
country’s wealth, the share of top  In a public lecture, Mr. Raghuram Rajan, former Governor, RBI, spoke about the number 
10% stands at 76.3%.  of billionaires per trillion dollars of GDP for major countries of the world. “Guess which 
country  tops  the  list?  It  is  Russia,  with  87  billionaires  for  the  USD1.3tn  of  GDP  it 
generates.  ‘Of  course!’  you  will  say—these  are  the  oligarchs  who  stole  the  country’s 
mineral resources, who participated in the Loan for Votes scheme, etc. But guess which 
country comes second? It is India with 55 billionaires for the USD1.1tn it generates.” 
 
Mr. Rajan then went on to argue that given the size of India’s economy, the number of 
billionaires  it  produced  was  extraordinary  compared  with  emerging  market  peers such 
as Brazil or with developed market peers such as Germany. Moreover, the fact that most 
billionaires  gained  wealth  because  of  their  access  to  natural  resources  such  as  land  or 
government  contracts  raised  disturbing  questions  about  the  nature  of  India’s  growth 
process. If Russia is an oligarchy, how long can we resist calling India one, quipped Mr. 
Rajan.  
 
Even the Gini coefficient measure indicates an increase in inequality in recent years. The 
Gini  coefficient  is  a  measure  of  inequality  of  distribution.  It  is  defined  as  a  ratio  with 
values  between  0  and  1:  the  numerator  is  the  area  between  the  Lorenz  curve  of  the 
distribution  and  the  uniform  distribution  line;  the  denominator  is  the  area  under  the 
uniform  distribution  line.  As  per  economists’  estimates  based  on  NSSO  data,  the  Gini 
coefficient based on consumption data for India rose significantly from 0.298 in 1983 to 
0.347  in  2004‐05  (Gini  coefficient  takes  values  between  0  and  1,  with  0  indicating 
perfect  equality  in  income  or  consumption  distribution  and  1  indicating  complete 
inequality in such distribution). The coefficient rose further to 0.359 in 2011‐12. 
 
Despite the increase in the official gauge of inequality in India, the level of inequality is 
considered  moderate  given  that  the  Gini  coefficient  for  middle‐income  developing 
countries  tends  to  range  from  0.4‐0.5  and  exceeds  0.5  in  some  of  the  most  unequal 
countries of the world, such as those in Latin America.
 
 
Reasons for increase in inequality in India include: 
 
Highly unequal asset distribution: Income is derived from 2 sources—assets and labour. As 
for  rural  areas,  the  ownership  pattern  of  the  most  important  asset,  viz.,  land,  is  highly 
unequal. Around 28% of the rural population owns 83% of the land. 
 
Inadequate  employment  generation:  Another  way  of  gaining  wealth  is  through 
employment.  But,  there  too  the  situation  is  not  favourable.  For  long,  the  increase  in 
employment opportunities remained less than the rise in labour force. 
 

20  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare

Lack of government spending: Total spend on healthcare in India is only ~4% of GDP, one‐
third of which comes from the government. State and central governments combined spend 
<1% of GDP on healthcare, which is amongst the lowest in the world. 
 
What is worth noting is that total healthcare expenditure, as % of GDP, has been declining 
over  the  past  15  years—from  4.3%  to  4.1%.  On  an  average,  countries  spend  ~8%  of  GDP. 
While the US spends 17% of GDP on healthcare, European countries spend >10%. 
 
Chart 12: Healthcare expenditure per capita grew at 9%,  Chart 13: …this resulted in decline in healthcare 
lagging GDP per capita growth of 11%...  expenditure, as a % of GDP 
CAGR 11% Healthcare spend as a % of GDP‐India

CAGR 9% 4.5  4.5 


CAGR 9% 4.4 
4.3 
4.1 
(x)

4.1 
3.9 

(%)
3.8 

2000 2005 2010 2012


normalised Urban healthcare expenditure per capita
2000

2002

2004

2006

2008

2010

2012

2014
normalised Rural healthcare expenditure per capita
normalised GDP per capita
  
Source: Source: Government of India (PFCE data),National Sample survey, Edelweiss research 
 
India’s nominal GDP per capita clocked 11% CAGR during 2000‐12. The government’s focus 
on energy, transport, education and rural development has been higher than on healthcare. 
Currently,  government  spending  on  healthcare  is  half  the  total  spending  on  subsidies  and 
even the growth rate of expense on healthcare is lower than that of subsidies. 
 
Chart 14: Low priority to healthcare 
Low priority in central  Healthcare spending  as a % of  Centres & State spending on 
government budget GSDP across  states  (2013‐14) healthcare: USD 16bn (FY16)
Interest payments  24 Manipur 2.7
Arunachal Pradesh 2.4 2.4 
Others 23 UP 1.0
Assam 1.0
Subsidies 16
Rajasthan 0.9
Defence 13 Kerala 0.8
Uttarakhand 0.8 13.7 
Police 8 Bihar 0.7
Agriculture 6 Karnataka 0.7
Andhra Pradesh 0.6
Infrastructure 4 Tamil Nadu 0.6
Education West Bengal 0.6
3
Gujarat 0.6 Public Spending
Health 1.6 Maharashtra 0.5 Opex (USD bn) Capex (USD bn)
   
Source: RBI, CMIE, Edelweiss research,  
 
 

21  Edelweiss Securities Limited 

Healthcare 

Healthcare Insurance market   3.  Low insurance penetration: In India, health insurance penetration (as a percentage of GDP) 
is <0.2% compared to <4% for life insurance. Currently, <25% of the total population in India 
250 
is covered under health insurance compared to ~85% of the population in US. Also, <5% of 
201
200  the  population  is  covered  under  private  health  insurance  compared  to  12%  in  UK,  13%  in 
150 
Spain and <45% in Australia. What is worth noting is that insurance penetration is the worst 
130
109 (~5%) within the middle class of the country that makes up ~60% of total population. While 
100  82
the  BPL  class  (~30%  of  population)  has  ~50%  penetration  owing  to  several  state  schemes, 
50  penetration  within  the  upper  class  (~10%  of  population)  is  >60%  as  a  result  of  private 
insurance and ESIS. The low penetration within the middle class is also largely as ESIS and 

2011‐12 2014‐15 private  insurance  have  not  penetrated  this  class  well.  This  class  can  be  the  biggest 
Number of policies (lakhs) Premium (INR bn) contributor to insurance growth in India. 
Source: CRISIL, IRDA Annual Reports
 
The  health  insurance  market  in  India,  at  USD3bn,  has  clocked  CAGR  of  ~16%  with  the 
government segment growing at mere 3%. 
 
Out‐of‐the‐pocket  health  expenditure,  as  a  %  of  total  expenditure,  at  63%  is  one  of  the 
highest in the world and much higher than the world average of 18%. 
 
Fig 3: Low health insurance penetration in India (2012) 
100%

Uninsured
Uninsured “Missing middle”
80%

Uninsured

Yeshasvini (KN)
60% CGHS
Aarogyasri (KN)
Other government

ESIS

Kalainagar (TN)
40%

Aarogyasri (AP) Private/


Public
20%

RSBY Other government

ESIS
0%
Below the poverty line Middle class Upper and upper‐
middle class

(~30% of the population) (~60% of the population) (~10% of the 


population)
 
Source: Nathealth, Edelweiss research 
ESIS: Employees’ State Insurance Scheme of India, CGHS: Central Government Health Scheme, RSBY: Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana 

22  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare

Sector Growth Levers: Insurance Penetration, Healthcare & REIT Policy 
 
Sector  potential,  despite  under  investment  and  government  apathy,  was  never  in 
doubt.  Growth  drivers  seem  to  be  perfectly  aligned  now  more  than  ever,  owing  to 
reforms  and  a  promising  healthcare  policy.  Going  ahead,  the  sector  will  witness:  (1) 
increase in insurance penetration in the most promising middle income segment (~60% 
of  total  population)  from  current  <10%;  (2)  higher  fund  allocation  by  government 
towards healthcare from current 1% of GDP. Every 100bps incremental spend (of GDP) 
by government could boost healthcare spend growth 300bps; and (3) models like REIT 
could help segregate real estate and healthcare management, thus lowering the cost of 
capital. 
 
 
India’s  total  healthcare  expenditure,  pegged  at  USD85bn,  clocked  13%  CAGR  during  FY00‐
15. While private expenditure jumped ~12%, government/ insurance expenditure increased 
14%/12%. We have already established the fact that government expenditure on healthcare 
has  been  low  historically.  Clearly,  India  is  behind  the  global  curve  in  providing  healthcare 
Recommendations of the High  access. Decades of under‐investment in the health sector has caused a huge deficiency. As 
Level Expert Group on Universal  countries move forward on the development track, healthcare moves up in the priority of 
Health Coverage with respect to  governments. India is now heading in the same direction where policy making will focus on 
health financing and financial  inclusive healthcare for its citizens. 
protection:    
  The following drivers can change the orbit of the healthcare sector growth in India from its 
“The government should increase  traditional 13% level: 
 
public expenditure on health from 
1. Increase in insurance penetration 
the current level of less than 1% of 
GDP to at least 2.5% by the end of  In western countries, good health care is not a privilege, it is considered a fundamental 
the Twelfth Plan and to at least 3%  right.  Government  functions  on  the  belief  that  society  must  be  able  to  provide  basic 
of GDP by 2022. Expenditure on  health to its citizen, irrespective of their paying capacity. Most countries have a public‐
primary healthcare should account  funded  healthcare  which  functions  in  2  ways—one  where  the  government  takes  up 
for at least 70% of all healthcare  charge  of  providing  healthcare  by  directly  administering  clinics,  hospitals  and  other 
expenditure.”   facilities; the other method is provision of healthcare via health insurance.  
 
India  has  struggled  since  independence  to  provide  healthcare  to  its  citizens. 
Government expenditure on healthcare including the Centre and states is <1% of GDP. 
Whatever  little  infrastructure  the  government  has  created  has  delivered  sub‐optimal 
results. Ergo, public perception about government hospitals is also poor. 
 
Now,  the  government  has  decided  to  opt  for  the  second  alternative,  i.e.  providing 
universal  healthcare  insurance  and  leaving  infrastructure  to  private  players.  Though 
government‐sponsored health insurance schemes are not new to India, their evolution 
has  been  slow.  Employees  State  Insurance  Scheme  (ESIS)  and  Central  Government 
Health Scheme (CGHS) have been running for quite some time. Mediclaim was private 
voluntary health scheme launched in 1986 by a government insurance company.  
 
In the previous decade, few states successfully implemented health insurance schemes 
like AarogyaSri (Andhra Pradesh), Vajpayee AarogyaSri (Karnataka) and Chief Minister’s 
Comprehensive  Health  Insurance  (Tamil  Nadu).  The  government  envisages  health 
insurance for all. The scheme will be launched soon. This scheme will initially primarily 
target the poor and will hence be a bottom‐up approach for health for all. 
 

23  Edelweiss Securities Limited 

Healthcare 

As  per  the  Insurance  Regulatory  and  Development  Authority  (IRDA),  nearly  288mn 
people  have  health  insurance  coverage  in  India  (as  of  2014‐15),  accounting  for  mere 
23%  of  total  population.  Government  or  government‐sponsored  schemes  like  the 
CGHS,  ESIS,  Rashtriya  Swasthya  Bima  Yojana  (RSBY),  Rajiv  Arogyasri  (Andhra  Pradesh 
government),  Kalaignar  (Tamil  Nadu  government),  etc.,  account  for  ~80%  of  health 
insurance  coverage  provided.  Only  20%  is  through  commercial  insurance  providers, 
both  government  (Oriental  Insurance,  New  India  Assurance,  etc.)  and  private  (ICICI 
Lombard, Bajaj Allianz, etc.). The total number of commercial health insurance policies 
in India clocked nearly 10% CAGR during FY12‐15. Health insurance currently accounts 
for ~28% market share in the non‐life insurance industry. 
 
Universal health insurance: Bottom‐up approach 
The  Health  Ministry  is  preparing  to  roll  out  an  extended  version  of  the  RSBY,  the 
government’s  flagship  health  insurance  scheme,  covering  >100mn  families  or  ~500mn 
people. The Labour Ministry rolled out this scheme in 2008, which has now been shifted 
If one were to assume that 
to  the  Health  Ministry.  The  scheme  will  be  the  first  step  towards  universal  health 
Universal Health Coverage (UHC) 
insurance.  Beneficiaries  will  be  chosen  not  only  on  the  basis  of  income—as  the  criteria 
will map all the currently 
for  BPL  families,  but  also  on  deprivations  as  listed  in  the  socio‐economic  caste  census. 
uninsured ~188mn BPL individuals 
Actual  roll  out  will  be  by  states,  which  will,  therefore,  have  a  say  in  the  final  basket  of 
and claim ratio is ~50% by FY22, 
services  to  be  covered  and  the  ceiling  for  a  particular  procedure  covered  under  the 
the total healthcare expenditure 
scheme. At the time of transfer, RSBY came with 37.2mn active smart cards which cover 
would rise to ~USD190bn (17% 
150mn from BPL families. Thus, there is an addressable market of 65mn families that still 
CAGR). 
need to be covered under insurance. 
 
 
Going forward, assuming GDP growth of 8% over FY16‐22 and that government expenditure 
will remain at current level of 1% of GDP while private/insurance expenditures increase at 
15%/10%  CAGR,  indicates  13%  CAGR  for  total  healthcare  expenditure  to  ~USD160bn  by 
FY21. Keeping similar assumptions for private and government expenditure as the base case, 
if  one  were  to  assume  that  Universal  Health  Coverage  (UHC)  will  map  all  the  currently 
uninsured  ~188mn  BPL  individuals  and  claim  ratio  is  ~50%  by  FY22,  the  total  healthcare 
expenditure would rise to ~USD190bn (17% CAGR). 
 
Chart 15: Healthcare market growth can be boosted by Universal Health Coverage 
20 18 
18  If ~65mn 
17  17 
17 households
get added to 
14  13  14  Universal 
14 13 
12  Health 
(%)

11  11  Coverage and 


11 12  13  13  claim ratio is 
~50% over 
8 next 5 years

5
FY17E

FY19E

FY21E
FY01

FY03

FY05

FY07

FY09

FY11

FY13

FY15

Base Case Scenario Total HC Expenditure
 
Source: Government of India (PFCE data), Edelweiss research 

24  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare

2. Increase in government expenditure 
Overall  healthcare  expenditure  in  India  has  grown  at  just  ~8‐10%  per  annum  in  the 
previous  decade,  despite  low  penetration.  Low  public  spending  (~30%)  and  limited 
health  insurance  penetration  (~25%)  have  led  to  out‐of‐pocket  (OOP)  expenditure 
accounting for ~62% of total healthcare spend.  
 
Government  expenditure  during  FY00‐15  clocked  14%  CAGR  and  India’s  GDP  posted 
13% CAGR over the same period. Government’s expenditure on healthcare, as a % of 
total  GDP,  remained  flat  during  the  mentioned  period.  On  the  contrary,  entitlements 
increased  at  17%  CAGR,  with  big‐ticket  government  schemes  launched  such  as  farm 
loan waivers and employment guarantee programmes. 
 
Chart 16: India—Government's aggregate expenditure on healthcare mere ~1% of GDP, ~30% of total 
90
30% of Total  75
Per capita government expenditure 

Healthcare  72
expenditure
54
on Healthcare (USD)

70%
(USD) 36
25% of 
USD23 20
Total 
Healthcare  18 73% 30%
expenditure
27%
0
USD5 2000 2014
Per capita government expenditure on health in India
2000 2014
   Per capita private expenditure on health in India
Source: World Healthcare Statistics, 2015 (WHO) 
 
Despite economic strides, India’s healthcare scenario has lagged global peers. In our view, 
the  government  can  be  the  real  game  changer  for  healthcare  commerce  in  India.  The 
government  needs  to  make  way  for  higher  allocation  to  healthcare,  preferably  by  playing 
the payer by enhancing insurance coverage or playing the provider through PPP models. 
 
Recommendations  of  High  Level  Expert  Group  on  UHC  with  respect  to  Health 
Financing  and  Financial  Protection:  “The  government  should  increase  public 
expenditure on health from the current level of less than 1% of GDP to at least 2.5% 
by  the  end  of  the  Twelfth  Plan  and  to  at  least  3%  of  GDP  by  2022.  Expenditure  on 
If one were to assume that 
primary healthcare should account for at least 70% of all healthcare expenditure.”
government expenditure on   
healthcare will gradually increase   
from 1% to 3% of GDP, the total  Enhancing  access  and  quality  of  healthcare  can  benefit  from  the  multiplier  effect  that 
healthcare expenditure would rise  healthcare  offers  to  communities.  This  will  be  the  opportune  moment  when  healthcare 
to ~USD200bn (19% CAGR).  providers and producers in India will be able to leap to the next orbit of growth beyond the 
current 11‐12%. 
 
Keeping  similar  assumptions  for  private  (15%  CAGR)  and  insurance  expenditure  (10% 
CAGR)  as  the  base  case,  if  one  were  to  assume  that  government  expenditure  on 
healthcare will gradually increase from 1% to 3% of GDP, the total healthcare expenditure 
would rise to ~USD200bn (19% CAGR). 

25  Edelweiss Securities Limited 

Healthcare 

Chart 17: Government expenditure can boost healthcare market growth  
25
21 
21 19  If govt. 
17  17  expenditure 
changes from 
17
14  1% to 3% of 
14  13  13 

(%)
12  GDP
13 10  10 
12  13  13 
9

FY17E

FY19E

FY21E
FY01

FY03

FY05

FY07

FY09

FY11

FY13

FY15
Base Case Scenario Total HC Expenditure Growth
 
Source: Source: Government of India (PFCE data), Edelweiss research 
 
3. Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs): A game changer 
The main drawback in the healthcare space is that 60‐70% of investments go into real 
estate  &  building,  and  therefore  30%  of  investment  has  to  sweat  itself  to  pay  for  the 
entire investment. We believe REITs could solve this problem.  
 
Healthcare  REIT  is  an  investment  product  where  a  trust  buys  an  income‐producing 
hospital and gives it back on operating lease to the same company from which it buys 
the hospital, thus freeing capital for the healthcare company. It allows the healthcare 
provider to focus its investments on patient care rather than high real estate costs. This 
is  particularly  helpful  in  mature  assets,  which  have  reached  optimum  capacity 
utilisation  and  will  thereon  grow  in  line  with  inflation.  The  healthcare  company  can 
invest the same capital in a new hospital and expedite growth and penetration. In India, 
REITs have been permitted by the government recently and going forward it will help 
healthcare providers to offload mature assets to a trust and free capital, which in turn 
can be invested in new assets. This will help lower the cost of capital, boost faster scale 
up and improve efficiency in the system. 
 
In  Union  Budget  FY16,  the  finance  minister  announced  key  changes  in  tax  laws 
governing  REITs  in  India.  Key  modifications  include  exemption  from  long‐term  capital 
gains  tax  on  listing  of  REIT  units  by  the  sponsor  and  pass  through  status  for  rental 
income  accruing  to  the  REIT  from  property  directly  held  by  it.  While  the  above 
provisions  clear  most  hurdles  for  successful  implementation  of  REITs,  payment  of 
stamp duty on transfer of assets to REIT will result in tax leakages of 5‐13% at the time 
of  transfer  of  the  asset  to  a  REIT.  We  believe,  while  a  successful  REIT  market  can  be 
developed in India under the current regulations, cap rates will have to be compressed 
by  ~150‐200bps  from  current  ~10%  levels  to  attract  developers  to  list  their  assets  in 
REITs as opposed to opting for a Commercial Mortgage‐Backed Security (CMBS). A 1% 
compression could push up capital value of rental assets by ~10%. 
 
 
 
 

26  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare

4. Medical tourism 
Apart from the steps taken by the government to ensure inclusive healthcare, medical 
tourism too can step up the sector’s growth. 
 
Given  the  state‐of‐the‐art  private  tertiary/quaternary  facilities  in  India  and  the  rising 
credibility  of  India’s  medical  fraternity,  people  from  the  world  over  are  travelling  to 
India  to  benefit  from  the  cost  arbitrage  (~30‐70%  cheaper).  India  hosted  ~230,000 
patients  from  all  over  the  world  in  2013  (KPMG).  While  western  patients  arrive 
primarily due to the cost arbitrage, a number of patients from neighbouring countries 
arrive due to lack of infrastructure and skilled manpower in their countries, and due to 
similarity of culture, food and language. In terms of countries, patients travelling from 
Bangladesh top the list, followed by Maldives and Afghanistan. 
 
Chart 18: Medical tourists flocking to India  Chart 19: Nationality‐wise break up (2014) 
350
Others Bangladesh
25% 22%
280
(OOO's Medical Tourists)

US
210 2%
UAE
140 2%
Sri Lanka Maldives
3% 17%
70
Oman
3%
0 Russia Afghanista
Nigeria Iraq n
2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 3%
6% 8% 9%
  
Source: KPMG, CII, Edelweiss research 
 
The global industry is pegged  at ~USD12‐14bn and estimated to clock ~15‐20% CAGR over 
period.  Thailand  is  the  biggest  beneficiary  of  medical  tourism  within  Asia‐Pacific  region, 
followed  by  India.  Medical  tourism  is  already  a  ~USD3bn  market  in  India,  having  posted 
~20% CAGR during 2009‐15. It is expected to post ~30% CAGR over next 5 years. 
 
Apart from providing a distinct growth kicker to the healthcare industry, medical tourism is 
an important engine also because of superior case realisations. When patients travel to India, 
they are usually offered ‘packages’ which take care of all their requirements including travel, 
meals, visa assistance, etc., essentially enhancing realisations of healthcare companies. 
Tapping into the medical tourism opportunity is a strategic objective for several organised 
Indian  private  healthcare  providers,  and  many  Indian  private  healthcare  facilities  have 
already acquired international quality accreditations like JCI and JCAHO (Joint Commission of 
Accreditation of Hospital Organisations) to attract tourists. 
 
To conclude, the growth headroom for healthcare delivery ecosystem in India is attractive. 
Low  penetration  bodes  well  for  a  long  cycle  of  investment,  growth,  improvement  in 
utilisation and subsequent improvement in return on capital. Over the next 5 years, India’s 
healthcare delivery market’s can grow anywhere between ~13% to ~20%. 
 

27  Edelweiss Securities Limited 

Healthcare 

Outlook for Players: Pick Up in Margin and Expansion in RoCE 
 
We  believe  that  structural  drivers  and  business  models  are  now  in  place.  Post 
increasing  ~2.5x  in  last  5  years,  capex  cycle  is  now  coming  to  an  end  with  overall 
quantum to nearly halve over the next 5 years, leading to improving asset turnover. As 
players  look  to  sweat  their  infrastructure  and  focus  on  business  mix,  the  sector’s 
EBITDA margin will inch up steadily. The net result will be a directional improvement in 
the  sector’s  RoCE.  Our  analysis  indicates  ~700‐900bps  RoCE  expansion  for  all  players 
over the next 5 years. 
 
 
Key trends which will dominate the healthcare space going forward: 

 Shift  from  unorganised  to  organised  players:  The  healthcare  sector  has  one  of  the 
least  penetration  of  organised  players.  As  organised  players  become  more  customer‐
centric,  outcomes‐driven  and  prevention‐focused  and  customers  become  more  brand 
conscious,  organised  players  will  gain  market  share  steadily  and  grow  300‐400bps 
faster than the overall sector (13% base case). 
 Decline of cost of capital: Macro trends indicate that interest rates are on a downward 
trajectory. Moreover, REIT and other models will help hospital players access markets 
for cheaper capital. We believe, over the next 5 years, cost of capital for the sector will 
plummet to 7‐8% from 13‐14% currently. 
 
Chart 20: Healthcare market growth can be boosted by government initiatives (USD bn) 
200
190 

160

Government expenditure 
increased to ~3% of GDP
Govt 
Universal Healthcare 

expenditure
launched

Insurance 85 
Government 
expenditure 
remains at 
~1% of GDP

Private (out 
of pocket)

FY16 base FY21 FY21 FY21


base case UHC case 3% of GDP case
 
Source: Source: Government of India (PFCE data), Edelweiss research 
 
 Capex intensity to wane: Capex has jumped to ~2.5x over the past 5 years. We believe 
the aggressive investment phase in the healthcare sector is now coming to an end and 
most players are now looking to sweat their land banks through brownfield expansion. 
Though a few select greenfield projects like Apollo’s Proton therapy project in Chennai 
or  Dr  Lal’s  new  regional  reference  laboratories  are  likely,  overall  quantum  will  fall  to 
nearly half, thereby improving asset turnover. 

 
 Margin to increase: As players look to sweat their infrastructure and focus on business 
mix, the sector’s EBITDA margin will inch up steadily over the next 5 years. 

28  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare

Chart 21: EBITDA Margin (~300bps) and RoCE (~1,000bps) for the sector to increase over next 5 years 
19.5
25.1 
23.7 
18.0
18.6 
16.5

(INR bn)
14.4  13.6  13.8 
(%)

13.0  12.4 
15.0 10.0  10.8 

13.5

12.0
FY17E

FY18E

FY19E

FY20E

FY21E
FY12

FY13

FY14

FY15

FY16

FY17E

FY18E

FY19E

FY20E

FY21E
FY12

FY13

FY14

FY15

FY16
EBITDA Margin Capex
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
 RoCE to increase: The net result of improved asset turnover and EBITDA margin will be 
a directional improvement in the sector’s RoCE. 
 
Chart 22: Sector’s RoCE to increase over next 5 years 
17.8 
15.3 
12.7 
10.2 
8.9 
(%)

7.6 
6.5 
5.2  5.2 
FY17E

FY18E

FY19E

FY20E

FY21E
FY13

FY14

FY15

FY16

RoCE
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research

29  Edelweiss Securities Limited 

Healthcare 

Conclusion: Choosing Right Model Key 
 
We  believe  efficacious  business  models  that  can  widen  access  with  quality  while 
maintaining  affordability  will  inevitably  scale  up  rapidly  and  deliver  attractive 
returns to shareholders. 
 
We prefer hospitals over diagnostic chains as both have the same growth drivers. 
In hospitals, single specialty hospitals are preferred over multi‐specialty players for 
faster  scale  up  and  breakeven.  We  like  HCG’s  model,  which  focuses  on  single 
specialty to address high potential therapies like oncology and fertility. 
 
Within multispecialty hospitals: 
(a) For  the  growth  conscious  investors,  Max  provides  best  visibility  in  terms  of 
EBITDA growth with an aggressive, yet balanced growth plan. 
(b) For  value  conscious  investors,  Fortis  is  the  best  bet  as  it  is  on  the  cusp  of 
significant value unlocking. 
(c) For  conservative  and  RoCE  conscious  investors,  Apollo  is  the  best  bet.  It  is 
present across the value chain from primary to secondary to tertiary and way 
ahead in investing in new formats to track changing consumer preferences. 
 
The  diagnostics  space  has  the  advantage  of  faster  scale  up  and  better  RoCE. 
However,  challenges  here  are  low  entry  barriers  and  stretched  valuations.  In 
diagnostics we prefer Dr Lal over Thyrocare for its strong brand and B2C model. 
 
We  initiate  coverage  on  Fortis,  Max,  HCG,  Dr  Lal  and  Thyrocare  with  ‘BUY’,  and 
maintain ‘BUY’ on Apollo Hospitals. 
 
 
Having  established  the  microstructure  of  the  Indian  healthcare  system,  we  address  the 
question of actionable ideas among listed companies.  
 

Hospitals 

In  hospitals,  we  prefer  single  specialty  hospitals  over  multi‐specialty  players  for  faster 
scale up, breakeven and better returns profile. 
 
Single specialty: Faster scale up 
Over  the  previous  decade,  growth  capital  has  steadily  flocked  to  more  efficacious  models 
that seek to breakeven sooner as well as provide better clinical outcomes for patients. Single 
specialty  hospitals  have  trumped  multi‐specialty  players  due  to  a  number  of  inherent 
advantages. These models are able to scale up faster and utilise capital more efficiently due 
to  lower  capex  requirement  and  better  therapeutic  focus.  They  are  also  able  to  avail 
advantages  of  economies  of  scale.  Moreover,  they  offer  best‐in‐class  clinical 
tertiary/quaternary protocols to patients due to the vast knowledge repository that they are 
able to create over time on a specific specialty. 
 
 

30  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare

Owing to the therapy focus, unit capital costs are generally lower in single specialty hospitals. 
Due  to  the  focus  and  unmet  need  within  the  geography,  scale  up  is  also  faster  and  often 
these  models  achieve  monthly  breakeven  within  first/second  year  of  operation.  This 
essentially results in faster ramp up of RoCE as well. 
 
Table 4: Single specialty entails lower capex, faster scale up and breakeven versus multi‐specialty 
Ahmedabad Chennai Bangalore NCR
Multispecialty  Single Specialty Multispecialty Single Specialty Multispecialty Multispecialty
(HCG) Oncology (HCG) (Apollo) Oncology (HCG) (Max ‐ MSSH Saket) (Fortis ‐ FMRI)
Maturity year Year ‐ 5 Year ‐ 5 >Year ‐ 10 Year‐10 Year‐10 Year‐3
Cost/bed (INR mn/bed) 6.5 5.7 10 6.8 15 15
Land cost (%) 30 30 30 30
Building cost (%) 30 25 30 25
Equipment cost (%) 40 45 40 45
Number of beds (avg) 118 78                1,526  317                            211                    300 
Total Capital employed 767 448             15,260  2191.7                         3,165                 4,500 
Revenue (INR mn)                   595                        800              13,856                    2,550                          2,853                 4,130 
ARPOB (INR mn/ year)                        5                          10                         9                          12                                14                      14 
Number of registrations                   8,000                 10,000 
Realization/ registration               100,000               195,000 
Asset Turnover (x)                  0.78                       1.79                   0.91                       1.16                            0.90                   0.92 
EBITDA                      93                        144                 4,434                        510                             514                    620 
EBITDA Margin (%)                  15.7                      18.0                  32.0                      20.0                            18.0                  15.0 
Depreciation                      38                          22                    763                        110                             158                    225 
EBIT                      55                        122                 3,671                        400                             355                    395 
EBIT margin (%)                    9.2                      15.2                  26.5                      15.7                            12.5                     9.6 
ROCE (%)                     7.2                       27.1                   24.1                       18.3                            11.2                     8.8  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
We like HCG’s  model which focuses on single specialty to address high potential therapies 
like oncology and fertility. owing to strong therapy tailwind and EBITDA margin levers, HCG 
is  positioned  for  robust  EBITDA  growth.  We  initiate  coverage  on  HCG  with  ‘BUY’ 
recommendation. 
 
Table 5: HCG Financials 
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E CAGR (FY16‐ FY21E)
Revenue (INR mn)            5,820            7,290            9,283          11,104        12,471        14,010 19.2
EBITDA (INR mn)                897            1,099            1,344            1,714          2,105          2,455 22.3
EBITDA Margin (%)               15.4               15.1               14.5               15.4             16.9             17.5 212bps
PAT (INR mn)                  75                101                  98                281              466              684 55.4
EPS (INR)                 0.9                 1.2                 1.1                 3.3               5.5               8.0 55.4
ROCE (%)                 6.7                 5.6                 6.4                 9.9             13.2             15.5 882bps
P/E (x)            255.5            190.3            197.8               68.7             41.3             28.2
EV/EBITDA (x)               23.9               19.5               15.9               12.5             10.2               8.7
Net Debt (INR bn)                 1.8                 4.0                 4.0                 3.2               3.1               2.4 5.5
Free cash flow (INR bn)                (1.9)                (2.5)                 0.2                 0.3               0.0               0.2
Market Cap (INR bn)                  19                  19                  19                  19                19                19  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
   

31  Edelweiss Securities Limited 

Healthcare 

Multi‐specialty: Long‐term structural story remains attractive 
Multi‐specialty  hospitals  provide  a  variety  of  themes  suiting  diverse  investment  criteria. 
Most  multi‐specialty  hospitals  in  India  are  focused  on  top‐end  of  the  pyramid.  These 
hospital chains refrain from targeting bottom of the pyramid or mass market, instead they 
target the top end with prices prohibitive enough to avoid the mass market tag, while being 
low enough to attract middle/higher middle class consumers, whose ranks are expected to 
swell as India moves into accelerated growth trajectory of >8%. 
 
Apollo,  Fortis  and  Max  are  focused  on  top‐end  of  the  pyramid,  whereas  Narayana  has 
created a niche for itself in middle part of the pyramid, leaving bottom of the pyramid space 
for government hospitals. 
 
Fig 4: Addressable markets for multispecialty hospitals 

15% of population Fortis Globals & Strivers


3 mn households, 16mn population
Apollo
>INR 1.7mn/ year
Max
HCG

Fortis Seekers
Apollo 31mn households, 160mn population
Max INR 340k ‐ 1.7mn/year
HCG

Aspirers
Narayana 71mn households, 360mn population
Government facilities INR 150k ‐ 340k/year

Deprived
135mn households, 680mn population
Government facilities <INR 150k/year

 
Source: Industry reports, Edelweiss research 
 
Table 6: Operating metrics 
Apollo Fortis Max HCG Narayana
Increase in number of beds over 5 years (FY16‐FY21E)                 945            1,450               724               611 NA
Revenue growth CAGR (FY16‐FY21E)                15.6              11.4              16.3              19.2 NA
EBITDA growth CAGR (FY16‐FY21E)                20.4              12.8              24.6              22.3 NA
RoCE improvement  (FY16‐FY21E) 955bps 837bps 730bps 882bps NA
RoCE (FY21E)                19.5              10.6              14.0              15.5 NA

Efficiency parameters (FY16)
ALOS                   4.2                3.6                3.3                2.9                4.3
occupancy (%)                63.0              72.0              71.1              51.0              54.2
ARPOB (INR/day)            28,036         37,534         30,334         26,592         17,534
outpatient/in patient volume                   3.5                9.0              27.8 NA                9.7
no of doctors/bed                   1.3                0.7                1.3                0.6                0.5
no of support staff/doctor                   1.7 NA                2.6                2.6                4.2  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 

32  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare

Within multi‐specialty hospitals, we believe investors will need to cherry pick according to 
their investment criteria. While Max offers best growth visibility, Fortis is a value play and 
Apollo offers stable growth with best‐in‐class RoCE. 
 
Max 
For growth conscious investors, Max provides best visibility in terms of EBITDA growth with 
an  aggressive,  yet  balanced  growth  plan.  The  company  is  estimated  to  clock  25%  EBITDA 
CAGR  over  FY16‐21  compared  to  Apollo’s  20%  and  Fortis’  19%  (hospital  EBITDAC)  in  the 
same  time  frame.  Max  is  a  compelling  bet  on  the  tertiary  care  opportunity  in  the  NCR 
market, which could have upsides from investments in health insurance. 

MHC (Max’s hospital network) is planning to expand capacity, through Brownfield expansion, 
from the current ~2,600 beds to ~3,800 by FY22 and to ~5,000 beyond FY23. The focus will 
be  on  tertiary  and  quaternary  care  in  North  India,  while  largely  retaining  the  current 
mature/non‐mature beds mix, thereby not exerting pressure on margin. 

 
Table 7: Max financials 
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E CAGR (FY16‐ FY21E) CAGR (FY16‐ FY19E)
Revenue (INR mn)     20,982     24,241     28,646     32,455     36,663     44,732 16.3 15.6
EBITDA (INR mn)       2,147       3,030       3,810       4,560       5,283       6,441 24.6 28.5
EBITDA Margin (%)          10.2          12.5          13.3          14.1          14.4          14.4 417bps 382bps
PAT (INR mn)             98           719           766       1,167       1,430       1,965 82.1
EPS (Max India share‐ 46%)            0.2            1.2            1.3            2.0            2.5            3.4 82.1
ROCE (%)            6.7            9.2          10.0          11.0          11.9          14.0 730bps 430bps
P/E (x)       842.2       114.8       107.8          70.7          57.7          42.0
EV/EBITDA (x)          32.5          23.0          18.3          15.3          13.2          10.8
Net Debt (INR bn)            9.2            8.4          11.7          10.5          10.8          10.9 3.4
Free cash flow (INR bn)           (9.5)            1.0           (3.3)            1.4           (0.1)           (0.2)
Market Cap (INR bn)             38             38             38             38             38             38  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Chart 23: For growth conscious investors, Max offers best visibility in EBITDA growth 
350
Max
25% CAGR
300
Apollo
20% CAGR
250
(x)

Fortis
200 19% CAGR

150

100
FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
(*EBITDAC CAGR for Fortis) 
Only hospital business EBITDAC considered for Fortis, as SRL will de‐merge during FY18 

33  Edelweiss Securities Limited 

Healthcare 

Fortis 
For  value  conscious  investors,  Fortis  is  on  the  cusp  of  unlocking  significant  value  by:  (i) 
demerging its 56% subsidiary SRL which can unlock value of ~INR57/share; and (ii) partially 
unwinding its REIT capital structure, on which Fortis pays an yield of 13‐14%, according to us. 

