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498

bzod-pa
pe
tsa* manufactured
salt, *zo-pe
ser* arti-
ficial
gold
Wdn. bzo-bo
=
bzo-pa,
bzo-bo
mKds-pa
a skilful artist
Mil.;
bzo-byed
1. id.
2.
imaginative faculty, imagination,
ni f. bzo-
Ids work Sch.
.
bzod-pa (rarely bzdd-pa)
I.
vb.,
^j^,
1 . to
suffer, bear, endure,
c.
ace.,
mig
nd-ba ma bzod-nas not
being
able to
bear the
pain
in his
eyes Dzl.',
lus
O
dis na
mi bzod with this
body pain,
disease,
cannot
be endured
Thgy.
;
sans-rgyds-kyitugs-r)e
ce-
bas ma bzod-nas seems to
imply:
Buddha
in his
mercy
not
suffering this,
but
checking
the
mischief;
also c. dat. :
^jdm-po-la
Tmfeorfhecannotbear what is soft or smooth
Dzl.',
ma-bde-ba
bdg-tsam-la bzod-pa
mi
byed-de getting
so fretful
through
a
slight
indisposition
Mil.
;
ltd-basmi bzod-de
finding
it unbearable for his
eyes Pth.;
drdn-pas
mi bzod-de as much as: so that he almost
lost his senses over it Pth.
;
bzod-tabs
(or
bzod-glags)-med-par O byun-ba
or
Ogyur-ba
not to be able to bear . . .
any longer, frq. ;
mi-bzod-pa
or
-bzdd-pa adj., unbearable,
in-
tolerable,
also
irresistible;
ma bzod-nas not
being
able to resist
any longer
Dzl. 2.
to
forgive, pardon,
snan-cad fo-
tsdm-pa
bzod-
par ysol
to
pardon
our former tricks is what
we
beg
Mil.
;
rtd-la ma
skyon-pa bzod-par
bzes fsal that I did not
request you
to
mount,
this I
beg you
to
forgive
me Mil.
;
bzod-
par fsol-lo byas kyan although
she
begged
pardon
Pth.
;
skyon-rnamsye-ses-spyan-ldan-
rnams-la
bzod-par ysol
with
respect
to the
deficiencies I
pray
for the
indulgence
of
the
very
wise
(readers); bzod-ysol
byed-pa
to ask
pardon,
forbearance Pth.
II. sbst. 1.
patience (Ssk. ^rf^O,
bzod-
pa sgom-pa
to exercise one's self in
patience
Dzl.
V, 12;
but
also,
to have
patience,
to
show
forbearance; bzod-pa bzes-pa,
id.
resp.
(v.
also above
I, 2); bzod-pa-can patient;
bzod-srdn unwearied
patience; bzod-pa-cun
impatient
Mil.,
bzod-med Cs. id. 2. in as-
ceticism:
perseverance,
stedfast adherence to
the four
truths, constancy
in
pursuing
the
path
that has been entered
upon,
mi
skye-
bai cos-la
bzod-pa
ace. to Was.
id., being
at the same time no
longer subject
to re-
births,
p. (140).
-
Observ. So far as 'to
forgive' implies
patience,
forbearance,
it
may
be rendered
by bzod-pa',
but as the
Scriptural
view of
'forgiveness
of sin' involves more than
that,
other
expressions,
such as bit-Ion
sel-ba,
must be resorted to with reference to the
latter.
'
bzob-pa
Sch.
=
ysob-pa.
bzom
hlb)
carried on the
back,
to
convey
water,
v. cu-bzom sub CM.
'
bztd-ba v. zld-ba.
bzlas-brjod (cf.
zld-ba
II, 2);
zld-ba in a strict
sense,
is stated
to be the
silent, brjod-pa
the
soft, yet
audible
pronouncing
of
spells etc., bzlas-brjod signi-
fying
both
together; bzlas-brjod byed-pa
to
mutter over
Glr.;
mu-stegs-pai bzlas-brjod
Brahmanical
spell-murmuring Thgy.
J"
bzlum-pa
v.
zlum-pa.
*
bzlo-ba v. zld-ba.
bzlog
the
contrary,
the
reverse, prd-
ba-las
bzlog sbom-po
the
contrary
of
thin is thick Lex.
bzlos
}
v. zlo-ba.
o
a,
1 . a letter
peculiar
to the Tibetan lan-
guage, which,
contrary
to
I^J
(q.v.)
de-
notes the
pure vowel,
without
any
admix-
ture of a consonant sound. The
difficulty
which attaches to the articulation of this
vowel, requiring
an
opening
of the
glottis
.98
Pf t!a" manufactured salt, 3tr' arti-
ficial gold Wdli. - bzd-ho - btd..pa, b::o.bo
midJ-pa a skilful artist Mil.; bzo-byJd 1. id.
2. imaginative faculty, imaginaucm, oi f. - b»
ids work &11.
htdd-pa (rarely M:dd-pa) I. vb.,
1. tosulfer, bear, endure, c.acc.,
mig lla-ha 111(1 bz6d-mu not being able to
bear the pain in his C}'CS Du.; IU8 odi311a
mi bzod with this body pain, diseasc, cannot
be endured Thgy.; 3<lJi&-rgyds-Ky1"tit,gs-r)ell-
lxu ma bzdd-1UU seems to imply: Buddha
in bis mercy not suffering this, but checking
the mischief; - also c. dat.: Jdm-]XJ-la
mibzodhecRnDothearwhat is soft or smooth
D::l.; ma-Ix/i·ba bd!J-tsam-la bzdd-fXl tni
byid-de getting so fretful through II. slight
indispositioDi.\Jil.; lId-ba3mi bz6d-de finding
it unbearable for his eyes Plh.; dnin-pa&
mi bz&d-de as much as: so that he ulmos!.
lost his senses over it. PIll.; bzQd-tabs (or
bzc4-glaf/s}-7IIid-paf obY'Ui-ba or o9yUl'-ba
not. to be able to bear ... an)' longer, frq.;
or -bzdd-pa adj., unbearable, in-
tolerable, also irresistible; ma bzOd-nfU not
being able to resist any longer Dzl. - t.