Fortis is planning to ramp up bed capacity by ~40% through asset light brownfield expansion. 
Accretion of beds and focus on sweating  its  assets will improve occupancy and mix of the 
hospitals  business,  thereby  boosting  Fortis’  growth  and  profitability  during  FY17‐21.  We 
forecast Hospital EBITDAC to clock 19% CAGR over FY16‐21. 

 
Table 8: Fortis financials 
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E CAGR (FY16‐ FY21E)
Revenue (INR mn)          42,651          49,318          47,616          55,282        63,596        73,074 11.4
EBITDAC (INR mn)            6,739            8,429            7,502            8,909        10,590        12,293 12.8
EBITDAC Margin (%)               15.8               17.1               15.8               16.1             16.7             16.8 102bps
PAT (INR mn)                   (8)                647                580            1,665          3,115          4,702
EPS (INR)                (0.0)                 1.4                 1.1                 3.2               6.0               9.0
ROCE (%)                 2.2                 4.5                 4.4                 6.4               8.5             10.6 837bps
P/E (x) NA            139.7            155.6               54.3             29.0             19.2
EV/EBITDA (x)               17.5               14.0               15.7               13.2             11.1               9.6
Net Debt (INR bn)                 6.2               17.9               22.2               21.7             19.6             16.2 21.1
Free cash flow (INR bn)                (1.4)             (12.2)                (1.8)                 0.2               1.8               3.1
Market Cap (INR bn)                  90                  90                  90                  90                90                90  
 Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
Market cap on fully diluted basis 
SRL considered de‐merged in FY18 
 
Chart 24: For value conscious investors, Fortis is the best bet 
27.0
Max (MHC)

23.4
(EBITDA CAGR (FY16‐21)

19.8

16.2 Fortis Apollo

12.6

9.0
12.0 12.8 13.6 14.4 15.2 16.0
Implied Hospitals  business FY19 EV/EBITDA  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
   

34  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare

Apollo 
For  conservative  and  RoCE  conscious  investors,  Apollo  is  the  best  bet.  It  is  India’s  largest 
hospital  chain.  It  is  equipping  itself  to  successfully  battle  the  anticipated  disruption  in  the 
healthcare  sector.  Going  forward,  it  is  targeting  select  tertiary  care  focused  greenfield 
investments and focus on improving operating metrics for the capacity it has rapidly created 
over the past 5 years. Under AHLL, it is adding a number of new healthcare delivery formats 
focused  on  primary  and  secondary  care  that  are  bound  to  bolster  its  patient  engagement 
early in the lifecycle. 

Apollo,  by  virtue  of  being  the  largest  hospital  network  in  India,  is  envisaged  to  be  key 
beneficiary  of  the  sector’s  growth  and  improving  fundamentals.  It  is  in  the  last  stage  of 
tertiary care capacity addition. Going forward, it will make selective greenfield investments 
like the super specialty hospital in Navi Mumbai and international cancer referral center in 
Chennai, that may exert some near‐term pressure on margin. Its focus will be on improving 
realisations across the network. 
 
Table 9: Apollo financials 
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E CAGR (FY16‐ FY21E)
Revenue (INR mn)          60,856          72,419          85,932          98,750      111,185      125,602 15.6
EBITDA (INR mn)            7,823            9,031          11,055          13,320        16,504        19,798 20.4
EBITDA Margin (%)               12.9               12.5               12.9               13.5             14.8             15.8 291bps
PAT (INR mn)            3,089            3,911            5,627            7,404          9,933        12,828 32.9
EPS (INR)               22.2               28.1               40.4               53.2             71.4             92.2 32.9
ROCE (%)               10.0               10.4               12.6               14.3             17.1             19.5 955bps
P/E (x)               59.4               46.9               32.6               24.8             18.5             14.3
EV/EBITDA (x)               26.2               22.7               18.5               15.4             12.4             10.4
Net Debt (INR bn)               20.1               22.7               24.8               23.6             22.7             18.4 (1.7)
Free cash flow (INR bn)                (5.8)                (1.4)                (0.4)                 3.4               3.8               8.2
Market Cap (INR bn)                184                184                184                184              184              184  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Chart 25: For conservative and RoCE conscious investors, Apollo is the best bet 

Apollo 10.0%  19.5% 

Max 
6.7% 14.0%
(MHC)

Fortis 2.2%  10.6%

 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
 

35  Edelweiss Securities Limited 

Healthcare 

Middle of the pyramid: Advocacy of healthcare as a basic human right is on the rise in India 
and is envisaged to drive consumption within the aspirers class in India (Fig. 4). Affordability 
is a critical aspect in addressing this market. Narayana qualifies on this front and it entails 
the  potential  to  scale  up  and  exploit  the  big  opportunity  in  the  lower‐end  of  the  pyramid. 
The  company  has  effectively  adopted  a  high‐volume  approach  to  lower  costs  and  pass  on 
the  benefits  to  consumers.  Having  started  as  a  225‐beds  hospital  in  2000,  it  is  currently  a 
6,700 bed multi‐specialty healthcare services chain providing superior tertiary healthcare at 
affordable cost. 
 
Table 10: Narayana financials 
FY17E FY18E FY19E CAGR (FY16‐FY19E)
Revenue (INR mn)          18,984        22,473        25,610                                    17
EBITDA (INR mn)            2,473          3,051          3,765                                    29
EBITDA Margin (%)               13.0             13.6             14.7 372bps
PAT (INR mn)                767          1,077          1,509                                    93
EPS (INR)                 3.8               5.3               7.4                                    93
ROCE (%)                 7.8             10.5             12.8
P/E (x)               89.0             63.4             45.2
EV/EBITDA (x)               28.6             23.1             18.8
Debt (INR bn) N/A N/A N/A
Market Cap (INR bn)                  68                68                68  
Source: Bloomberg consensus, Edelweiss research 
   

36  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare

Diagnostics 
Diagnostics has the advantage of faster scale up and better RoCE  
Diagnostics makes a strong investment case as it is still a largely under‐consumed module of 
treatment  and  demand  has  significant  room  to  grow.  As  evidence‐based  treatment  gains 
ground,  growth  drivers  for  diagnostics  will  remain  upbeat.  Even  as  India  continues  to 
grapple with the burden of communicable diseases, a wave of non‐communicable diseases 
has  flooded  the  country  with  ailments  like  diabetes,  obesity  and  cancer,  among  others. 
Hence,  preventive  healthcare  diagnosis  (wellness)  will  continue  to  gain  popularity.  Also, 
current  market  share  of  organised  chains  is  fairly  low,  boosting  their  long‐term  growth 
visibility. The space also offers best RoCE due to its asset‐light reagent rental model and low 
gestation period. 
 
Table 11: Comparison of diagnostics companies 
FY16 numbers unless 
Dr Lal Thyrocare SRL
mentioned, INR mn                    
Number of laboratories                                                      172                                                       7                                                 314
Number of samples (mn)                                                        26                                                    12                                                   15
Revenue CAGR (FY11‐16)                                                        27                                                    24                                                   14
Revenue                                                   7,913                                               2,312                                              8,980
EBITDA Margin (%)                                                        27                                                    39                                                   20
ROCE (%)                                                        44                                                    24                                                   12
Market Cap (INR bn)                                                        87                                                    33 N/A
Test profile  <10% imaging  <10% imaging  < 10% imaging
~70% routine tests like CBC and  Only Biochemistry tests offered <5% preventive healthcare
lipid profile ~20% thyroid rest are routine and 
~30% specialized like molecular  ~50% preventive healthcare specialized tests 
diagnostics, genetics, thyroid, etc.  ~30% non thyroid tests 
Revenue mix  ~40% walk‐ins (172 labs) All revenues derived from   ~ 33% walk‐in (314 labs)
~ 35% from collection centers  franchises across India (~  ~24% collection centers (7,200 
(1,560 patient service centers) 1,200)  centres)
~ 25% from pickup points (4,970  ~20% hospitals
centers)  ~16% direct clients 
FY18 P/E                                                        43                                                    37 N/A
FY18 EV/EBITDA                                                        28                                                    22 N/A
FY19 P/E                                                        33                                                    29 N/A
FY19 EV/EBITDA                                                        23                                                    18 N/A  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
The most significant risk with diagnostics is that it is a low entry barrier business, with low 
capex requirement and minimum regulatory hurdles. Attracted by the high growth rate and 
lucrative  returns,  competitive  intensity  in  the  space  could  rise  in  the  future  be  it  among 
incumbents  in  the  organised  market  or  individually‐owned  labs  offering  personalised 
customer‐centric  services  or  new  startup  labs  that  are  focusing  on  specific  tests  such  as 
new‐born  screening  or  genomics.  Already  a  number  of  private  equity  backed  regional 
players  have  started  expanding  their  operations  aggressively.  Another  factor  is  the 
reinvestment  risk  of  business  cash  flow.  While  RoCE  of  the  business  is  currently  high,  it 
could dilute if incremental capital employed does not generate similar returns. 
 

37  Edelweiss Securities Limited 

Healthcare 

We believe, investors need to bear in mind that current valuations of diagnostics companies 
are already factoring in high growth rate for a long period. There are several factors central 
to cherry picking stocks in the space including, but not limited to:  

 Mix of radiology/pathology: While radiology mix for Dr Lal and SRL will decline, it will 
increase for Thyrocare due to nueclear. 

 Mix of B2B/B2C models: While Thyrocare is purely a B2B model, Dr Lal is a mix of B2B 
and B2C models. 

 Organic  pathology  growth  initiatives:  Thyrocare  is  setting  up  more  regional  labs  to 
improve its turnaround time in areas far from airport nodes. Dr Lal is looking to expand 
geographically  by  setting  up  reference  laboratories  in  Lucknow  and  Kolkata  and 
penetrating  these  markets  deeper.  It  is  also  scaling  up  its  business  of  hospital‐based 
laboratories laboratory management. 

 New  business/inorganic  initiatives:  While  Thyrocare  is  looking  to  add  more  testing 
verticals like water/food, it is averse to inorganic ventures. Dr Lal may look for strategic 
acquisitions. 

The  diagnostics  space  has  the  advantage  of  faster  scale  up  and  better  RoCE.  While  it  has 
same  growth  drivers  as  hospitals,  due  to  low  entry  barriers  and  stretched  valuations  we 
prefer  the  hospitals  space.  However,  in  the  diagnostic  space,  we  prefer  Dr  Lal  over 
Thyrocare for its strong brand and B2C model. We  estimate Dr  Lal  and  Thyrocare  to  post 
25% profit CAGR over the next 5 years on account of rising prevalence of evidence‐based 
treatment, shift in favour of unorganised players and expanding product portfolio. Both the 
players  are  in  a  strong  FCF  generation  phase  owing  to  low  capex  requirements,  which  is 
envisaged  to  sustain  high  valuations  in  the  medium  term.  We  initiate  coverage  on  Dr  Lal 
and Thyrocare with ‘BUY’ recommendations. 
 
Table 12: Dr Lal financials 
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E CAGR (FY16‐ FY21E)
Revenue (INR mn)          7,913          9,721        11,943        14,146        17,378        21,349 22.0
EBITDA (INR mn)          2,097          2,489          3,045          3,706          4,553          5,594 21.7
EBITDA Margin (%)            26.5            25.6            25.5            26.2            26.2            26.2 ‐30bps
PAT (INR mn)          1,322          1,604          2,019          2,601          3,281          4,140 25.6
EPS (INR)            16.0            19.4            24.4            31.5            39.7            50.1 0.3
ROCE (%)            43.5            37.6            36.9            36.8            36.6            36.1 ‐743bps
P/E (x)            65.7            54.1            43.0            33.4            26.5            21.0
EV/EBITDA (x)            40.0            33.7            27.5            22.6            18.4            15.0
Net Cash (INR bn)               2.9               3.9               5.3               7.6            10.2            13.7 36.0
Free cash flow (INR bn)               1.0               1.3               1.7               2.7               3.2               4.2 32.1
Market Cap (INR bn)                87                87                87                87                87                87  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
   

38  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare

Table 13: Thyrocare financials 
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E CAGR (FY16‐ FY21E)
Revenue (INR mn)          2,410          2,971          3,674          4,441          5,321          6,351 21.4
EBITDA (INR mn)             935          1,166          1,475          1,797          2,141          2,526 22.0
EBITDA Margin (%)            38.8            39.2            40.1            40.5            40.2            39.8 98bps
PAT (INR mn)             518             703             906          1,138          1,356          1,621 25.6
EPS (INR)               9.6            13.1            16.9            21.2            25.2            30.2 25.6
ROCE (%)            23.8            26.9            31.2            34.7            36.4            38.0 1420bps
P/E (x)            63.9            47.1            36.6            29.1            24.4            20.4
EV/EBITDA (x)            34.3            27.5            21.8            17.9            15.0            12.7
Net Cash (INR bn)               1.0               1.1               1.7               1.9               2.6               2.9 23.2
Free cash flow (INR bn)               0.7               0.6               1.0               0.9               1.2               1.2 10.8
Market Cap (INR bn)                33                33                33                33                33                33  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research

39  Edelweiss Securities Limited 

Healthcare 

Appendix I: The Diagnostics Industry 
 
Within  the  healthcare  system,  diagnostics  services  play  the  role  of  an  information 
intermediary, providing useful information for correct diagnosis and treatment of diseases. 
Diagnostic services have lower share in overall healthcare spends (~4% of total), but play a 
vital role in identifying problem areas and major illnesses. 
 
A  number  of  factors  are  driving  higher  growth  of  diagnostic  services  versus  overall 
healthcare industry growth, including: 

 While  in  the  past,  the  style  of  treatment  relied  somewhat  lower  on  evidence‐based 
approaches, this trend has seen a quick turnaround in the previous decade. 

 While focus on prevention was limited earlier, it is steadily inching up evident from the 
faster  growth  rate  in  the  wellness  segment  of  the  sector.  Screening,  early  detection, 
and monitoring reduce downstream costs. 
 
Table 14: Diagnostics market segments 
Ticket size (INR) Category Sub‐category Comment
250‐500 Clinical Pathology Biochemistry Tests the changes in the chemical composition of body fluids in 
response to a particular disease or condition compared to results 
from healthy people, eg. Blood sugar
Hematology Study of diseases which affect blood. Eg. number of blood cells, 
clotting & bleeding studies
Immunochemistry Sudy of diseases caused by an abnormal immune response through 
analysis of blood serum components. Eg. Allergies, auto‐immune & 
immunodeficiency diseases.
Microbiology Study of diseases caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, etc. done by 
culturing organisms from specimens such as urine, faeces and 
swabs to identify pathogens
Coagulation Amount of time required for coagulation of blood. point of care tests 
popular
Urinalysis Detect and measure various properties of urine. point of care tests 
popular
800‐1000 Anatomical Pathology Anatomical tests diagnose diseases through microscopic study of 
organs and tissue samples
1000‐1500 Molecular Diagnostics Analyse DNA and RNA to detect heritable or acquired disease‐related 
genotypes, mutations, phenotypes or karyotypes
Radiology Market Segmentation
INR 4000‐5000 MRI systems
Ultrasound systems
INR 2000‐3000 Computed Tomography (CT) Systems
Nuclear Imaging Systems
INR 150‐200 X‐ray systems  
Source: Edelweiss research 

   

40  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare

Chart 26: Break up of ~USD4bn Indian diagnostics market 

Immunology
22% Rural
Hematology 33%
18%
Pathology Biochemistry
Radiology
56% 39%
44%

Others
21% Urban
67%

  
Source: CRISIL, Edelweiss research 
 
There  is  much  fragmentation  with  >100k  labs  in  the  country,  but  demand  for 
institutionalised services has led to organised players becoming more relevant in this sunrise 
sector and have hence benefited from this trend. SRL, Metropolis, Dr Lal, Thyrocare, Vijaya 
Diagnostics, Medall, among others, are major organised players in the segment. 
 
Chart 27: Diagnostics ‐ Highly fragmented industry 
Hospital based
37% Regional Chains
9%

Diagnostic 
Chains
15%

Standalone  Large Pan India 
centres Chains
48% 6%
 
Source: CRISIL, Edelweiss research 
 
To understand the demand within the diagnostics market, we break it up across channels: 
(a) Referrals  are  the  biggest  channel,  making  up  ~50‐60%  cases  in  the  market.  These 
require commission payments to doctors of ~30‐40% by small/new labs and ~5‐10% by 
established  labs.  While  walk‐in  patients  make  up  ~30‐35%  of  cases,  corporate  clients 
make up the balance. 

(b) While  a  chunk  comprises  the  sick‐care  market,  ~7%  of  overall  value  is  derived  from 
wellness and preventive diagnostics. 
 

41  Edelweiss Securities Limited 

Healthcare 

Chart 28: Mix of ~USD4bn Indian diagnostics market 
Corporate  Wellness 
clients 7%
10%

Walk‐ins Referrals
35% 55%

Sick care 
     93%
Source: CRISIL, Edelweiss research 
 
The  best  way  to  gauge  size  of  the  pathology  market  is  reagent  sales  to  this  market.  The 
reagent market size in India is ~INR38‐48bn and pathology players clock ~75% gross margin. 
Also, pathology makes up ~55% of the diagnostics market. On the basis of this, we believe 
that diagnostics is a ~USD4bn market for players that grew ~14% CAGR during 2012‐15. We 
believe  the  diagnostics  industry  will  continue  to  post  ~14%  CAGR  through  2020,  slightly 
faster than growth of the reagent market. 
 
Chart 29: Strong diagnostics industry growth to sustain 

6.7 

3.5 

2.4 

2012 2015 2020


 
Source: Edelweiss research 

 
   

42  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare

Appendix II: Health Insurance Sector in India 
 
India’s  non‐life  Insurance  market  comprises  22  private  and  4  public  sector  companies.  Of 
the 22 private sector companies, 5 are standalone health insurance companies (SAHI) – Max 
Bupa  Health  Insurance  Company,  Star  Health  &  Allied  Insurance  Company,  Apollo  Munich 
Health  Insurance  Company,  Religare  Health  Insurance  Company  and  Cigna  TTK  Health 
Insurance.  
 
Health insurance has been the fastest growing segment in non‐life insurance industry in past 
5 years. Total health insurance premium in FY15 reached INR201bn, growing at 16% CAGR 
during the period. 
 
Chart 30: Health insurance premium – GWP (INR bn)  Chart 31: Health insurance segment 
220 220

28  CAGR 17%
176 176 CAGR 23%
22 
17  44  CAGR 11% 88
132 45  132 74
(INR bn)

16  59
(INR bn)
42  CAGR 18%
15  34  49 CAGR 16%
88 88 39
29 
129  81 89
108  59 72
44 96  44 50
67  80 
22 22 23 21 24 CAGR 2%
0 0
FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15

Public GI Private GI SAHI Government Group Insurance Individual


  
Source: General Insurance Council 
 
In India, health insurance penetration (as a % of GDP) is <0.2% (as compared to ~4% for life 
insurance). The segment has high potential with only ~5% of the population covered under 
private health insurance versus 12% in UK, 13% in Spain and ~45% in Australia. It continues 
to  be  one  of  the  most  rapidly  growing  sectors  in  the  Indian  insurance  industry  with  an 
expected CAGR of >15% over next 3‐5 years. Rising healthcare costs and high level of out‐of‐
pocket expenses in India bode well for industry growth. 
 
Table 15: Salient features of health insurance sector 
Key drivers for the sector Key challenges
Rising healthcare costs and high level of out of pocket expenses Increased regulatory activism
Low health insurance penetration & coverage Lack of unified data
Increase in proportion of individuals buying health insurance Fragmented provider market
New channels are increasing distribution reach and penetration High cost of activation for distribution channels
Customer friendly regulation and increased product offerings High incurred claims ratio
Government Initiatives and Tax Incentives  
Source: Industry, Edelweiss research 
 
 
   

43  Edelweiss Securities Limited 

Healthcare 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Companies 
 

44  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
COMPANY UPDATE 
                                   
APOLLO HOSPITALS
Metamorphosing into new age healthcare behemoth
India Equity Research| Healthcare 

Apollo  Healthcare  (Apollo),  India’s  largest  hospital  chain,  is  equipping  EDELWEISS 4D RATINGS 
itself  to  successfully  battle  the  anticipated  disruption  in  the  healthcare    Absolute Rating  BUY
sector.  Going  forward,  it  is  targeting  select  tertiary  care  focused    Rating Relative to Sector  Outperform
greenfield investments and focus on improving operating metrics for the    Risk Rating Relative to Sector  Low
capacity  it  has  rapidly  created  over  the  past  5  years.  Under  AHLL,  it  is    Sector Relative to Market  Overweight
adding a number of new healthcare delivery formats focused on primary 
and  secondary  care  that  are  bound  to  bolster  its  patient  engagement 
early in the lifecycle. Maintain ’BUY’ with target price of INR1,740.    MARKET DATA (R:  APLH.BO, B:  APHS IN) 
  CMP   :  INR 1,320 
 
  Target Price   :  INR 1,740 
Eyeing selective tertiary care investments going forward    52‐week range (INR)   :  1,545 / 1,213 
Apollo, by virtue of being the largest hospital network in India, is envisaged to be key    Share in issue (mn)   :  139.1 
beneficiary of the sector’s growth and improving fundamentals. It is in the last stage of    M cap (INR bn/USD mn)   :  186 / 2,791 
tertiary  care  capacity  addition.  Going  forward,  it  will  make  selective  greenfield    Avg. Daily Vol.BSE/NSE(‘000)   :  217.6 
investments like the super specialty hospital in Navi Mumbai and international cancer 
referral  center  in  Chennai,  that  may  exert  some  near‐term  pressure  on  margin.  Its   SHARE HOLDING PATTERN (%)
focus will be on improving realisations across the network.  Current Q1FY17  Q4FY16
  Promoters *  34.4 34.4  34.4 
Embracing newer formats  MF's, FI's & BK’s 1.3 1.1  1.0 
Focus  on  margin  improvement  and  calibrated  expansion  across  its  standalone  FII's 44.8 45.1  45.3 
pharmacies  business  will  contribute  ~21%  to  Apollo’s  incremental  EBITDA  over Others 19.5 19.5  19.4 
FY16‐21. Additionally, investments in newer formats under AHLL will start maturing by  * Promoters pledged shares  : NIL
   (% of share in issue) 
FY21 and contribute ~4% of incremental EBITDA over the same period. 
 
 PRICE PERFORMANCE (%)
RoCE to improve over medium to long term  BSE 
Stock  Nifty 
We  believe,  upfront  investments—Navi  Mumbai  hospital  (480  beds,  INR6bn  capex,  Healthcare 
breakeven in ~3‐4 years) and AHLL—will squeeze near‐term margin. However, over the  1 month  (4.2)  (2.5) (0.7)
medium  to  long  term,  Apollo  will  optimise  asset  utilisation  and  improve  case  mix,  3 months  (2.8)  4.3 1.7
which  is  bound  to  drive  margin  and  RoCE.  New  hospitals  in  the  system  have  12 months  (10.4)  6.4   (11.4) 
~INR11.5bn capital employed and are yet to contribute to RoCE. 
   
  Outlook and valuations: Metamorphosing; maintain ‘BUY’ 
  We estimate ~19% EBITDA CAGR and RoCE to jump 428bps to ~14% over FY16‐19. This 
  implies valuation of 15x FY19E EV/ EBITDA. We maintain ’BUY/SO’ with TP of INR1,740. 
  Deepak Malik 
+91 22 6620 3147 
  Financials (INR mn) deepak.malik@edelweissfin.com 
  Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E  
Rahul Solanki 
  Net Revenues (INR mn) 57,349 68,246 80,980 93,059 +91 22 6623 3317 
  EBITDA (INR mn)          7,823          9,031         11,055       13,320 rahul.solanki@edelweissfin.com 
 
  EBITDA margin (%)            12.9
             12.5            12.9            13.5
Archana Menon 
Adjusted Profit  (INR mn)          3,089          3,911          5,627          7,404 +91 22 6620 3020 
 
Diluted P/E (x)            59.4            46.9            32.6            24.8 archana.menon@edelweissfin.com 
  EV/EBITDA (x)  
26.2 22.7 18.5 15.4
ROACE (%)            10.0            10.4            12.6            14.3 October 7, 2016 
Edelweiss Research is also available on www.edelresearch.com, 
Bloomberg EDEL <GO>, Thomson First Call, Reuters and Factset.  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Healthcare 
 

A bird’s eye view 
 
Eyeing selective tertiary care investments going forward 
Largest hospital network in India 
Apollo,  with  ~6,800  owned  operational  beds  in  61  hospitals  across  India,  is  the  country’s 
largest  hospital  network.  Ergo,  we  envisage  it  to  be  key  beneficiary  of  the  sector’s 
anticipated growth and improving fundamentals. 
 
Greenfield projects in select new markets 
Apollo is in the last lap of capacity addition and aims to add more ~900 beds by FY21. This 
comprises  greenfield  investments  in  key  new  facility  in  Navi  Mumbai  (480  beds,  INR6bn 
capex, to be commissioned in FY17) and South Chennai (200 beds + Proton beam therapy, 
INR7.5bn capex, to be commissioned in FY19). 
 
Chennai cluster: Muted bed addition; realisation to keep improving  
The Chennai facility is its flagship hospital with the highest revenue and profitability across 
all hospitals, and the cluster (1,500 beds) contributes ~57% to Apollo’s total EBITDA. Going 
forward,  while  the  bed  addition  in  this  cluster  will  be  limited  (100/50/50  during 
FY19/20/21),  the  company’s  focus  is  to  decongest  the  main  hospital  and  increase  more 
specialty  cases,  thereby  improving  share  of  high  realisation  treatments.  This  should  drive 
higher realisation per bed and we estimate ARPOB to clock CAGR of 8% over FY16‐21. We 
expect  EBITDA  margin  to  remain  steady  through  FY16‐21  and  EBITDA  to  post  14%  CAGR 
during FY16‐21. Thus, Chennai cluster’s growth will be primarily driven by improvement in 
realisation. It will contribute ~34% to Apollo’s incremental EBITDA during FY16‐21. 
 
Proton beam therapy introduced for the first time in India at cost of USD50mn 
In  FY19,  Apollo  will  commission  South  East  Asia's  first  Proton  Beam  Therapy  Centre  in 
Chennai  and  India  will  then  be  one  amongst  the  few  nations  in  the  world  offering  this 
advanced cancer care treatment. It is one of the most superior forms of radiation therapy in 
the world and uses high‐energy proton beam for cancer treatment. 
 
Hyderabad: No bed addition in overcrowded market; realisation to drive growth 
The Hyderabad cluster (~930 beds) contributes ~15% to Apollo’s EBITDA currently. However, 
this market is now saddled with overcapacity, leading to new challenges. To deal with this, 
Apollo  has  consciously  started  rationalising  low‐yield  cases,  which  has  affected  occupancy 
(60% in FY16 versus peak of  67% in FY14) and hence topline growth (9% during FY14‐16). 
Going  forward,  we  forecast  steady  occupancy  levels  and  just  ARPOB  growth  to  drive  11% 
revenue CAGR for the cluster. We expect margin to remain steady and EBITDA to clock 14% 
CAGR. Hyderabad will contribute ~9% of incremental EBITDA during FY16‐21. 
 
Other clusters: No material bed addition, operating metrics to improve and drive growth  
Other  older  hospitals  (~2,100  beds)  contribute  ~4%  to  Apollo’s  EBITDA  currently.  ~1,000 
beds have been added during the past 5 years. Thus, while revenue has clocked ~19% CAGR 
in this cluster of hospitals, margin has remained depressed in single digit (4% currently). We 
expect  occupancy  to  move  from  ~57%  to  ~70%  gradually,  accompanied  with  a  steady  9% 
growth in ARPOB. Revenue will register ~14% CAGR, with  margin estimated to improve to 

46  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Apollo Hospitals Enterprise
 
~20% by FY21, driving 39% EBITDA CAGR. This cluster will contribute ~25%  of incremental 
EBITDA over FY16‐21 and contribute ~13% to Apollo’s EBITDA by FY21. 
 
Bengaluru 
We forecast occupancy to drive ~9% CAGR at this 80‐bed hospital. Expect INR400mn EBITDA 
loss during FY17E and then breakeven during FY18. We estimate EBITDA margin to improve 
to ~17% by FY21. 
 
Navi Mumbai: Muted bed addition; realisation to keep improving 
Apollo  is  launching  a  super  specialty  480‐beds  hospital  in  Navi  Mumbai  by  Q3FY17  end, 
which  entails  ~INR6bn  worth  of  capex.  It  will  have  specialties  like  trauma,  transplant  and 
oncology. While the EBITDA loss for first year will be ~INR300mn, cash loss will be higher at 
~INR500mn. Launch of this facility will exert pressure on Apollo’s margin during FY17/18. 
 
Byculla, Mumbai 
A 300‐bed hospital will be launched in Byculla in FY21, contributing INR200mn EBITDA loss 
in the first year. 
 
Chart 1: Chennai to contribute ~50% of incremental hospitals EBITDA during FY16‐21 
EBITDA  Standalone Hospitals EBITDA  Navi  Byculla ‐
margin 21% margin 25% Mumbai EBITDA 
600  (200) 14,618  4% loss 
2,035 
Others
1,133 
15% +200 beds
+480 beds

4,072  Others  
24%
6,577 
Chennai
+200 beds

Hyderabad
Chennai 58%
18% Hyderabad
67% 15%

EBITDA  Chennai Hyderabad Others Navi  Byculla EBITDA 


(FY16) Mumbai (FY21E)

Source: Apollo hospitals, Edelweiss research 
 
Embracing newer formats 
Calibrated expansion in standalone pharmacies 
While  standalone  pharmacies  contribute  ~40%  to  revenue,  owing  to  low  margin  they 
contribute only 11% to the company’s EBITDA currently. We estimate revenue to post CAGR 
of 19% over FY16‐21, driven by same store sales growth as well as new pharmacies addition. 
We  forecast  margin  to  improve  from  3.6%  to  6%,  and  drive  ~22%  CAGR  over  the  same 
period. Thus, this vertical will contribute ~18% of Apollo’s incremental EBITDA over FY16‐21, 
and ~17% of Apollo’s EBITDA by FY21E.  
 
Increase presence in Indian healthcare retail space through new formats under AHLL 
AHLL is a subsidiary of Apollo. It provides primary healthcare facilities through a network of 
owned/  franchised  clinics  across  India,  offering  specialist  consultations,  diagnostics, 
preventive  health  checks,  telemedicine  facilities  and  a  24‐hour  pharmacy  under  one  roof. 
The  AHLL  vertical  is  yet  to  break  even.  During  FY16,  it  incurred  EBITDA  loss  of  INR420mn. 
We expect AHLL’s revenues to post CAGR of 10% over FY16‐21. We expect AHLL’s losses to 
wane, but continue through to FY19, and the vertical to just about break even during FY20 

47  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Healthcare 
 
and then earn marginal profit during FY21. This turnaround in AHLL will contribute ~4% of 
incremental EBITDA over FY16‐21. 
RoCE to improve over medium to long term 
We believe, upfront investments—Mumbai hospital (480 beds, INR6bn capex, breakeven in 
~3‐4 years) and AHLL—will squeeze near‐term margin. However, over the medium to long 
term,  Apollo  will  optimise  asset  utilisation  and  improve  case  mix,  which  is  bound  to  drive 
margin and RoCE. New hospitals in the system have ~ INR11.5bn capital employed and are 
yet to contribute to RoCE. 
 
Chart 2: Hospitals business will be main driver for Apollo  (INR mn) 
EBITDA  EBITDA 
margin ‐13% margin ‐16%

520  914  19,803 


2,480  21 
8,040 

7,827 

EBITDA  Standalone  Standalone  Apollo  AHLL  Others EBITDA 


(FY16) Hospitals Pharmacy Munich  (FY21E)
 
Source: Apollo hospitals, Edelweiss research 
 
Outlook and valuations: Metamorphosing; maintain ‘BUY’ 
We  estimate  ~19%  EBITDA  CAGR  over  FY16‐19  and  RoCE  to  jump  428bps  to  ~14%.  This 
implies valuation of 15x FY19E EV/ EBITDA. We maintain ’BUY’ with target price of INR1,740. 
 
Table 1: Valuation table 
Valuation Mar‐18
Multiple 20x
EBITDA  (FY19)                                         13,320
EV                                       266,399
Less: net debt                                          23,902
Market Cap                                       242,497
No of shares                                               139
Value per share                                            1,743  
Source: Edelweiss research 
 

48  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Apollo Hospitals Enterprise
 

Investment Rationale 
Eyeing selective tertiary care investments going forward 
Apollo, by virtue of being the largest hospital network in India, is envisaged to be key 
beneficiary of the sector’s growth and improving fundamentals. It is in the last stage of 
tertiary  care  capacity  addition.  Going  forward,  it  will  make  selective  greenfield 
investments like the super specialty hospital in Navi Mumbai and international cancer 
referral center in Chennai that will exert some near‐term pressure on margin. Its focus 
will be on improving realisations across the network. 
 
Largest hospital network in India 
With  ~6,800  owned  operational  beds  in  61  hospitals  across  India,  Apollo  is  the  largest 
hospital  network  in  the  country.  Ergo,  we  envisage  it  to  be  key  beneficiary  of  the  sector’s 
growth  and  improving  fundamentals.  The  company  has  established  strong  brand  equity 
among patients and doctors with sustained focus on better and consistent clinical outcomes 
and  investments  in  technology  (e‐ICUs,  robotic  surgery,  high‐end  scanners—PET/CT  and 
PET/MRI).  These  soft,  but  critical,  aspects  of  branding  will  enable  it  to  sustain  pricing 
premium, superior ARPOBs, enhance market share in key specialties and reduce ALOS. 
 
Focus on Centers of Excellence with 1 or 2 anchor specialties in each market 
Apollo’s  leadership  in  the  organised  hospitals  chain  bestows  it  the  economies  of  scale  to 
invest  in  tertiary  and  quaternary  care  (~63%  of  in‐patient  revenue)  and  remain  at  the 
frontier  of  clinical  excellence.  For  instance,  it  was  the  first  player  to  bring  PET‐CT  and 
Cyberknife to India, it has successfully performed robotic surgeries on over 3,000 adults & 
80 children using Da Vinci Robotic system and to further its oncology offerings it now plans 
to set up South Asia’s and Africa’s first Proton beam therapy in 2018. Each of Apollo’s key 
clusters has been built around a quaternary care hospital (Center of Excellence) with 1 or 2 
key  specialties.  The  company  aims  to  set  benchmark  standards  in  clinical  outcomes  for 
therapies  like  cardiology,  oncology,  neurosciences,  critical  care,  orthopedics  and 
transplants. 
 
Precision oncology: Key specialty focus going forward 
Precision oncology is a personalised approach to treat cancer based on a patient’s individual 
genetic  blueprint.  Unlike  traditional  methods  that  treat  cancer  by  disease  type,  precision 
medicine uses genomic sequencing, a process used to determine the genetic blueprint of a 
patient’s cancer to target the “achilles’ heel” of the tumour. 
 
Apollo aims to expand its oncology presence through clinical excellence as well as exclusive 
oncology  referral  hospitals.  It  is  currently  constructing  a  200‐bed  international  cancer 
referral  center  in  Chennai.  It  will  start  in  FY19  and  become  fully  operational  by  FY21.  This 
facility will  be established with a capex of INR7.5bn,  including the  USD50mn Proton beam 
therapy—a  state‐of‐the‐art  tool  that  will  be  brought  to  India  for  the  first  time.  Apollo  will 
charge ticket size of ~INR1.5mn/ therapy for this. 
 
Greenfield projects in select new markets 
Within the 6,800 owned beds, 62% are >5 years more old. 8%, 19% and 11% of the beds are 
<1 year old, 1‐3 years old and 3‐5 years old, respectively. Apollo is in the last lap of capacity 
addition and aims to add ~900 beds more by FY21. This comprises greenfield investments in 
key new facility in Navi Mumbai (480 beds, INR6bn capex, to be commissioned in FY17) and 

49  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Healthcare 
 
South  Chennai  (200  beds  +  Proton  beam  therapy,  INR7.5bn  capex,  to  be  commissioned  in 
FY19). 
 
Table 2: Maturity profile of Apollo’s beds 
Maturity share of beds (%)
>5 years 62
3‐5 years 11
1‐3 years 19
<1 year 8   
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Table 3: Defined expansion plan for owned bed capacity 

Location Commisioning date Beds Total project cost (INR bn) Comments


Navi Mumbai FY17 480 6.0 Super specialty hospital
South Chennai FY19 200 7.5 Includes Proton Beam Therapy (USD 50mn)
Byculla, Mumbai FY21 300 1.4 Only 200 beds will be operational by FY21  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Chart 3: Calibrated bed addition ahead (standalone beds) 
5,500  5,423 
250

5,200  130
200
(no of beds)

4,900  100
200
4,600  4,543 

4,300 

4,000 
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E Total
 
Source: Apollo hospitals, Edelweiss research 
 
Chennai cluster: Muted bed addition; realisation to keep improving 
Apollo’s  main  facility  in  Chennai  is  a  multi‐disciplinary  facility  bustling  with  critical  care 
cases.  It  has  one  of  the  largest  transplant  centres  including  kidney,  liver,  pancreatic  and 
multi‐organ transplants. The facility boasts of a strong doctor fraternity. The company has a 
well balanced case mix with focus on key specialties (Centers of Excellence) that contribute 
>60% to total cases at Apollo. 
 
The Chennai facility is its flagship hospital with the highest revenue and profitability across 
all hospitals, and the cluster (1,500 beds) contributes ~57% to total EBITDA. Going forward, 
while  the  bed  addition  in  this  cluster  will  be  limited  (100/50/50  during  FY19/20/21),  the 
company’s  focus  is  to  decongest  the  main  hospital  and  increase  more  specialty  cases, 
thereby improving share of high realisation treatments. This should drive higher realisation 
per bed and we estimate ARPOB CAGR of 8% over FY16‐21. We forecast EBITDA margin to 

50  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Apollo Hospitals Enterprise
 
remain  steady  through  FY16‐21  and  EBITDA  to  post  14%  CAGR  during  FY16‐21.  Thus, 
Chennai cluster’s growth will be primarily driven by improvement in realisation. The Chennai 
cluster will contribute ~34% of Apollo’s incremental EBITDA during FY16‐21E. 
 
Proton beam therapy introduced for first time in India at a cost of USD50mn 
In  FY19,  Apollo  will  commission  South  East  Asia's  first  Proton  Beam  Therapy  Centre  in 
Chennai  and  India  will  then  be  one  amongst  the  few  nations  in  the  world  offering  this 
advanced cancer care treatment. It is one of the most superior forms of radiation therapy in 
the world and uses high‐energy proton beam for cancer treatment. 
 
The therapy has transformed the treatment of numerous cancers such as pediatric cancers, 
skull base tumors, brain tumors, breast cancer, prostate cancer and lung cancer, to name a 
few.  It  becomes  a  feasible  option,  predominantly  in  cases  where  treatment  options  are 
limited and conventional radiotherapy entails a higher risk to patients. 
 
Hyderabad: No bed addition in overcrowded market; realisation to drive growth 
The Hyderabad cluster (~930 beds) contributes ~15% to Apollo’s EBITDA currently. However, 
this market is now saddled with overcapacity that has led to new challenges. To deal with 
them, the company has consciously started rationalising low‐yield cases, which has affected 
occupancy (60% in FY16 versus peak of 67% in FY14) and hence topline growth (9% during 
FY14‐16).  Going  forward,  we  forecast  steady  occupancy  levels  and  only  ARPOB  growth  to 
drive 11% revenue CAGR for the cluster. We expect margin to remain steady and EBITDA to 
post 14% CAGR. Hyderabad will contribute ~9% of incremental EBITDA over FY16‐21. 
 
Other clusters: No material bed addition; operating metrics to improve and drive growth  
Other  older  hospitals  (~2,100  beds)  contribute  ~4%  to  Apollo’s  EBITDA  currently.  ~1,000 
beds have been added during the past 5 years. Thus, while revenue has posted ~19% CAGR 
in  this  cluster  of  hospitals,  margin  has  remained  depressed  in  single  digit  (4%  currently). 
During FY16, new hospitals like Vanagaram and Jayangar have started breaking even. Going 
forward, there will be no bed additions in the cluster. We expect occupancy to move from 
~57%  to  ~70%  gradually,  accompanied  with  a  steady  9%  growth  in  ARPOB.  We  expect 
hospitals like Trichy, Nashik, Women & Child ‐ OMR, Nellore, Perungudi, Women & Child – 
SMR,  Vizag  and  Malleswaram  to  start  breaking  even  as  well.  These  new  hospitals  have 
~INR11.5bn capital employed and are yet to contribute to RoCE. Revenue will register ~14% 
CAGR with margin to improve to ~20% by FY21E, driving 39% EBITDA CAGR. This cluster will 
contribute  ~25%  of  incremental  EBITDA  over  FY16‐21E  and  contribute  ~13%  to  Apollo’s 
EBITDA by FY21E. 
 
Bengaluru 
We forecast occupancy to drive ~9% CAGR at this 80‐bed hospital. We estimate INR400mn 
EBITDA loss during FY17 and then breakeven during FY18. Expect EBITDA margin to improve 
to ~17% by FY21E. 
 
Navi Mumbai: Muted bed addition; realisation to keep improving 
Apollo  is  launching  a  super  specialty  480‐beds  hospital  in  Navi  Mumbai  by  end  Q3FY17, 
which  entails  ~INR6bn  worth  of  capex.  It  will  have  specialties  like  trauma,  transplant  and 
oncology. The company will operationalise 200 beds in FY17, followed by 100/100/80 more 
beds to be operationalised during FY18/19/20, respectively. However, most of the capex is 
upfronted due to technical reasons pertaining to the land. Thus, while the EBITDA loss for 

51  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Healthcare 
 
first year will be ~INR300mn, cash loss will be higher at ~INR500mn. Launch of this facility 
will exert pressure on Apollo’s margin during FY17/18. 
 
Apollo  believes  the  geography  presents  an  under‐served  market  and  it  can  garner  >50% 
occupancy  to  begin  with  and  gradually  raise  it  to  ~70%  by  FY20  despite  adding  beds.  Our 
forecasted  EBITDA  trajectory  is—loss  of  INR300mn  during  FY17  to  improve  to  INR600mn 
profit by FY21. 
 
Byculla, Mumbai 
A 300‐bed hospital will be launched in Byculla in FY21, contributing INR200mn EBITDA loss 
in the first year. 
 
Chart 4: Steady growth ahead in hospitals business 
15,000  27 
60,000 
25 
12,000  25 
48,000 
23 
9,000  23 

(INR mn)
36,000 
(INR mn)

21 

(%)
21 
21 
24,000  6,000  21 
20 

12,000  3,000  19 

0  0  17 
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E
Healthcare revenue
EBITDA EBITDA margin (%)
  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Chart 5: Chennai to contribute ~50% of incremental hospitals EBITDA during FY16‐21E 
EBITDA  Standalone Hospitals EBITDA  Navi  Byculla ‐
margin 21% margin 25% Mumbai EBITDA 
600  (200) 14,618  4% loss 
2,035 
Others
1,133 
+200 beds

15%
+480 beds

4,072  Others  
24%
6,577 
Chennai
+200 beds

Hyderabad
Chennai 58%
18% Hyderabad
67% 15%

EBITDA  Chennai Hyderabad Others Navi  Byculla EBITDA 


(FY16) Mumbai (FY21E)

Source: Apollo hospitals, Edelweiss research 
 

52  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Apollo Hospitals Enterprise
 
Embracing newer formats 
Focus  on  margin  improvement  and  calibrated  expansion  across  its  standalone 
pharmacies  business  will  contribute  ~20%  of  Apollo’s  incremental  EBITDA  over  FY16‐
21E. Additionally, its investments in newer formats under AHLL will start maturing by 
FY21 and contribute ~4% of its incremental EBITDA over the same period. 
 
Calibrated expansion in standalone pharmacies 

While  standalone  pharmacies  contribute  ~40%  to  revenue,  owing  to  low  margin  they 
contribute only 11% to the company’s EBITDA currently. We estimate revenue to post CAGR 
of  19%  over  FY16‐21,  driven  by  same  store  sales  growth  as  well  as  new  pharmacies 
addition. We estimate margin to improve from 3.6% to 6% and drive ~22% CAGR over the 
same period. Thus, this vertical will contribute ~18% of Apollo’s incremental EBITDA during 
FY16‐21E and contribute ~17% to Apollo’s EBITDA by FY21E. 
 
Apollo  is  planning  calibrated  expansion  of  the  standalone  pharmacies  business. 
Management  estimates  100‐150  additions  each  year  with  sharpening  focus  on  improving 
profitability and RoCE. Ergo, it has introduced a variety of private label (OTC) products which 
offer  higher  gross  margins  (40%  versus  20‐30%  for  medicines)  and  also  boost  same  store 
sales. While currently private labels contribute ~6‐7% to turnover, Apollo is eyeing 20% over 
the long term. 
 
Chart 6: Increased asset turnover to boost RoCE of pharmacies  
3,500  65,000  12.5 
(Number of Pharmacies)

3,000  53,000  10.0 

2,500  41,000  7.5 


(INR mn)

6.0  6.0 
(%)

5.0 
2,000  29,000  4.5  4.5 
5.0 
3.3  3.3  3.6 
2.7 
1,500  17,000  1.9 
2.5 

1,000  5,000 
0.0 
FY17E
FY18E
FY19E
FY20E
FY21E
FY12
FY13
FY14
FY15
FY16

FY17E

FY18E

FY19E

FY20E

FY21E
FY12

FY13

FY14

FY15

FY16

Number of Pharmacies Revenues EBITDA Margin (%) ROCE


  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Increase presence in Indian healthcare retail space through new formats under AHLL 
AHLL is a subsidiary of Apollo. It provides primary healthcare facilities through a network of 
owned/  franchised  clinics  across  India,  offering  specialist  consultations,  diagnostics, 
preventive  health  checks,  telemedicine  facilities  and  a  24‐hour  pharmacy  under  one  roof. 
These models have proved effective in increasing efficiencies via higher volumes, resulting 
in  reduced  costs  and  simultaneously  delivering  comparable  quality  standards  and  success 
rates. The increase in patient touch points will strengthen Apollo’s ability to be the premier 
healthcare provider for the community. New formats require lower investments as they are 
asset‐light (leased infrastructure) and peak margin could be in the 20‐25% range. 
 

53  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Healthcare 
 
The AHLL vertical is yet to break even. During FY16, it posted EBITDA loss of INR420mn. We 
estimate  its  revenue  to  register  CAGR  of  10%  over  FY16‐21.  We  expect  AHLL’s  losses  to 
wane, but continue through to FY19, and the vertical to just about break even during FY20 
and then earn marginal profit during FY21. This turnaround in AHLL will contribute ~4% of 
incremental EBITDA over FY16‐21E. 
 
Dental  and  dialysis  clinics:  Apollo  has  created  state‐of‐the‐art  dental  clinics‐cum‐spas 
which provide comprehensive portfolio of dental services at competitive prices. Each dental 
clinic has dedicated consultants, quality infrastructure and offer superior service. 
 
Cradle (birthing centers):  The concept of birthing centers as a specialty healthcare service 
is  novel.  These  address  specialised  women  and  child  care  needs,  including  high  risk 
pregnancy care, infertility cases, neonatal care and new born intensive care.  
 
Day surgery centers: These are specialised 20‐30 bed facilities wherein the patient can be 
admitted for surgery and return home the same day. Target patient groups include higher 
income  individuals,  who  are  offered  differentiated  patient  care.  The  average  revenue  per 
surgery ranges between INR25,000 and INR100,000. 
 
Battle  ready  to  fight  disruptive  headwinds:  As  emerging  trends  unleash  disruption  in  the 
healthcare  sector,  Apollo’s  strategy  is  to  leverage  technology  to  enhance  customer 
experience & loyalty, analytics, patients outreach and access, tele‐medicine and e‐consults. 
Such models are gaining wider acceptance in India due to shortage of doctors and medical 
practitioners which constrains quality of outcomes. 
 
Chart 7: AHLL to breakeven and start contributing FY21 onwards 
2,500 500 

2,000 300 

100 
(INR mn)

1,500
(INR mn)

1,000 (100)

500 (300)

0 (500)
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E
Revenue EBITDA
  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research

54  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Apollo Hospitals Enterprise
 
RoCE to improve in medium to long term 
We  believe,  upfront  investments—Mumbai  hospital  (480  beds,  INR6bn  capex, 
breakeven in ~3‐4 years) and AHLL—will squeeze near‐term margin. However, over the 
medium  to  long  term,  Apollo  will  optimise  asset  utilisation  and  improve  case  mix, 
which  is  bound  to  drive  margin  and  RoCE.  New  hospitals  in  the  system  have 
~INR11.5bn capital employed and are yet to contribute to RoCE. 
 
Upfront investments to suppress near‐term margin  
Apollo has added 11 hospitals and created additional capacity of >1,700 beds over the past 
3 years. It has also acquired a 210‐bed hospital in Guwahati. Further, over the next 3 years, 
it  is  planning  to  add  another  565  beds  across  3  new  hospitals,  including  the  greenfield 
project in Mumbai (480 beds, INR6bn capex, breakeven to take ~3‐4 years). This expansion, 
along with its investments in the retail format (AHLL losses), will squeeze near‐term margin. 
 
Focus on improving key operating metrics 
Apollo  is  optimising  its  asset  utilisation  in  flagship  facilities  and  improving  its  case  mix.  Its 
efforts  have  already  started  bearing  fruits—ARPOB  has  improved  and  ALOS  has  reduced. 
This  will  aid  margin  and  RoCE  improvement  over  the  medium  to  long  term.  We  expect 
hospitals like Trichy, Nashik, Women & Child ‐ OMR, Nellore, Perungudi, Women & Child – 
SMR,  Vizag  and  Malleswaram  to  start  breaking  even  as  well.  These  new  hospitals  have 
~INR11.5bn capital employed and are yet to contribute to RoCE. 
 
Chart 8: Hospitals business will be main driver for Apollo  (INR mn) 
EBITDA  EBITDA 
margin ‐13% margin ‐16%

520  914  19,803 


2,480  21 
8,040 

7,827 

EBITDA  Standalone  Standalone  Apollo  AHLL  Others EBITDA 


(FY16) Hospitals Pharmacy Munich  (FY21E)
 
Source: Apollo hospitals, Edelweiss research 
 

55  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Healthcare 
 

Valuations 
 
We  forecast  revenue  CAGR  of  18%  with  ~65bps  EBITDA  margin  improvement  and  ~19% 
EBITDA  CAGR  over  FY16‐19;  RoCE  is  estimated  to  jump  428bps  to  ~14%.  This  implies 
valuation of 15x FY19E EV/ EBITDA. We maintain ’BUY/SO’ with target price of INR1,740. 
 
Table 4: Valuation table 
Valuation Mar‐18
Multiple 20x
EBITDA  (FY19)                                         13,320
EV                                       266,399
Less: net debt                                          23,902
Market Cap                                       242,497
No of shares                                               139
Value per share                                            1,743  
Source: Edelweiss research

56  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Apollo Hospitals Enterprise
 

Key Risks 
 
Success of business depends on expansion of network 
Historically, the company’s business growth has been primarily driven by establishing new 
centres and hospitals through various partnership arrangements and acquisitions; and it is 
expect that these will continue to be key drivers for its future growth. 
 
Subsidiaries may be unable to sustain profitability in the future 
Some  of  company’s  subsidiaries  have  reported  net  losses  in  the  recent  years  and  may  be 
unable to achieve or sustain profitability in the future, which may materially and adversely 
impact their business and prospects. 
 
Specialist physicians could dis‐associate 
The  success  of  this  business  is  dependent  on  the  ability  to  attract  and  retain  leading 
specialist physicians. Company’s ability to attract and retain these specialist physicians and 
other  healthcare  professionals,  including  physicians  and  nurses  depends,  among  other 
things,  on  the  commercial  terms  that  it  offers  them,  the  reputation  of  its  centres  and 
hospitals and the exposure to technology and research opportunities that it offers them. 
 
Rising infrastructure costs could restrict investment 
Near  term  upfront  investments  could  suppress  margin  if  infrastructure  costs  continue  to 
rise. 
 
 

57  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Healthcare 
 

 Financial Outlook  
 
Chart 9: Steady revenue growth…  Chart 10: ….with consistent improvement in EBITDA margin 
150,000 20.0 

120,000 18.0 

15.8 
90,000 16.0 
(INR mn)

14.8 

(%)
60,000 13.5 
14.0 
12.9  12.9 
12.5 
30,000 12.0 

0 10.0 
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E
  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Chart 11: … will drive strong EBITDA growth  Chart 12: …and ramp up RoCE 
20,000 19.5 
20.0
17.1 
16,000 17.0
14.3 
12,000
(INR mn)

14.0 12.6 
(%)

8,000 10.0  10.4 


11.0

4,000 8.0

0 5.0
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E
  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

58  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Apollo Hospitals Enterprise
 
Company Description 
Apollo  is  widely  recognised  as  the  pioneer  of  private  healthcare  in  India,  and  was  the 
country’s  first  corporate  hospital.  The  Apollo  Hospitals  Group,  which  started  as  a  150‐bed 
hospital in Chennai in 1983 and today, operates 6,800 beds across 61 hospitals. The Group 
has  emerged  as  the  foremost  integrated  healthcare  provider  in  Asia,  with  mature  group 
companies  that  specialize  in  insurance,  pharmacy,  consultancy,  clinics  and  many  such  key 
touch points of the ecosystem. 
 
The group includes Hospitals, pharmacies, primary care and diagnostic clinics, telemedicine 
centres and Apollo Munich Insurance branches panning the length and breadth of India. As 
an  integrated  healthcare  service  provider  with  health  insurance  services,  global  projects 
consultancy capability, medical education centres and a research foundation with a focus on 
global clinical trials, epidemiological studies, stem cell & genetic research, Apollo has been 
at the forefront of new medical breakthroughs with the most recent investment being that 
of  commissioning  the  first  Proton  Therapy  Center  across  Asia,  Africa  and  Australia  in 
Chennai, India. 
 
Investment Theme 
Apollo  Healthcare  (Apollo),  India’s  largest  hospital  chain,  is  equipping  itself  to  successfully 
battle  the  anticipated  disruption  in  the  healthcare  sector.  Going  forward,  it  is  targeting 
select  tertiary  care  focused  greenfield  investments  and  focus  on  improving  operating 
metrics  for  the  capacity  it  has  rapidly  created  over  the  past  5  years.  Under  Apollo  Health 
and  Lifestyle  (AHLL),  it  is  adding  a  number  of  new  healthcare  delivery  formats  focused  on 
primary and secondary care that are bound  to bolster its patient engagement early in the 
lifecycle. We estimate ~19% EBITDA CAGR and RoCE to jump 428bps to ~14% over FY16‐19. 
Maintain ’BUY’ with target price of INR1,740. 
 
Key Risks 
 Success of business depends on expansion of network 
 Subsidiaries may be unable to sustain profitability in the future 

 Specialist physicians could dis‐associate 

 Rising infrastructure costs could restrict investment 

 
 
 
 

59  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Pharmaceuticals 
Financial Statements 
Key Assumptions      Income statement     (INR mn)
Year to March  FY16  FY17E  FY18E FY19E Year to March FY16  FY17E FY18E FY19E
Macro       Net revenue 57,349  68,246 80,980 93,059
 GDP(Y‐o‐Y %)  7.4  7.9  8.3 8.3 Other Operating Income 3,507  4,173 4,952 5,691
 Inflation (Avg)  4.8  5.0  5.2 5.2 Income from operations 60,856  72,419 85,932 98,750
 Repo rate (exit rate)  6.8  6.0  6.0 6.0 Materials costs 30,558  36,210 42,966 48,733
 USD/INR (Avg)  65.0  67.5  67.0 67.0 Employee costs 10,242  13,110 15,732 18,092
Company       EBITDA 7,823  9,031 11,055 13,320
 Bed capacity  6,454  6,724  6,989 7,089 Operating profit 7,823  9,031 11,055 13,320
 Pharmacy additions (YoY)  2,326  2,476  2,626 2,776 EBIT 5,290  6,302 8,254 10,393
 Tax rate (%)  24.1  20.0  20.0 20.0 Add: Other income 267  110 106 181
Less: Interest Expense 1,685  1,712 1,832 1,832
Add: Exceptional items 292  ‐ ‐ ‐
Profit Before Tax 4,164  4,700 6,528 8,742
Less: Provision for Tax 1,002  940 1,306 1,748
Less: Minority Interest (73)  (75) (104) (110)
Associate profit share 75  75 300 300
Reported Profit 3,310  3,911 5,627 7,404
Exceptional Items 221  ‐ ‐ ‐
Adjusted Profit 3,089  3,911 5,627 7,404
Shares o /s (mn) 139  139 139 139
Adjusted Basic EPS 22.2  28.1 40.4 53.2
Diluted shares o/s (mn) 139  139 139 139
Adjusted Diluted EPS 22.2  28.1 40.4 53.2
Adjusted Cash EPS 40.4  47.7 60.6 74.3
Dividend per share (DPS) 6.0  7.1 10.2 13.4
Dividend Payout Ratio(%) 25.2  25.2 25.2 25.2
 
Common size metrics    
Year to March FY16  FY17E FY18E FY19E
Operating expenses 87.1  87.5 87.1 86.5
Materials costs 50.2  50.0 50.0 49.4
Staff costs 16.8  18.1 18.3 18.3
Depreciation 4.2  3.8 3.3 3.0
Interest Expense 2.8  2.4 2.1 1.9
EBITDA margins 12.9  12.5 12.9 13.5
Net Profit margins 5.0  5.3 6.4 7.4
 
Growth ratios (%)    
Year to March FY16  FY17E FY18E FY19E
Revenues 17.7  19.0 18.7 14.9
EBITDA 6.5  15.4 22.4 20.5
PBT (8.6)  12.9 38.9 33.9
Adjusted Profit (6.5)  26.6 43.9 31.6
EPS (6.5)  26.6 43.9 31.6
 

60  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Apollo Hospitals Enterprise
Balance sheet        (INR mn) Cash flow metrics    
As on 31st March  FY16  FY17E  FY18E FY19E Year to March FY16  FY17E FY18E FY19E
Share capital  696  696  696 696 Operating cash flow 4,232  6,296 5,459 10,265
Reserves & Surplus  33,841  36,568  40,492 45,656 Investing cash flow (6,840)  (6,000) (4,000) (5,000)
Shareholders' funds  34,537  37,264  41,188 46,351 Financing cash flow 2,725  (2,895) (1,534) (4,072)
Net cash Flow 116  (2,599) (76) 1,193
Minority Interest  1,303  1,228  1,124 1,013
Capex (8,306)  (6,000) (4,000) (5,000)
Short term borrowings  1,820  1,820  1,820 1,820
 
Long term borrowings  22,956  22,956  24,956 24,956
Profitability and efficiency ratios    
Total Borrowings  24,776  24,776  26,776 26,776
Year to March FY16  FY17E FY18E FY19E
Long Term Liabilities  45  45  45 45
ROAE (%) 8.8  10.3 13.7 16.3
Def. Tax Liability (net)  4,843  4,843  4,843 4,843
ROACE (%) 10.0  10.4 12.6 14.3
Sources of funds  65,504  68,156  73,975 79,029
Inventory Days 47  47 47 47
Depreciation  2,533  2,730  2,802 2,927
Debtors Days 42  42 42 42
Net Block  34,443  37,714  38,912 40,985
Payable Days 55  51 48 46
Capital work in progress  5,956  5,956  5,956 5,956
Cash Conversion Cycle 34  38 41 43
Intangible Assets  3,803  3,803  3,803 3,803
Current Ratio 2.7  2.6 2.6 2.8
Total Fixed Assets  44,203  47,473  48,671 50,745
Gross Debt/EBITDA 3.2  2.7 2.4 2.0
Non current investments  1,980  1,980  1,980 1,980
Gross Debt/Equity 0.7  0.6 0.6 0.6
Cash and Equivalents  4,693  2,094  2,018 3,211
Adjusted Debt/Equity 0.7  0.6 0.6 0.6
Inventories  4,433  4,970  6,187 6,468
Net Debt/Equity 0.6  0.6 0.6 0.5
Sundry Debtors  7,020  8,584  9,931 11,346
Interest Coverage Ratio 3.1  3.7 4.5 5.7
Loans & Advances  13,923  14,527  19,231 19,563
 
Other Current Assets  487  526  675 705
Operating ratios    
Current Assets (ex cash)  25,862  28,608  36,025 38,082
Year to March FY16  FY17E FY18E FY19E
Trade payable  5,037  5,090  6,306 5,978
Total Asset Turnover 1.0  1.0 1.1 1.2
Other Current Liab  6,196  6,909  8,413 9,012
Fixed Asset Turnover 1.6  1.7 1.9 2.1
Total Current Liab  11,234  11,999  14,719 14,989
Equity Turnover 1.7  1.8 2.0 2.1
Net Curr Assets‐ex cash  14,628  16,609  21,306 23,093
 
Uses of funds  65,504  68,156  73,975 79,029
Valuation parameters    
BVPS (INR)  248.2  267.8  296.0 333.2
Year to March FY16  FY17E FY18E FY19E
     
Adj. Diluted EPS (INR) 22.2  28.1 40.4 53.2
Free cash flow        (INR mn)
Y‐o‐Y growth (%) (6.5)  26.6 43.9 31.6
Year to March  FY16  FY17E  FY18E FY19E
Adjusted Cash EPS (INR) 40.4  47.7 60.6 74.3
Reported Profit  3,310  3,911  5,627 7,404
Diluted P/E (x) 59.4  46.9 32.6 24.8
Add: Depreciation  2,533  2,730  2,802 2,927
P/B (x) 5.3  4.9 4.5 4.0
Interest (Net of Tax)  1,279  1,369  1,465 1,465
EV / Sales (x) 3.6  3.0 2.5 2.2
Others  (5,208)  (3,253)  (6,523) (3,033)
EV / EBITDA (x) 26.2  22.7 18.5 15.4
Less: Changes in WC  (2,317)  (1,539)  (2,088) (1,502)
Dividend Yield (%) 0.5  0.5 0.8 1.0
Operating cash flow  4,232  6,296  5,459 10,265
Less: Capex  8,306  6,000  4,000 5,000
Free Cash Flow  (5,759)  (1,416)  (373) 3,434
     

61  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Pharmaceuticals 
Additional Data 
Directors Data 
Prathap C Reddy  Founder, Chairman  Preetha Reddy Executive Vice Chairperson
Suneeta Reddy  Director  Sangita Reddy Director 
Rajkumar Menon  Director  Rafeeque Ahamed Director 
N Vaghul  Director  G Venkatraman Director 
 
Shobana Kamineni  Executive Vice Chairperson Deepak Vaidya Director 
 
  Auditors ‐  S Viswanathan 
*as per last annual report

 
 
Holding – Top10
  Perc. Holding    Perc. Holding 
Pcr investments ltd  19.57      Integrated healthcar 10.85
Massachusetts mutual  8.38      Schroders plc 4.64
Reddy prathap c  3.91      Reddy suneeta 2.43
Vanguard group  2.21      Reddy sangita 1.75
Munchener ruckversic  1.72      Blackrock 1.69
*in last one year

Bulk Deals
Data  Acquired / Seller  B/S Qty Traded Price 
     
No Data Available     
*in last one year 

Insider Trades
Reporting Data  Acquired / Seller  B/S  Qty Traded 
     
No Data Available     
*in last one year

62  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Dr Lal PathLabs
INITIATING COVERAGE 
 
 
DR LAL PATHLABS 
Going strong 
India Equity Research| Healthcare 

Dr  Lal  Pathlabs  (Dr  Lal)  is  one  of  India’s  premier  diagnostic  players  that  EDELWEISS 4D RATINGS 
has  a  B2C  heavy  business  and  is  positioned  to  benefit  from  favourable    Absolute Rating  BUY
sector dynamics. Having established a strong presence in North India, it is    Rating Relative to Sector  Performer
now gearing to drive next phase of growth by expanding footprint in East    Risk Rating Relative to Sector  Low
and Central India by opening 2 additional regional reference labs. Owing    Sector Relative to Market  Overweight
to  low  capex  requirements,  strong  FCF  generation  phase  will  continue, 
sustaining  high  valuations  in  the  medium  term.  Initiate  coverage 
  MARKET DATA (R:  NA, B:  DLPL IN) 
with ’BUY’ and target price of INR1,180. 
  CMP   :  INR 1,050 
    Target Price   :   INR 1,180 
Tailwinds spurring diagnostics growth to sustain    52‐week range (INR)   :  1,275 / 696 
As evidence‐based treatment gains ground, growth drivers for diagnostics will remain    Share in issue (mn)   :  82.7 
upbeat.  Other  than  having  the  same  drivers  as  the  healthcare  sector  in  general,    M cap (INR bn/USD mn)   :  88 / 1,322 
preventive  healthcare  diagnosis  (wellness)  will  continue  to  gain  popularity.  Current    Avg. Daily Vol.BSE/NSE(‘000)   :  4,20.4 
market share of organised players is fairly low, boosting long‐term growth visibility. 
   SHARE HOLDING PATTERN (%)
B2C heavy business penetrating deeper in new markets  Current Q1FY17  Q4FY16
Dr  Lal  is  one  of  the  strongest  B2C  +  B2B  brands  with  one  of  the  best  walk‐in  ratios.  Promoters *  58.6 58.7  58.7 
Having established strong presence in North India, it is now gearing to drive next phase  MF's, FI's & BK’s 5.8 7.7  8.0 
of  growth  by  expanding  footprint  in  East  and  Central  India  by  opening  2  additional  FII's 7.2 7.2  6.1 
regional reference labs in Kolkata and Lucknow. It is also planning to spread wings in  Others 28.3 26.4  27.2 
* Promoters pledged shares  : 0.2
South and West India by acquiring regional players with strong brand recognition.     (% of share in issue) 
 
Strong free cash flow generation renders high yield   RELATIVE PERFORMANCE (%)
Owing to the favourable rental reagent model and thereby low capex requirement, Dr  BSE 
Stock  Nifty 
Lal’s free cash flow will continue to be strong. CMP implies ~3.2% FCF yield to market  Healthcare 

cap  for  FY19,  twice  of  the  hospital  sector.  The  space  also  offers  best  RoCE  due  to  its  1 month  (7.6)  (2.5) (0.7)
asset‐light reagent rental model and low gestation period.  3 months  13.4  4.3 (1.7)
  12 months  NA  6.4  (11.4)  
Outlook and valuations: Best in class; initiate with ‘BUY’ 
 
We forecast revenue and EBITDA to grow at CAGR of 21% each, over FY16‐19 and RoCE 
  to stabilise around 38% to 40% post launching new regional labs. We initiate coverage 
  with ’BUY/SP’ and target price of INR1,180 (25x FY19E EV/EBITDA). 
 
  Financials Deepak Malik 
(INR mn)
+91 22 6620 3147 
  Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E deepak.malik@edelweissfin.com 
  Net revenues (INR mn) 7,913 9,721 11,943 14,146  
Rahul Solanki 
  EBITDA (INR mn) 2,097 2,489 3,045 3,706 +91 22 6623 3317 
  EBITDA Margin (%) 26.5 25.6   25.5 26.2 rahul.solanki@edelweissfin.com 
 
  Reported profit  (INR mn) 1,322
  1,604 2,019 2,601
Archana Menon 
Diluted P/E (x)             65.7             54.1             43.0             33.4 +91 22 6620 3020 
 
EV/EBITDA (x)             40.0             33.7             27.5             22.6 archana.menon@edelweissfin.com 
 
ROACE (%) 43.5 37.6 36.9 36.8
October 07, 2016 
Edelweiss Research is also available on www.edelresearch.com, 
63 
Bloomberg EDEL <GO>, Thomson First Call, Reuters and Factset.  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

A bird’s eye view 
 
Tailwinds spurring diagnostics growth to sustain 
Diagnostics Market (USD bn)  Diagnostics makes a strong investment case as it is still a largely under‐consumed module of 
treatment  and  demand  has  significant  room  to  grow.  As  evidence‐based  treatment  gains 
Diagnostic market 6.7 ground,  growth  drivers  for  diagnostics  will  remain  upbeat.  Even  as  India  continues  to 
grapple with the burden of communicable diseases, a wave of non‐communicable diseases 
has  flooded  the  country  with  ailments  like  diabetes,  obesity  and  cancer,  among  others. 
3.5 Hence,  preventive  healthcare  diagnosis  (wellness)  will  continue  to  gain  popularity.  Also, 
2.4 current  market  share  of  organised  chains  is  fairly  low,  boosting  their  long‐term  growth 
visibility. The space also offers best RoCE due to its asset‐light reagent rental model and low 
gestation period. 
 
2012 2015 2020
B2C heavy business penetrating deeper into new markets 
Source: Industry reports,   Numero uno brand positioned to benefit from favourable sector dynamics 
Edelweiss research
The  company  is  one  of  the  most  recognised  brands  among  patients  as  well  as  physicians. 
With  a  large  and  diverse  customer  pool,  its  walk‐in  patients  account  for  highest  share 
(~40%) of revenue. 
 
Expanding presence in North India 
Dr Lal will continue to focus on its core market ‐ North India. It intends to further strengthen 
its position by opening new franchised patient service centers to deepen its network reach. 
We expect North India to contribute ~36% of incremental revenue growth during FY16‐21E, 
and the region to post CAGR of 18%. 
 
Focus on penetrating deeper in East and Central India 
To  drive  next  phase  of  growth  in  East  and  Central  India,  the  company  intends  to  expand 
presence  through  construction  of  regional  reference  laboratories  in  Lucknow  (December 
2018)  and  Kolkata  (September  2017).  We  estimate  East  India  to  contribute  16%  of 
incremental  revenue  growth  during  FY16‐21  and  the  region  to  post  CAGR  of  25%  and 
contribute 15% to total revenue versus 13% currently. We expect Central India to contribute 
27% of incremental revenue growth during FY16‐21 and the region to post CAGR of 23% and 
contribute 26% to the company’s total revenue versus 25% currently. 
 
Eyeing new geographies via strategic acquisitions and partnerships 
On  a  combined  basis,  South  and  West  contribute  15%  to  total  revenue  currently.  We 
estimate  it  to  post  28%  CAGR  and  contribute  22%  to  incremental  revenue  during  FY16‐21 
and thereby increase its revenue contribution to 19% of total by FY21E. 
 

64  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Dr Lal PathLabs
 
Chart 1: Expansion across Central and East India to boost revenue  

2,903  21,349 
Others Others
2,111 
15% 3,614  19% Delhi
4,808  40%
East 
India Delhi 7,913 
13% 47% East 
India
15%

Revenue  Delhi Central  East India Others Revenue  Central India


Central India (FY16) India (rest  (FY21E) (rest of North
(rest of North of North  India) 26%
India) 25% India)
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Operating metrics to remain steady 

Its scalable model is well equipped to manage seamless integration of new reference labs. 
Over FY16‐21, we expect the number of samples to register CAGR of 17%, while realisation/ 
sample  to  improve  at  5%  CAGR.  We  estimate  EBITDA  margin  to  remain  steady  at  ~26% 
versus 27% as of FY16. ~69% of incremental  EBITDA will thus be contributed by growth in 
samples versus ~31% due to improvement in realisation. 
 
Chart 2: Volume as well as realisation to drive EBITDA growth 
EBITDA margin  EBITDA margin 
27% 26%
1,074  5,594 

2,422 

2,097 

EBITDA (FY16) Number of  Realizations/ EBITDA (FY21E)


samples sample
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Strong FCF generation renders high FCF yield 
Owing to the favorable rental reagent model and thereby low capex requirement, Dr Lal’s 
free  cash  flow  will  continue  to  be  strong.  CMP  implies  ~3.2%  FCF  yield  to  market  cap  for 
FY19, twice of the hospital sector. 
 
 

65  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Outlook and valuations: Best in class; initiate with ‘BUY’ 
We forecast revenue and EBITDA to grow at CAGR of 21% each, over FY16‐19 and RoCE to 
stabilise  around  38%  to  40%  post  launching  new  regional  labs.  We  initiate  coverage  with 
’BUY/SP’ and target price of INR1,180 (25x FY19E EV/EBITDA). 
 