to forgive, pardon,8Jian-lad (o-isdm-pa bzQd-
par yBOl to pardon our former tricks is what
we beg Mil.; rtd-la ma skyon-pa bzOd-pa1'
bzes
o
l8al that! did not request )'ou to mount,
this I beg you to forgive me Mil.; bzOd-
pal' rsdl-lo b!JfU kyan although she begged
pardon PtA.; !bJon-f7Ia7118ye-iJetr-!!pyan-ldan-
l'1lams-la bzOd-par pol with respect to the
deficiencies I pray for the indulgence of
tile very wise (refuIers); bZ4d-}'3ol b!led-pa
to ask pardon, forbearance -
II. sbst. 1. patience (&k. bzOd-
pa S9011lfa to exercise one's self in patience
C\ a, 1. a. letter peculiar to the Tibetan lan-
guage, which, contrary to 1R (q.v.) de-
notes the pure vowel, wit out any admix-
D::L ,,', 12; but also, to hM'e patience, to
show forbearance; bzdd-pa bUs-pa, id. reSll,
(v. also above I, 2); bzOd-pa-can patient;
bUld-srdn unwearied patience; bzod-pa-Ctui
impatient Mil., b::od-med 01. id. - 2. in as-
ceticism: perseverance, stedfast adherence to
the four truths, constancy in pur.;uing the
path that has been entered upon, mi sk!le-
bai eos-la bwd-pa acc. to Was. id., being
at the same time no longcr subject to re-
births, p. (140). -
Observ. So far as 'to forgi\'e' implies
patience, forbeamnoo, it may be rendered
by bzOd-pa; but as the Scriptural ,·jewof
'forgiveness of sin' involves more than that,
other expressions, such as bit-Ion sel-ha,
musl be resorted to with reference to the
latter.
bzQb..pa Sck - fs6b-pa.
carried onthe back, to
water, v. tu-bzom sub Cu.
'ldJ·.::r bzld-ba v. zld-ba.
bzlas-br)6d (cf. zld-ba II, 2);
1 zld-ba in a strict sense, is stated
to be the silent, l)TjOd-pa the soft, yet audible
pronouncing of spells etc" bzlfU-br)od signi-
fying both tobTCther; bzlw-br)dd byM-pa to
mutter over Glr.; mit-sterJ8-pai bzla!-br)dd
Brabmanical spell-murmuring Th!J!J.
bzlum.-pa v. zbim-pa.
bzM-ba v. zlo-ba.
bzWg the contrary, the reverse, prd-
ba-l<u bzWg the contrary of
thin is thick Lu.
bZW3, v. do-ba.
ture of a consonant sound. The difficnlty
which attacbes to the articnlation of this
requiring an opening of the glottis
499
si-cog
,"'
before it is
sounded,
L miied ;i
great
variety
of
pronunciation
in the
differentpro-
\inrial dialects. Vide Phonetic Table with
it-
explications.
2. numerical
figure:
23.
^d-cag,
Cs.
we,
v.
ji-cay.
i't n. of a
country
Glr.
,"-''-"",
with
log-pa,
Sch.: to
per-
form
somersets, to tumble
over,
to roll.
Q.'<3TUsJC"
*
a
~
na
~!J
a"
although, Sc/t.; ^a-na-
nm-na Sch.
;
perfectly alike, having
a
striking
resemblance
(?).
d-ma
but, e.g. ^d-ma
ma
rjed cig
but
do not
forget
!
(
.
-w* Set1 -'-
'shaking
or
rattling
sounds'
cf.
^ur-jir.
nr*
<
a" 1- like
yan}
attached to
conjunc-
tions,
and
corresponding
to the
English
ever, soever,
after
vowels,
col. also after
consonants, e.g. nam-^an.
2
^dn-sgra,
bofi-bui Cs. the
braying
of an ass.
qr*m*
^dn-ke (not
ident. with
an-gi
num-
ber),
a
mystical character,
frq.
oc-
curring
in certain finical ornaments or flour-
ishes called
sbrul-mgo, occasionally
also in
written words.
!']*
db-pa
Ts. to bark.
s.
angry
-
ytum-po.
+'ir-lnt
(
lot,
rgydb-pa
to
cast,
=
rgyan rgydb-pa.
ar-^ur
v.
jtr-^ur.
*
^dr-yan also, too,
likewise Sch.
j
1. num.
figure
: 53. 2. W. demonstr.
pron.
inst. of
Odi, this,
also
'i-po.
q-
t* 1. num.
figure:
83. 2. sbst.
kiss,
^
v.^.0.
3.
also.,0,
Cs.: demonstr.
pron.,
this, ^u-ni-ru, ^.u-nir, ^6-ni>\ hither;
Ts. *><-
ahi* this.
<~
s
9
ra Gl>'- noise of
many foot-steps,
prob.
=
^ur-sgra.
0/3*71*
^'^
1" a^ so
<^~^
a
9 Glr.y ^6 -cog
Tlu/y., ^.u-bu-cag
Dzl.
pers.pron.
we.
-
2.
chimney W.(?).
Q/SP]'
^u-tug
Sch.:
"
Liiderlichkeit,
auch
yy'/J&TOfJ"
'w-^tk/*';
but in M
7
.
*'un-fug
co-cf
NS
^
means to break out into a violent
passion,
and
*'un-fug-Kan
or -can*
angry ;
in
C'.
*mu-fug-pa*
and
*dug-(ug-pa*
to be at a
loss;
so also in MY.
O*^* ji-bu
v.
ju-caq.
NO
NO
**
jn-ru-ru
Sch. ur.
^u-luij compulsory post-service,
the
1
gratuitous forwarding
of
letters, lug-
gage
and
persons,
the
supply
of the
requi-
site
porters
and beasts of burden
(also
more
immediately
these
themselves),
ori-
ginally
a
socage-service
rendered to lords
and
proprietors, government
officers and
priests;
in more recent times remunerated
and
legally regulated
in those
parts
that
are visited
by European
travellers;
mi-la
^u-ldg
skul-ba to
impose
such
services, by
exacting porters
etc.
Pth., ^gel-ba
id.; skyel-
ba
prob.
to forward
by Ulag; (Cs.
limits
the
signification
too
much).
^u-su
Lt. coriander seed.
^ug-pa,
owl, Lt.; <ug-rgdn
Sch. the
great horn-owl, ^ug^gu^-cun
the
little
owl;
^ug-mig
owl's
eyes
(Cs. 'large
languishing eyes',
Sch.:
'large protruding
eyes
1
); ^ug-mig-can having
such
eyes, ^g
mig-pa
or -ma a
goggle-eyed
man or wo-
man Cs. 2. Ld. also for
yug-po
oats.
fug-sins
v.
sins-po.
jud
\. Cs.
swaggering, bragging,
bom-
^ ]
bast, fustian; ,</
<vr smra-ba to
swag-
ger, brag, gen.