While Dr Lal’s FY19E FCF yield is ~2x of the average for the hospital sector, RoCE is ~3x. We 
assign a target price multiple of 25x EV/ EBITDA, a 25% premium over the hospital sector. 
We believe this premium will continue in the medium term. 
 
Table 1: Valuation table 
Valuation Mar‐18
Multiple 25x
EBITDA  (FY19)                                  3,706
EV                                92,657
Less: net debt                                  (5,258)
Market Cap                                97,914
No of shares                                        83
Value per share                                  1,184  
Source: Edelweiss research 

66  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Dr Lal PathLabs
 

Investment Rationale 
 
Tailwinds spurring diagnostics growth to sustain 
Diagnostics  makes  a  strong  investment  case  as  it  is  still  a  largely  under‐consumed 
module  of  treatment  and  demand  has  significant  room  to  grow.  As  evidence‐based 
treatment  gains  ground,  growth  drivers  for  diagnostics  will  remain  upbeat.  Even  as 
India continues to grapple with the burden of communicable diseases, a wave of non‐
communicable diseases has flooded the country with ailments like diabetes, obesity 
and  cancer,  among  others.  Hence,  preventive  healthcare  diagnosis  (wellness)  will 
continue  to  gain  popularity.  Also,  current  market  share  of  organised  chains  is  fairly 
low, boosting their long‐term growth visibility. The space also offers best RoCE due to 
its asset‐light reagent rental model and low gestation period. 
 
Diagnostic services have lower share in overall healthcare spends (~4% of total), but play a 
vital role in identifying problem areas and major illnesses. 
 
A  number  of  factors  are  driving  higher  growth  of  diagnostic  services  versus  overall 
healthcare industry growth, including: 

 While  in  the  past,  the  style  of  treatment  relied  somewhat  lower  on  evidence‐based 
approaches, this trend has gained ground in the previous decade. 
 While focus on prevention was limited earlier, it is steadily inching up evident from the 
faster growth rate in the wellness segment. Screening, early detection and monitoring 
reduce downstream costs. 
 
We believe that diagnostics is a ~USD4bn market for players that clocked ~14% CAGR during 
FY12‐15.  The  industry  will  continue  to  post  ~14%  CAGR  through  2020,  slightly  faster  than 
growth of the reagent market. 
 
Chart 3: Diagnostics industry ‐ Robust growth to sustain 

6.7 

3.5 

2.4 

2012 2015 2020


 
Source: Industry reports, Edelweiss research 
 
 
   

67  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

To understand demand within the diagnostics market, we break it up across channels: 

(a) Referrals  are  the  biggest  channel,  making  up  ~50‐60%  cases  in  the  market.  These 
require commission payments to doctors of ~30‐40% by small/new labs and ~5‐10% by 
established  labs.  While  walk‐in  patients  make  up  ~30‐35%  of  cases,  corporate  clients 
make up the balance. 

(b) While  a  chunk  comprises  the  sick‐care  market,  ~7%  of  overall  value  is  derived  from 
wellness and preventive diagnostics. 
 
Chart 4: Mix of ~USD4bn Indian diagnostics market 
Corporate  Wellness 
clients 7%
10%

Walk‐ins Referrals
35% 55%

Sick care 
     93%
Source: CRISIL, Edelweiss research 
 
There  is  much  fragmentation  with  >100k  labs  in  India,  but  demand  for  institutionalised 
services has led to organised players becoming more relevant in this sunrise sector and have 
hence  benefited  from  this  trend.  SRL,  Metropolis,  Dr  Lal,  Thyrocare,  Vijaya  Diagnostics, 
Medall, among others, are major organised players in the segment. 
 
Chart 5: Diagnostics ‐ Highly fragmented industry 
Hospital based
37% Regional Chains
9%

Diagnostic 
Chains
15%

Standalone  Large Pan India 
centres Chains
48% 6%
 
Source: CRISIL, Edelweiss research 
 

68  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Dr Lal PathLabs
 
Chart 6: Break up of ~USD4bn Indian diagnostics market 

Immunology
22% Rural
Hematology 33%
18%
Pathology Biochemistry
Radiology
56% 39%
44%

Others
21% Urban
67%

  
Source: CRISIL, Edelweiss research 
 
Table 2: Comparison of diagnostics companies 
FY16 numbers unless 
Dr Lal Thyrocare SRL
mentioned, INR mn                    
Number of laboratories                                                      172                                                       7                                                 314
Number of samples (mn)                                                        26                                                    12                                                   15
Revenue CAGR (FY11‐16)                                                        27                                                    24                                                   14
Revenue                                                   7,913                                               2,312                                              8,980
EBITDA Margin (%)                                                        27                                                    39                                                   20
ROCE (%)                                                        44                                                    24                                                   12
Market Cap (INR bn)                                                        87                                                    33 N/A
Test profile  <10% imaging  <10% imaging  < 10% imaging
~70% routine tests like CBC and  Only Biochemistry tests offered <5% preventive healthcare
lipid profile ~20% thyroid rest are routine and 
~30% specialized like molecular  ~50% preventive healthcare specialized tests 
diagnostics, genetics, thyroid, etc.  ~30% non thyroid tests 
Revenue mix  ~40% walk‐ins (172 labs) All revenues derived from   ~ 33% walk‐in (314 labs)
~ 35% from collection centers  franchises across India (~  ~24% collection centers (7,200 
(1,560 patient service centers) 1,200)  centres)
~ 25% from pickup points (4,970  ~20% hospitals
centers)  ~16% direct clients 
FY18 P/E                                                        43                                                    37 N/A
FY18 EV/EBITDA                                                        28                                                    22 N/A
FY19 P/E                                                        33                                                    29 N/A
FY19 EV/EBITDA                                                        23                                                    18 N/A  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 

69  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

B2C heavy business penetrating deeper into new markets 
Dr Lal is one of the strongest B2C + B2B brands with one of the best walk‐in ratios. 
Patients are primary decision makers in India and this plays to Dr Lal’s advantage due 
to a strong front‐end. Having established a strong presence in North India, it is now 
gearing to drive next phase of growth by expanding its footprint in East and Central 
India  by  opening  2  additional  regional  reference  labs  in  Kolkata  (September  2017) 
and Lucknow (December 2018). It also targets to spread its wings in South and West 
India, by acquiring regional players that enjoy strong brand recognition. 
 
 
Numero uno brand positioned to benefit from favourable sector dynamics  

Dr Lal has established itself as one of the country’s leading pathology brands having worked 
intently on the 2 most important aspects of quality and service. The company is one of the 
most  recognised  brands  among  patients  as  well  as  physicians.  With  a  large  and  diverse 
customer pool, its walk‐in patients account for highest share (~40%) of revenue. It has one 
of the widest offerings of diagnostic tests among organised players in the market.  
 
The Company has set up a highly scalable model. It’s national level hub‐and‐spoke network 
includes  its  National  Reference  Laboratory  in  New  Delhi,  172  other  clinical  laboratories, 
1,559  Patient  Service  Centres  (PSCs)  and  ~5,000  Pick‐up‐Points  (PUPs).  The  company’s 
integrated  centralised  IT  platform  enables  rapid  network  expansion.  The  centralised 
diagnostic testing provides greater economies of scale. PSCs and PUPs facilitate penetration 
within  the  region  and  expand  Dr  Lal’s  reach.  Its  dedicated  logistics  team  ensures  a  fast 
turnaround time with facilities like online access and home collections.  
 
Patients are the primary decision makers in India, and this plays to the advantage of a brand 
centric  model  like  Dr  Lal  with  a  strong  front‐end.  Thus,  Dr  Lal  has  one  of  the  best  walk‐in 
ratios  in  the  space.  But,  its  quality/reliability  proposition  has  ensured  good  growth  in  the 
B2B category as well. 
 
Chart 7: Steady network expansion… 
Clinical Laboratories Patient Service Centers Pick‐up Points
5,668 
172 

1,559 

4,967 
164 
146 

1,340 

4,225 
131 

1,064 

2,879 
824 

FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16
   
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
   

70  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Dr Lal PathLabs
 
Chart 8: … translated into strong volume growth 
Number of patients 60
Number of samples
15
57
12 48
48
12.0
36 41
9 9.9

(nos)
36
(nos)

9.0
31
7.7 24
6 26
22
19
12 16
3
0

FY17E

FY18E

FY19E

FY20E

FY21E
FY13

FY14

FY15

FY16
0
FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16
   
 
Chart 9: Strong volume growth translated into robust revenue growth 
Revenue (INR mn) West India International
7,913  South India 7% 1%
7%
6,596 
5,579 
4,517  East India
13%

North India
72%
FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16
 
 
Chart 10: Revenue growth balanced across regions 
North India East India South India West India International
7,000 1,200 600 600 200

1,000 480
5,600 480 160
800
(INR mn)

4,200 360 360 120


(INR mn)
(INR mn)

(INR mn)
(INR mn)

600
2,800 240 240 80
400
1,400 120 120 40
200

0 0 0 0 0
FY13 FY16 FY13 FY16 FY13 FY16 FY13 FY16 FY13 FY16
                  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 

71  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Expanding presence in North India 

Dr Lal will continue to focus on its core market ‐ North India. It intends to further strengthen 
its position by opening new franchised patient service centers to expand its network reach. 
We expect North India to contribute ~36%  of incremental revenue growth during FY16‐21 
and the region to post CAGR of 18%. Currently, the region contributes 47% to Dr Lal’s total 
revenue.  However,  as  other  regions  grow  at  a  faster  clip,  North’s  contribution  will  dip 
marginally to 40% by FY21E. 
 
Focus on penetrating deeper in East and Central India 

To drive next phase of growth in East and Central India, Dr Lal intends to expand presence 
through  construction  of  regional  reference  laboratories  in  Lucknow  (December  2018)  and 
Kolkata (September 2017) at a capex of ~INR400‐450mn over and above the land cost. The 
company  believes  its  overall  penetration  is  low  in  these  regions  and  perceives  immense 
potential  to  grow  by  opening  additional  smaller  clinical  laboratories  and  new 
complementary PSCs. 
 
According to the company, the NCR market is growing at ~13‐15% and the East at ~17‐18% 
with  potential  to  grow  at  >25%.  Dr  Lal  expects  to  penetrate  deeper  into  the  promising 
markets of Bengal, Bihar and North East using the Kolkata reference lab. We estimate East 
India  to  contribute  16%  to  incremental  revenue  growth  during  FY16‐21  and  the  region  to 
post CAGR of 25% and contribute 15% to the company’s total revenue versus 13% currently. 
 
Similarly,  it  expects  the  new  reference  lab  in  Lucknow  to  help  it  penetrate  UP  and  MP 
markets.  It  expects  Lucknow  to  become  a  major  medical  hub  with  Medanta’s  Medicity 
launch  there.  We  expect  Central  India  to  contribute  27%  of  incremental  revenue  growth 
during FY16‐21 and the region to post CAGR of 23% and 26% to the company’s total revenue 
versus 25% currently. 
 
Bolstering services 

Dr Lal will continue to increase the breadth of its diagnostic healthcare testing and services 
platform  through  adoption  of  new  and  cutting‐edge  diagnostic  healthcare  testing 
technology as it believes this will expand its revenue sources and further enhance its brand’s 
reputation. The company intends to offer more preventive healthcare screening and chronic 
and  lifestyle  disease  management  services,  given  increasing  health  awareness  and 
concomitant  increase  in  chronic  and  lifestyle  ailments  in  India.  This  includes  further 
development  in  genetics,  molecular  and  oncology  testing  and  further  sprucing  up  of  its 
current  chronic  disease  management  and  wellness  programmes.  It  also  intends  to  further 
beef up its corporate customer base by continuing to market its healthcare proposition to 
human resource departments and other corporate decision makers. 
 
Eyeing new geographies via strategic acquisitions and partnerships 

Since FY08, Dr Lal has made several strategic acquisitions in India of smaller‐scale diagnostic 
healthcare  service  providers  that  currently  contribute  ~10‐12%  of  overall  revenues.  The 
company  last  made  a  small  INR40mn  acquisition  in  FY15.  Strong  cash  flows  from  business 
could  be  utilised  for  further  strategic  acquisitions.  Dr  Lal  proposes  to  continue  exploring 
expansion  opportunities  in  India,  including  strategic  acquisitions  of  regional  diagnostic 
healthcare  service  providers  who  have  brand  recall  among  its  existing  patient  base  and 

72  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Dr Lal PathLabs
 
healthcare  providers.  Dr  Lal  believes  future  acquisitions  will  provide  it  operating  synergies 
and aid organic growth in these new regions through introduction of specialised testing in 
addition  to  those  already  offered  by  the  acquired  company.  It  will  also  enjoy  additional 
purchasing power with its suppliers and increased economies of scale. 
 
Plans  are  also  afoot  to  expand  presence  in  South  and  West  India  by  opening  additional 
clinical  laboratories  and  PSCs.  It  is  also  continuously  enhancing  breadth  of  its  diagnostic 
tests. On a combined basis, South and West contribute 15% to total revenue currently. We 
estimate it to clock 28% CAGR and contribute 22% of incremental revenue during FY16‐21 
and thereby increase its revenue contribution to 19% of total by FY21. 
 
Expanding lab management venture 

Dr  Lal  is  looking  at  scaling  up  the  offshoot  model  whereby  it  undertakes  management  of 
laboratories  which  are  functioning  within  a  hospital.  Every  hospital  has  a  routine  lab.  This 
far, the company has only been tapping part of the business which is being outsourced to 
Reference  Labs.  Having  realised  that  with  its  scale,  size  and  productivity,  it  can  manage 
these  labs  operationally  with  co‐branding  of  Dr  Lal,  thereby  protecting  margins  for  these 
hospital‐based  laboratories  and  still  be  able  to  make  margin  gains  (~18‐20%).  While  this 
margin may not be to the extent it makes in its existing business, it could secure a very large 
captive high volume business. Initial response has been encouraging (~18‐20 labs) and it is 
looking at adding more such contracts going forward. 
 
Chart 11: Expansion to drive robust volume growth translating into revenue and EBITDA growth 
Samples (mn) Revenue (INR mn) EBITDA  and EBITDA 
21,349  6,000 Margin 30 

4,800 28 
14,146 
(INR mn)

3,600 26 

(%)
7,913  2,400 24 

4,517  1,200 22 

0 20 
FY17E
FY19E
FY21E
FY13
FY15
FY17E
FY18E
FY19E
FY20E
FY21E
FY13
FY14
FY15
FY16
FY17E
FY18E
FY19E
FY20E
FY21E
FY13
FY14
FY15
FY16

EBITDA EBITDA Margin
    
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 

73  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Chart 12: Expansion across Central and East India to boost revenue  

2,903  21,349 
Others Others
2,111 
15% 3,614  19% Delhi
4,808  40%
East 
India Delhi 7,913 
13% 47% East 
India
15%

Revenue  Delhi Central  East India Others Revenue  Central India


Central India (FY16) India (rest  (FY21E) (rest of North
(rest of North of North  India) 26%
India) 25% India)
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Operating metrics to remain steady 

We  expect  Dr  Lal’s  operating  metrics  to  remain  steady  through  this  rapid  expansion  and 
growth  phase  during  FY16‐21.  Its  scalable  model  is  well  equipped  to  manage  seamless 
integration of new reference labs. Over FY16‐21, we expect the number of samples to post 
CAGR  of  17%,  while  realisation/  sample  to  improve  at  CAGR  of  5%.  We  estimate  EBITDA 
margin to remain steady at ~26% versus 27% as of FY16. ~69% of incremental EBITDA will 
thus be contributed by growth in samples versus ~31% due to improvement in realisation. 
 
Chart 13: Volume as well as realisation to drive EBITDA growth 
EBITDA margin  EBITDA margin 
27% 26%
1,074  5,594 

2,422 

2,097 

EBITDA (FY16) Number of  Realizations/ EBITDA (FY21E)


samples sample
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 

74  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Dr Lal PathLabs
 
Strong FCF generation renders high FCF yield 
Owing  to  the  favourable  rental  reagent  model  and  thereby  low  capex  requirement, 
Dr  Lal’s  free  cash  flow  will  continue  to  be  strong.  CMP  implies  ~3.2%  FCF  yield  to 
market cap for FY19, twice of the hospital sector. 
 
 
Rental reagent model will continue to maintain asset‐light model 

Dr  Lal’s  test  volumes  and  long‐standing  relationships  with  vendors  have  enabled  it  to 
develop an equipment leasing model, leading to minimal capital expenditure for diagnostic 
equipment. Through this model, equipment and instruments used are generally leased from 
vendors  in  exchange  of  a  commitment  to  purchase  reagents  and  consumables  from  them 
for  a  specified  period.  Its  reagent  and  consumable  costs  are  then  expensed  as  cost  of 
materials  consumed.  The  company  benefits  financially  from  this  model  as  it  minimizes 
capital costs typically associated with diagnostic equipment as it is not required to expend 
capital immediately to procure the necessary instruments and equipment. 
 
As  its  network  the  number  of  tests  it  performs  continue  to  grow,  Dr  Lal  will  improve  its 
economies  of  scale  and  further  optimise  the  cost  of  samples  and  test  it  processes.  It  will 
keep passing some of these cost efficiencies to customers and offer tests at affordable rates. 
Offering  tests  at  competitive  prices  is  conducive  to  the  expansion  of  its  customer  base, 
which may in turn increase the number of samples and tests it processes. 
 
Chart 14: Capex to remain low post lumpy investments  Chart 15: Free cash flow 
750  4,171
600  600 
600 
3,189

432  2,722
450 
(INR mn)

1,684
300 
1,313
200  200  200  1,037
150 


FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E
  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 

75  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Valuations:  
We forecast revenue and EBITDA to grow at CAGR of 21% each, over FY16‐19 and RoCE to 
stabilise  around  38%  to  40%  post  launching  new  regional  labs.  We  initiate  coverage  with 
’BUY/SP’ and target price of INR1,180 (25x FY19E EV/EBITDA). 
 
While Dr Lal’s FY19E FCF yield is ~2x of the average for the hospital sector, RoCE is ~3x. We 
assign a target price multiple of 25x EV/ EBITDA, a 25% premium over the hospital sector. 
We believe this premium will continue in the medium term. 
 
Table 3: Valuation table 
Valuation Mar‐18
Multiple 25x
EBITDA  (FY19)                                  3,706
EV                                92,657
Less: net debt                                  (5,258)
Market Cap                                97,914
No of shares                                        83
Value per share                                  1,184  
Source: Edelweiss research 
 
 
 
 

76  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Dr Lal PathLabs
 

Key Risks 
 
Success of business depends on expansion of network 
Historically, Dr Lal’s business growth has primarily been driven by expansion of network and 
various partnership arrangements and acquisitions. Wider network will continue to be the 
key driver for future growth. 
 
Rising infrastructure costs could restrict investment 
Near‐term  upfront  investments  could  suppress  margins  if  infrastructure  costs  continue  to 
rise. 
 
Intensifying competition 
A  number  of  new  PE‐backed  players  have  entered  the  market.  Rsising  competition,  could 
suppress growth going ahead. 
 
 

77  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Company Description 
 
Started in 1949, Dr Lal is a provider of diagnostic and related healthcare tests and services in 
India.  Through  its  integrated  and  nation‐wide  network,  the  company  offers  patients  and 
healthcare providers a broad range of diagnostic and related healthcare tests and services 
for  use  in  core  testing,  patients’  diagnosis  and  prevention,  monitoring  and  treatment  of 
disease and other health conditions. Its customers include individual patients, hospitals and 
other healthcare providers and corporate customers. 
 
Dr  Lal’s  country‐wide  network  comprises  a  national  reference  laboratory  in  New  Delhi, 
supported by 172 clinical laboratories, 1,559 patient service centres and over 4,967 pickup 
points.  The  company  has  an  exhaustive  catalogue  of  tests  which  includes  over  1,110  test 
panels, 1,934 pathology tests and 1,561 radiology and cardiology tests and it keeps adding 
newer and more effective tests over time. The company employs over 3,000 personnel work 
with  >55%  of  the  staff  engaged  in  laboratory  functions.  It  has  a  qualified  team  of  147 
pathologists,  8  radiologists,  13  microbiologists,  5  biochemists  and  11  specialists  with 
doctorate degrees. 
 
   

78  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Dr Lal PathLabs
 
Table 4: Management Overview 
Name  Designation Particulars
Dr. Om Manchanda Cheif Executive Officer Dr. Om Manchanda is the Chief Executive Officer of Dr Lal PathLabs.
Before joining Dr Lal PathLabs in 2005, Manchanda led the International & 
Innovation group of the Consumer Healthcare Division at Ranbaxy. Prior to 
Ranbaxy, he worked for Monsanto as the head of Sales and Marketing.
Earlier, during his tenure with Hindustan Unilever for about 10 years, Manchanda 
received in‐depth exposure in consumer product sales, distribution and 
marketing. An MBA from the Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad; 
Manchanda is also a Doctor in Veterinary Sciences from HAU, Hisar.
Mr. Dilip Bidani Chief Financial Officer Dilip has over 25 years of professional experience. He started his career with ICI 
(now Akzo Nobel) where he spent over 5 years and moved to Hindustan Unilever. 
After nearly 9 years in Unilever, Dilip moved as Group CFO to Mother Dairy 
followed by Manpower Group (a Fortune 500 company), Orbis Financial 
Corporation ‐ a SEBI regulated Custodian Services company, and thereafter spent 
over 3 years with Avon Beauty Products as Director Finance. Dilip is a Chartered 
Accountant, PGDM (IIM Ahmedabad) and a B Com (Hons) from Calcutta University.
Mr. Manoj Garg Chief Human Resources Officer Manoj Garg has over 21 years of professional experience with a variety of 
organizations across multiple industries including Paints , Semiconductors and 
Telecom. Manoj is a MBA HR (Gold Medal) from XLRI Jamshedpur , and B Tech 
from NIT Kozhikode.
Dr. Neelum Tripathi National Director ‐ Lab  Dr Neelum Tripathi is a Pathologist from MGM medical college Indore MP. She 
Operations joined at Dr Lal PathLabs as Head Lab Operations in 2006. She has experience of 
more than 20 yrs as a Pathologist and running operations of hospital based and 
stand‐alone Labs. Prior to joining Dr Lal PathLabs she worked as a pathologist 
with SRL Ranbaxy, Fortis Hospital Noida, Noida Medical Center, Gokuldas 
Hospital and Research Center Indore, Apollo Diagnostic Center Indore.
Mr. Shankha Banerjee  Chief Operating Officer ‐  Mr. Shankha Banerjee is an alumnus of Delhi College of Engineering and SP Jain 
Region II Institute of Management & Research, Mumbai. He has also done ‘BP Sales and 
Marketing Leadership Development Course’ at Kellogs, USA. He worked for Castrol 
India Limited & BP Lubricants for 14 years and went on to become Global Market 
Space Manager. Later he joined Pidilite Industry Limited as President – Sales & 
Marketing:Middle East & Africa. He joined Dr Lal PathLabs in July 2014 as Chief 
Operating Officer‐Region II.
Mr. Munender Soperna Cheif Information Officer Mr. Munender Soperna has experience of directing business and technology 
operations for Healthcare‐Pathology, Auto Ancillary, and Power & Consultancy 
industries to optimize bottom line productivity.  Mr. Munender Soperna is a post 
graduate in Computer Application from Delhi University with Master in Business 
Administration in Systems. 
Ved Prakash Goel  Financial Controller CA Ved Prakash Goel is a finance professional with more than 17 years of 
professional experience in different industries including Manufacturing, Mines, 
Engineering, Infrastructure and Healthcare Services. 
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 

79  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Financial Outlook  
 
Chart 16: Strong revenue growth…  Chart 17: …. With steady EBITDA margin 
25,000 28 

20,000 27 
‐30bps

15,000 26 
(INR mn)

(%)
10,000 25 

5,000 24 

0 23 
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E
  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Chart 18: …to drive strong EBITDA growth  Chart 19: RoCE to stabilize post FY17 
6,000 50 

4,800 46 

3,600 42 
(INR mn)

(%)

2,400 38 

1,200 34 

0 30 
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E
   
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 

80  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Dr Lal PathLabs
 

Appendix: Diagnostic market segments 
 
Table 5: Diagnostics market segments 
Ticket size (INR) Category Sub‐category Comment
250‐500 Clinical Pathology Biochemistry Tests the changes in the chemical composition of body fluids in 
response to a particular disease or condition compared to results 
from healthy people, eg. Blood sugar
Hematology Study of diseases which affect blood. Eg. number of blood cells, 
clotting & bleeding studies
Immunochemistry Sudy of diseases caused by an abnormal immune response through 
analysis of blood serum components. Eg. Allergies, auto‐immune & 
immunodeficiency diseases.
Microbiology Study of diseases caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, etc. done by 
culturing organisms from specimens such as urine, faeces and 
swabs to identify pathogens
Coagulation Amount of time required for coagulation of blood. point of care tests 
popular
Urinalysis Detect and measure various properties of urine. point of care tests 
popular
800‐1000 Anatomical Pathology Anatomical tests diagnose diseases through microscopic study of 
organs and tissue samples
1000‐1500 Molecular Diagnostics Analyse DNA and RNA to detect heritable or acquired disease‐related 
genotypes, mutations, phenotypes or karyotypes
Radiology Market Segmentation
INR 4000‐5000 MRI systems
Ultrasound systems
INR 2000‐3000 Computed Tomography (CT) Systems
Nuclear Imaging Systems
INR 150‐200 X‐ray systems  
Source: Edelweiss research 
 

81  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Financial Statements 
Key assumptions Income statement (INR mn)
Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E
Macro Income from operations 7,913 9,721 11,943 14,146
GDP (Y‐o‐Y %)  7.4 7.9 8.3 8.3 Total operating expenses 5,816 7,233 8,897 10,440
Inflation (Avg) 4.8 5.0 5.2 5.2 Medical consumables 1,729 2,139 2,627 3,112
Repo rate (exit rate) 6.75 6.00 6.00 6.00 Staff costs 1,368 1,750 2,174 2,546
USD/INR (Avg) 65.0 67.5 67.0 67.0 SG&A expenses 2,718 3,344 4,096 4,781
Company Depreciation 283 344 385 345
Number of samples (mn)               26               31               36               41 EBITDA 2,097 2,489 3,045 3,706
Realisation/ Sample            301            316            332            342 Operating Profit 2,097 2,489 3,045 3,706
EBITDA margin (%)               27               26               26               26 EBIT 1,814 2,145 2,660 3,361
tax rate (%)               34               34               34               34 Less: Interest Expense       (142)       (270)       (366)       (524)
Add: Other income 50 50 58 66
Profit before tax    2,007    2,465    3,084    3,951
Less: Provision for Tax 675 848 1,048 1,324
Less: Minority Interest            10            13            16            26
Reported Profit    1,322    1,604    2,019    2,601
Adjusted Profit     1,322    1,604    2,019    2,601
No. of Shares outstanding 83 83 83 83
Adjusted Basic EPS 16 19 24 31
No. of Diluted shares outstanding 83 83 83 83
Adjusted Diluted EPS 16 19 24 31
Adjusted Cash EPS       19.4       23.6       29.1       35.6
Dividend per share (DPS) 2 3 4 5
Dividend Payout Ratio (%)       15.3       15.0       15.0       15.0

Common size metrics‐ as % of net revenues
Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E
Operating expenses 73.5 74.4 74.5 73.8
Medical consumables 21.9 22.0 22.0 22.0
Staff costs 17.3 18.0 18.2 18.0
Depreciation 3.6 3.5 3.2 2.4
EBITDA margins 26.5 25.6 25.5 26.2
Net profit margins 16.8 16.6 17.0 18.6

Growth metrics (%)
Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E
Net Revenues 20.0 22.9 22.9 18.5
EBITDA  34.5 18.7 22.4 21.7
PBT 44 23 25 28
Adjusted Profit 40.3 21.4 25.9 28.8
EPS (4.1) 21.4 25.9 28.8

82  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Dr Lal PathLabs
 
Balance sheet (INR mn) Cash flow metrics
As on 31st March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E
Share capital 826.8 826.8 826.8 826.8 Operating cash flow 1,469 1,913 2,284 2,922
Reserves  & Surplus 4,247 5,553 7,205 9,334 Financing cash flow 4 (286) (351) (446)
Shareholders' funds 5,074 6,379 8,032 10,161 Investing cash flow (1,518) (621) (564) (221)
Minority interest 29 42 57 84 Net cash flow (46) 1,006 1,369 2,255
Long Term Liabilities & Provisions 242 302 366 425 Capex (432) (600) (600) (200)
Deferred tax liability (net) (121) (121) (121) (121) Dividend paid (156) (291) (367) (472)
Sources of funds 5,224 6,603 8,335 10,549
Net Block 1,239 1,495 1,710 1,565 Profitability & liquidity ratios
Capital work in progress 41 41 41 41 Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E
Total Fixed assets 1,280 1,536 1,751 1,606 Return on Average Equity (ROAE) (%) 31.2 28.1 28.1 28.7
Goodwill on consolidation 417 417 417 417 Pre‐tax Return on Capital Employed  43.5 37.6 36.9 36.8
Other non‐current assets 38 49 58 69 Inventory days 30 30 30 30
Long term loans and advances 159 230 248 318 Debtors days 16 16 16 16
Cash and cash equivalents 2,940 3,946 5,315 7,570 Payble days 81 81 81 81
Inventories 145 211 227 292 Cash Conversion Cycle (35) (35) (35) (35)
Sundry debtors 363 463 552 651 Current Ratio 5 5 5 6
Loans & advances 723 727 1,054 1,055 Net Debt/Equity (1) (1) (1) (1)
Other Current Assets 67 67 67 67 Interest Coverage Ratio   (12.74)      (7.94)      (7.27)      (6.42)
Total current assets (ex cash) 1,298 1,468 1,899 2,064
Trade payable 423 522 639 737 Operating ratios
Other Current Liabilities & Short Ter 485 520 715 757 Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E
Total current liabilities & provisions 908 1,042 1,354 1,494 Total asset turnover 1.8 1.6 1.6 1.5
Net current assets (ex cash) 390 425 546 570 Fixed asset turnover 6.8 7.1 7.5 8.6
Uses of funds 5,224 6,603 8,335 10,549 Equity turnover 1.9 1.7 1.6 1.5
Book Value per share (INR) 61 77 97 123
Valuation parameters
Free cash flow  Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E
Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E Adjusted Diluted EPS (INR) 16.0 19.4 24.4 31.5
Reported Profit 1,322 1,604 2,019 2,601 Y‐o‐Y growth (%) (4) 21 26 29
Add: Depreciation 283 344 385 345 Adjusted Cash EPS (INR) 19.4 23.6 29.1 35.6
Interest (Net of Tax) (95) (177) (242) (348) Diluted Price to Earnings Ratio (P/E)  66 54 43 33
Others   (110) 177 242 348 Price to Book Ratio (P/B) (x) 17.1 13.6 10.8 8.5
Less: Changes in WC (69) 35 121 24 Enterprise Value / Sales (x) 11 9 7 6
Operating cash flow 1,469 1,913 2,284 2,922 Enterprise Value / EBITDA (x) 40.0 33.7 27.5 22.6
Less: Capex 432 600 600 200 Dividend Yield (%) 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4
Free cash flow 1,037 1,313 1,684 2,722

83  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Additional Data 
Directors Data 
(Hony) Brig. Dr. Arvind Lal  Chairman & Managing Director Dr. Vandana Lal Executive Director
Dr. Om Prakash Manchanda  CEO & Whole‐time Director Mr. Rahul Sharma Non‐Executive Director
Mr. Naveen Wadhera  Non‐Executive Nominee Director Mr. Sandeep Singhal Non‐Executive Nominee Director
Mr. Arun Duggal  Independent Director  Mr. Anoop Mahendra Singh Independent Director
 
Mr. Sunil Varma  Independent Director  Mr. Harneet Singh Chandhoke Independent Director
 
  Auditors ‐  S.R. Batliboi & Co. LLP 
*as per last annual report
 
 
 
 
Holding – Top10
   Perc. Holding    Perc. Holding 
West Bridge Crossover Fund  12.86      Wagner Ltd 9.2
SBI Fund Management  4.96      House Eskay 2.03
Wasatch Advisors Inc  1.56      Sanjeevani Investment Holdings 1.08
FMR LLC  1.06      Vanguard group 0.43
Goldman Sachs  0.3      DSP Blackrock 0.25
*in last one year

Bulk Deals
 Data    Acquired / Seller  B/S  Qty Traded   Price 
   
No Data Available   
*in last one year

Insider Trades
 Reporting Data    Acquired / Seller  B/S   Qty Traded  
     
     
No Data Available     
*in last one year

84  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
INITIATING COVERAGE 
  Fortis Healthcare
 
  FORTIS HEALTHCARE
On the cusp of value unlocking 
India Equity Research| Healthcare 

Fortis  Healthcare  (Fortis)  is  a  high  quality  tertiary  player  levered  to  the  EDELWEISS 4D RATINGS 
high‐potential of the NCR/ North India market. Its focus is on asset‐light    Absolute Rating  BUY
brownfield  expansion  and  sweating  its  assets  to  improve  operating    Rating Relative to Sector  Outperformer
metrics.  Fortis  is  on  the  cusp  of  unlocking  significant  value  by:  (i)    Risk Rating Relative to Sector  Low
demerging  its  56%  subsidiary  SRL  which  can  unlock  value  of    Sector Relative to Market  Overweight
~INR57/share;  and  (ii)  partially  unwinding  its  REIT  capital  structure,  on 
which  Fortis  pays  an  yield  of  13‐14%,  according  to  us.  Hospital  business 
  MARKET DATA (R:  FOHE.BO, B:  FORH IN) 
EBITDAC margin will improve ~170bps over FY16‐19 and RoCE will expand 
  CMP   :  INR 173 
by ~420bps. Initiate with ’BUY’ and target price of INR265.    Target Price   :   INR 265 
    52‐week range (INR)   :  199 / 141 
High quality tertiary care infrastructure network    Share in issue (mn)   :  463.2 
Delhi has the highest per capita income level in India and is growing at higher rate than    M cap (INR bn/USD mn)   :  79 / 1,192 
rest of the country. ~50% of Fortis’ bed capacity is in North India of which ~70% is in    Avg. Daily Vol.BSE/NSE(‘000)   :  1,025.4 
NCR, that has high potential owing to a large, affluent, but under‐served population. 
   SHARE HOLDING PATTERN (%)
Focus on asset‐light expansion, improvement in operating metrics  Current Q1FY17  Q4FY16
Promoters *  71.3 64.5  64.5 
Fortis  is  planning  to  ramp  up  bed  capacity  by  ~40%  through  asset  light  brownfield 
expansion. Accretion of beds and focus on sweating its assets will improve occupancy  MF's, FI's & BK’s 5.3 12.1  12.2 

and  mix  of  the  hospitals  business,  thereby  boosting  Fortis’  growth  and  profitability  FII's 13.6 12.8  10.7 

during FY17‐21. We forecast Hospital EBITDAC to clock 19% CAGR over FY16‐21.  Others 9.8 10.6  12.7 


* Promoters pledged shares  : 59.3
     (% of share in issue) 
On cusp of significant value unlocking in medium term 
The company has multiple levers to unlock significant value: (i) it is partially unwinding   RELATIVE PERFORMANCE (%)
the capital structure of RHT, which we believe is inefficient, that will result in saving BT  Stock  Nifty 
BSE 
fees  of  ~INR2bn;  (ii)  it  is  demerging  SRL,  its  56%  subsidiary  which  is  India’s  biggest  Healthcare 

organised diagnostics player which can unlock ~INR 57/share value.  1 month  (2.2)  (2.5) (0.7)


  3 months  8.3  4.3 1.7
Outlook and valuations: Unlocking value; initiate with ‘BUY’  12 months  0.6  6.4  (11.4)  

We forecast hospital revenue CAGR of 16% with EBITDAC margin improving ~170bps to 
drive ~21% EBITDAC CAGR over FY16‐19. We envisage free cash flow generation FY19 
  onwards  to  lead  to  re‐rating.  We  initiate  coverage  with  ’BUY/SO’  and  target  price  of 
  INR265 (SOTP value of INR 208/share for Fortis + INR57/share for SRL). 
  Deepak Malik 
  +91 22 6620 3147 
deepak.malik@edelweissfin.com 
  Financials (INR mn)  
  Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E Rahul Solanki 
+91 22 6623 3317 
  Net Revenues (INR mn) 42,015 48,618 46,846 54,435 rahul.solanki@edelweissfin.com 
  EBITDAC (INR mn) 6,739 8,429 7,502 8,909  
Archana Menon 
  EBITDAC margin (%) 15.8 17.1   15.8 16.1
+91 22 6620 3020 
  Adjusted Profit  (INR mn) (8)
  647 580 1,665 archana.menon@edelweissfin.com
Diluted P/E (x) NM 139.7 155.6 54.3
 
EV/EBITDA (x) 17.5 14.0 15.7 13.2
October 07, 2016 
ROACE (%) 2.2 4.5 4.4 6.4
Edelweiss Research is also available on www.edelresearch.com, 
85 
Bloomberg EDEL <GO>, Thomson First Call, Reuters and Factset.  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

A bird’s eye view 
 
High quality tertiary care infrastructure network 
~35% bed capacity in high‐potential NCR market 
Delhi  has  the  highest  per  capita  income  level  in  the  country  and  is  growing  at  higher  rate 
than  rest  of  India.  Thus,  owing  to  a  large  under‐served  population  and  its  affluence,  NCR 
market has high potential. 
 
~50% of Fortis’ bed capacity is in North India. Of this, ~70% is in NCR. Its renowned hospitals 
like Fortis Escorts Heart Institute, Delhi (FEHI), Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon 
(FMRI),  Fortis  Hospital,  Noida,  Fortis  Rajan  Dhall  Hospital,  Vasant  Kunj,  among  others  are 
present in NCR. 
 
Focus on asset‐light expansion and improvement in operating metrics 
Calibrated, bolt‐on brownfield expansion can potentially double bed capacity 
Fortis,  post  investing  significantly  in  growing  its  business  over  the  past  several  years,  has 
now  sharpened  focus  on  optimising  the  performance  of  its  assets.  While  the  current  plan 
entails increasing capacity by 40% to 5,065 beds by FY22 versus 3,615 owned beds currently, 
Fortis could potentially double it to ~9,000 via brownfield expansion. 
 
The company has shifted to the medical services model, which has enabled it to hive off the 
capital intensity of the business to Religare Health Trust (RHT)—a REIT listed in Singapore— 
and unlock value of its core competence—medical services. 
 
Chart 1: Plans to increase bed capacity by 40% over next 6 years 
Number of owned beds Shalimar Bagh ‐370 
beds (FY21E) and 
210 5065 FMRI ‐ 493 beds 
Leased 290
Owned 365 Leased (FY21) to be owned 
11% 14% 445
140 9%
3615
Owned
30%

RHT
61%
RHT
75%
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E FY22E
 
Source: Edelweiss research 
 
Sharpening focus on margin expansion 
Fortis’ focus is to sweat its assets by optimising occupancy and mix to improve the margin 
trajectory  from  low  single  digits  currently  to  mid  teens  over  the  next  2  years.  Hospital 
EBITDAC  to  register  CAGR  of  19%  during  FY16‐21E.  Established  hospitals,  FMRI,  FEHI  and 
start  up  hospitals  will  contribute  56%,  30%,  10%  and  3%  of  the  incremental  hospital 
EBITDAC in this period. 
 
 

86  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Fortis Healthcare
 
Chart 2: Hospital EBITDAC to post CAGR of 19% during FY16‐21E 
EBITDAC EBITDAC
EBITDAC  movement‐ Hospitals (India)
margin  15% margin  17%

250  12,293 
FMRI FEHI 2,174  741  FMRI
12% 8% 23%

+200 beds
+580bps margin
4,050 

+50 beds
+400bps margin
Startups‐

+500bps margin
+210 beds
Ludhiana,  FEHI Startups‐
5,078 
Bangalore ‐ Established 9% Ludhiana, 
Bangalore 

+990 
66%

beds
Established EBITDA loss
2%
81%

EBITDAC  Established FMRI FEHI Startups‐ EBITDAC 


(FY16) Ludhiana,  (FY21E)
Bangalore  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
On cusp of significant value unlocking in medium term 
Partial unwinding of capital structure, which we believe is inefficient 
In  February  2016,  Fortis  announced  that  it  will  acquire  51%  economic  interests  of  Fortis 
Hospotel (FHTL). BT fees have increased over the years and Fortis currently pays an yield in 
excess  of  13‐14%  on  the  capital  it  has  conserved  by  switching  to  this  model.  This  has 
rendered  the  structure  inefficient  as  rather  than  paying  such  a  high  yield,  it  could  source 
capital at <10‐12% in the Indian market. 
 
Unlocking value of diagnostics business (SRL) 
Fortis owns 56% stake in SRL, India’s largest organised diagnostic player with ~6‐7% share of 
the overall market and one of the best walk‐in ratios. Fortis is unlocking SRL’s inherent value 
by demerging the business into a separate listed entity. This will unlock significant value for 
shareholders—~INR57/share in our estimate. 
 
While  we  do  not  envisage  significant  free  cash  generation  for  the  hospital  business  in  the 
near term, it will kick start FY19 onwards. 
 
Chart 3: Free cash flow to kick start FY19 onwards 
Free cash  flow (INR mn) 3,074 
1,756 
229 

(1,407) (1,764)
(3,166) (3,328)
(5,389)
(7,471)

(12,192)

FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
Note:*FY18 onwards Free cash flow only pertains to the Hospital business (excluding SRL) 

87  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Outlook and valuations: Unlocking value; initiate with ‘BUY’ 
We  forecast  hospital  revenue  CAGR  of  16%  with  EBITDAC  margin  improving  ~170bps  to 
drive  ~21%  EBITDAC  CAGR  over  FY16‐19.  We  envisage  free  cash  flow  generation  FY19 
onwards to lead to re‐rating. We initiate coverage with ’BUY/SO’ and target price of INR265 
(SOTP value of INR 208/share for Fortis + INR57/share for SRL). 
 
Table 1: SOTP valuation 
Valuation Mar‐18
Hospitals
Multiple                          18
EBITDAC (FY19E)                    8,909
EV                160,371
Less: net debt (Mar '18E)                  22,185
Market Cap (Mar '18E) (A)                138,186
SRL
Multiple 20
EBITDA (FY19E)                    2,678
EV                  53,551
Less: net debt (Mar '18E)                         ‐
Market Cap (Mar '18E)                  53,551
Fortis Share (56%) (B)                  29,989
RHT (28% stake)
Market cap                  40,965
External shareholder's stake (72%) (C)                  29,495
Total
Market cap (A)+(B)‐(C)                138,679
no of shares                        523
Target Price                        265  
Source: Edelweiss research 

88  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Fortis Healthcare
 

Investment Rationale 
 
High quality tertiary care infrastructure network 
  Delhi has the highest per capita income level in India and is growing at higher rate than 
  rest of the country. ~50% of  Fortis’ bed capacity is in North India of which ~70% is in 
  NCR,  that  has  high  potential  owing  to  a  large,  affluent,  but  under‐served  population. 
  ~50%  of  Fortis’  bed  capacity  is  in  North  India.  Of  this,  ~70%  is  in  NCR.  Its  renowned 
  hospitals  like  Fortis  Escorts  Heart  Institute,  Delhi  (FEHI),  Fortis  Memorial  Research 
Institute,  Gurgaon  (FMRI),  Fortis  Hospital,  Noida,  Fortis  Rajan  Dhall  Hospital,  Vasant 
  Kunj, among others are present in NCR. 
 
 
~30% bed capacity in high‐potential NCR market 
~30% of Fortis’ operational bed capacity is in NCR across 9 hospitals. Of the company’s top 
10 hospitals, 4 in NCR contribute ~45% to revenue. Its renowned hospitals like Fortis Escorts 
Heart  Institute,  Delhi  (FEHI),  Fortis  Memorial  Research  Institute,  Gurgaon  (FMRI),  Fortis 
Hospital, Noida, Fortis Rajan Dhall Hospital, Vasant Kunj, among others are present in NCR. 
FMRI is the company’s flagship facility with one of the highest ARPOBs in the country and 
has ~300 operational beds with a potential to go to approximately 1,000 beds. 
 
The NCR has some of the most affluent neighbourhoods in India with considerable spending 
power.  The  region  has  one  of  the  densest  populated  areas  in  the  country  with  a  large 
unaccounted floating population as well. However, the region’s bed density is considerably 
low  compared  to  global  standards.  Hence,  there  is  a  vast  untapped  market  within  NCR, 
which offers significant potential for healthcare providers. 
 
Chart 4: NCR—One of the most affluent territories in India, but under‐served despite capacity addition 
Per capita  income (2014) Rate of growth  of per capita  income in 
250,000  Delhi and  in India
22 
200,000  Average growth rate 
19  (2008‐2015)
(INR)

150,000  Delhi‐ 14%


India‐ 12%
16 
100,000 
(%)

50,000  12 

0  9 
Odisha

Gujarat

Maharashtra
Punjab
West Bengal

Delhi
Assam

India
Bihar


FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15

Delhi India
    
Source: Source: Press Information Bureau, Government, Economic survey of Delhi, Department of 
Health Services, World Bank WDI, Edelweiss research 
 
 
   

89  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Focus on asset‐light expansion, improvement in operating metrics 
Fortis  is  planning  to  ramp  up  its  bed  capacity  by  ~40%  through  brownfield  expansion 
and this will be done via asset light route because of the REIT structure adopted by the 
company. Accretion of beds and focus on sweating assets will improve occupancy and 
mix of the hospitals business, thereby boosting Fortis’ growth and profitability during 
FY17‐21. We forecast Hospital EBITDAC to clock 19% CAGR during FY16‐21. 
 
 
Calibrated, bolt‐on brownfield expansion can potentially double bed capacity 
Fortis,  post  investing  significantly  in  growing  its  business  over  the  past  several  years,  has 
now  sharpened  focus  on  optimising  the  performance  of  its  assets.  Incremental  capacity 
addition  planned  will  be  only  through  brownfield  expansion  by  adding  new  blocks,  floors, 
medical programmes and beds to existing hospitals. These could comprise specific units as it 
bolsters  its  medical  programmes  focusing  on  oncology,  mother  &  child  health  and  organ 
transplantation,  besides  introduction  of  precision  technologies  and  treatment  options, 
including  minimal  invasive  techniques  and  robotics.  Beds  will  be  added  at  high  occupancy 
hospitals. While the current plan entails increasing capacity by 40% to 5,065 beds by FY22 
versus  3,615  owned  beds  currently,  Fortis  could  be  potentially  double  it  to  ~9,000  via 
brownfield expansion. 
 
The company has shifted to the medical services model, which has enabled it to hive off the 
capital intensity of the business to Religare Health Trust (RHT)—a REIT listed in Singapore— 
and unlock value of its core competence—medical services. This asset light model leverages 
the company’s core competence in clinical excellence while providing a perpetual source of 
long‐term  capital.  It  brings  knowledge  and  core  strengths  in  hospital  operations  & 
management, clinical talent, brand recognition and brand salience to the table. Under the 
O&M arrangement, while the partner will make capital investments, Fortis will operate and 
run the facility. 
 
Chart 5: ~74% of capex during FY17‐21 to be done at established units

+990 beds Total Capex (FY17E‐FY21E)

9,513 

Owing to RHT, Fortis will have to 
spend only about INR3mn/ bed 
for capacity expansion, balance 
will done by RHT.
+210 beds +200 beds
+50 beds

1,457  1,125 
754 
Established FMRI FEHI Startups‐ Ludhiana, 
Bangalore  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
   

90  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Fortis Healthcare
 
Chart 6: Plans to increase bed capacity by 40% over next 6 years 
Number of owned beds Shalimar Bagh ‐370 
beds (FY21E) and 
210 5065 FMRI ‐ 493 beds 
Leased 290
Owned 365 Leased (FY21) to be owned 
11% 14% 445
140 9%
3615
Owned
30%

RHT
61%
RHT
75%
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E FY22E
 
Source: Edelweiss research 
 
Established facilities 
Keeping  FMRI,  FEHI  and  the  start  up  hospitals  like  Ludhiana  and  Bangalore  Sacred  Heart 
aside, Fortis has a number of established facilities like its major facilities in Noida and Jaipur. 
Over FY16‐21, Fortis will add 990 beds across these facilities, increasing capacity at CAGR of 
6%  while  keeping  steady  occupancy  of  ~75‐76%.  We  estimate  ARPOB  to  post  CAGR  of  5% 
and combination of this with bed addition to drive revenue CAGR of 12%. These established 
facilities will contribute ~62% of FY21 revenue versus 73% as of FY16. 
 
Startups: Ludhiana, Bangalore Sacred Heart 
Fortis has a couple of new facilities at Ludhiana and Bengaluru that have combined 113 beds. 
These  facilities  will  have  ~200  beds  addition  during  FY16‐21,  with  steady  occupancy 
between 52% and 55% and ARPOB CAGR of 3%. We estimate revenue CAGR of 29% at these 
startup hospitals to contribute ~9% to Fortis’ hospitals revenue by FY21 versus 5% as of FY16. 
 
Fortis’ Super Specialty facilities in NCR hold significant potential 
Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon (FMRI) 
FMRI,  the  flagship  hospital  of  Fortis,  was  launched  in  May  2013.  This  is  a  multi‐super 
specialty,  quaternary  care  hospital  with  international  faculty,  reputed  clinicians,  including 
super‐sub‐specialists and specialty nurses, supported by cutting‐edge technology. In a short 
span,  it  has  turned  into  the  largest  revenue  contributor  and  superior  ARPOB  generating 
hospital  across  the  Fortis  network,  clocking  18%  revenue  surge  to  INR4.13bn  during  FY16. 
While this hospital has ~300 operational beds currently, it has the capacity to be scaled up 
to ~1,000 beds. 
 
Over FY16‐21, we estimate Fortis to add 210 beds across this facility, increasing capacity at 
CAGR  of  12%  while  improving  occupancy  from  ~61‐62%  currently  to  >80%.  We  estimate 
ARPOB  to  post  CAGR  of  7%,  and  combination  of  this  with  bed  addition  to  drive  revenue 
CAGR of 28%. FMRI will contribute ~19% to FY21E revenue versus 12% as of FY16. 
 
Fortis Escorts Heart Institute (FEHI), New Delhi  
FEHI  is  a  reputed  facility  for  cardiac  care  with  the  distinction  of  having  done  some  path 
breaking  work  over  the  past  25  years.  It  is  globally  recognised  as  a  world‐class  centre, 
providing  latest  technology  in  cardiac  bypass  surgery,  interventional  cardiology,  non‐

91  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

invasive cardiology and pediatric cardiology & cardiac surgery. The hospital is also backed by 
the  most  advanced  laboratories  performing  a  complete  range  of  investigative  tests  in 
Nuclear  Medicine,  Radiology,  Biochemistry,  Haematology,  Transfusion  Medicine  and 
Microbiology.  It  has  recently  hired  one  of  the  most  renowned  specialist  surgeons  in 
orthopedics  and  added  Neurology  and  Gastrology  specialties.  Fortis  believes  that  this 
development will drive significant revenue growth and margin improvement over the next 
2‐3 years. 
 
Over FY16‐21, we estimate Fortis to add just 50 beds across this facility, increasing capacity 
at  CAGR  of  3%  while  improving  occupancy  from  ~67‐68%  currently  to  ~80%.  We  estimate 
ARPOB  to  post  CAGR  of  7%  and  a  combination  of  this  with  bed  addition  to  drive  revenue 
CAGR of 16%. FEHI will contribute ~10% to FY21E revenue, same as FY16. 
 
Chart 7: Revenue, ARPOB and occupancy trend across FMRI and FEHI 
15,000 FMRI 82  90 7,500 FEHI 100
89 
75  82  80 
68  70  67 
72  75 
12,000 62  61  63  72 6,000 80
67  68  68 
50 
9,000 54 4,500 60
(INR mn)
(INR mn)

38  35 
30  32 
6,000 25  27  28  36 3,000 40
18  21  23  25 
16  18  19  20  22 
14 
3,000 6  18 1,500 13  20

0 0 0 0

FY17E
FY18E
FY19E
FY20E
FY21E
FY17E

FY18E

FY19E

FY20E

FY21E

FY13
FY14
FY15
FY16
FY13

FY14

FY15

FY16

Revenue ARPOB (mn/year) Occupancy (%) Revenue ARPOB (mn/year) Occupancy (%)


  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Sharpening focus on margin expansion 
Fortis’ focus is to sweat its assets by optimising occupancy and mix to improve the margin 
trajectory from low single digits currently to mid teens over the next 2 years. The company’s 
beds are on the cusp of maturity. Management believes, the current overall occupancy level 
of ~72% could jump to ~76% over the next 3 years driven by market share gains. It is also 
focusing  on  increasing  ARPOB  by  focusing  on  high‐end  healthcare  services,  reducing 
inpatients’ ALOS and improving utilisation rates. Fortis is optimising various mid‐line costs, 
for instance by centralising some of the services.  
 
Established facilities 
Across established facilities,  we expect EBITDAC margin to  remain flat at ~16%. Calibrated 
bed  expansion  in  these  established  facilities  will  drive  15%  CAGR  over  FY16‐21E  and 
contribute  ~56%  of  incremental  EBITDAC  for  the  hospitals  business  in  the  same  period. 
While these facilities contributed ~81% to Fortis’ hospitals EBITDAC as of FY16, we estimate 
them to contribute ~66% by FY21. 
 
 

92  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Fortis Healthcare
 
Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon (FMRI) 
At  FMRI,  we  expect  EBITDAC  margin  to  improve  from  ~15%  to  ~20%  (up  500bps).  Bed 
expansion  combined  with  margin  improvement  will  drive  35%  CAGR  over  FY16‐21E  and 
contribute  ~30%  of  incremental  EBITDAC  for  the  hospitals  business  in  the  same  period. 
While  FMRI  contributed  ~12%  to  Fortis’  hospitals  EBITDAC  as  of  FY16,  we  estimate  it  to 
contribute ~23% by FY21. 
 
Fortis Escorts Heart Institute (FEHI), New Delhi 
We estimate FEHI’s EBITDAC margin to improve from ~12% to ~16% (up 400bps). Marginal 
bed expansion combined with margin improvement will drive 23% CAGR over FY16‐21E and 
contribute  ~10%  of  incremental  EBITDAC  for  the  hospitals  business  in  the  same  period. 
FEHI’s contribution to hospital business EBITDAC will remain flat at ~8‐9%. 
 
Startups: Ludhiana, Bangalore Sacred Heart 
At  startup  hospitals,  we  estimate  EBITDAC  margin  of  ~580bps  to  ~3%.  Bed  expansion 
combined with margin improvement will drive turnaround of these hospitals over FY16‐21. 
We estimate them to contribute ~3% of incremental EBITDAC for hospitals business during 
FY16‐21. FEHI’s contribution to hospital business EBITDAC will remain minuscule at just ~2%. 
 
Chart 8: Hospital EBITDAC to post CAGR of 19% during FY16‐21E 
EBITDAC EBITDAC
EBITDAC  movement‐ Hospitals (India)
margin  15% margin  17%

FEHI 250  12,293 


FMRI 2,174  741  FMRI
12% 8% 23%
+200 beds
+580bps margin

4,050 
+50 beds
+400bps margin

Startups‐
+500bps margin
+210 beds

Ludhiana,  FEHI Startups‐


5,078 
Bangalore ‐ Established 9% Ludhiana, 
Bangalore 
+990 

66%
beds

Established EBITDA loss
2%
81%

EBITDAC  Established FMRI FEHI Startups‐ EBITDAC 


(FY16) Ludhiana,  (FY21E)
Bangalore  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Table 2: Faster turnaround of recent greenfield facilities 
Launch  EBITDAC Breakeven Current EBITDAC Age of the
Facility Year (months) Margin (%) facility (years)
Jaipur 2007 16 25 9
Shalimar Bagh 2010 10 25 6
FMRI, Gurgaon 2013 5 15 3
Ludhiana 2014 8 0 2 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
Note: EBITDAC refers to EBITDA before net business trust costs & Corporate Costs 
   

93  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Chart 9: India hospitals business 
90,000 20.0

72,000 18.0

54,000 16.0

(INR mn)

(%)
36,000 14.0

18,000 12.0

0 10.0

FY17E

FY18E

FY19E

FY20E

FY21E
FY12

FY13

FY14

FY15

FY16
Revenue EBIDTAC EBITDAC margin
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Table 3: Maturity profile 
Net Revenue  EBITDAC  EBITDAC 
Contribution Operational  ARPOB Occupancy Contribution Margin
Age Profile (%) Beds (INR mn) (%) (%) (%)
10 Years above*                           43.0                44.0          11.8              74.0                   46.0                 23.1
5‐10 Years                           31.0                30.0          12.1              77.0                   35.0                 24.7
3‐5 Years                           11.0                13.0          11.1              73.0                   10.0                 19.4
0‐3 years                           15.0                13.0          17.8              56.0                     9.0                 12.4
Total                         100.0              100.0          12.4              72.0                 100.0                 21.6  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
Note: *Excludes FEHI and the facilities that have been exited during the year Above data basis 
YTD Dec 2014

94  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Fortis Healthcare
 
On cusp of significant value unlocking in medium term 
 
Fortis  has  multiple  levers  to  unlock  significant  value:  (i)  it  is  partially  unwinding  the 
 
inefficient capital structure of RHT, that will result in saving BT fees of ~INR2bn; (ii) it is 
 
demerging SRL, which can unlock ~INR 57/share value. 
 
 
Partial unwinding of capital structure, which we believe is inefficient 
In May 2012, Fortis switched from the conventional model of owning capital assets to the 
more  contemporary  REIT  model.  The  rationale  was  to  focus  on  its  core  competence  of 
medical services. It transferred a number of its facilities, including capital assets to Religare 
Health Trust (RHT). The aim was to shift towards a more asset‐light, cost‐effective business 
model  to  strengthen  operations  and  enable  the  company  to  focus  on  its  core  business  of 
medical  healthcare  services,  besides  deleveraging  its  balance  sheet.  Fortis  listed  RHT  in 
October 2012 on Singapore bourses acting as its primary sponsor and diluted its stake from 
100%  to  ~28%,  raising  SGD510mn.  In  lieu  of  using  RHT’s  capital  assets,  Fortis  pays  fees  to 
the former (~11% of total sales during FY16), which is a combination of fixed and variable 
components. Owing to RHT, Fortis will have to spend only about INR3mn/ bed for capex. 
 
However, BT fees have increased over the years and Fortis currently pays an yield in excess 
of 13‐14% on the capital it has conserved by switching to this model. This has rendered the 
structure inefficient as rather than paying such a high yield, it could source capital at <10‐
12% in the Indian market. 
 
FHTL acquisition reduces BT fees, thereby boosting EBITDA 
In  February  2016,  Fortis  announced  that  it  will  acquire  51%  economic  interest  of  Fortis 
Hospotel  (FHTL),  a  subsidiary  of  RHT,  for  INR9.7bn.  FHTL  comprises  Fortis  Memorial 
Research  Institute  (FMRI)  and  Fortis  Hospital  Shalimar  Bagh.  Of  the  current  ~INR4.7bn  BT 
cost  to  Fortis,  ~INR2bn  was  owing  to  FHTL.  RHT’s  profitability  will  hence  reduce,  implying 
the  share  of  associate  to  Fortis  will  fall  by  ~INR200mn.  However,  as  a  result  of  100% 
consolidation  of  FHTL,  minority  interest  for  Fortis  will  also  marginally  increase.  As  a  net 
impact of this transaction, INR2bn will be added to EBITDA and EPS will increase marginally. 
 
Chart 10: Reduction of BT service fee will boost EBITDA 
15,000

12,000

9,000
(INR mn)

6,000

3,000

0
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E

EBITDAC BT Service Fee EBITDA


 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 

95  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Unlocking value of diagnostics business (SRL) 
Fortis owns 56% stake in SRL, India’s largest organised diagnostic player with ~6‐7% share of 
the overall market and one of the best walk‐in ratios. Fortis is unlocking SRL’s inherent value 
by demerging the business into a separate listed entity. This will unlock significant value for 
shareholders—~INR57/share  in  our  estimate.  Organised  diagnostics  players  have  created 
significant value for shareholders recently. Given the macro fundamental of the healthcare 
industry  in  India,  management  envisages  robust  growth  opportunity  for  SRL  in  the 
foreseeable  future.  Ergo,  the  company  believes,  for  the  next  phase  of  growth  it  would  be 
strategically  apt  to  restructure  SRL  into  a  separate  entity  to  enable  it  to  move  forward 
independently with greater focus.  
 
SRL has a network of 330 labs with a pan‐India footprint (4 reference labs and 108 labs in 
hospitals and over 7,300 collection points that feed its satellite and reference labs). 
 
Chart 11: SRL—Largest organised player   Chart 12: Continuously rationalising imaging business 
8,000 30.0 100.0

6,400 25.0 80.0

60.0
4,800 20.0
(INR mn)

(%)
(%)

40.0
3,200 15.0
20.0
1,600 10.0
0.0
Q1FY14
Q2FY14
Q3FY14
Q4FY14
Q1FY15
Q2FY15
Q3FY15
Q4FY15
Q1FY16
Q2FY16
Q3FY16
Q4FY16
Q1FY17
0 5.0
FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16
Revenue EBITDA EBITDA margin (%) Imaging Lab medicine
   

Chart 13: Customer revenue mix  Chart 14: Geographical revenue mix 
International
International
3%
Wellness 2%
4% South
Walk‐in 17% North
Direct client 33% 31%
16%

Hospitals West
20% 31%
Collection  East
centers 19%
24%   
Source: Company, Edelweiss research

96  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Fortis Healthcare
 
Table 4: Comparison of diagnostics companies 
FY16 numbers unless 
Dr Lal Thyrocare SRL
mentioned, INR mn                    
Number of laboratories                                                      172                                                       7                                                 314
Number of samples (mn)                                                        26                                                    12                                                   15
Revenue CAGR (FY11‐16)                                                        27                                                    24                                                   14
Revenue                                                   7,913                                               2,312                                              8,980
EBITDA Margin (%)                                                        27                                                    39                                                   20
ROCE (%)                                                        44                                                    24                                                   12
Market Cap (INR bn)                                                        90                                                    33 N/A
Test profile  <10% imaging  <10% imaging  < 10% imaging
~70% routine tests like CBC and  Only Biochemistry tests offered <5% preventive healthcare
lipid profile ~20% thyroid rest are routine and 
~30% specialized like molecular  ~50% preventive healthcare specialized tests 
diagnostics, genetics, thyroid, etc.  ~30% non thyroid tests 
Revenue mix  ~40% walk‐ins (172 labs) All revenues derived from   ~ 33% walk‐in (314 labs)
~ 35% from collection centers  franchises across India (~  ~24% collection centers (7,200 
(1,560 patient service centers) 1,200)  centres)
~ 25% from pickup points (4,970  ~20% hospitals
centers)  ~16% direct clients 
FY18 P/E                                                        43                                                    37 N/A
FY18 EV/EBITDA                                                        28                                                    22 N/A
FY19 P/E                                                        33                                                    29 N/A
FY19 EV/EBITDA                                                        23                                                    18 N/A  
 
Table 5: SRL key financials (Standalone) 
P&L FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E
Revenue       8,980       9,878     10,965     12,171     13,631     15,403
EBITDA       1,820       2,143       2,412       2,678       3,363       3,800
EBITDA margin (%)             20             22             22             22             25             25
Dep          500          600          600          600          600          600
EBIT       1,320       1,543       1,812       2,078       2,763       3,200
PBT       1,320       1,543       1,812       2,078       2,763       3,200
tax (33%)          436          509          598          686          912       1,056
PAT          884       1,034       1,214       1,392       1,851       2,144  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
Exiting non‐core assets 
Fortis  is  evaluating  and  rationalising  its  underperforming  operations.  The  company  has 
already exited all international assets with the divestment of Singapore hospitals in 2015. It 
has  also  exited  low‐margin  facilities  like  Moradabad,  Mysore  and  Agra,  which  were 
contributing mere ~2% to revenue with ~5% of beds. Going forward, the company aims to 
exit  non‐core  assets  worth  almost  INR5bn  and  prune  debt  that  is  likely  to  escalate  due  to 
the  FHTL  transaction.  The  company  has  land  parcels  in  Ahmedabad  and  Delhi  which  it 
intends to sell, in addition to its 29% stake in the Lanka hospital (worth ~INR2.25bn).

97  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Valuations 
 
While  we  do  not  envisage  significant  free  cash  generation  for  the  hospital  business  in  the 
near  term,  it  will  kick  start  FY19  onwards.  Owing  to  the  FHTL  transaction,  Fortis’  debt  will 
spike  temporarily  by  ~INR11bn  for  a  year  or  so,  until  it  hives  off  non‐core  assets.  Though 
conversion of INR5.6bn FCCBs during FY18 will lead to a fully diluted base of 523mn shares, 
it will reduce interest cost. 
 
Chart 15: Free cash flow to kick start FY19 onwards
Free cash  flow (INR mn) 3,074 
1,756 
229 

(1,407) (1,764)
(3,166) (3,328)
(5,389)
(7,471)

(12,192)

FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
Note:*FY18 onwards Free cash flow only pertains to the Hospital business (excluding SRL) 
 
Fortis is a collective of: (i) Hospitals business: with ~4,650 operational beds (of which 3,615 
are own beds) across India, Fortis is the 3rd largest hospital chain in the country after Apollo 
and Narayana; (ii) 56% stake in SRL, India’s largest diagnostics chain; and (iii) 28% stake in 
RHT  (Religare  Health  Trust),  a  REIT  listed  in  Singapore.  It  has  traded  at  inferior  valuations 
versus  peers  owing  to  suboptimal  operating  metrics  across  parts  of  the  business.  The 
company is now, we believe, on the cusp of significant value unlocking for shareholders. 
 
We  forecast  hospital  revenue  CAGR  of  16%  with  EBITDAC  margin  improving  ~170bps  to 
drive  ~21%  EBITDAC  CAGR  over  FY16‐19.  We  envisage  free  cash  flow  generation  FY19 
onwards to lead to re‐rating. We initiate coverage with ’BUY/SO’ and target price of INR265 
(SOTP value of INR 208/share for Fortis + INR57/share for SRL). 
 
 

98  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Fortis Healthcare
 
Table 6: SOTP valuation 
Valuation Mar‐18
Hospitals
Multiple                          18
EBITDAC (FY19E)                    8,909
EV                160,371
Less: net debt (Mar '18E)                  22,185
Market Cap (Mar '18E) (A)                138,186
SRL
Multiple 20
EBITDA (FY19E)                    2,678
EV                  53,551
Less: net debt (Mar '18E)                         ‐
Market Cap (Mar '18E)                  53,551
Fortis Share (56%) (B)                  29,989
RHT (28% stake)
Market cap                  40,965
External shareholder's stake (72%) (C)                  29,495
Total
Market cap (A)+(B)‐(C)                138,679
no of shares                        523
Target Price                        265  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 

99  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Key Risks 
 
Success of business depends on network expansion 
Historically,  Fortis’  business  growth  has  been  primarily  driven  by  establishing  new  centres 
and  hospitals  through  various  partnership  arrangements  and  acquisitions.  It  expects  these 
to  continue  to  be  key  drivers  of  future  growth.  Any  hiccups  in  expansion  of  network  will 
have adverse impact on growth. 
 
Subsidiaries may be unable to sustain profitability  
Some  of  the  company’s  subsidiaries  have  reported  net  losses  in  recent  years  and  may  be 
unable  to  achieve  or  sustain  profitability  in  the  future.  This  may  materially  and  adversely 
impact their business and prospects. 
 
Specialist physicians could dis‐associate 
The  success  of  Fortis’  business  hinges  on  its  ability  to  attract  and  retain  leading  specialist 
physicians. The company’s ability to attract and retain these specialist physicians and nurses 
depends, among other things, on the commercial terms that it offers them, reputation of its 
centres & hospitals and exposure to technology and research opportunities that it offers. 
 
Rising infrastructure costs could restrict investment 
Near‐term  upfront  investments  could  suppress  margin  if  infrastructure  costs  continue  to 
rise. 

100  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Fortis Healthcare
 

Company Description 
Fortis started its journey with first hospital in 2001 in North India and during the course of 
15  years  has  grown  to  become  a  leading  healthcare  service  provider  with  presence  in  day 
care  specialty,  diagnostics  and  tertiary  &  quaternary  care.  These  include  the  world 
renowned  Escorts  Heart  Institute  and  the  erstwhile  Wockhardt  facilities.  Its  flagship,  the 
Fortis Memorial Research Institute (FMRI), Gurgaon, has become a landmark in the region 
for its exceptional clinical services and patient care. 
 
As of FY16, the company has a network of 45 healthcare facilities (including projects under 
development),  with  approximately  4,600  operational  beds  (of  which  ~3,600  are  own  beds 
excluding  associates  and  O&M)  and  the  potential  to  reach  over  9,000  beds.  In  India,  the 
company  is  one  of  the  largest  private  healthcare  chains  comprising  a  network  of  42 
healthcare facilities, including 30 operating facilities, 6 satellite & command centres located 
in public & private hospitals and 6 healthcare facility projects which are under development 
or are greenfield land sites. Fortis’ diagnostics business SRL has a presence in over 600 cities 
&  towns,  with  an  established  strength  of  314  laboratories  including  161  self‐operated 
laboratories, 108 laboratories inside hospitals including 27 labs located in Fortis’ healthcare 
facilities,  18  wellness  centres  and  3  international  laboratories.  It  also  has  over  7,200 
collection  points,  which  include  98  collection  centers  that  are  owned  and  61  collection 
centres at international locations. 
 
Table 7: Specialty mix improving 
Specialty Revenue (%) FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16
Cardiac Sciences          35.0          35.0          31.0          28.0
         25.0
Ortho            8.0            8.0            8.0            9.0
           9.0
Renal            4.0            4.0            6.0            7.0
           7.0
Neuro            7.0            6.0            8.0            8.0
           8.0
Gastro            3.0            4.0            4.0            4.0
           4.0
Onco            4.0            4.0            4.0            5.0
           5.0
Pulmo            1.0            2.0            2.0            2.0
           2.0
Gynae            4.0            4.0            4.0            5.0
           5.0
IPD others          18.0          17.0          17.0          16.5
         18.0
OPD others          16.0          16.0          16.0          15.5
         17.0  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 

101  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Table 8: Fortis—Network of hospitals and healthcare facilities 
Hospital Model FY16
No of beds (excluding O&M arrangements)
FEHI‐ Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre ‐ Delhi Owned                310
Seshadripuram, Bangalore Owned                   53
Rashbehari Road, Kolkata (FHKI) Owned                   53
Ludhiana 1, Punjab Owned                   75
Gurgaon, Haryana‐ FMRI Operated ‐RHT                283
Fortis Hospital, NOIDA Operated‐RHT                191
Fortis Escorts Hospital, Jaipur Operated‐RHT                245
BG Road, Begaluru Operated‐RHT                255
Mulund, Mumbai Operated‐RHT                261
Shalimar Bagh, New Delhi Operated‐RHT                200
Anandpur, Kolkata Operated‐RHT                190
Fortis Hospital, Mohali Operated‐RHT                344
Fortis Escorts Hospital, Faridabad Operated‐RHT                210
Fortis Escorts Hospital, Amritsar Operated‐RHT                153
Fortis Malar Hospital, Chennai Operated‐RHT                167
Kalyan, Mumbai Operated‐RHT                   49
Escorts Hospital, Raipur Operated                   40
Ashlok Hospital Operated                   27
Fortis La Femme, GK ‐ II, New Delhi Leased                   38
Cunningham Road, Bengaluru Leased                118
Kangra, Himachal Pradesh Leased                   62
RENKARE,Greater Kailash, Part‐I, New Delhi Leased                 ‐
Chirag Enclave,New Delhi Leased                   22
Hiranandani Hospital, Vashi, Mumbai Leased                138
Rajajinagar RHT Owns the Hospital as well as its operations                   48
Nagarbhavi RHT Owns the Hospital as well as its operations                   45
Sacred Heart, Richmond Road, Bangalore Leased                   38
Total no of beds (excluding O&M arrangements)             3,615

Total no of beds (under O&M arrangements)                683

Total             4,298

Associates                350

Total no of beds             4,648  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
   

102  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Fortis Healthcare
 
Table 9: Management overview 
Name  Designation Particulars
Malvinder Mohan  Executive Chairman Mr. Malvinder Singh incubated and established Fortis Healthcare Limited 
Singh (Fortis) and SRL, in the late 1990’s. Previously, Malvinder was Chairman, MD 
and CEO of Ranbaxy Laboratories. He is an Alumnus of the Doon School and 
graduated in Economics Honours from St Stephens College, Delhi University. He 
went on to earn his MBA from the prestigious Fuqua School of Business, Duke 
University, USA.
Dr. Shivinder Mohan  Non Executive Vice  Dr. Shivinder Singh incubated and established Fortis Healthcare Limited 
Singh Chairman (Fortis) and SRL. He has now relinquished his executive responsibilities at 
Fortis in order to pursue his inner calling, to offer Sewa at Beas. Previously, he 
was executive Vice Chairman at Fortis.
Bhavdeep Singh CEO Mr Bhavdeep Singh has over 25 years of experience. He has held senior 
executive roles in HR, Retail and Healthcare. Mr Singh attended Pace University 
and completed several certified courses in Leadership and Executive 
Management from premier institutions such as the Harvard Business School, 
Cornell University, University of Hartford, Dial Institute of Management and St. 
Joe’s University in the United States.
Daljit Singh President Daljit Singh has led the Company’s strategy and organizational development 
functions and has held the office of CEO. He has over 39 yrs of management 
experience. He is on the Steering Boards constituted by the World Economic 
Forum to guide two major Global projects: “Scenarios for Sustainable Health 
Systems” and “The Healthy Living Charter”. He is also on the Forum’s Advisory 
Board on “The Economic Burden of Non Communicable Diseases in India”. A 
graduate from the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, and Mr. Singh was a 
Commonwealth Scholar to the Senior Management Programme at the 
Manchester Business School in 1995. 
Gagandeep Singh Bedi Group Chief Financial  Mr. Gagandeep Singh Bedi holds a Bachelor’s degree in Commerce from Delhi 
Officer University and is a Chartered Accountant from the Institute of Chartered 
Accountants of India. He has over 18 years of wide experience in the areas of 
Finance, Total Quality Management, leading a business and a global 
transformation program. Mr. Bedi joined Fortis Healthcare in 2011 from 
Philips Healthcare, Netherlands. 
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
RHT  is  the  first  business  trust  listed  on  Singapore  Exchange  Securities  Trading  with  India 
based  healthcare  assets.  It  has  a  large  portfolio  of  strategically  located  clinical 
establishments and operating hospitals across India—12 clinical establishments, 4 greenfield 
clinical  establishments  and  2  operating  hospitals.  Fortis  has  granted  RHT  a  Right  of  First 
Refusal  over  the  clinical  establishments  that  it  owns.  RHT’s  policy  is  to  distribute  at  least 
90% of  its distributable income. Currently, it  distributes 100% of the distributable income. 
For  FY17,  RHT  intends  to  distribute  95%  of  its  distributable  income  and  retain  5%  to  fund 
future capital expenditure for expansion or other growth initiatives. 
 