*wnr
se-pa*,C.
2.
=
yud
Thgy., jid-kyis,
in a moment,
instantly,
sud-
denly.
3. command, order
(?),
Sch. :
jid-
sgrog-pa
to make known an order.
qq-q-
^ub-pa
to
sweep
or rake
together
\\itli one >
hands,
pan-pas ^ub-kyis
bsdus-te Pth. with the arms
gathering
all
into one
heap.
the
palace
of the ancient
Tibetan
king
Thothori,
Glr.
-
,///
1 .
noise,
din,
clashing, cracking,
roar
^
of a
tempest
etc.,
but also and not less.
32*
before it is has occasioncd " grellt
"ariety of prollllllcinlion in tile ,Iitrerentpro-
vinci," di"lects. Vide PllOMtic Tnhle with
ill> cxplien.tions. - 2. nwnerirtt.l figure: 23.
C•. we, v•
",a-N ll. of a counlry Gb·.
",u-li-Ica, wilh ldg-pa, &k: to per-
.::J form somersels, to lumble over, to roll.
a..."""'i!:.' ",u-Ull-ytl,i although, &h.; ",U-M"
11U1-nu &/1.; perfectly alike, having
a striking resemblance (7).
. .,d-ma but, e.g. .,d"'lIIu ma Jjed 8[1 but
. do not forget! (il. ..
..a-ur &11.: 's:haking or rattling sounds'
"" cf. .,ur-.,ul'.
a"c,- .,a'i 1. like yan, l\ttl\chell to conjunc-
tions, and corresponding to the English
ever, soever, lIfter vowels, col. also Ilfter
e.g. nam-.,an. - i ",aA"8gl'a,
b,j,j-lmi 01. the bfl\ying of :m uss.
QF....oTf. ",dil-ke (not ident. with ;;'Ii-gi num-
lIer), a mystical chal'ftCter, frq. oc-
curring in certain finical ocnaulent.ll or flour-
ishes called 8brill-mgo, occasionally \Ilso in
written words,
c::r.:,j' ",db-pa T3. 10 bark.
",dr-can T8.angry-
ytmn-po.
c:,,:;,:::r ..al·-ba C. lot, I'f/!Jtib-pa to -
I'flYan "fIYab-pa.
a,.2\R."I{c'. ,,«""yon also, 100, likewise &J..
(;l' .,i l. nUIIl. figure: 53. - 2. W. demonstf.
"\ pron. iust. of "di, this, also 'i-ptJ.
Cl,' ",u I. num. figurc: 83. - i. sllst. kiss,
"" V.",o. - 3. nl60..o, Gil.: demonstr. pron"
this, ",u_ni_I'l.l, ",u_IIir, ",O-nil', hither; T8. "leu-
alii" this.
a,':<J
0
Gir. noise 01 many fool-steps,
",,:n prob. =
1. fllso A-tag Glr., ",o-i:og
...... TII!I'h D::l. pets. pron. we.
- 2. chimney W. (7).
r.::,.t'I:I'1' &11.,: 'J,("lderlichkcit
o
l\uch
......
499
Cl,.J::;' w·
.
'U-flSUg8'; but in IV, ",UrI-(ug Cd-it!
"" m('llns to break oul into a violent
passion, and "',m-flly-l!lm or -b'm" angry; in
G: "mlt-(ug-pa" 1U1i1 "dilg-ftl[l-l'"" 10 be al a
lOss; so also in Mil.
",i.-lilt v. ",i<-tug.
",u-ru-nt &1,. '"" W·.

.,u-ldg compulsory post-service, the
"" p;rntuitous forwarding of letters,lug-
gage and persons, the supply of tbe requi-
site porters and beasts of burden (also
more immedintely these themselves), - ori-
ginally a socage-service rendered to lords
lind proprietors, gorcfnment officers :wd
priests; in more recent times remunerated
and legally regulated in those parts that
lU'e visited by European travellers; mi-la
",!.t-ld.g dill·ba to impose such services, by
exacting porters etc. PfA, ofJil-lJa id.; .kyil-
ba prob. to fOfwlU'd by Uiag; (w. limits
the signification too much).
",u..u lAo coriander seed.

Cl,=if=,j' ",tig-pa, ow4 Lt.; ",tl[l-rgdn &h. the
...... great horn-owl, ",ug(-gu)-ltlli the
little owl j owl's eyes (w. 'large
languishing eyes', &1, ... 'large protruding
eyes'); ",uy-m;g..cw< baving such .,tig
'mig-pa or -ma a goggle-eyed man or wo-
man w. - 2. Ld. also for '!JUg-po oats.
",uU",iil. ". ,in.-po.
!O... J. u. swaggering, bragging, bom-
1 basi, fuslian; ",lid Cw J1ll1'a-ba t.o swag-
ger, lIrng, gen. "Icur j(-pa",C. - 2. - yud
TI'9!J., in a moment, instantly, sud-
denly. - 3. command, order(?), &11.: ",lid-
8fI''O$'''pa to make known an order.
a,:,..:.j0 .,fl.b - pa to sweep or rake together
...... witll one's hands, -pa& ",ub-j,yit
bW.ra-U 1'tJ•. with the Ilrms gathering lIll
into one henl).
.,tllll-bu-glmi-m/{ar n. of
;,...;...... l' the palace of the ancient
Tiltetan king Tholhori, GIl',
a,=,: 1. noise, din, clashing, cracking, Nlar
tic . U )4?nljlCStCtc., but 111:>0 lind noi Ie"!,
3'l'
500
a
low, humming noise,
rnd-bai
bu-ga bkdg-
pai
fse
^ur-^ur zes-pai sgra
the
humming
in the ears
produced by stopping
them
Wdn.,
^ur-^ur-po-yi sgra
id.
Wdn.;
rnd-ba
jkr-la
Jcrog
there is a
buzzing
in
my
ear
S.g.;
JULY
Idan or
Jbyun
a noise is
heard;
Cs. more
particularly:
talk, babbling, chit-chat, jmr-
yton-ba
to
talk,
to
chat; *ton-^ur*
C.
(lit.
ston) bragging, humbug ; jur
-
sgra
=
_.ur
noise caused
by many
voices,
many
foot-
steps,
cf.
^u-sgra ;
of the
howling
of a tem-
pest, ^ur-sgra
ce
although
it
(the thunder)
makes a
great
noise Mil.
; juur-tin
a brass
basin,
used to make a noise
by striking
it Sch.
;
^ur-ba
sbst. a
humming insect,
beetle
Sch.;
vb,,
to be
noisy, chattering, Cs.;
dga-gwys
^ur-te shouting, rejoicing
Mil.
; %wr
co-ce*
to set a
dog
on a
person
W.
;
*
<
ur
bsdd-pa,
^ur-brddb
btdn-ba* C., W. to
exaggerate,
brag,
boast. 2.
bag
-
dro
^ur -^ur
Pth.
seems to describe the
feeling
of a
genial
warmth
pervading
the
body.
--
3. *wur
gydg-pa* (7,
*W
gydb-ce,
tdn-ce* W. to
smooth,
v. dbur-ba. 4.
^ur-rdo
a
sling
Sch.^ur-rdo Open-pa
to throw with a
sling.
Q^
w
^e
num.
figure:
113.
C\
<o
I. num.
figure:
143.
-
II. sbst. 1.
pro
vine,
jn
kiss
(^Jof),
<o
byed-pa
to kiss
Lt.,
Kd-la on the mouth
Pth.;p
e
yag, zabsresp.
on the
hand,
the foot
Cs.; <o yton-ba Cs.,
*'u Idn-ce*
W., ^o byed-
pa.
2. v.
^o-ma.
III.
pron.
1.
pers. pron.
we,
v.
^.u-cag.
2. dem.
pron.
this Cs. v.
ji
III. IV.
inter), (p <o)
1. like
oh, yes!
as a
reply:
^o
Idgs-so
oh
very
well! Mil
;
*'o
yon-nog,
'o
Mg-gog,
'o
gydl-log W!,
*
<
o
yon-ne*
C. well!
it's all
right
to me!
well,
do so!
^o,
^o,
so ! well !
very
well ! in W. it is a common
reply, indicating nothing
more,
than that
attention has been
paid
to the words
spo-
ken,
like the
English
well! indeed! 2.
as a
positive affirmative, yes
!
W.,
cf.
^.o-nd.
<'"
s
^^
&lso w^h mams and
cag,
(Cs.
also
ji-skofy, Ld.'d-xo, we, Mil.,
Tar., Thgy., e.g. (if
all men must
die), ^o-
skol Ita ci smos of course also we
Thgy. ;
it
is
very
often used as a
reciprocal pronoun
:
^6-skol
ma si
prdd-pa
the
fact,
that we
have seen each other once more before we
die Mil.
^o-brgydl, resp. fatigue, weariness,
want, any
kind of
hardship, *peb-
lam-la
ob-gydl
ma
kyod-da*
W. has not
your
walk hither
fatigued you? ^o-brgydl yon-
lugs
the
getting
into difficulties
Mil.;
more
frq.
as vb.:
^o-brgydl-ba, Jcyed-cag-rnams ^o
ma
brgydl-lam
are
you perhaps fatigued?
Glr.;
zabs-tog ^o
mi
brgyal-ba Jbul
a short
expression
for:
everything
shall be at
your
service,^so
that
you
shall not want
anything
Mil.
; ^o
-
re
-
brgydl <o- brgydl
1 .
trouble,
drudgery, annoyance
Mil. 2.
decay,
decline,
ruin,
of
religion, usages
etc.
_ ^>c**.
sour cream Sch.
^o-snyigs
birch-tree Sch.
^o-dod lamentation, wailing, cry
for
help, gen.
as vb.
^o-dod Obod-pa
to
lament,
to call for
help
Glr., Pth.,
Wdn.;
^o-dod-pa
one that seeks
help, support,
re-
dress,
a
client,
a
plaintiff,
more in
pop.
lan-
guage.
^o-nd (cf. ^o, ^on, ^dn-kyan),
comes
nearest to the Greek
ahka,
used
esp.
to introduce a new
thought
or
proposition
in
speech
:
now,
what shall
you
do in that
case?
Dzl; well,
what did he
say?
DzL;
well,
I
hope you
have at least . . . Dzl.
;
why,
ay, Mil;
but now
Thgy.;
but,
the Latin
autem,
when a new clause is added
Mil.,
Thgy.; yea,
in a
climax, e.g.:
I met with
a naked
man, yea,
an insane ascetic Mil.
-
2. as an answer in the
affirmative, yes
w.-
^o'-ma milk, ^6-ma jo-ba
to milk
Glr.;
snyol-ba
to let it curdle
6s., srub-pa
to churn it
Cs.-^o-ma cags
the milk
thickens,
coagulates
6s.
Comp. ^o-fdn 'milk-meadow',
the
plain
in which Lhasa now
stands;
of the former
lake, ^.o-fdn-gi
mt'so
Glr.,
a
sedgy
moor is
said to be still
remaining. <o-fi/g
rnilk-
soup
Tar.
^o-fud cheese,
v. fud.
^o-
Jun suckling-child, baby.
=
zo-^fun.
/>-
a low, humming noise, 1'1Id-bai M-fJa bkag-
pai he Us-pai $[JI'a the humming
in the ears produced lly stopping themWd,i.,
.i<r-p<JlIi IJ{/ra id. Wdti.; rnd-ba
Jlrc9 there is n. buzzing in my car S.g.;
Idati or "bllwi a noise is heard; C3. more
particularly: talk, babbling, chit-chat,
rto,,-ba to I!llk, to chat; C. (lit.
stoJi) bragging, }lUmbug; - 3fJra -
noise caused by many \'oices, many root-
sleps, cr. of t.he howling or n. lem-
pest, (6 although it (the thunder)
makes a great noise Mil.; n brass
bflSin,used tomake anoisc by striking itBe".;
sbst. a humming insect, beetle &11.;
vb., to be noisy, chattering, e".; d[Ja - gl:;1:;3
shouting, rejoicing Mil.; *.,Ul'
to set a dog on a Ilerson lV.; * b.Ydd-pa,
btd,i·ha* C., W. to exaggernte,
brag, boast. - 2. bUfJ-drd l'Ih.
seems to describe the f('eling of a genial
warmth perYnding the body. - 3, ·U'IJI'
gydg-pa*C, *'Ul' twi-ee* IV. to
smooth, v. dbul'-ba. - 4. .,lir-rdo a sling
#n-pa t.o throw with a sling.

.,6 Dum. fIgure: 113.