   

103  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Chart 16: Yield of 8% over past 4 years  Chart 17: Consistent growth in operating beds since listing 
7,500 4,000
6,000
3,200 
3,200
(INR mn)

4,500 2,908 
2,607  2,629 

(Number of beds)
3,000
2,400 2,252 
1,500
1,706 
0
1,600
(annualized)

(annualized)
FY14

FY15

FY16
FY13

FY17
800

Base fee Variable fee Hospital income Other income 0


       IPO FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17E FY18E

Chart 18: FHTL’s contribution to RHT portfolio (post FHTL disposal) 
% Valuation % Revenue
Shalimar  Shalimar 
Bagh Bagh
9% 9%
Gurgaon
Gurgaon 15%
19%

Others
72% Others
     76%

Chart 19: Yield of 8% over past 4 years  Chart 20: Distributable income (SGD mn) 
11.0  80

10.0  64 6% (2%)

25%
9.0  8.4 48 4%
8.1
(%)

(SGD mn)

7.9
8.0  7.5 32
7.3
7.0  16

6.0  0
(annualized)

(annualized)
(annualized)

(annualized)

FY14

FY15

FY16
FY14

FY15

FY16

FY13

FY17
FY13

FY17

       
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 

104  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Fortis Healthcare
 
Through the dividends distributed by RHT, INR2.3bn will flow back to Fortis by virtue of its 
28% holding in RHT. This implies net cash outflow of INR7.4bn for 51% economic interest in 
FHTL.  RHT  will  continue  to  own  49%  equity  and  economic  interests  in  FHTL.  The  latter’s 
standalone  ‘other  income’  will  dip  from  ~INR800mn  to  ~INR  400mn  on  consolidated  level 
owing to the intra‐company transaction. This is owing to an INR9bn NCD asset that earns 9% 
interest, partly from RHT and partly from Fortis. Fortis will also consolidate 100% of FHTL’s 
INR4.3bn compulsory convertible debenture and Fortis’ depreciation will rise by INR350mn. 
 
Fig 1: Change of structure in RHT/ FHTL 
Pre‐transaction structure  Post‐transaction structure 

  
                  Source: RHT 
 
Fig 2: SRL’s history 

 
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 

 
 

105  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Table 10: Composite scheme of arrangement for demerger of SRL 
Step Rationale Consideration
Transfer of the hospital business of  To house the hospital business under  Fortis Healthcare to pay a cash 
Fortis Malar to Fortis Healthcare by way  one entity, that is, Fortis Healthcare consideration to Fortis Malar of INR 
of slump sale. Fortis Malar to retain its  430mn
existing diagnostic business
Demerger of business undertaking  To house the Diagnostic business under  Fortis Malar to allot its shares to 
comprising the diagnostic business in  one entity, that is, Fortis Malar shareholder of Fortis Healthcare in the 
Fortis Healthcare to Fortis Malar share entitlement ratio of 0.98:1
Merger of SRL into Fortis Malar. Name of  To house the entire diagnostic business  Fortis Malar to allot its shares to 
Fortis Malar to be changed to SRL Ltd. directly under Fortis Malar shareholders of SRL (excluding itself) in 
the exchange ratio of 10.8:1
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Fig 3: Change of structure 
Pre‐transaction structure  Post‐transaction structure 
 

 
                  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research
Note: *Fully diluted shareholding assuming full FCCB conversion 
^Fully diluted shareholding assuming all CCPS conversion 
^^Non‐promoter shareholders of SRL include Private Equity  
shareholders of SRL, Other Financial institution/ corporate entity shareholders of SRL 
Note: *Fully diluted shareholding assuming full FCCB conversion 
^Public shareholders of SRL include Private Equity shareholders of SRL, Other Financial institution/ corporate entity shareholders of SRL and 
public shareholders of FMHL 

106  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Fortis Healthcare
 

Financial Snapshot 
 
Chart 21: Steady revenue growth…  Chart 22: ….with some improvement in EBITDAC margin 
17.5 
80,000
17.1 
17.0  16.8 
64,000
16.7 

48,000 16.5 
(INR mn)

(%)
32,000 16.0  15.8  16.1 
15.8 

16,000 15.5 

0 15.0 
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E
  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Chart 23: … will drive EBITDAC CAGR of ~13%  Chart 24: Ramp up in RoCE 
14,000
12.0
10.6 
11,200
10.0
8.5 
8,400
(INR mn)

8.0
6.4 
(%)

5,600
6.0
4.4 
4.5 
2,800
4.0
2.2 
0
2.0
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E
     
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
  

107  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Financial Statements 
Key assumptions Income statement (INR mn)
Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E
Macro Income from operations 42,651 49,318 47,616 55,282
GDP (Y‐o‐Y %)  7.4 7.9 8.3 8.3 Gross Revenues 42,015 48,618 46,846 54,435
Inflation (Avg) 4.8 5.0 5.2 5.20 Net revenues 42,015 48,618 46,846 54,435
Repo rate (exit rate) 6.75 6.00 6.00 6.0 Other operating income 636 700 770 847
USD/INR (Avg) 65.0 67.5 67.0            67 Total operating expenses 40,482 44,589 43,113 49,472
Company Materials cost 9,572 9,864 9,285 11,056
Number of beds (own)     3,615     3,755     4,200     4,565 Employee cost 8,260 9,499 10,449 11,494
ARPOB (in mn/year)        13.7        14.9        16.0        17.1 Other expenses 22,650 25,226 23,379 26,922
Occupancy rate            72            73            72            72 Depreciation 2,295 2,865 2,428 2,460
EBITDAC margin (%)            16            17            16            16 EBITDA 2,169 4,729 4,502 5,809
tax rate (%)         484            20            20            20 EBITDAC 6,739 8,429 7,502 8,909
EBIT        (125)     1,864     2,074     3,349
Less: Interest Expense     1,249     2,277     2,637     2,637
Add: Other income     1,470     1,184     1,094     1,174
Profit before tax        (236)          771          531     1,886
Less: Provision for Tax          466          154          106          377
Less: Minority Interest          213          500          300          300
Add: Share of profit from assoc.          656          456          456          456
Reported Profit        (248)          572          580     1,665
Adjusted Profit               (8)          647          580     1,665
No. of Shares outstanding 463 463 523 523
Adjusted Basic EPS          (0.0)           1.4           1.1           3.2
No. of Dil. shares outstanding 523 523 523 523
Adjusted Diluted EPS          (0.0)           1.2           1.1           3.2
Adjusted Cash EPS           4.9           7.6           5.8           7.9

Common size metrics‐ as % of net revenues
Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E
Operating expenses 94.9 90.4 90.5 89.5
Materials costs 22.4 20.0 19.5 20.0
Staff costs 19.4 19.3 21.9 20.8
Depreciation 5.4 5.8 5.1 4.5
Interest Expense 2.9 4.6 5.5 4.8
EBITDA margins 5.1 9.6 9.5 10.5
EBITDAC margins 15.8 17.1 15.8 16.1
Net profit margins 0.5 2.3 1.8 3.6

Growth metrics (%)
Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E
Net Revenues 7.3 15.7 (3.6) 16.2
EBITDA  66.1 118.0 (4.8) 29.0
EBITDAC  17.1 25.1 (11.0) 18.8
PBT (85.2) (427.0) (31.1) 255.3
Adjusted Profit NA NA (10.2) 186.8
EPS NA NA (20.6) 186.8

108  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Fortis Healthcare
 
Balance sheet (INR mn) Cash flow metrics
As on 31st March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E
Share capital 4,631 4,631 4,882 4,882 Operating cash flow 1,674 3,705 3,708 5,660
Reserves  & Surplus 35,342 35,914 33,443 35,108 Financing cash flow (4,438) 9,923 (8,637) (2,337)
Shareholders' funds 39,973 40,545 38,325 39,990 Investing cash flow 2,210 (13,620) 1,165 (2,795)
Comp. convertible pref. shares 6,700 6,700 0 0 Net cash flow (554) 8 (3,764) 529
Minority interest 1,431 1,931 1,431 1,731 Capex (1,832) (13,620) (2,835) (2,795)
Long term borrowings 8,411 20,111 24,111 24,111 Dividend paid 6 0 0 0
Short term borrowings 5,187 5,187 5,187 5,187
Total Borrowings 13,598 25,298 29,298 29,298 Profitability & liquidity ratios
Long Term Liabilities & Provisions 1,043 1,205 1,164 1,351 Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E
Deferred tax liability (net) (506) (506) (506) (506) Return on Avg. Equity (ROAE) (%) 0.5 2.7 2.1 4.8
Sources of funds 62,239 75,174 69,712 71,864 Pre‐tax ROACE (%) 2.2 4.5 4.4 6.4
Gross Block 17,900 28,655 25,561 25,896 Inventory days 24 23 25 22
Net Block 17,900 28,655 25,561 25,896 Debtors days 37 35 41 40
Intangible assets 21,866 21,866 17,866 17,866 Payble days 210 211 216 193
Total Fixed assets 39,766 50,521 43,428 43,763 Cash Conversion Cycle (149) (153) (151) (131)
Non current investments 10,784 10,784 10,784 10,784 Current Ratio 1.5 1.6 1.8 1.7
Other non‐current assets 6,927 7,829 8,094 9,476 Gross Debt/EBITDA  6.3 5.3 6.5 5.0
Cash and cash equivalents 7,369 7,377 7,113 7,642 Gross Debt/Equity 0.3 0.6 0.7 0.7
Inventories 619 649 610 727 Adjusted Debt/Equity 0.3 0.6 0.7 0.7
Sundry debtors 4,438 4,933 5,479 6,361 Net Debt/Equity 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.5
Short term Loans & advances 1,119 2,202 2,381 2,764 Interest Coverage Ratio (0.1) 0.8 0.8 1.3
Other Current Assets 792 970 1,428 1,658
Total current assets (ex cash) 6,968 8,753 9,899 11,511 Operating ratios
Trade payable 5,753 5,669 5,337 6,355 Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E
Other Current Liab. & ST Prov. 3,823 4,421 4,268 4,956 Total asset turnover 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.8
Total current liabilities & prov. 9,576 10,090 9,605 11,310 Fixed asset turnover 1.0 1.1 1.0 1.2
Net current assets (ex cash) (2,609) (1,337) 294 200 Equity turnover 1.0 1.2 1.1 1.3
Uses of funds 62,239 75,174 69,712 71,864
Book Value per share (INR) 76 78 73 76 Valuation parameters
Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E
Free cash flow  Adjusted Diluted EPS (INR) (0.0) 1.2 1.1 3.2
Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E Y‐o‐Y growth (%) NA NA (20.6) 186.8
Reported Profit (248) 572 580 1,665 Adjusted Cash EPS (INR) 4.9 7.6 5.8 7.9
Add: Depreciation 2,295 2,865 2,428 2,460 Dil.Price to Earnings Ratio (P/E) (x) NA 139.7 155.6 54.3
Interest (Net of Tax) 3,716 1,821 2,109 2,109 Price to Book Ratio (P/B) (x) 2.3 2.2 2.4 2.3
Others   (5,359) (3,185) (1,316) (604) Enterprise Value / Sales (x) 2.1 2.1 2.4 2.1
Less: Changes in WC (1,271) (1,631) 93 (30) Enterprise Value / EBITDA (x) 17.5 14.0 15.7 13.2
Operating cash flow 1,674 3,705 3,708 5,660
Less: Capex 1,832 13,620 2,835 2,795
Less: Interest Expense 1,249 2,277 2,637 2,637
Free cash flow (1,407) (12,192) (1,764) 229

109  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Additional Data 
Directors Data 
Mr Malvinder Mohan Singh  Executive Chairman Dr Brian William Tempest Non‐Executive director
Mr Harpal Singh  Non‐Executive director Ms Joji Sekhon Gill Non‐Executive director
Ms Lynette Joy Hepburn Brown  Non‐Executive director Mr Pradeep Ratilal Raniga Non‐Executive director
Dr Preetinder Singh Joshi  Non‐Executive Director Mr Ravi Umesh Mehrotra Non‐Executive  Director
 
Mr Shivinder Mohan Singh  Non‐Executive Director  
 
  Auditors ‐  Deloitte,Haskins and Sells 
 
 
 
 
Holding – Top10
   Perc. Holding    Perc. Holding 
IL&FS Trust   5.86      International Finance Corp 3.56
Standard Chartered  1.94      Nordea Bank AB 1.58
East Bridge Master Fund  1.49      Jupiter invest Mgmt 1.17
Grantham Mayo Van   1.08      BNY Mellon 0.84
Van Eck Associates  0.72      Dimensional Fund Advisors 0.71
*in last one year

Bulk Deals
 Data    Acquired / Seller  B/S  Qty Traded   Price 
   
No Data Available   
*in last one year

Insider Trades
 Reporting Data    Acquired / Seller  B/S   Qty Traded  
     
No Data Available     
*in last one year

110  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
INITIATING COVERAGE 
  Healthcare Global
 
  HEALTHCARE GLOBAL
Singular bet on the promise of oncology tertiary care
India Equity Research| Healthcare 

Healthcare Global (HCG), a focused oncology player, is poised to benefit  EDELWEISS 4D RATINGS 
from strong growth in the therapy. Also, HCG’s hub and spoke model is at    Absolute Rating  BUY
the  cusp  of  rapid  EBITDA  scale  up  as:  (i)  several  of  its  comprehensive    Rating Relative to Sector  Outperformer
cancer centers are set to mature; and (ii) it has one of the best specialty    Risk Rating Relative to Sector  Low
mixes and is looking at enhancing its channel mix. Ergo, owing to strong    Sector Relative to Market  Overweight
therapy tailwind and EBITDA margin levers, HCG is positioned for robust 
EBITDA growth. We initiate with ’BUY’ and TP of INR310. 
  MARKET DATA (R:  NA, B:  HCG IN) 
 
  CMP   :  INR 227 
Leading oncology player with a unique Hub and Spoke model    Target Price   :   INR 310 
HCG is a concentrated bet on oncology, one of the most promising therapies that rely    52‐week range (INR)   :  239 / 167 
on  institutionalised  approach  that  boosts  clinical  outcomes  for  patients.  It  is  the    Share in issue (mn)   :  85.1 
leading  Oncology  player  in  India.  The  company  has  built  a  strong  ‘Hub  and  spoke’    M cap (INR bn/USD mn)   :  20 / 294 
wherein  it  leverages  its  Bengaluru  center  of  excellence  hub  for  providing  seamless    Avg. Daily Vol.BSE/NSE(‘000)   :  286.8 
cancer care across the comprehensive cancer care center spokes across India. It has a 
unique partnership approach that facilitates faster ROCE‐effective expansion.   SHARE HOLDING PATTERN (%)
  Current Q1FY17  Q4FY16
At the cusp of steady margin expansion  Promoters *  24.6 24.6  24.6 
HCG’s  specialty  mix  is  already  rich  versus  others,  and  the  company  now  seeks  to  MF's, FI's & BK’s 50.1 34.9  32.5 
enhance  its  channel  mix  to  both  bolster  growth    (more  international  patients  and  FII's ‐ 15.2  15.8 
growing  daycare  centres  across  Africa)  and  improve  margins  (less  government  Others 25.3 25.3  27.2 
* Promoters pledged shares  : 0.11
business).  While  EBITDA  margin  of  existing  facilities  in  FY16  stood  at  ~18%  and  is     (% of share in issue) 
improving, EBITDA break‐even for newer hospitals is now happening at relatively faster 
pace than multispecialty hospitals (<12‐18 months).   RELATIVE PERFORMANCE (%)
  BSE 
Stock  Nifty 
Milann, a tuck‐in bet on the high growth fertility therapy  Healthcare 
Fertility treatment is an emerging segment with high growth potential (IVF cycles could  1 month  6.7  (2.5) (0.7)
grow  9‐12x).  HCG  will  partake  in  the  upside  from  this  therapy  through  Milann  (holds  3 months  19.3  4.3 (1.7)
~50% stake), which operates a network of fertility centers.  12 months  NA  6.4  (11.4)  
 
Outlook and valuations: Soon maturing; initiate with ‘BUY’ 
  We  estimate  revenue  CAGR  of  24%  over  FY16‐19  and  EBITDA  margin  to  remain  flat, 
  translating into ~24% EBITDA CAGR. RoCE will improve by 320bps to 10%. We initiate 
Deepak Malik 
  coverage with ’BUY/SO’ and TP of INR310 (18x FY19E EV/ EBITDA, 20% discount to 1‐ +91 22 6620 3147 
  year forward sector multiple).  deepak.malik@edelweissfin.com 
 
  Financials Matrix (INR mn) Rahul Solanki 
  +91 22 6623 3317 
Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E rahul.solanki@edelweissfin.com 
  Net Revenues (INR mn) 5,759 7,214 9,186 10,988  
  EBITDA (INR mn) 897 1,099 1,344 1,714 Archana Menon 
+91 22 6620 3020 
  EBITDA Margin (%) 15.4 15.1   14.5 15.4 archana.menon@edelweissfin.com 
  Adjusted Profit  (INR mn) 75   101 98 281  

  Diluted P/E (x) 255.5 190.3 197.8 68.7


EV/EBITDA (x) 23.9 19.5 15.9 12.5 October 07, 2016 
ROACE (%) 6.7 5.6 6.4 9.9
Edelweiss Research is also available on www.edelresearch.com, 
111 
Bloomberg EDEL <GO>, Thomson First Call, Reuters and Factset.  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

A bird’s eye view 
 
Oncology  is  an  under‐diagnosed,  under‐served  market  with  big 
potential 
There  is  a  large  gap  between  reported  and  real  cancer  incidence  in  India,  as  evident  by 
benchmarking  against  global  figures.  Lack  of  awareness  and  participation  in  screening 
programs in India are significant contributory current factors for the relatively late stage of 
the disease presentation and consequently low reported cancer incidences. The prevalence 
of cancer in India is expected to increase from an estimated 3.9mn in 2015 to an estimated 
7.1mn people by 2020. Reported cancer incidences in India are expected to jump from an 
estimated 1.1mn in 2015 to 2.1mn by 2020. 
 
HCG is a leading oncology player with a unique Hub and Spoke model 
HCG  is  a  unique  Cancer  specialist  with  a  ‘Hub  and  Spoke’  model  that  provides 
comprehensive  services  at  the  spoke  and  also  leverages  Bengaluru  hub  for  higher  end 
procedures 
HCG  is  a  concentrated  bet  on  oncology,  one  of  the  most  promising  therapies  that  rely  on 
institutionalized  approach  that  boosts  clinical  outcomes  for  patients.  It  is  the  leading 
Oncology  player  in  India.  The  company  has  built  a  strong  ‘Hub  and  spoke’  wherein  it 
leverages  its  Bengaluru  center  of  excellence  (COE)  hub  for  providing  seamless  cancer  care 
across the comprehensive cancer care center spokes across India. 
 
A unique partnership approach facilitates faster ROCE‐effective expansion 
HCG  enters  into  various  types  of  partnership  arrangements,  mostly  with  other  specialist 
physicians and hospitals, to expand its network. These arrangements include setting up joint 
venture (JV) companies or limited liability partnerships with partners, wherein partners have 
minority  ownership  interest  to  establish  new  centers;  and  revenue  or  profit‐sharing 
arrangements, wherein HCG shares a portion of the revenue or profit from the centre with 
and/or pay a fixed fee to the partner. These arrangements contribute in reducing the time 
taken to establish and ramp up its centers as it is able to benefit from the established clinical 
practice and patient base of partners. 
 
Aggressive leg of expansion between FY16‐19 
During FY17/18, HCG has an aggressive plan to establish 8 new CCCs in India, and upgrade 
its  Bhavnagar  multi‐specialty  hospital  into  a  CCC  through  addition  of  radiation  and 
chemotherapy.  With  these,  HCG  will  have  26  CCCs  across  India,  covering  a  mix  of  metros, 
tier‐I  towns  and  tier‐2  towns.  HCG  will  employ  incremental  capital  of  INR  3.3bn  for  these 
centers, out of  the total INR4.2bn capex during FY17‐19. In terms of the clusters, ~51% of 
the incremental capital employed will be in the West cluster, ~44% of it will be employed in 
the Others cluster and ~5% will be employed in the East cluster. Amongst various clusters, 
while  the  biggest  cluster  Karnataka  will  grow  at  revenue  CAGR  of  12%,  while  the  fastest 
growing cluster would be Maharashtra that will grow at 52% revenue CAGR. 
 
 
 
 
 

112  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Healthcare Global
 
Chart 1: Number of beds to increase at steady pace,  Chart 2: Oncology revenue growth driven by smart  
with rising maturity  growth at both existing and new centers  
Nagpur: 115 Jaipur: 69 15,000
Bhavnagar: 33
Vizag: 88 Borivali: 105 Kolkata: 50
Baroda: 69 Kanpur: 90 South  12,000
Mumbai: 32

2,983 
2,400 3.5

2,631 
9,000

2,317 
(INR mn)
1,920 2.8
(Number of beds)

1,581 
589 
1,440 2.1 6,000

(INR bn)

4,529  24 
960 1.4
3,000

5,248 

6,030 

6,868 

7,640 

8,501 
480 57% 0.7
72% 60% 55% 57% 65%
0 0.0 0
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E
>5 years <5 years Capex (INR bn) Existing centres New centres
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
At cusp of steady margin expansion 
HCG’s specialty mix is already rich versus others, and the company now seeks to enhance its 
channel  mix  to  both  bolster  growth  (more  international  patients  and  growing  daycare 
centres across Africa) and improve margins (less government business). It is at the cusp of 
delivering  strong  EBITDA  margins  as  its  model  achieves  maturity,  which  implies  only 
calibrated investments would be needed to grow. While EBITDA margin of existing facilities 
in  FY16  stood  at  ~18%  and  is  improving,  EBITDA  break‐even  for  newer  hospitals  is  now 
happening at relatively faster pace than multispecialty hospitals (<12‐18 months). 
 
Chart 3: EBITDA bridge 
EBITDA  EBITDA  Milann
CAGR 16% CAGR 18% Multispeciality  11%
hospitals 4%
Milann  177  2,455 
1,340  42 
Multispeciality  12%
hospitals 12%

897 

Cancer  Cancer 
centres 81% EBITDA (FY16) Cancer  Multispeciality  Milann EBITDA (FY21E) centres 85%
centres hospitals
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Milann, a tuck‐in bet on the high growth fertility therapy 
Fertility, an emerging high growth area 
Fertility  treatment  is  yet  another  emerging  segment  in  the  Indian  healthcare  industry, 
though currently relatively underdeveloped and fragmented. The number of couples going 
for infertility treatment and evaluation in India is expected to increase from 270k in 2015 to 

113  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

around 650‐700k annually in 2020. The number of IVF cycles performed in India is forecast 
to increase from 100k in 2015 to an estimated 260k in 2020. 
 
Milann, a network model in fertility therapy, attracts equity investment  
HCG acquired 50% equity interest in BACC Health Care (BACC) in 2013, which has a network 
of  fertility  centres  under  the  Milann  brand  and  helmed  by  a  team  of  qualified  and 
experienced  fertility  specialists.  Market  fragmentation  presents  HCG  the  opportunity  to 
leverage its expertise to build Milann and establish it as a recognised speciality healthcare 
brand  across  India.  We  expect  Milann  to  grow  revenue/  EBITDA  at  CAGR  of  20%  during 
FY16‐21. 
 
Outlook and valuations: Soon maturing; initiate with ‘BUY’ 
We  estimate  revenue  CAGR  of  24%  over  FY16‐19  and  EBITDA  margin  to  remain  flat, 
translating  into  ~24%  EBITDA  CAGR.  RoCE  will  improve  by  320bps  to  10%.  We  initiate 
coverage  with  ’BUY’  and  TP  of  INR310  (18x  FY19E  EV/  EBITDA,  20%  discount  to  1‐year 
forward sector multiple). 
 
Table 1:  Valuation on FY19 financials 
Valuation Mar‐18
Multiple 18x
EBITDA                                            1,714
EV                                         30,851
Less: net debt                                            4,343
Market Cap                                         26,508
No of shares                                                 85
Value per share                                              312  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
 

114  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Healthcare Global
 

Investment Rationale 
 
Oncology  is  an  under‐diagnosed,  under‐served  market  with  large 
potential 
There is a large gap between reported and real cancer incidence in India, as evident by 
benchmarking against global figures. Lack of awareness and participation in screening 
programs  in  India  are  significant  contributory  current  factors  for  the  relatively  late 
stage  of  the  disease  presentation  and  consequently  low  reported  cancer  incidences. 
The prevalence of cancer in India is expected to increase from an estimated 3.9mn in 
2015  to  an  estimated  7.1mn  people  by  2020.  Reported  cancer  incidences  in  India  are 
expected to jump from an estimated 1.1mn in 2015 to 2.1mn by 2020. 
 
Oncology is an under‐diagnosed market 
While  Cancer  is  estimated  to  have  affected  3.9mn  people  in  India  in  2015,  with  1.1mn 
reported  new  cases  during  the  year,  the  real  incidence  of  cancer  is  believed  to  be 
significantly  higher  than  this  reported  figure.  Data  from  large  random  screening  trials 
undertaken in the country indicate that the real incidence of cancer could be 1.5‐2.0x higher 
than reported. Even at this level, the age adjusted cancer incidence per 100k people in India 
is significantly lower than that in the US and China. The reported incidence of cancer in India 
is  based  on  data  collected  from  cancer  registries,  which  cover  less  than  10%  of  the 
population,  resulting  in  a  significant  margin  of  error  in  estimation.  The  gap  between 
reported and real cancer incidence can primarily be attributed to under‐diagnosis of cancer 
in the country. 
 
The under‐diagnosis of cancer is evident from the reported incidence of cancer cases in India 
relative to other countries. Lack of awareness and participation in screening programs in India 
are  significant  contributory  current  factors  for  the  relatively  late  stage  of  the  disease 
presentation and consequently low reported cancer incidences. For instance, fewer than 1% of 
women in India aged between 40 and 69 years participate in recommended breast screening 
mammograms once in 24 months compared to 30% in China and 65% in the US in 2014. 
 
Chart 4: Number of PET‐CT scanners per million people  Chart 5: Estimated incidence and per million new cases 
1,300  1238 4.0  3.4
3.2 
1,040 
2.4 
(Mn)

1.6‐2.2 1.7
780  1.6  1.1
(Nos.)

0.9
520  0.8 
0.0 
Africa

(Reported)

200
China
India(Real)

US

260  110 137


77
India


Africa India China UK US

0.0 0.1 0.3 0.9 6.2 123 94 150‐200 174 318

Per Million Incidence Per million population Cancer incidence 2015 (mn) Age specific incidence rate ('000)


 
Source: E&Y, Edelweiss research 

115  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Oncology is an under‐served therapy in India
 Limited  penetration  of  CCCs:  A  CCC  offers,  at  a  single  location,  comprehensive  cancer 
diagnosis  and  treatment  services  (including  radiation,  medical  oncology  and  surgical 
treatments). While India has just one per 6mn people, United States has one per 0.3mn in 
the United States. Almost 40% of these centres in India are located in eight metropolitan 
cities  and  ~15%  of  these  centers  are  government  operated,  which  limits  access  to 
advanced and multimodal treatment options available to cancer patients. India needs at 
least 450‐550 CCCs by 2020 versus 200‐250 today.  

 Significant shortage of oncologists in India: India has only one oncologist per 1,600 cancer 
patients in India, as against one per 100 cancer patients in the US. 

 Timely  diagnosis  hampered  by  several  impediments:  There  are  just  ~120‐130  PET‐CT 
scanners in India, and majority are in the metropolitan cities. 

 Radiation  therapy:  A  scarce  key  requirement:  A  key  requirement  for  successfully 


providing radiation therapy is the availability of the Linear Accelerator (LINAC). Only 15‐
20% of cancer patients in India receive radiation treatment with LINAC, compared to an 
international standard of 50‐60%, as of 2015. Of the 350 LINAC installations operational 
in India as of 2015, one‐third are concentrated in the 7 metropolitan cities. India needs 
at least an estimated 750‐900 LINAC installations by 2020 
 
Table 2: Availability of LINAC  
LINACs per  Cancer  Cancer 
Number of  million  prevalance per  incidence per 
Region/ Country LINACs (2015) population LINAC LINAC
United States 3,818 11.9 1,572 419
United Kingdom 323 5.0 3,096 929
China 986 0.7 6,288 3,144
India 342 0.3 7,310 3,216   
Source: E&Y, Edelweiss research 
 
Oncology market has large potential 
According  to  E&Y,  the  prevalence  of  cancer  in  India  is  expected  to  increase  from  an 
estimated  3.9mn  in  2015  to  an  estimated  7.1mn  people  by  2020.  Reported  cancer 
incidences  in  India  are  expected  to  jump  from  an  estimated  1.1mn  in  2015  to  2.1mn  by 
2020.  As  of  2015,  cancer  patients  underwent  ~1.4‐2.0mn  chemotherapy  cycles/  0.3‐0.4 
cancer surgeries each year in India. This is expected to increase to 2.3‐3.5mn chemotherapy 
cycles/ 0.6‐0.75 surgeries by 2020. 

 Demographic changes: Cancer incidence rates increase with age, and particularly so after 
the age of 50 years. India’s population is ageing, and in particular the population over the 
age of 50 years is expected to increase from 228mn in 2015 to 262mn by 2020. 

 Exposure to Risk Factors: Factors that have been associated with increased risk of cancer 
including as tobacco use, rising alcohol consumption, increasing use of processed food & 
meat, reduced fiber content in diet, rising incidence of obesity and increasing levels of air 
pollution are anticipated to result in increasing cancer cases in India. 

 Narrowing  diagnosis  gap:  Growing  cancer  awareness,  a  greater  public  emphasis  on 
screening and improvement in diagnosis of cancer are resulting in earlier and increased 
diagnosis of cancer.    

116  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Healthcare Global
 
HCG is a leading oncology player with a unique Hub and Spoke model 
HCG is a concentrated bet on oncology, one of the most promising therapies that rely 
on institutionalized approach that boosts clinical outcomes for patients. It is the leading 
Oncology  player  in  India.  The  company  has  built  a  strong  ‘Hub  and  spoke’  wherein  it 
leverages  its  Bengaluru  center  of  excellence  hub  for  providing  seamless  cancer  care 
across  the  comprehensive  cancer  care  center  spokes  across  India.  It  has  a  unique 
partnership approach that facilitates faster ROCE‐effective expansion. 
 
HCG  is  a  unique  Cancer  specialist  with  a  ‘Hub  and  Spoke’  model  that  provides 
comprehensive  services  at  the  spoke  and  also  leverages  Bengaluru  hub  for  higher  end 
procedures 
HCG  is  poised  to  benefit  from  strong  growth  in  oncology  as  a  therapy.  As  cancer  is  an 
extensive, capital‐intensive speciality in health care, HCG follows a ‘Hub and Spoke’ model 
where  the  secondary  centres  in  tier  II  cities  are  linked  with  the  Bengaluru  Centre  of 
Excellence (COE) and thus, provide same treatment to all across the country at an affordable 
price. Under the HCG brand, the company operates the largest cancer care network in India 
in  terms  of  total  number  of  cancer  centers  in  operation.  We  believe  that  within  the 
organized hospital chains in India, HCG has the highest revenue from Oncology. 
 
Table 3: One of the Leading Oncology player in India                 (INR mn) 
Tata 
HCG Apollo Max Fortis
Memorial
Oncology Revenue      4,553       2,782        2,728       1,724         5,959
Contribution to total revenue(%)           78               5             13              4             100  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
HCG  started  expanding  its  network  in  2006  and  has  since  added  17  CCCs,  3  free  standing 
diagnostic  centres  and  1  day  care  chemotherapy  centre  across  India.  Several  of  these  are 
located in tier 2 towns, thereby broadening access to cancer patients. 
 
A unique partnership approach facilitates faster ROCE‐effective expansion 
HCG  enters  into  various  types  of  partnership  arrangements,  mostly  with  other  specialist 
physicians and hospitals, to expand its network. These arrangements include setting up joint 
venture (JV) companies or limited liability partnerships with partners, wherein partners have 
minority  ownership  interest  to  establish  new  centers;  and  revenue  or  profit‐sharing 
arrangements, wherein HCG shares a portion of the revenue or profit from the centre with 
and/or pay a fixed fee to the partner. The company assesses its partners based on a number 
of  factors,  including  their  expertise  and  reputation  in  the  market,  existing  patient  base, 
ethical  and  value  system,  access  to  land  or  buildings  to  establish  a  cancer  centre  and 
financial  and  technical  capability.  Partnership  arrangements  enable  the  company  leverage 
the  position  and  reputation  of  its  partners  in  local  communities.  These  arrangements 
contribute  in  reducing  the  time  taken  to  establish  and  ramp  up  its  centers  as  it  is  able  to 
benefit  from  the  established  clinical  practice  and  patient  base  of  partners.  These 
arrangements also facilitate stronger presence in each market that HCG serves. The partners 
also  benefit  from  HCG’s  experience  and  expertise  in  cancer  care,  its  brand  strength, 
technological  capabilities  and  network  across  India.  Existing  partners  also  enhance  HCG’s 
brand image and contribute to the expansion of its network by making recommendations to 
other specialist physicians to join the network. 

117  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Its successful track record in identifying right partners, evaluating target markets for its cancer 
centres and managing project execution to set up and operate a cancer centre, have enabled 
the  company  to  expand  its  network,  reduce  the  time  taken  to  stabilise  new  centers  and 
contribute  to  growth  of  new  patient  registrations.  All  these  factors  help  it  create  efficiency, 
manage costs for itself & its patients and put the company at an advantage over competitors. 
 