I. Dum. figure: 143.-
n. sbst. 1. provine. ..u, kiss
"!JCd-pa to kiss Lt., fa-Ia on the mouth
Pth.; PJau, :abs resp. on the Imnd, the foot
Cs.j .0 rtoli-ba u., .'u, ftill-ee* W, = .0 byed-
pa. - 2. v. -
III. proll. 1. lien;. pron. we, v. •u-eag.
- 2. demo pron. this C:'. v. •u 111 - lV.
intcrj.(o..o) I. like oh,yes!
ldgwo oh \"ery well! Mil; ·'0 !/On-neg, '0
tJi[J-gog, '0 gytil-tog W:, • !fO,i-lit' C. well!
it's all right to me! well, do so! - ..0.0,
)'JjJ, so! well r very well! in W: it.isacommon
reply, indicating nothing morc, than that
attention has been llllid to the words spo-
ken, like the English well! indeed! - 2.
M a positive affirmati"e, yes! cf. ..()o-ud.
a;W'..f .tMkol, ?'1I,a./Ii$;and ro,fJ,
(Q. also .u-s/;.ol), La. a-X<I, we,MIl.,
Tar., Thgy., e.g. (if 1111 men must die),
$kollta Ci smOll of eourse N3l\ 'fC; T"vy.; it
is very often used as reciprocal pronoun:
.0- Mol 1Ila jmid - pa the fact, that we
hu\'e seen each other once more before we
die Mil.
. .o-brgydl, resp. fatigue, wearine»,
-..:J want, nn)' kind of hardship, *j'lib-
lam-la ob-gyul"llla kyQd-da*lY. has not your
wnlk Lither fatigued you? .o-bryyul '!J(JI'-
lU[f8 the getting into difficulties Mil.; more
frq.as vb.: ;o-brg!Jdl-bo., ;0
",a bl'[Jydl-lam are you perhups fatigued?
Glr.; ;abs-tdg 11Ii brg,lJOl-ba "buin short
exrression for: everythiug shall be at your
service,.so that you shnll not wanl· anything
Mil.; = ..o-bl'[Jyul l. trouble,
drudgel')', annoyance Mil. 2. decay, decline,
ruin, of religion, usages etc.
..o-snyig sour cream Se!l.
birch-tree &11.
lamentation, wailing, cry for
help, gen. as vb. "bOd-pa to
IlImen!, to cnll for help Gil'., PtA., lVwi.;
..o-ddd-pa one that seeks hc1p, support,
dress, 11 client, a plaintiff, more in pop. lan-
gUllge.
?f",. ..()o-lIa (cf. ..0, ..6n-ky(lli), eomes
nearest to the Greek «Hu, used
to introduce a new thought or proposition
in speech: now, what shall you do in that
case'? Dzl.; well, what did he say? Dzl.;
well, 1 hope you have lC3st ... Dzl.; why,
ay, Mi1.; but now TII9!J.; but, the Latin
a!/lem, when a new clause is ndded Mil.,
Thgy.; yea, iu a climax, e.g.: I met with
a naked man, yea, an insane ascetic Mil.
- 2. liS an answer in the affirmutive, yes
1v.-
. ..o-mlt milk, .0-"IIIa Jd-bo to milk GIr.;
snydl-ba to let it curdle £:$., 81-Ub-pa
to churn it the milk thickens,
coagulates c.. -
Compo .o-tali 'milk-meudow', the phin
in which Lhasa now stands; of the former
lake, ..o-(uli-gi m(1J(J GIr., a sedgy moor is
said to be still remaining. - milk-
soup Tar. - ;o-{ud cheese, V. fud. - ,0-
iilJi suckling-child, baby..- u-Juli. - ",0-
501
-
.s//oi/ milk-vessel.
^o-sp/V,
^o-sri}
cream.
-
f
n-t//<ir I. milk and butter Mt. 2. tenniii.
of
s>-ma
into the milk.
^o-zo
milk-pail.
jD-itui-zi-zi
\V.
pater-noster pea,
the seed of Abrus
precatorius,
used as beads for rosaries.
terrier Mi.
^o-re-brgydl
v.
^o-brgydl.
K,
only
in *'d-so tdn-ce or
gydb-
ce* to
laugh at, deride,
to feel a
plea-
sure at the misfortune of others.
^o-se mulberry, ^d-se-sin mulberry-
tree; ba-^os Med.,
perh. strawberry
spinach,
Blitum,
which in W. is called ba-
o-se,
cow-mulberry.
^og,
W.
*yog*,
Ts.
*ivag*,
1. root
sig-
nifying below,
or with reference to
time,
after,
opp.
to
gon
;
<dg-tu,
W.
*
yog-la*
\ . adv.
down,
below, underneath; afterwards, later;
in
paging
books it denotes the second
page
of a
leaf,
v.
gon;
it is used as an
expedient
to correct errors in
numbering,
or to make
additions,
as with us
e.g. 'page 24,
b'. 2.
postp. under,
with
accus.,
less
frq.
with
dat.,
down
from;
after
(as
to
time, rank,
succes-
sion). ^dg-na,
W.
*ydg-na*,
1. adv. under-
neath,
below. 2.
postp.
c.
gen. under,
after.
-
^dg-nas,
W.
*ydg-nas*
1. adv. from
under,
from below. 2.
postp.
c.
genit.
forth
from below
^dg-tu Jjug-pa
to
put
underneath,
to
subject,
subdue
Glr.;
ka-^dg
Ts.
=
^dg-
tu,
e
g. *sin-gi Ka-wdg*
under the tree
;
some-
times
(less corr.)
with accus. inst. of
genit.,
also
^og
alone,
inst. of
^dg-fu, dg-na:
*Ru-
fog
Gu-lab-sin
'og
mi
dug*
W.
Kutog
does
not stand
under,
is not subordinate
to,
Gulab
Singh; Idih-^og
the division of soldiers
under the
Dingpon,
or a
century (division
of
hundred); bcu-^og
a
body
of ten men
under a
bcu-dpon
or
corporal.
2.
testicles,
of
animals,
^og-can
not
castrated;
*wog
tr'-pa* (spyad-pa}
to
cover,
copulate
C.
Comp.
and deriv.
^dg-sgo
the lower ori-
fices of the
body
for the
discharge
of the
excretions,
^dg-sgo fnyis S.g.
;
more
partic.
the anus Pth.
^og-rdo
anvil Sch.