Fig.1: Cluster wise mix of business and investment plans 
EBITDA  Capital employed New Capex 
Revenue (FY16)
(FY16) (FY16) Centres (FY17‐FY21)

Total ‐ 2,557 471 2,848


Owned Bangalore‐ KR‐DR 2,095 

Partnership MS Ramaiah 191 


Karnataka

Partnership Hubli 139 

JV MHIO ‐ Shimoga 42 

Owned Gulbarga 24 

Owned Curie‐ Day care 66 

Total ‐ 839 151 526 Borivali  1,680


South Mumbai
West 
India

Owned Ahmedabad 646  Nagpur


Bhavnagar
Partnership Nasik 193  Baroda
Total ‐ 424 101 469 Kolkata 160
East India

Partnership Cuttack 298 


Partnership
Ranchi 126 

Total ‐ 733 88 834 Kanpur 1,430


Jaipur
Owned Ongole 31 
Vizag
Owned Vijayawada 148 

Owned Chennai‐ Kamakshi 86 


Others

Partnership Tiruchirappali 35 

Partnership Chennai 138 

JV Delhi‐ DCA 50 

Partnership SMH‐ Delhi 244 

 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 

118  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Healthcare Global
 
Aggressive leg of expansion between FY16‐19 
During FY17/18, HCG has an aggressive plan to establish 8 new CCCs in India, and upgrade its 
Bhavnagar multi‐specialty hospital into a CCC through addition of radiation and chemotherapy. 
With these, HCG will have 26 CCCs across India, covering a mix of metros, tier‐I towns and tier‐
2 towns. HCG will employ incremental capital of INR 3.3bn for these centers, out of the total 
INR4.2bn capex during FY17‐19. 
 
Chart 6: Number of cancer centers 

Capex  2,100 3,300 500 400


(INR mn) 26
5

4
1 Nagpur (115)
16
South Mumbai (32)
Vizag (88) Kolkata (50)
Baroda (60) Jaipur (60)
Gulbarga (85) Borivali (105) Bhavnagar  (33) *
Kanpur (90)

FY15 FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E


 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
* Bhavnagar multispecialty is being upgraded into a comprehensive cancer center 
 
In terms of the clusters, ~51% of the incremental capital employed will be in the West cluster, 
~44% of it will be employed in the Others cluster and ~5% will be employed in the East cluster. 
Amongst  various  clusters,  while  the  biggest  cluster  Karnataka  will  grow  at  revenue  CAGR  of 
12%, while the fastest growing cluster would be Maharashtra that will grow at 52% revenue 
CAGR. 
 
The new centers will contribute ~26% of total cancer revenue by FY21. Between FY16‐21, we 
expect the existing centers to grow at CAGR of 13%, and new centers to push overall cancer 
revenue CAGR to 20%. 
 
Karnataka cluster 
The Karnataka cluster includes HCG’s COE and is the most important cluster for the company 
which  ~55%  of  the  total  capital  employed  here.  It  contributes  ~44%/53%  of  company’s 
Revenue/EBITDA at present. Expansion plans in Karnataka are muted for now, with just an 85 
bed center opened at Gulbarga during Q4FY16 which has already broken even. Thus, by FY21, 
Karnataka will comprise a lower share of total capital employed at ~33%. We estimate cluster’s 
revenue to grow at ~12% CAGR between FY16‐21, but EBITDA to grow at ~18% as margin at 
both  existing  facilities  improves  from  ~19%  to  ~24%  and  the  new  Gulbarga  center  improves 
margin to ~19%. 
 
 
 
 

119  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

West India cluster 
The next leg of expansion will essentially occur primarily within the West India cluster, that is 
Gujarat  and  Maharashtra.  ~51%  of  incremental  capital  will  be  employed  in  this  cluster 
between FY16‐21. New centers will be opened in Borivali (Mumbai), South Mumbai, Nagpur 
and  Baroda,  and  its  Bhavnagar  multi‐specialty  hospital  will  be  upgraded  into  a  CCC  through 
addition of radiation and chemotherapy. Revenue will grow at CAGR of 34% during FY16‐21, 
but EBITDA will grow at a slightly lower CAGR of 29% as rapid capacity addition happens. While 
existing centers EBITDA margin will improve from ~ 18% to 28%, new centers will marginally 
weigh on the margin. 
 
East India 
Between FY16‐21, ~5% of the incremental capital employed will be towards East India cluster 
as it opens a new center in Kolkata. Revenue will grow at CAGR of 22%, and EBITDA will grow 
at CAGR of 16% as Kolkata weighs on the margin. 
 
Others 
~44% of the incremental capital employed will be towards the new centers will also be opened 
in  Kanpur,  Jaipur  and  Vizag.  While  revenue  will  grow  at  CAGR  of  26%,  EBITDA  will  grow  at 
CAGR of 23%. 
 
Chart 7: Oncology revenue  
Gujarat Oncology revenue
Others 14% Gujarat
11,484  17%
21% Others
34%

4,553 
East 
9%
East 
10% Karnataka
Karnataka FY16 FY21 39%
56%
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
   

120  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Healthcare Global
 
Chart 8: Number of beds to steadily increase,   Chart 9: Oncology revenue growth led by both growth at  
with rising maturity  existing centers as well as addition of new centers 
Nagpur: 115 Jaipur: 69 15,000
Bhavnagar: 33
Vizag: 88 Borivali: 105 Kolkata: 50
Baroda: 69 Kanpur: 90 South  12,000
Mumbai: 32

2,983 
2,400 3.5

2,631 
9,000

2,317 
(INR mn)
1,920 2.8
(Number of beds)

1,581 
589 
1,440 2.1 6,000

(INR bn)

4,529  24 
960 1.4
3,000

5,248 

6,030 

6,868 

7,640 

8,501 
480 57% 0.7
72% 60% 55% 57% 65%
0 0.0 0
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E
>5 years <5 years Capex (INR bn) Existing centres New centres
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 

121  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

At cusp of steady margin expansion
HCG’s  specialty  mix  is  already  rich  versus  others,  and  the  company  now  seeks  to 
enhance  its  channel  mix  to  both  bolster  growth    (more  international  patients  and 
growing  daycare  centres  across  Africa)  and  improve  margins  (less  government 
business).  It  is  at  the  cusp  of  delivering  strong  EBITDA  margins  as  its  model  achieves 
maturity,  which  implies  only calibrated  investments  would  be  needed to grow.  While 
EBITDA  margin  of  existing  facilities  in  FY16  stood  at  ~18%  and  is  improving,  EBITDA 
break‐even  for  newer  hospitals  is  now  happening  at  relatively  faster  pace  than 
multispecialty hospitals (<12‐18 months).  
 
 
Model hitting maturity stage 
HCG’s business model is hitting the critical stage for EBITDA margin expansion. COE is now 
running  at  ~19%  margin.  While  EBITDA  margin  of  existing  facilities  in  FY16  stood  at  ~18% 
and  is  improving,  EBITDA  break‐even  for  newer  hospitals  is  now  happening  at  relatively 
faster  pace  than  multispecialty  hospitals  (<12‐18  months).  During  FY17/18,  HCG  has  an 
aggressive plan to establish 8 new CCCs in India, and upgrade its Bhavnagar multi‐specialty 
hospital into a CCC through addition of radiation and chemotherapy. 
 
The  company  seeks  to  maximise  utilisation  of  equipment  and  technologies  used  across  its 
network  via  optimal  scheduling  of  patients  undergoing  treatment,  in  particular,  radiation 
therapy.  It  has also  implemented  a  centralised  drugs  and  medical  consumables  formulary, 
allowing it to maximise the utilisation of generic drugs and lower the overall cost of drugs 
and  medical  consumables.  The  scale  of  HCG’s  operations  and  relationships  it  enjoys  with 
vendors  of  specialised  medical  equipment  lends  it  a  competitive  advantage  in  terms  of 
favourable economic terms of purchase and financing of medical equipment. 
 
Chart 10: Margin expansion at existing centers, turn‐around at new centers  
FY16 FY21E
374 2245
116 Others Karnataka
359
Others 23% 47%
17% 584

East 
India 812 East 
12% India
10%

Gujarat
13%
Karnataka EBITDA  Karnataka Gujarat East India Others EBITDA  Gujarat
58% (FY16) (FY21E) 20%  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Figures among the best in terms of therapeutic mix, improving channel mix 
As established, cancer is a high potential therapy in India with a long growth curve ahead. It 
is also a high realization therapy with higher barriers to entry compared to other therapies. 
HCG’s concentrated bet on oncology makes its therapeutic mix among the best in industry. 
Government schemes are an important source of new patient registrations and revenue for 
HCG, but they tend to create doubtful debt and result in typically low realisations. Indeed, 

122  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Healthcare Global
 
the  company  had  to  take  provision  of  ~INR211mn  in  FY15  due  to  failure  by  government 
payers  to  meet  payment  commitments.  In  recent  times,  HCG  has  started  rationalising  this 
business  which  will  improve  its  channel  mix.  The  company  has  also  steadily  enhanced  the 
mix of its mix business from international patients.  
 
Table 4: Cost of cancer diagnosis and treatment in India and the US    (INR) 
United Sates 
Type of treatment India United States (purchasing power 
Increasing proportion of  parity adjusted)
revenue from international  Chemotherapy 150,000 ‐ 240,000 1.3 ‐ 1.8 million 510,000 ‐ 720,000
patients at COE  Surgery 60,000 ‐ 100,000 1.5 ‐ 1.8 million 600,000 ‐ 720,000
20.0  Radiation Therapy 60,000 ‐ 100,000 1.1 ‐ 1.4 million 420,000 ‐ 540,000  
Source: Call for Action: Expanding cancer care in India dated July 2015, published by Ernst & Young 
16.0 
 
12.0  In the past, HCG experienced an increase in the number of international patients travelling 
(%)

8.0  to its Bengaluru COE and other CCCs in India for treatment. Also, government business, as a 
proportion of total business, decreased from 15% in FY15 to 9% in FY16, while revenue from 
4.0 
international patients increased by 29% YoY in FY16. This trend is likely to continue, in turn 
0.0  leading to better realisations in future. 
FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
Expanding wings in the under‐served African market  
HCG  believes  its  specialty  healthcare  model  can  be  replicated  in  other  under‐served 
healthcare  markets  as  well.  Accordingly,  the  company  intends  to  establish  a  network  of 
specialty cancer centers in East Africa, similar to its cancer care network in India, to cater to 
the rising unmet demand for cancer care in Africa. It has entered into a definitive agreement 
with  CDC,  pursuant  to  which  the  latter  will  invest  in  the  former’s  subsidiary,  HCG  Africa, 
which will set up a network of CCCs in East Africa. 
 
   

123  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

HCG network includes a couple of multispecialty hospitals in Gujarat
HCG  also  runs  2  multispecialty  hospitals,  at  Bhavnagar  and  Ahmedabad.  This  is  not  by 
design, but rather due to the unwillingness of local authorities to allow shutting down non‐
Oncology  divisions  post  take  over  by  the  HCG  management.  They  make  up  ~12%/7%  of 
revenue/EBITDA of the consolidated entity. Revenue/EBITDA grew at 15%/8% during FY11‐
16 and currently clocks  ~17% RoCE, but will reduce to ~12% by FY21 as a cancer unit will be 
added to Bhavnagar in FY18. We estimate revenue/EBITDA growth of ~10%/10% for these 
multispecialty hospitals over FY16‐21. 
 
Chart 11: Multispecialty hospitals ‐ Revenue and EBITDA                 (INR mn) 
Multi‐speciality hospitals‐ Revenue Multi‐speciality hospitals‐ EBITDA 111 
1,091  101 
992  92 
902  84 
820  76 
745  69 
677 

FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
 

124  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Healthcare Global
 
Milann, A Tuck‐in Bet On The High Growth Fertility Therapy 
Fertility treatment is an emerging segment with high growth potential (IVF cycles could 
grow  9‐12x).  HCG  will  partake  in  the  upside  from  this  therapy  through  Milann  (holds 
~50% stake), which operates a network of fertility centers. 
 
 
Fertility treatment, an emerging high growth area 
Fertility treatment is yet another emerging segment of the Indian healthcare industry, which 
is  currently  relatively  underdeveloped  and  fragmented.  An  estimated  220mn  couples  in 
India are of reproductive age (between 20‐44 years) and ~27.5mn couples in this group are 
estimated to be suffering from infertility. By 2020, the number of infertile couples in India is 
expected  to  increase  to  29‐32mn  from  27.5mn  in  2015.  The  total  fertility  rate  (defined  as 
the average number of children born to a woman during her lifetime) in India has declined 
rapidly in past few decades from 3.9 in 1990 to 2.3 in 2013. Several Indian states, including 
Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Kerala have total fertility rates <2.0, which is considered to be 
the rate below which population will decline. 
 
The  number  of  couples  coming  forth  for  infertility  treatment  and  evaluation  in  India  is 
expected to increase from 270k in 2015 to 650‐700k annually in 2020. Similarly, the number of 
IVF cycles performed in India is also forecast to rise from 100k in 2015 to an estimated 260k in 
2020. 
 
Fig. 2: Fertility rates across India have fallen steadily  Fig. 3: Rise in IVF treatments 

 
Source: E&Y, Edelweiss research 
 
HCG holds equity stake in Milann 
HCG acquired 50.10% equity interest in BACC Health Care (BACC) in 2013, a fertility centre 
founded by Dr. Kamini Rao, who had a successful 25‐years track record of providing fertility 
treatments. Led by a team of qualified and experienced fertility specialists, BACC operated 
fertility  centres  under  the  Milann  brand.  These  fertility  centres  provide  comprehensive 
reproductive medicinal services, including assisted reproduction, gynaecological endoscopy 
and fertility preservation and follow a multidisciplinary and technology‐focused approach to 
diagnosis and treatment. HCG currently operates 4 Milann fertility centres in Bengaluru. 
 
Milann, a network model in fertility therapy 
Market fragmentation presents HCG with an opportunity to leverage its expertise in building 
a  nationally  recognised  speciality  healthcare  brand  and  establish  the  Milann  brand  across 
India.  The  company  would  draw  from  its  experience  of  setting  up  its  own  network  via 

125  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

partnerships with specialist physicians and hospitals, and standardising clinical protocols & 
quality standards. It would seek to replicate the same in expansion of the Milann network. 
We expect Milann to grow revenue/ EBITDA at CAGR of 20% during FY16‐21. 
 
Chart 12: Milann expected to grow at above‐industry growth rate (INR mn) 
Multi‐speciality hospitals‐ Revenue Multi‐speciality hospitals‐ EBITDA
111 
1,091 
101 
992  92 
902  84 
820  76 
745  69 
677 

FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
 

126  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Healthcare Global
 
Oncology business to drive robust EBITDA growth for HCG 
While HCG’s oncology business will be the contributor of its ~86% of its incremental revenue 
between FY16‐21, it will contribute ~90% of the incremental EBITDA in the same period. 
 
Chart 13: Revenue mix 
Revenue Milann
Milann 13,864  9%
9%
Multispeciality  Multispeciality 
hospitals 12% hospitals 8%

5,759 

Existing  New  Existing 


centres centres centres
79% 22% 61%

FY16 FY21E
 
 Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Chart 14: EBITDA bridge 
EBITDA  EBITDA  Milann
CAGR 16% CAGR 18% Multispeciality  11%
hospitals 4%
Milann  177  2,455 
1,340  42 
Multispeciality  12%
hospitals 12%

897 

Cancer  Cancer 
centres 81% EBITDA (FY16) Cancer  Multispeciality  Milann EBITDA (FY21E) centres 85%
centres hospitals
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
 

127  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Valuations 
 
We  estimate  revenue  CAGR  of  24%  over  FY16‐19  and  EBITDA  margin  to  remain  flat, 
translating  into  ~24%  EBITDA  CAGR.  RoCE  will  improve  by  320bps  to  10%.  We  initiate 
coverage  with  ’BUY’  and  TP  of  INR310  (18x  FY19E  EV/  EBITDA,  20%  discount  to  1‐year 
forward sector multiple). 
 
Table 5:  Valuation on FY19 financials 
Valuation Mar‐18
Multiple 18x
EBITDA                                            1,714
EV                                         30,851
Less: net debt                                            4,343
Market Cap                                         26,508
No of shares                                                 85
Value per share                                              312  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 

128  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Healthcare Global
 

Key Risks 
 
Success of business hinges on network expansion 
Historically, HCG’s business growth has been primarily driven by new centres and hospitals 
set up through various partnership arrangements and acquisitions. It is expected that these 
will continue to be the key drivers of future growth. 
 
Subsidiaries may dither on profitability  
Some  subsidiaries  reported  net  losses  in  recent  years.  Going  ahead,  they  may  continue  to 
drag and may not sustain profitability, which could materially and adversely impact business 
and prospects. 
 
Specialist physicians could dis‐associate 
Success of this business is dependent on HCG’s ability to attract and retain leading specialist 
physicians. The company’s ability to attract and retain these specialist physicians and other 
healthcare professionals, including physicians and nurses depends, among other things, on 
the  commercial  terms  that  it  offers  them,  reputation  of  its  centres  and  hospitals  and 
exposure to technology and research opportunities that it offers them. 
 
Rising infrastructure costs could restrict investment 
Near  term  upfront  investments  could  suppress  margins  if  infrastructure  costs  continue  to 
increase. 

129  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Company Description 
 
HealthCare  Global  Enterprises  (HCG)  is  a  provider  of  speciality  healthcare  in  India  with  4 
broad verticals: 

 Cancer:  Operates  India’s  largest  cancer  care  network  with  17  comprehensive  cancer 
centers  (CCCs)  under  the  HCG  brand,  3  free‐standing  diagnostic  centers  and  1 
chemotherapy center 

 Infertility: Operates 5 fertility centres under the Milann brand 

 Runs 2 multi‐specialty hospitals 

 Under the Triesta brand, runs a cancer‐focused diagnostic and clinical trial management 
centre 

Each of its CCCs offer, at a single location, comprehensive cancer diagnosis and treatment 
services  (including  radiation,  medical  oncology  and  surgical  treatments).  The  freestanding 
diagnostic centres and daycare chemotherapy centres offer diagnosis and medical oncology 
services, respectively. 
HCG  is  well  equipped  to  deliver  quality  cancer  care  to  patients  across  India  in  a  seamless 
manner.  It  relies  on  a  network  of  physicians  across  the  country  specialising  in  medical, 
radiation and surgical oncology, and its integrated multi‐disciplinary and technology‐focused 
approach  relies  on  close  collaboration  among  oncologists,  nuclear  medicine  physicians, 
pathologists and radiologists. 
 
Fig. 4: Evolution of HCG 

 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
   

130  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Healthcare Global
 
Table 6: Comprehensive cancer care centres, facilities and service offerings 
Facilities and Services
Location of the comprehensive  Commencement of  Nos. of  Nos. of RT‐  Nos. Of operation  Number of PET‐
cancer centre Operation Beds LINACs theatres CT scanners Laboratory
Existing HCG cancer centres in India
Karnataka Cluster
Bengaluru ‐ Double Road 1989 92 1 4 0 kYes
Shimoga 2003 52 1 3 0 kYes
Bengaluru ‐ Kalinga Rao Road 2006 225 k3 7 2 kYes
Bengaluru ‐ MS Ramaiah Nagar 2007 22 1 1 1 kYes
Hubli 2008 70 1 1 1 kYes
Gulbarga Q4FY16 85 1 3 0 kYes
Gujarat Cluster
Ahmedabad 2012 78 1 5 0 kYes
Baroda Q1FY17 60 1 4 1 kYes
East India Cluster
Ranchi 2008 49 1 2 0 kYes
Cuttack 2008 116 2 2 1 kYes
Others
Nasik 2007 k0 1 k0 1 kYes
Delhi 2007 70 1 2 k1 kYes
Vijaywada 2009 k30 2 1 0 kYes
Chennai 2012 35 1 k0 0 kYes
Ongole 2012 k19 1 2 0 kYes
Tiruchirappalli 2014 35 1 0 0 kYes
Vishakhapatnam Q1FY17 88 1 k0 1 kYes
HCG cancer centres under development in India
Nagpur Q4FY17 115 1 4 1 kYes
Mumbai ‐ Borivali Q4FY17 105 1 5 1 kYes
Kochi FY18 100 1 3 1 kYes
Delhi FY18 95 1 1 k0 kYes
Kanpur Q3FY17 90 1 3 1 kYes
Jaipur FY18 60 1 2 1 kYes
Kolkata FY18 50 1 2 k0 kYes
Mumbai‐Cooperage FY18 32 1 2 1 kYes
Bhavnagar Q2FY18 35 1 3 0 kYes  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Table 7: Milann fertility centres, their facilities and service offerings 
Facilities and Services
Commencemen Number  Endoscopy  Embryology 
Location of the Milann fertility centre t of Operation of Beds IVF opearation theatre laboratory Neonatal ICU
Bengaluru ‐ Shivananda Circle 1989 38    
Bengaluru ‐ Jayanagar  2010 26    
Bengaluru ‐ Indiranagar 2012 6    
Bengaluru ‐ MS Ramaiah Nagar 2015 6    
Delhi ‐ Greater Kailash Q4FY16 4     
 Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
Note: HCG utilises the neonatal facilities of its partner 

131  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Table 8: Management  
Name  Designation Particulars
Dr. BS Ajai Kumar Chairman and Chief  Dr. Ajai Kumar has served as the CEO since 2005.Dr. Ajai Kumar has been a practicing 
Executive Officer oncologist in the US and India for over three decades. He completed his residency training in 
Radiotherapy from the MD Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute of the University of Texas, 
and his residency training in Oncology from the University of Virginia Hospital, 
Charlottesville. He received his MBBS from the St. Johns Medical College, Bangalore.
Anant Kittur Director of Projects Anant Kittur is the director of projects in HCG. He is responsible for overseeing and initiating 
new projects of HCG and managing all business development initiatives. Previously, he was 
the director (Imaging) of Wipro GE Healthcare for South Asia and has held several leadership 
positions at GE Healthcare from 2000 to 2015.  He is a member of the Institute of Chartered 
Accountants of India and is a B.Com from Bangalore University.
Dr. Kamini Rao Medical Director, Milann Dr. Kamini Rao is the medical director of Milann since its inception. She is a practicing 
consultant in gynaecology and obstetrics and a specialist in fertility medicine, and a past 
president of the Federation of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Societies of India. Dr. Kamini Rao 
was awarded the Padma Shri Award by the President of India in 2014. She has completed her 
post graduate diploma in medical law and ethics from the National Law School of India 
University, Bengaluru, a diploma in obstetrics from the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland, 
a diploma in child health from the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland and the Royal 
College of Surgeons in Ireland. She holds a master’s degree in obstetrics and gynaecology 
from the University of Liverpool and an MBBS from Bangalore University.
Dinesh Madhavan Director of Healthcare  Dinesh Madhavan is  responsible for the corporate function of brand management of HCG, as 
Services well as international business of HCG, including HCG’s Africa projects. In addition, he is also 
responsible for managing the operations of certain cancer centres in the HCG network. He has 
over 20 years of experience in sales, marketing, business development and general 
management of healthcare services. Prior to joining HCG, he worked as head of marketing for 
Wockhardt Hospitals Group and as the vice president of marketing at Hosmat Hospitals. He 
has also previously worked at Breach Candy Hospital and Apollo Hospitals.
Dr. Bharat Gadhavi Chief Operating Officer,  Dr. Bharat Gadhavi  has over 13 years of experience in the field of hospital management and 
Gujarat administration. Previously, he was the medical director at Sterling Addlife India Private 
Limited from 2001 to 2007. He holds a Master’s degree in surgery from Maharaja Sagajirao 
University of Baroda and has done his MBBS from Maharaja Sagajirao University of Baroda.
Sunu Manuel Company Secretary She has been with HCG since 2006. She is a member of the Institute of the Company 
Secretaries of India and holds a B. Com from Calicut University.
Dr. Ramachandran  Chief Medical and  Dr. Ramachandran Balaji is  responsible for planning and executing all aspects of our 
Balaji Information Officer information management strategy. He has over 15 years of experience in the field of IT 
Management. 
Dr. Naveen Nagar VP, Medical Services Dr. Naveen Nagar has been with HCG since 2006. He is experienced in the field of 
establishment and management of hospitals. Prior to joining HCG, he worked as a resident at 
Nepean Hospital, Sydney, Australia from 2005 to 2006, as a surgical registrar, Head of 
Medical Services at Bangalore Institute of Oncology from 2003 to 2005 and as senior resident 
ENT at Manipal Hospital from 1999 to 2002.
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
 
 
 
 
 

132  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Healthcare Global
 

Financial Outlook
 
Chart 15: Strong revenue CAGR…  Chart 16 ….with marginal improvement in EBITDA margin 
18,000 18.0  17.5 

16.9 
14,400 17.0 
(INR mn)

10,800 16.0  15.4 


15.4 

(%)
15.1 
7,200 15.0  14.5 

3,600 14.0 

0 13.0 
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E
    
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Chart 17: …to drive strong EBITDA CAGR  Chart 18: …and improvement in ROCE 
3,000 16.0  15.5 

13.2 
2,400 13.6 

1,800 11.2  9.9 


(INR mn)

(%)

1,200 8.8 
6.7  6.4 
600 6.4  5.6 

0 4.0 
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E
  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 

133  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Financial Statements 
Key assumptions Income statement (INR mn)
Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E
Macro Income from operations 5,820 7,290 9,283 11,104
GDP (Y‐o‐Y %)  7.4 7.9 8.3 8.3 Net revenues 5,759 7,214 9,186 10,988
Inflation (Avg) 4.8 5.0 5.2 5.2 Other operating income 61 76 97 116
Repo rate (exit rate) 6.8 6.0 6.0 6.0 Total operating expenses 4,923 6,191 7,938 9,390
USD/INR (Avg) 65.0 67.5 67.0 67.0 Materials cost 1,496 1,932 2,543 2,887
Company Employee cost 990 1,139 1,366 1,640
Number of beds     1,146     1,604     1,757     1,757 Other Expenses 2,437 3,120 4,029 4,864
No. of new registrations‐ HCG centres  
37,242  
47,233  
59,933  
69,520 Depreciation 444 598 692 674
EBITDA margin (%)            16            15            15            16 EBITDA 897 1,099 1,344 1,714
tax rate (%)              (4)            34            34            34 EBIT 452 502 652 1,040
Less: Interest Expense 376 395 515 505
Add: Other income 35 31 34 42
Profit before tax 50 138 170 577
Less: Provision for Tax (4) 47 58 196
Less: Minority Interest 42 (10) 15 100
Reported Profit 12 101 98 281
Adjusted Profit  75 101 98 281
No. of Shares outstanding 85 85 85 85
Adjusted Basic EPS 0.9 1.2 1.1 3.3
No. of Diluted shares outstanding 85 85 85 85
Adjusted Diluted EPS 0.9 1.2 1.1 3.3
Adjusted Cash EPS          6.1          8.2          9.3       11.2

Common size metrics‐ as % of net revenues
Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E
Operating expenses 84.6 84.9 85.5 84.6
Materials costs 25.7 26.5 27.4 26.0
Employee expenses 17.0 15.6 14.7 14.8
Other expenses 41.9 42.8 43.4 43.8
Depreciation 7.6 8.2 7.5 6.1
Interest Expense 6.5 5.4 5.6 4.5
EBITDA margins 15.4 15.1 14.5 15.4
Net profit margins 2.0 1.3 1.2 3.4

Growth metrics (%)
Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E
Net Revenues 11.6 25.3 27.3 19.6
EBITDA  17.6 22.6 22.3 27.5
PBT 105.4 175.6 23.2 238.4
Adjusted Profit  21.7 34.3 (3.8) 187.9
EPS 0.1 34.3 (3.8) 187.9

134  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Healthcare Global
 
Balance sheet (INR mn) Cash flow metrics
As on 31st March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E
Share capital 851 851 851 851 Operating cash flow 690 1,056 1,051 1,020
Reserves  & Surplus 4,511 4,612 4,710 4,991 Financing cash flow 1,899 2,190 115 (200)
Shareholders' funds 5,362 5,463 5,561 5,841 Investing cash flow (2,022) (3,265) (1,040) (322)
Minority interest 332 322 337 437 Net cash flow 567 (20) 126 498
Long term borrowings 2,652 4,852 4,952 4,652 Capex (2,133) (3,300) (500) (400)
Short term borrowings 8 8 8 8 Dividend paid 0 0 0 0
Total Borrowings 2,660 4,860 4,960 4,660
Long Term Liabilities & Provisions 39 55 65 79 Profitability & liquidity ratios
Deferred tax liability (net) (86) (86) (86) (86) Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E
Sources of funds 8,307 10,614 10,836 10,931 Return on Average Equity (ROAE) (%) 2.7 1.6 1.9 6.3
Net Block 5,040 7,742 7,551 7,276 Pre‐tax Return on Capital Employed ( 6.7 5.6 6.4 9.9
Capital work in progress 1,551 1,551 1,551 1,551 Inventory days 34 32 32 32
Intangible assets 27 27 27 27 Debtors days 45 43 43 43
Total Fixed assets 6,618 9,320 9,128 8,854 Payble days 234 234 234 234
Goodwill 609 609 609 609 Cash Conversion Cycle (155) (159) (159) (159)
Non current investments 36 36 36 36 Current Ratio 1.0 0.9 0.9 1.0
Long term loans and advances 901 848 1,380 1,285 Gross Debt/EBITDA  3.0 4.4 3.7 2.7
other non current assets 79 114 131 162 Gross Debt/Equity 0.5 0.8 0.8 0.7
Cash and cash equivalents 847 828 954 1,452 Adjusted Debt/Equity 0.5 0.8 0.8 0.7
Inventories 134 205 241 266 Net Debt/Equity 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.5
Sundry debtors 789 928 1,259 1,358 Interest Coverage Ratio 1.2 1.3 1.3 2.1
Loans & advances 118 131 186 193
Other Currrent Assets 117 137 186 201 Operating ratios
Total current assets (ex cash) 1,157 1,401 1,871 2,016 Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E
Trade payable 1,084 1,393 1,868 1,834 Total asset turnover 0.8 0.8 0.9 1.0
Others current liabilities 819 1,096 1,343 1,575 Fixed asset turnover 1.2 1.1 1.2 1.5
Short term provisions 38 53 63 76 Equity turnover 1.3 1.3 1.6 1.8
Total current liabilities & provisions 1,941 2,542 3,274 3,484
Net current assets (ex cash) (784) (1,141) (1,403) (1,468) Valuation parameters
Uses of funds 8,307 10,614 10,836 10,931 Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E
Book Value per share  63 64 65 69 Adjusted Diluted EPS (INR) 0.9 1.2 1.1 3.3
Y‐o‐Y growth (%) 0.1 34.3 (3.8) 187.9
Free cash flow  Adjusted Cash EPS (INR) 6.1 8.2 9.3 11.2
Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E Diluted Price to Earnings Ratio (P/E) ( 255.5 190.3 197.8 68.7
Reported Profit 12 101 98 281 Price to Book Ratio (P/B) (x) 3.6 3.5 3.5 3.3
Add: Depreciation 444 598 692 674 Enterprise Value / Sales (x) 3.7 3.3 2.6 2.1
Interest (Net of Tax) 408 261 340 333 Enterprise Value / EBITDA (x) 23.9 19.5 15.9 12.5
Others   (247) 453 184 (203) Dividend Yield (%) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Less: Changes in WC (72) 357 262 65
Operating cash flow 690 1,056 1,051 1,020
Less: Capex 2,133 3,300 500 400
Less: interest 408 261 340 333
Free cash flow (1,851) (2,505) 211 287

135  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Additional Data 
Directors Data 
Dr. B.S. Ajai Kumar  Chairman & CEO  Gangadhara Ganapati Non‐ Executive Director 
Prakash Parthasarathy  Non‐ Executive Director  Dr. Jennifer Gek Choo Lee Non‐ Executive Director 
Rajesh Singhal  Non‐ Executive Director  Dr. Sudhakar Rao Non‐Executive Independent Director
Shanker Annaswamy  Non‐Executive Independent Director Sampath Thattai Ramesh Non‐Executive Independent Director
 
Suresh Chandra Senapaty  Non‐Executive Independent Director Bhushani Kumar Non‐Executive Independent Director
 
  Auditors ‐  Deloitte,Haskins and Sells 
 
 
 
 
Holding – Top10
  Perc. Holding    Perc. Holding 
PI Opputunities Fund  14.02      V‐Sciences Inv Pte Ltd 9.78
IL&FS Trust Co  5.28      Reliance Capital Trustee 5.22
Reliance Life Insurance  5.22      International Finance Corp 5.12
Sundaram Asset Mgmt Co  4.47      HDFC Life Insurance 3.15
Reliance Life Insurance Co  1.75      Edelweiss Commodities 1.36
*in last one year

Bulk Deals
 Data    Acquired / Seller  B/S  Qty Traded   Price 
   
No Data Available   
*in last one year

Insider Trades
 Reporting Data    Acquired / Seller  B/S   Qty Traded  
     
No Data Available     
*in last one year

136  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
INITIATING COVERAGE 
  Max India
 
  MAX INDIA 
Strong growth visibility
India Equity Research| Healthcare 

Max  India  (Max)  is  well  poised  to  clock  strongest  growth  among  India’s  EDELWEISS 4D RATINGS 
hospitals peers. We expect earnings spurt to be fuelled by: (i) ~50% jump 
  Absolute Rating  BUY
in  capacity  over  FY16‐22  in  high‐potential  NCR  market  via  brownfield 
  Rating Relative to Sector  Outperformer
expansion  (with  improving  mix  of  maturity);  (ii)  channel  (international    Risk Rating Relative to Sector  Low
patients) and service (lucrative tertiary care therapies) mix; and (iii) cost    Sector Relative to Market  Overweight
efficiency  initiatives  driving  EBITDA  margin  surge.  We  believe,  Max  is  a 
compelling bet on the tertiary care opportunity in the NCR market, which 
could  have  upsides  from  investments  in  health  insurance.  Initiate    MARKET DATA (R:  MAXI.NS, B: MAXI IN) 
coverage with ’BUY’ and target price of INR175.    CMP  :   INR 142 
    Target Price  :   INR 175 
  52‐week range (INR)  :   180 /119 
Aggressive, but balanced, growth plans 
  Share in issue (mn)  :   267 
MHC  (Max’s  hospital  network)  is  planning  to  expand  capacity,  through  Brownfield    M cap (INR bn/USD mn)  :   37.9 / 600 
expansion,  from  the  current  ~2,600  beds  to  ~3,800  by  FY22  and  to  ~5,000  beyond    Avg. Daily Vol.BSE/NSE(‘000)  :   391.8 
FY23.  The  focus  will  be  on  tertiary  and  quaternary  care  in  North  India,  while  largely 
retaining the current mature/non‐mature beds mix, thereby not exerting pressure on   SHARE HOLDING PATTERN (%)
margin. 
Current Q1FY17  Q4FY16
 
Promoters *  40.4 NA  NA 
Channel and service mix to fuel margin expansion   MF's, FI's & BK’s 35.6 NA  NA 
The company’s strategy is to focus on improving margin by sprucing up: (i) channel mix  FII's 13.7 NA  NA 
(priority to international over government patients); (ii) service mix (focus on oncology,  Others 10.3 NA  NA 
neurology,  cardiology  and  transplants);  and  (iii)  cost  efficiency  initiatives.  Ergo,  we  * Promoters pledged shares  : 7.94
   (% of share in issue) 
estimate Max’s EBITDA to jump ~3x over FY16‐21. 
 
 RELATIVE PERFORMANCE (%)
Health insurance can unlock significant value 
BSE 
Max can unlock significant value from its Max Bupa Health Insurance business wherein  Stock  Nifty 
Healthcare 
it has 51% stake. Its gross written premium is estimated to clock 20‐22% CAGR going 
1 month  (2.3)  (2.5) (0.7)
forward and breakeven by FY20.  3 months  NA  4.3 1.7
  12 months  NA  6.4  (11.4) 
Outlook and valuations: Strong growth ahead; initiate with ‘BUY’ 
We forecast revenue CAGR of 16% with EBITDA margin improving ~380bps and driving 
  ~29%  EBITDA  CAGR  over  FY16‐19;  RoCE  is  estimated  to  jump  430bps  to  11%.  In  our 
  SOTP valuation, we assume 20x FY19E EV/ EBITDA for MHC and 1x P/BV for Max Bupa 
  & Antara to arrive at target price of INR175. We initiate coverage with ’BUY/SO’. 
Deepak Malik 
  Financials ‐ Max India share (46%) (INR mn) +91 22 6620 3147 
  Year to March FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E deepak.malik@edelweissfin.com 
 
  Net revenues (INR mn)       20,982        24,241        28,646        32,455 Rahul Solanki 
  EBITDA (INR mn)          2,147           3,030           3,810           4,560 +91 22 6623 3317 
  EBITDA margin (%)            10.2             12.5             13.3             14.1 rahul.solanki@edelweissfin.com 
 
  Adjusted profit  (INR mn)               98              719                766           1,167 Archana Menon 
  Diluted P/E (x)             842
              115              108                71 +91 22 6620 3020 
archana.menon@edelweissfin.com 
EV/EBITDA (x)               33                23                18                15
   
ROACE (%)              6.7               9.2             10.0             11.0
October 7, 2016 

Edelweiss Research is also available on www.edelresearch.com, 
137 
Bloomberg EDEL <GO>, Thomson First Call, Reuters and Factset.  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

A bird’s eye view 
 
Betting big on high‐potential NCR market 
Owing  to  a  large  under‐served  population  and  its  affluence,  the  NCR  tertiary  healthcare 
market entails huge potential. Delhi has not only the highest per capita income but it is also 
growing  at  highest  rate  in  India.  Max  is  betting  big  on  this  market  with  ~80%  of  its  total 
2,600 beds across NCR, among which ~30% are in South Delhi—most affluent part of Delhi. 
 
Chart 1: NCR—One of the most affluent territories 
Per capita  income (2014) Rate of growth  of per capita  income in 
250,000 
Delhi and  in India
22.0 
200,000  Average growth rate 
18.8  (2008‐2015)
150,000 
(INR)

Delhi‐ 14%
India‐ 12%
100,000  15.6 

(%)
50,000  12.4 

0  9.2 
Odisha

Gujarat

Maharashtra
Punjab
West Bengal
Assam

Delhi
India
Bihar

6.0 
FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15

Delhi India
  
Source: Press Information Bureau, Government of India, Economic Survey of Delhi, Edelweiss research 
 
Aggressive, but balanced, growth plans 
50% capacity expansion over FY16‐22 without diluting mature beds mix  
MHC  (Max’s  hospital  network)  is  planning  to  expand  capacity,  without  incremental  land 
bank,  from  the  current  ~2,600  beds  to  ~3,800  by  FY22  and  eventually  to  ~5,000  beyond 
FY23 with focus on tertiary and quaternary care in North India., while largely retaining the 
current mature/non‐mature beds mix, thereby not exerting pressure on the margin. 
 
Chart 2: MHC—Expansion to ramp up growth through healthy mix of mature/new units 
1,230  4,999  5,000 
5,000

4,000 600 
4,000 
(No. of beds)

300  2,440 
104 
3,000 2,445  125  160  35 
(No. of beds)

3,000 
2,000 1,246 
1,114 
1,000 2,000  1,453 
0 2,559 
1,000  1,923 
1,651 
FY23 and beyond
FY16

FY17

FY18

FY19

FY20

FY21

FY22

Total

1,117 

FY23 and 
FY16

FY17

FY18

FY19

FY20

FY21

FY22

beyond

mature beds (> 5 years) new beds (< 5 years)
  

138  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Max India
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
Channel and service mix to fuel margin expansion  
The strategy is to focus on improving margin by sprucing up: 

 Channel mix (priority to international over government patients); and 

 Service  mix  (focus  on  oncology,  neurology,  cardiology  and  transplants).  Max  is  also 
investing in a sound digital platform to drive operational and cost efficiencies. 
 
Chart 3: Focus on tertiary/quaternary care  Chart 4: Increasing share of preferred channels to improve  
  profitability 
60.0  100.0 
19.4 16.2
25.6
48.0  14 13 80.0 
14
15
14
36.0  13 13 60.0 
12
(%)

(%)
9 11
24.0  10 10 40.0 
9 10 10

12.0  8 10 10
7 7 20.0 
4 4 5 6 6
4 3 3 3 9.1 12.9
0.0  2 0.0  1.6
FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 MHC Mature units New units
MAMBS Renal Ortho Neuro Onco Cardiac International Walk‐in
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Max lab, health insurance, senior living can unlock significant value 
Max  has  created  a  separate  SBU  to  help  it  leverage  its  strengths  and  grow  externally. 
Currently, its captive business is worth ~INR2.5bn. The company has invested in a few other 
pockets  of  health  chain  as  well—health  insurance  through  51%  stake  in  Max  Bupa  and 
senior living through Antara with an equity investment of INR2bn. Though nascent currently, 
these  investments  could  deliver  significant  upsides  over  the  long  term.  Max  Bupa’s  gross 
written premium is estimated to clock 20‐22% CAGR going forward and breakeven by FY20.  
 
Chart 5: EBITDA to jump ~3x over FY16‐21E, ~45% to come from Saket cluster 
FY16 EBITDA  EBITDA  FY21E
margin‐ 10% margin‐ 14%
1,419  6,434 
Others
Vaishali  558  18%
843 
9% Saket
1,467  Vaishali
45%
+149 

12%
beds
+200 

Patparganj   2,147 
beds

37% Saket
+375 

68%
beds

Patparganj  
25%
Others  
EBITDA (FY16) Saket Patparganj  Vaishali Others EBITDA (FY21E)
loss ‐13%
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 

139  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Outlook and valuations: Strong growth ahead; initiate with ‘BUY’ 
We forecast revenue CAGR of 16% with EBITDA margin improving ~380bps and driving ~29% 
EBITDA  CAGR  over  FY16‐19;  RoCE  is  estimated  to  jump  430bps  to  11%.  In  our  SOTP 
valuation, we assume 20x FY19E EV/ EBITDA for MHC and 1x P/BV for Max Bupa & Antara to 
arrive at target price of INR175. We initiate coverage with ’BUY/SO’. 
 
Table 1:  SOTP valuation on FY19 financials 
Valuation Mar‐18
Hospitals
Multiple 20x
EBITDA (FY19E)                                        4,560
EV                                     91,197
Less: net debt (Mar '18E)                                     13,533
Market Cap (Mar '18E)                                     77,664
MIL's stake@46%                                     35,725
Max Bupa (investment) (@51% stake)                                        4,580
Antara (investment)                                        2,000
Cash (FY16)                                        4,115
Total                                     46,420
No of shares                                           267
Target Price                                           174  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
   

140  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Max India
 

Investment Rationale 
 
Betting big on high‐potential NCR market 
Owing  to  a  large  under‐served  population  and  its  affluence,  NCR’s  tertiary  healthcare 
market  entails  high  potential.  Delhi  has  the  highest  per  capita  income  level  in  the 
country  and  is  growing  at  higher  rate  than  rest  of  India.  Max  is  betting  big  on  this 
market with ~80% of its total 2,600 beds across NCR, among which ~30% are in South 
Delhi—most affluent part of Delhi. 
 
The NCR has some of the most affluent neighbourhoods in India with considerable spending 
power.  The  region  has  one  of  the  densest  populated  areas  in  the  country  with  a  large 
unaccounted floating population as well. However, the region’s bed density is considerably 
low  compared  to  global  standards.  Hence,  there  is  a  vast  untapped  market  within  NCR, 
which offers significant potential for healthcare providers. 
 
Chart 6: NCR—One of the most affluent territories in India 

250,000 
Per capita  income (2014) Rate of growth  of per capita  income in 
Delhi and  in India
22.0 
200,000  Average growth rate 
18.8  (2008‐2015)
150,000 
(INR)

Delhi‐ 14%
India‐ 12%
100,000  15.6 
(%)

50,000  12.4 

0  9.2 
Odisha

Gujarat

Maharashtra
Punjab
West Bengal
Assam

Delhi
India
Bihar

6.0 
FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15

Delhi India
 
Source: Press Information Bureau, Government of India, Economic Survey of Delhi, Edelweiss research 
 
Chart 7: NCR—Under‐served market despite addition of capacity 
50,000  2.7  3.0  Beds per 1,000
2.5  2.5 
2.3  2.2  2.3 
40,000  2.4 
3.4
30,000  1.8 
(Nos.)

(Nos.)

2.71
2.5
20,000  1.2 

10,000  0.6 
0.9
0  0.0 
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014

Delhi India‐urban India‐rural India


Beds  Beds per 1000  
Source: Economic survey of Delhi, 2014‐15, Department of Health Services, World bank WDI, Edelweiss research 

141  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

80% of bed capacity in NCR, predominantly in Delhi 
Average. occupancy at MHC’s  Through  MHC,  Max  runs  a  network  of  14  hospitals  (~2,600  beds,  largely  tertiary  and 
network at >70% despite  quaternary  care)  across  North  India.  The  network  comprises  9  quaternary/  tertiary  care 
capacity addition and reduction  hospitals, 4 secondary hospitals and 1 primary care centre. While ~1,500 beds are owned, 
in ALOS  ~1,100 beds are serviced through agreements. 
   
The network derives ~70%  MHC is one of the fastest growing players in the listed space, with a healthy set of operating 
revenue from tertiary care and  metrics—revenue  and  EBITDA  clocked  CAGR  of  26%  and  34%,  respectively,  over  FY11‐16. 
surgical procedures  During FY08‐13, the network capacity almost doubled from 662 beds to 1,311 beds. FY13‐15 
was  a  period  of  consolidation.  MHC  focused  on  steady  improvement  in  the  financial 
performance  of  new  capacities  and  improving  profitability  of  established  ones.  In  FY16, 
MHC turned profitable despite 2 large acquisitions. 
 
In July 2015, MHC completed acquisition of ~78% equity shareholding in Crosslay Remedies, 
which owns and operates a 260 beds Max Super Specialty Hospital, Vaishali, located in the 
East Delhi‐Ghaziabad‐Noida corridor. Its capacity is expandable to 460 beds. Max has a call 
option right to acquire balance stake, which it intends to do in FY20 for a cash consideration 
of ~INR1.5bn. 
 
In  November  2015,  MHC  completed  acquisition  of  51%  equity  shareholding  in  Saket  City 
Hospitals, which provides services to Max Smart Super Specialty Hospital. It has ~225 beds, 
which are currently being expanded to ~300, further expandable to 1,200 beds. Max has a 
call  option  right  to  acquire  the  balance  stake,  which  it  intends  to  do  in  FY18  for  a  cash 
consideration of ~INR4.4bn (INR3.75bn + 12% compounded interest). 
 
Table 2: MHC’s network of hospitals and healthcare facilities 
Ownership/Service  Commencement  Existing bed  Peak bed 
Hospital Location
agreements of operations capacity capacity
Existing Hospitals and Medical Centers
Max Super Speciality Hospital West Block, Saket, New Delhi Owned May 2006              211         311
Max Super Speciality Hospital Shalimar Bagh, New Delhi Owned Nov 2011              275         379
Max Super Speciality Hospital Mohali, Punjab Owned Sept 2011              218         253
Max Super Speciality Hospital Bhathinda, Punjab Owned Sept 2011              186         186
Max Super Speciality Hospital Dehradun, Uttarakhand Owned May 2012              168         168
Max Super Speciality Hospital Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh Owned July 2015              260         460
Max Hospital Pitampura, New Delhi Leased Feb 2002                70           70
Max Hospital Noida, Uttar Pradesh Leased Aug 2002                46           46
Max Hospital Gurgaon, Haryana Owned July 2007                64           64
Max Multi Speciality centre Panchsheel Park (North), New Delhi Leased Jan 2001
Max Super Speciality Hospital (Unit of Devki  East Block, Saket, New Delhi Medical Service  Dec 2004               324             474 
Devi Foundation) Agreement
Max Super Speciality Hospital (Unit of Balaji  Patparganj, New Delhi Medical Service  May 2005               402             602 
Medical and Diagnostic Research Centre) Agreement
Max Smart Super Speciality Hospital (Unit of  Saket, New Delhi Medical Service  Nov 2015               225        1,210 
GMHRC) Agreement
Max Multispeciality Hospital Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh Service Agreement July 2014               114            120 

Proposed Hospitals
Max Super Speciality Hospital Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh Owned To be decided                  ‐              380 
Max Super Speciality Hospital Mullanpur Owned To be decided                  ‐              400 
           2,563        5,123  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
   

142  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Max India
 
Aggressive, but balanced, growth plans 
MHC  (Max’s  hospital  network)  is  planning  to  expand  capacity,  through  brownfield 
expansion, from the current ~2,600 beds to ~3,800 by FY22 and to ~5,000 beyond FY23. 
The focus will be on tertiary and quaternary care in North India, while largely retaining 
the current mature/non‐mature beds mix, thereby not exerting pressure on margin. 
 
Currently, MHC’s employed  To expand capacity 50% over FY16‐22 through brownfield expansion... 
capital includes ~INR10.8bn debt 
MHC  is  planning  to  enhance  capacity  from  current  ~2,600  beds  to  ~3,800  by  FY22  by 
and ~INR10.7bn equity 
expanding capacity at its existing network. It plans to eventually increase capacity to ~5,000 
 
beds  beyond  FY23.  The  company  already  has  land  available  for  these  expansions  and  will 
Importantly, Max currently holds 
not require incremental land bank and thus the cost is already saddled in the balance sheet. 
78% stake in Max Vaishali 
MHC  is  also  seamlessly  integrating  its  recently  acquired  high‐growth  hospitals  (Saket  City/ 
Hospital and 51% in Saket City 
Vaishali). 
Hospital. It has agreements in 
 
place to increase stake to 100% 
The company will also beef up its existing advantages in identified specialties around which 
in Saket (FY18, payment of 
centers of excellence have been built (oncology and neurology). It will also invest in select 
~INR4.4bn) and Vaishali (FY20, 
complex clinical capabilities like organ transplants. 
payment of INR1.5bn) 
 
 
… and without diluting mix of mature beds 
Over the next 5 years, MHC will 
employ ~INR18bn capital   Standout feature of MHC’s expansion plan is the projected mix of maturity of its beds (>55% 
beds  with  age  of  at  least  5  years  post  FY18),  which  will  remain  healthy  through  the  rapid 
expansion.  Hence,  due  to  the  mix,  EBITDA  margin  will  not  be  under  pressure  during  the 
expansion phase. 
 
Chart 8: MHC to bolster growth via expansion…  Chart 9: …via healthy mix of mature/new units 
1,230  4,999  5,000 
5,000

4,000 600 
4,000 
(No. of beds)

300  2,440 
104 
3,000 2,445  125  160  35 
(No. of beds)

3,000 
2,000 1,246 
1,114 
1,000 2,000  1,453 

0 2,559 
1,000  1,923 
1,651 
FY23 and beyond
FY16

FY17

FY18

FY19

FY20

FY21

FY22

Total

1,117 
0  FY23 and 
FY16

FY17

FY18

FY19

FY20

FY21

FY22

beyond

mature beds (> 5 years) new beds (< 5 years)
  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
Saket cluster, Patparganj, Vaishali: Pivotal growth drivers 
MHC has 3 hospitals in Saket (New Delhi), which contribute ~35% and 70% to the company’s 
Saket City will have a specialised 
revenue and EBITDA, respectively. The Saket cluster will remain important to the company’s 
oncology centre with a dedicated 
growth  and  contributes  ~70%  to  current  EBITDA,  i.e.,  ~INR1.45bn,  which  we  believe  will 
tower with 300‐500 beds. This 
double by FY21. 
facility will, thus, be an important 
 
contributor to the company’s 
 
aspiration to become the biggest 
 
oncology care provider in India 

143  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

 Max Super Specialty, East Block, Saket (Devki Devi Foundation) 
This  is  a  324  bed  super  specialty  hospital  offering  the  highest  standards  of  care  for 
heart  and  vascular  diseases.  It  specializes  in  high‐risk  patients  and  has  introduced 
innovative  techniques  for  minimally  invasive  surgeries.  MHC  operates  this  hospital 
under a 30‐year service agreement with Devki Devi Foundation that began in 2004. The 
hospital’s peak bed capacity is 474. 
 
Over  FY13‐16,  revenue  and  EBITDA  posted  CAGR  of  8%  and  13%,  respectively.  FY16 
EBITDA margin was 22.7%. 
 
 Max Super Specialty Hospital, Saket (West Block) 
This  211  beds  hospital  offers  various  super‐specialty  facilities  in  addition  to  a  wide 
range  of  tertiary  and  secondary  healthcare  facilities.  It  houses  specialty  units  for 
therapies like orthopedics & joint replacement, neurosciences, obstetrics & gynecology 
and  pediatrics.  It  offers  one  of  the  highest  standards  of  neuroscience  related 
procedures in Asia, including the state‐of‐the‐art BRAIN‐SUITE IMRI. Between FY13 and 
FY16,  this  hospital’s  revenue  and  EBITDA  posted  CAGR  of  9%  and  12%,  respectively. 
FY16 EBITDA margin was 18.3%. The hospital’s peak bed capacity is 311. 
 
 Max Smart Super Specialty, Saket City (Gujarmal Modi Hospital & Research Centre for 
Medical Sciences) 
In  November  2015,  MHC  completed  acquisition  of  51%  equity  shareholding  in  Saket 
City  Hospitals  that  provides  services  to  Max  Smart  Super  Specialty  Hospital.  For  the 
acquisition,  agreed  enterprise  value  was  INR10.25bn  (INR3.25bn  equity  value  for  51% 
stake  and  INR3.25bn  debt).  This  hospital  has  ~225  beds,  currently  being  expanded  to 
~300, and further expandable to 1,200 beds. Max has a call option right to acquire the 
balance  stake,  which  it  intends  to  do  in  FY18  for  a  ~INR4.4bn  cash  (INR3.75bn  +  12% 
compounded interest). 
 
Saket  City  Hospital  is  a  215  bed  hospital  which  will  be  one  of  India’s  largest  private 
facilities  with  ~1,200  beds  once  expansion  is  completed  and  one  of  Asia’s  largest 
Medicity  within  Saket.  In  an  integrated  complex  with  Max  Saket,  this  will  have  a 
dedicated outpatient department tower, cluster of operation theatres & intensive care 
units,  centralised  labs  and  emergency  rooms.  The  facility  design  is  based  on 
comprehensive demand mapping, which includes demand not only from NCR, but also 
from catchment areas in North India and international markets. It will have 7 centers of 
excellence,  viz.,  oncology,  neurosciences,  transplants,  cardiac  sciences,  orthopedics, 
metabolic  &  bariatric  surgery  and  mother  &  child.  It  will  also  have  a  specialised 
oncology centre with a dedicated tower with 300‐500 beds. This facility will, thus, be an 
important  contributor  to  Max’s  aspiration  to  become  the  biggest  oncology  care 
provider in India. It will also have a state‐of‐the‐art centre for all transplants including 
heart, liver, kidney and bone marrow. 
 

144  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Max India
 
 Patparganj 
This is a super‐specialty hospital and has a dedicated super‐specialty oncology, cardiac, 
orthopedic  &  joint  replacement  and    neurosciences  departments.  MHC  operates  this 
hospital  under  a  30‐year  service  agreement  with  the  Balaji  Medical  &  Diagnostic 
Research Centre that commenced in 2005. 
 
Over  FY13‐16,  this  hospital  clocked  revenue  and  EBITDA  CAGR  of  17%  and16%, 
respectively. FY16 EBITDA margin was 19.7%. It contributed ~37% to FY16 EBITDA and is 
estimated to contribute ~20% of incremental EBITDA between FY16 and FY21. 
 
 Vaishali 
In  July  2015,  MHC  completed  acquisition  of  ~78%  equity  shareholding  in  Crosslay 
Remedies,  which  owns  and  operates  a  260  beds  establishment  (Max  Super  Specialty 
Hospital,  Vaishali)  located  in  the  East  Delhi‐Ghaziabad‐Noida  corridor.  Its  capacity  is 
expandable to 540 beds. Max has a call option right to acquire the balance stake, which 
it intends to do in FY20 for ~INR1.5bn cash. 
 
This hospital has established centers of excellence in orthopedics & joint replacement, 
nephrology  &  kidney  transplant,  cardiology  &  cardiac  surgery,  IVF  &  infertility  and 
plastic & aesthetic surgery that provide care at par with international benchmarks. It is 
strategically situated on NH24 and has the potential to dominate the Eastern Delhi and 
Western  UP  market.  This  facility  is  already  clocking  ~16%  EBITDA  margin  versus  ~1% 
before acquisition, primarily driven by ARPOB which has catapulted ~80%. 
 
Significant capital expenditure and investments over FY16‐21 
Over the next 5 years, MHC will employ ~INR18bn capital. Of this, it will invest  ~INR4.4bn to 
acquire the balance 49% stake in Saket City in FY18 and ~INR1.5bn to acquire balance stake 
in Vaishali in FY20. Further, it will also add 375 beds at Saket and 200 beds at Vaishali. There 
will be significant investments in adding a dedicated 300‐500 bed oncology tower at Saket 
City hospital. Thus, with this additional ~INR9bn of capex, total capital employed at Saket by 
FY21 will touch ~36% (31% currently) of the total capital employed by MHC. Currently, Saket 
hospitals contribute ~70% to EBITDA, i.e., INR1.45bn, which is estimated to double by FY21. 
 
Chart 10: ~50% of investments will be in Saket cluster over next 5 years 
Capital employed (FY16) Balance 49% stake Total capex (FY16‐FY21E) Capital employed (FY21E)
in Saket city will be 
acquired in FY18 
Saket (INR 4400mn)
Others Saket
31% Balance stake in 
9,658  37% 36%
Others Vaishali will be 
42% acquired in FY20 
+375  (INR 1500mn)
beds
3,971  3,772 
+200  +149
936  beds beds
Patparganj   Patparganj  
Vaishali
Vaishali 16% 13%
Saket Patparganj  Vaishali Others 14%
11%
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research

145  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Channel and service mix to fuel margin expansion  
The strategy is to focus on improving margin by sprucing up: 
 Channel mix (priority to international over government patients); and 
 Service mix (focus on oncology, neurology, cardiology and transplants).  
 Max  is  also  investing  in  a  sound  digital  platform  to  drive  operational  and  cost 
efficiencies. 
 
Ergo, we estimate EBITDA to jump ~3x over FY16‐21. 
 
 
Focusing on improving service mix 
Max’s  existing  service  mix  leans  on  tertiary/  quaternary  care.  However,  going  ahead,  the 
company  is  planning  to  scale  up  high‐realisation  specialty  therapies  like  oncology  and 
neurology, among others. In fact, the company aims to become one of the largest oncology 
players  in  India  and  its  brownfield  expansion  in  Saket  will  consist  of  a  dedicated  oncology 
unit,  the  biggest  in  the  country.  Max  is  also  investing  in  state‐of‐the‐art  digital  platforms 
(DigiCare) and patient concierge front‐ends (to take care of insurance, visa, etc.) to improve 
patient experience. 
 
It  is  also  driving  comprehensive  efforts  to  achieve  operational  and  cost  efficiencies.  For 
instance, it made ~INR400mn cost savings in FY16 and is eyeing ~INR400mn cost efficiency 
in FY17. 
 
Multiple levers to improve channel mix 
One of the most significant growth drivers for Indian healthcare over the next decade will be 
medical  tourism.  Currently,  ~9%  of  Max’s  total  revenue  is  contributed  by  international 
patients and it endeavors to further enhance this mix. The company enjoys premium pricing 
on these cases. Additionally, it will de‐prioritise the low‐margin institutional business across 
new units to bring the mix closer to its mature units. 
 
Chart 11: Focus on tertiary/quaternary care  Chart 12: Improving channel mix to improve profitability 
60.0  100.0 
19.4 16.2
25.6
48.0  14 13 80.0 
14
15
14
36.0  13 13 60.0 
12
(%)

(%)

9 11
24.0  10 10 40.0 
9 10 10

12.0  8 10 10
7 7 20.0 
4 4 5 6 6
4 3 3 3 9.1 12.9
0.0  2 0.0  1.6
FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 MHC Mature units New units
MAMBS Renal Ortho Neuro Onco Cardiac International Walk‐in
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 

146  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Max India
 
Chart 13: Occupancy levels to remain healthy, despite expansion  Chart 14: Expect steady growth in ARPOB 
3,500  76  3,169  76.8  50.0 

2,765  2,869 
2,800  2,570  2,730 

(in 000 per operating bed day)
75.2  40.0 
75 
73 
(no of beds)

2,100  73  73.6 


72  30.0 

(%)
1,400  72.0 
20.0 
700  70.4 

0  68.8  10.0 
FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E
0.0 
avg unoccupied beds avg occupied beds
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E
occupancy (%)   
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Diagnostics business (Max Lab) another value accretive opportunity 
Max has created a separate SBU to help  it leverage its strengths and grow  externally. The 
diagnostics  business  currently  accrues  ~INR2.5bn  in  revenue  from  in‐house  pathology 
services. The strategy is to build on B2C business model that can help Max achieve EBITDA 
margin in excess of 35% on incremental revenue. 
 
EBITDA to jump ~3x over FY16‐21E, ~45% to come from Saket cluster 
We estimate MHC’s EBITDA margin to improve from current ~10% to ~14% by FY21, despite 
adding  ~30%  incremental  beds.  Saket  hospitals,  Patparganj  hospital  and  Vaishali  hospital 
will  contribute  34%,  20%  and  13%  of  the  incremental  EBITDA,  respectively.  The  Saket 
hospitals  cluster  has  the  best  EBITDA  margin  of  19%  versus  MHC’s  overall  margin  of  10%. 
Others contribute ‐3% EBITDA margin and contribute to ~13% EBITDA bleed currently. This 
is estimated to change going forward to ~ 8% margin and contribute ~18% to the company’s 
overall EBITDA. 
 
Chart 15: EBITDA to jump ~3x over FY16‐21E, ~45% to come from Saket cluster 
FY16 EBITDA  EBITDA  FY21E
margin‐ 10% margin‐ 14%
1,419  6,434 
Others
Vaishali  558  18%
843 
9% Saket
1,467  Vaishali
45%
+149 

12%
beds
+200 

Patparganj   2,147 
beds

37% Saket
+375 

68%
beds

Patparganj  
25%
Others  
EBITDA (FY16) Saket Patparganj  Vaishali Others EBITDA (FY21E)
loss ‐13%
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
Note: HO cost of INR1.15bn not apportioned in EBITDA shares of respective hospitals 
 
   

147  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Chart 16: MHC—Annual gross revenue by hospital age  Chart 17: MHC—Annual EBITDA by hospital age 
50,000  44,828  7,000  6,434  18.0 

40,000  36,758  5,600  5,285  16.0 


32,550  4,565 
28,741  4,200  3,811  14.0 

(INR mn)
30,000  24,336 
(INR mn)

3,031 

(%)
21,676 
2,800  12.0 
20,000  2,147 

1,400  10.0 
10,000 
0  8.0 
0  FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY20E FY21E
Mature units (>5yrs) New units (<5yrs)
Mature units (> 5 years) New units (< 5 years) EBITDA margin (Total)
  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

148  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Max India
 
Health insurance, senior living: Significant value unlocking  potential 
Max  has  presence  in  a  few  other  pockets  of  the  healthcare  chain  as  well:  (i)  health 
insurance  through  51%  stake  in  Max  Bupa;  and  (ii)  senior  living  through  Antara.  Max 
Bupa’s gross written premium is estimated to post 20‐22% CAGR going forward and will 
breakeven by FY19. 
 
 
Max Bupa Health Insurance 
Health  insurance  has  been  the  fastest  growing  segment  in  the  non‐life  insurance  industry 
over  the  past  5  years.  It  continues  to  be  one  of  the  most  rapidly  growing  sectors  in  the 
Indian  insurance  industry  with  an  expected  CAGR  of  >15%  over  the  next  3‐5  years  as  just 
~5% of the population is currently covered under private health insurance versus 12% in UK, 
13% in Spain and ~45% in Australia. 
 
Max  Bupa  is  the  fourth  largest  private  health  insurance  player  in  India  in  terms  of  gross 
written premium (GWP). It is a JV with Max India, which holds 51% of equity share capital, 
and Bupa, which holds the balance 49%. As of FY16, Max Bupa had ~1mn urban lives in force 
under various policies (under different product propositions). 
 
Chart 18: Max Bupa ‐ Healthy premium growth with consistent improvement in combined ratio  
Gross written premium 600  553 Combined ratio (%)
5,700 
4,760 
4,600  480 
3,730 
3,500  3,150  360 
(INR mn)

(%)

2,060  240  212


2,400 
151 142 127 115
1,300  990  120 
250 
200  0 
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16
  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Max Bupa is focused on the urban B2C of health insurance market with limited play in B2B 
and B2G segments. During FY16, its B2C market share amongst private health insurers fell to 
7.6% from 9.3% in FY15. Share of B2C segment in Max Bupa’s GWP rose to 98% from 95% in 
the previous year with sharpened focus on the segment. 
 
Recently,  the  company  ventured  into  a  new  bancassurance  channel.  Such  distribution 
channels  generally  result  in  cash  burn  for  the  next  ~3‐4  years  and  cash  generation  begins 
only  fifth  year  onwards.  Max  Bupa’s  premium  is  estimated  to  post    CAGR  of  20‐22%  via 
policy CAGR of ~15% and price hike of 4‐5%. 
 
 
 

149  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Table 3: Max Bupa—Performance dashboard 
Key Business driver FY15 FY16 YoY growth
Gross written premium income
First year premium INR mn 1,450 1,800 24.1
Renewal premium INR mn 2,280 2,960 29.8
Total INR mn 3,730 4,760 27.6
Net earned premium INR mn 3,150 3,930 24.8
Net loss INR mn (930) (680) (26.9)
Claim ratio (B2C segment, normalised) % 50 56 ‐600 bps
Avg premium realization per life (B2C) INR 6,364 6,800 6.9
Conservation ratio (B2C segment) % 81 83 200 bps
Number of agents No 8,909 12,581 41.2
Paid up capital INR mn 7,910 8,980 13.5  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Max Bupa offers health insurance and personal accident insurance products to 4 segments: 
 
1. Urban retail B2C 
With  focus  on  the  urban  retail  B2C  segment,  the  company’s  products  are  largely 
positioned  in  the  premium  sector  for  high  net  worth,  affluent  and  mass  affluent 
population in the top 20‐25 towns and cities of India.  

 Heartbeat: Heartbeat is Max Bupa’s flagship product for retail customers, offering 
comprehensive  health  insurance  cover  ranging  from  INR0.2‐10mn  for  individuals 
and families. 
 Health  Companion:  It  is  an  affordable  health  plan  which  offers  features  like  no 
room  rent  capping,  refill  benefit,  pre‐  and  post‐hospitalisation  expenses,  Ayush 
Treatment and all‐day care treatments with guaranteed renewability for lifetime, 
among other features. 

 Health  Assurance  (fixed  benefit):  Health  Assurance  is  a  unique  fixed  benefit  plan 
that  provides  flexibilities  to  cover  sudden  eventualities  like  accidents,  critical 
illnesses and incidences of hospitalisation. 
 
2. Urban group B2B 
 Group  Health  Insurance:  This  is  a  comprehensive  suite  of  health  insurance  that 
includes  hospitalisation,  OPD  treatment,  critical  illness,  health  check  up,  hospital 
cash cover and named illnesses. 
 Employee  First:  This  product  is  offered  under  2  variants:  (a)  Employee  First  is  a 
comprehensive health scheme suited for small and large corporate and institutions 
for high sum insured (ranging from INR0.1‐5mn) and quality coverage with added 
maternity  benefits  and  wellness  initiatives;  and  (b)  Employee  First  Classic 
accommodates  small  and  medium  enterprises  with  an  insured  sum  of  INR0.05‐
0.5mn. 
 Group Personal Accident (fixed benefit): The product is a comprehensive personal 
accident  cover  for  large  as  well  as  small‐size  groups,  which  provides  flexibility  to 
design  a  cover  suited  to  requirements  of  group  members  with  a  choice  of  basic 
benefits and optional benefits. 
 

150  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Max India
 
3. Rural retail B2C 
 Swasth Parivar: A health indemnity plan designed to meet the healthcare financing 
needs of the Indian rural population. It offers an affordable cover with sum insured 
options  of  INR0.05‐0.1mn  and  provides  basic  coverage  like  hospitalisation 
expenses,  medicine  &  drugs,  IVF,  blood  transfusion,  operation  theatre  charges, 
diagnostic tests & procedures and surface ambulance. 
 
4. Rural group B2B 
 Swasthya Pratham: A group health micro insurance cover intended to cater to the 
group  healthcare  needs  of  non‐governmental  organisations  (NGOs)  and  self‐help 
groups (SHGs). 

 Group  Personal  Accident  (fixed  benefit):  This  product  offers  cover  for  basic 
benefits  like  accidental  death,  permanent  total  disability,  permanent/partial 
disability  and  temporary  total  disability  plus  and  flexibility  for  additional  benefits 
and for extending coverage to dependents. 
 
Table 4: GWP by segment                                               (INR mn)  Table 5: GWP by business acquisition channel    (INR mn) 
FY13 FY14 FY15 FY13 FY14 FY15
Urban retail (B2C) Individual Agents 871 1,365 1,891
Growth in urban retail (B2C) 110 52 45 Direct Business 564 675 864
% of urban retail (B2C) in Total GWP 78.0 79.0 95.0 Corporate Agents‐ Banks 0 31 273
Brokers 227 364 400
Urban group (B2B) Corporate Agents‐ Others 0 0 110
Growth in urban group (B2B) 77 45 (69) Others 410 654 190
% of Urban Group (B2B) in Total GWP 18.5 18.0 5.0 Total 2,072 3,088 3,727

Other‐ Rural & Social
Growth in Rural & Social 1,287 8 (84)
% of Rural & Social in Total GWP 4.0 3.0 0.0    
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Post a detailed strategic review in 2014, Max Bupa decided to focus largely on its core area 
of expertise—the B2C segment—and limit its exposure to the B2B segment. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

151  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Healthcare 

Antara: Senior living 
With  a  growing  number  of  seniors  who  are  well  travelled  and  accustomed  to  a  certain 
quality of life and infrastructure, the demand for senior living facilities is on the rise. Senior 
living is a relatively new, but promising and rapidly growing, sector in India. The sector has 
seen significant and increasing levels of activity over the past few years with entry of several 
specialised  real  estate  and  corporate  players,  and  launch,  progression  and  completion  of 
senior living projects. Compared to developed markets like US, UK and Canada where senior 
living has a long history and a sizeable, well‐developed infrastructure, several aspects of the 
industry in India are still evolving.  
 
Antara,  a  wholly  owned  subsidiary  of  Max,  develops,  manages  and  operates  senior  living 
communities. Crafted by internationally renowned architects and constructed by renowned 
partners, it is being created with a unique design philosophy to encourage utmost quality of 
life.  The  Dehradun  project  is  spread  over  13.6  acres  comprising  200  apartments  between 
1,400 and 6,600 square feet and a 50,000 square feet clubhouse.  The apartments are priced 
between INR15mn and INR66mn. 
 
Max’s current equity investment in this project is ~INR2bn, while its total equity investment 
will  be  INR2.5bn.  The  Dehradun  project’s  total  project  cost  will  be  INR6bn.  As  of  FY16, 
Antara had completed signing long‐term lease contracts for 83 (42%) of its senior living units 
at its Dehradun project and collected advance payment of ~INR1bn. 
 

152  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Max India
 

Valuations 
 
We forecast revenue CAGR of 16% with EBITDA margin improving ~380bps and driving ~29% 
EBITDA  CAGR  over  FY16‐19;  RoCE  is  estimated  to  jump  430bps  to  11%.  In  our  SOTP 
valuation, we assume 20x FY19E EV/ EBITDA for MHC and 1x P/BV for Max Bupa & Antara to 
arrive at target price of INR175. We initiate coverage with ’BUY/SO’. 
 
Table 6:  SOTP valuation on FY19 valuations 
Valuation Mar‐18
Hospitals
Multiple 20x
EBITDA (FY19E)                                        4,560
EV                                     91,197
Less: net debt (Mar '18E)                                     13,533
Market Cap (Mar '18E)                                     77,664
MIL's stake@46%                                     35,725
Max Bupa (investment) (@51% stake)                                        4,580
Antara (investment)                                        2,000
Cash (FY16)                                        4,115
Total                                     46,420
No of shares                                           267
Target Price                                           174  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Table 7: Summary financials  (INR mn) 
Max India 
MHC Max Bupa  Antara
(Consolidated)
FY16 FY17E FY18E FY19E FY17E FY18E FY15 FY16
P&L
Revenue (excluding other income) 12,119 24,241 28,646 32,455 4,796 5,851 58 57
EBITDA (75) 3,030 3,810 4,560 (634) (369) (1,714) (2,104)
EBITDA margin NA 13 13 14 NA NA NA NA
PAT