^og-
pag
v.
pag. ^dg-ma adj.
the
lower, later,
following one,
dei
j&g-ma
the one
following
a tier
that,
the second in
turn; *ld-m<:
ge-nyen y6g-ma big dug*
W. a
Genyen
is
inferior to a Lama,
^og-min, ^qifqg,
'the
not inferiors' i.e. the
highest,
the inmates
of a certain heaven inhabited
by gods,
or
also that heaven itself.
^6g-rol-tu
=
<6g-
tu Tar.
^og-rlun
Lt.
vapour,
flatulence.
^og-sdl crop,
craw of birds.
^on-ba, pf.
oiis, imp. o^,
13. and Jlul.
(*'d/i-c-os*),
for which in common life
almost
always,
and in more recent literature
not
seldom, yoh-ba,
W.
*y6h-ce*,
is
used,
1. to
come,
ma
^6n-ba
mfon-nas Dzl. when
he saw his mother
coming;
ndn-du
.,0/is,
Dzl. he came
in;
jiyir
^on-ba
Glr. to come
back;
mi
ynyis
nai di'un-du
^.6/i-^rgyu yin-
pa
Glr. two men that were about to come
to
me; ^6/l~bai
lam-du Pth. when
being
on
their
way
;
ti-se-la
sgdm-du ydns-pa yin
Mil.
we come to the Tise in order to
meditate;
^ons-pa legs-so you
are welcome
6s.;
rias
^o-dod by
as
kyan^oh-mKanmedPth. although
I was
crying
for
help, nobody came;
kyer
^6ns
-
so Glr.
they
came to
bring , they
brought
with
them; Krid-sog bring
hither!
krid
^6/ts-so
Glr.
they brought thither;
with
reference to time :
ma-^ns-pa
not
yet come,
i.e.
future,
dus etc.
very frq.;
also
poet.:
ma-^ons
don-du for the benefit of those
that are to
come,
i.e. of
posterity;
can
yd
h-
bai
rigs,
Wdn.,
the kinds
(of cerealia)
from
which beer comes
(is made).
2. to
happen,
yod-pa yon-gin Odug-pas
Mil. as it some-
times
happens
that there are . . .
;
more
frq.
to
OCCUr,
to be met
^'^.^ri-ii-ba^on^gyiti'-na
whenever an e
occurs,
wherever an e stands
Gram.
;
mii
yul-na
mi
^ot't
such a
thing
does
not occur on earth
Glr.]
*di-ru mi
yon(-ce)*
W. that is not to be met with here. 3.
to fall to the lot
of,
to be
given,
to come
upon,
c.
dat.,
sras
^dn-bai ysdl-ba
btdb-bo Ptti.
she
prayed
that a sou
might
be
given
to
her;
*Ko-la nad
yohs*
W. a disease came
upon
him; *sod-nyom yon*
I receive
alms,
*sod-nam
yon*
I
acquire
merit
W.;
to come
in,
yon-sgo
income,
revenue
Schr.,
cf.
yon-
sndd milk-vessel. - "o--.rl, crealD.
- #o-mor I. milk nnd butter &11. 2. termin.
of ..6."'0 into the milk. - milk-I'l'il.
..fJ-'ffIfl-;:(.;:i W. pater-noster pea,
the of Abrus precatorius,
u"Cd heads fOI" rosarie!>.
a;:-W::ff floyd, ..0-960 terrier &11,
...r ..o-re-brgydl v. .. o-br!J!/dl.
..Q-.Jo W, onl)' in ·'040 tdli-a offllJdb-
u- to laugh ai, deride, to fed a plcn
A
SUI'C I\t the misfortuDC of others.
..o-u mUlberry, .. mulbf'rry-
trec; ba-..';, .MeJ., peril. strawberry
"pinnell, Blitum, which in IV. is called ba-
o-u, cow-mulberry.
"., .
Q::rl' ..O!J, • YO!! , .I'. wag, . root slg-
i"1 nifyingbelow,orwithrefercnce to time,
after, op[l. to f/Oli; ..Of!-tu, IV. ·!JOy-Ia- I. adv.
down, below, underneath; afterwards, later;
in paging llOoks it denotes Ille second page
of (I leaf, v. [IO,l; it is used as nn e:lpedicnt
1.0 correct errors ill numbering, or to make
additions, as with us e.g. 'page 24, b'. 2.
Ilostp. under, wilh accus., less frq. with dut.,
down from; after (lUI to lime, f'lI.ok, succes-
sion). - AI-na, lV. -ydg-na-, l.adv. under-
neath, below. 2. postp. c. gen. under, after.
- Ay-na!, lV. -!Jdg-na3- I. adv. from
under, from below. 2. postp. c. genit. forth
from below to put underneath,
to subjecl, subdue Gil'.; T3. =
tu, e g. "U,l-gi !la-waf! under the tree; some-
times (less corr.) witli accus. inst. of geniI.,
also nlooe, iost. of .dg-tu, dg-na: -Nu--
(()(J Gu·lab·ri,l 'og lIli du!!- W: Hutog doe..
lIot stand under, is not subordinate kl, Gulah
Siugh; {diio - the di\'ision of holdier.>
under the Dingpon, or n. century (aivisiou
of bundred); bi:u-.Of/ a body of ten meD
under n bi:u-dptJll 01' corporal. - 2. testicles,
of lIoimals, .Of/-Call not castrated; -u'Cg
b:'-pa- (3pyacl-pa) 1.0 cover, copulnte C.
Compo and denv. tbe lower ori-
fices of tbe body for the discharge of the
excretions, Tllyi& 1).y.; more partie.
the anus Ptll. - ,09 ,'110 all\'il &/1.
501
paff v. PO!!. - ..dg-'l'11i adj. the lower, laler,
following one, dh ,&y-?na tlte olle following
ll{t('1" thnt, the secood in tum; -ld--11le IIJio
!Je-?Iyin ydg_T111l zig dUff- IV. a Genyen is
inferior to 1\ Lama. .,og-TIIi,l, 1I1t1f0l8, 'the
not inferiors' i.e. tILe highest, thc inmates
of a cert:lin heaveu iuhauited uy gods, or
nlso thut l1eaven itself. - = .d!J-
tu 1ar. - ,Off-rlU,j Lt. vapour, flatulence.
- .o<j-Adl crop, craw of birds.
aF'::r ,dn-ba, llf. Qh" imp. lJ. nnd
C-'d,/-c(l3-), for wluch 10 common Me
almost always, nud in more recent liternture
not seldom, ydti.ba, IV. -!PI/-M', is used,
l. to come, ma ,dn-ba rnfdti-ntU D;:l. when
he saw his mother coming; ndli·du ..0';',
l):l. he came in; 1Wir GIl'. to come
back; mi )'1I1/i& oiai dritti4u ,oti-r!J!IU yill-
pa Glr. two meD that were about to cowe
to me; .d'l-bai ldm-du Ptk when Leing on
their way; ti-ae-la sgdm..Ju ydn,-pCl yin Mil.
we come to the Tise in order to mcditntc;
,dli3-pa Mgs.w you are welcome lA.; tlas
,0..J6d bya31yall ,olj-mtrallmMPtk altbough
I was crying fOI' help, nobody elUDe; 1t!Jel'
,d'IS - so Gir. they came kl bring, they
urougbt with them; lirid-kg bring hitber!
krid ",dtiNo Gb·. the)' bl'ongllt thither; with
reference to time: rna.,d,i!-pa not yet COme,
i.e. fulure, du, ctc. very frq.; also pooL:
ma_.,otis ddn-du for the benefit of those
that nrc to come, i.e. of lati ydio-
bai rigs, Wd/i., tbe kind;; (of cerea!ill) from
which beer cowes (is made).- 2. to happen,
ydd.pa yO/i-gin "ti'ly'pm Mil. 11011 it some-
times happens that there are ... ; more frq.
to occur, to be met with,oY,.iti.bu..o1i o!/!lur-Ila
whenever an e occurs, wherever an e stands
GI'<I.III.; mii yu[-na 1/Ii ,/Hi such a tbiug does
1I0t occur on earth Glr.; -di-ru 1/Ii ydti(-ctt
IV. tbat is not to be met witb here. - 3.
to fall to the lot 01, to be given, to come upon,
c. dllt., sras .,dio-bai r3di-ba blab-bo PI/"
she pra)'ed that lI. son might be gi\'ell to
her; -fo-la nud yoti,- W. a. disease came
upon bim; -,dd-nyol" yo"'- I receive alms,
yo"'- I ncquire merit IV.; to come
in, yoii-ago income, re\'enuc &/1/,., ce. yoli-
502
jotl-mol on-kyan
tan sub fan 2. --4. to be
suitable, prac-
ticable,
to
do, bstdn-pa ycig-la ston-pa ynyis
mi
^.ons-pas
Glr. as two
preceptors
for one
doctrine will not
do; yul-du log-pa
mi
^on-
bas Glr. as a
journey
home is not
practi-
cable; ^-yon-nog
v.
<>;
Ids-la 6n-bai bdr-
du as
long
as he was fit for work
;
to
go
on
well,
to do well 6'..
*da
yori-na*
W. will it do
now? --5. when connected with
verbs,
it
serves to indicate
futurity,
like the
English
auxiliaries shall and
will,
as becomes evident
from such
expressions
as the
following: O
ci-
ba
namyon
ca med Mil. when
dying comes,
i.e. when we shall
die,
is uncertain
;
mdog
Ogyur
-
ba
^.on
Glr. a
change
of colour is
coming,
i.e. the colour
will,
or is
going to,
change; Ogro-ba
mi
yon-bar Odug
Mil. I am
not
likely (dug-pa, 4)
to
go
there
any
more;
*tel-ce mi
yon*
W. he will not be
put
to
shame,
not be
disappointed
;
also with the
supine
:
srog
dan brdl-bar
^/yur-du ^on
Dzl.
it will even come to his
dying,
it will be
his
death;
zos-su
^on
Dzl. he will even
get
so far as to eat . . .
;
si-bar
^on
he will die
;
still more free and
popular
are those
turns,
in which the
gerund
or the mere root is
used:
ynan-ste ^on
Pth. he will assent to
it,
allow
it; ycig
min
kyaii ycig yin-te ^on
Glr. if it is not the
one,
it will be the
other;
deb
yon
he will come Mil. and in 6'.
very
common;
yid-ces
mi
^on they
will not be-
lieve
it;
it is also used to
express
the
passive
voice,
and the
English
to
become,
to
grow,
to
get:
ses-na na
ysod ^6n-bas
Glr. as I
should be
killed,
if she heard of
it;
*zer
yon*
C. so it is
said, expressed,
i.e. this is the
usual
way
of
expressing
it;
*pel-te yon*
W.
it is
getting larger,
increases;
orwith a noun:
smin
^oti
Glr. it is
growing ripe; rgydl-po
Jbans-su^ohMa.
the
king
becomes a
subject.
jrir ^.on-mol
Ld. for
^l-mo.
<od, light, shine, brightness,
sar flames
up, shines, Opro spreads, proceeds
from
;
^od spro-ba
to emit
light, bkye-ba
to
spread
Sch.', <pd
lham-mer
mdzdd-pa resp.,
to shine
with a
bright light Sch.;
^od Kens-pa
filled
with
light
Sch.
;
lus-la
^.od
yod-pa
self-lumi-
nous,
a
property
of
primeval
man Glr.
; nyi-
^6d sun-light, zla-^od moon-light, skar-^d
star-light 6s.; ynam-^od
brightness
of the
night-heavens,
zodiacal-light
6s.
; me-^od
fire-shine
6s.; lustre, brightness,
of
polished
metal, ^od byin-pa
to elicit a
gloss
or
lustre,
to
give
a
bright polish
Sch.
; metaphor,
fair
complexion,
external
beauty, *Kdn-pe
'od
pelte yon*
the
splendour
of the house in-
creases,
*bud ca
dug* declines, decays W.\
^od
dan
Iddn-pa B., ^od-can
1.
luminous.
emitting light;
2.
bright, polished.
3.
light,
*da
'od-can ca
yin*
W. now
r
it will
grow light.
4. of a fine
colour,
of a
blooming appearance
Glr. 5.
beautiful, splendid, stately; <od-med,
vulgo
^od-med-ttan,
the
contrary.
Com
p. ^od-kor
or skor a luminous circle
Lex.
^od-dkar
\. white
light.
2.
symb.
num.: 1.
^.od-can,
v. above.
^od-dpag-
med, ^rHTfTW?
'^ so
snan-ba-mfa-yds
the
fourth
Dhyani-Buddha,
v. sans
-
rgyds.
-
^od-spro (or Opro?) light?
--
*nd-lo*
W.,
*6d-to
tog*
hold
up
the
light!
*6d-to bu*
glow-worm, fire-fly; ^od^pro
sometimes oc-
curring
in the names of
gods. ^od-yzer
ray
of
light
Dzl. and elsewh.
frq.; ^od-yzer-
can n. of a
god, ^od-yzer-can-ma
of a
god-
dess Do.
^od-srun
n.
p.
1 .the human Bud-
dha of the
preceding period
of the world.
2. a
king
of
Tibet,
son of
Langdarma.
-
^od-ysdl
J . a
bright light
or
gloss, ^od-ysdl
mdahs dan
Iddn-pa very glossy,
of leaves.
2. com. of the
supernatural enlightening
of
the
saints, ^od-ysal-gyi
ndh-nas
yzigs-te
Mil.
knowing, beholding, by
means of
prophetic
light.
nr'^r
<dd-ma cane, bamboo, ^.od-ma t'sal,
f,
cane
-grove;
such a
grove
near
Rajagriha
was a favourite retreat of
Buddha.
gi- ^on
W. but
(sed, autem); (not
so often
'
used as in
English).
^on-kyan
but, yet, notwithstanding
Dzl. and elsewh
, frq.
in B.
;
rarely
^on-yan
for it
Mil.',
it stands at the be-
ginning
of
sentences,
but is also
preceded
by
a
gerund
with
-kyi,
in which case it is
almost
pleonastic;
Lexx.
give
^rnft
as the
""
(wi sub (a,j 2. - 4. to be suitable, prac-
ticable, to do, b3tdn-pa fCifl-la 'tOll-pa m!lu
vii .,Qlis-pus Glr. as two PIOCCC(ltOfll for one
doctrine will Dol do; f/ul-du MfJ-pa tni .,01;.
bWl Glr. llS a journey home is not practi-
cable; ",Q-!JQ,i-7iog \". ",0; ltis-la o4-bai bdr-
du as long as he was fit for work j to go on
well, to do well C.• ·da ydil-Jiu· JI'. will it do
DOW'? - 5. when connected with verbs, it
serves to indicate futurity, like the English
llwliarics sllall and will, as becomes evident
from such expressions us the following: )!{-
baumllywi ca med Mil. when driug comes,
i.e. when we alJaH <lie, is uncertlliu; mdog
09yur - ba .,oli Gil', a ch&Jlge of eolour is
coming, i.e. the COIOllf will, or is going to,
change; o!J'rd-ba mi Y()Jj-bar oduy Mil. 1 am
not likely (dug-pa, 4) to go there any more;
-(tl-ee 'lIIi !lO"· W. he will nut be put to
sbume, not be disappointed; nlso willi the
supine: 31'0f! dali bral-bal' o!I!lul'-d" D::l.
it will even come to his dying, it will be
his death; zds-su D::i. he will ewm get
so fur ns to ent ... ; 3i-ba,. he will die;
still more free and popular are those lurns,
in which the gerund or the more root is
used: )'7lali-ste !'th. he will assent to
it, nnow it; rag min kyail rCig.yin--te
Gfr'. if it is not the one, it will he the other;
sleb yoil he will come jIil. and in C. very
common; yid-lh 1lli ..Q,j they wiU not be-
lieve it; it is also useu to express tile I,assive
\'oice, nnd the English to become, to grow,
10 get: "h-na ,ia {sod Gi,.. as I
should be killed, if she heard of it; ·Zt,. yo"'-
C. so it is said, expressed, i.e. this is the
IlSUn! way of expressing it; ·pH-lt yo,i· W.
it is getting larger, increases; orwith a noun:
8ll1in ..Oil GIl'. it is growing ripe; rgydl-po
obatis-su..oiulfa. the king become.. a subject
a;E:.';fr...r lA. fOI' ..dl-mo.
?iR: ..00, light, shine., brightness, 8ar flames
up, shines, oprospreads, proceeds from ;
to emil light, bJ.ye-ba to spread
Sch.; ..ad Ulam-mer 7Ildzdd-pa resp., to dline
willI fl bright light Sel, ; ..00 !'eilS-pa ulled
with light &h.; lu.-fa ydd-pa self-lumi-
nous, 1\ property of primeval man Gir.; nyi.
sun-liglll, zla· moon-ligllt, ..dd
(,11.; )'7Ialll- brightness of the
night-llea"ens, r.odiacnl.light (.'s. j '1141 - ..oJ
fire-shinew.; lustre, brightness, of polished
metal, ..00 byin-pa to elicit It gloss or lustre,
to give a bright polish Sclt.; metaphor. fair
conlplaion, external beauty, 'ad
Illite YOli· the splendour of the house in-
crensl'S, ·lmd ea durl declines, decal'S lV.;
.00 dali Wan-pa 11., I. luminous,
emitting light; 2.bright, polished. :1. light, ·da
'od-ran Ea yin- W. no\\' it will grow light.
,I. of a fine colour, of a blooming appearance
GIl'. 5. beautifUl, splendid, stately;
vulgo .od-med_!'un, the contl'UJ·Y.
Compo or sJ.:or l\ luminous circle
Lu. - ..ar 1. white light. '2. symb.
num.: 1. - .. v. 8bo\·e. -
mM, "I'f1l''/ff1f, nlso $na,i-ba -m(a.yds the
fourth Dhyani.Buddha, Y. $a';3· 'rgyii$. -
.6d-$Pro (or op,.ol) light? - 11'.,
·Qd..!O tOf!· IlOld up the light! -6d·to bu·
glow-worm, fire-fly; sometimesoe-
curring in the names of gods. -
my of light Dzl. and dsewh. frq.; ..od-y::ir-
can n. of n god, ..od-ydr_ran_'ma of a god-
- ..od·3rilli n. p. I. the humall Bud·
dlla of the preceding period of the world.
2. a king of Tibet, son of Langdnrma. -
..oJ-ya& J. a bright light or gloss, ..od-rsril
mdail. dmi hldn-pa very glossy, of leaves.
'2. com. of the supernatural eolightening of
the saints, ,ia.t-nas y::igs_le Mil.
koo".. iog, beholding, b)' means of prophetic
light.
:...6d-ma cane, bamboo, ..dd-ma (sal,
cane-grove; sucb a gro,·e
neur HlJjagriha was n fU"ourite retreat of
Buddha.
. ..om IV. but (sed, autetn); (not so oflen
used as in Englisll).
but, yet,
DzL nnd e1sewh, frq. III n.; rnrely
..oll-ya>i for it Mil.; it stands aT"the be-
ginning of sentences, but is also preceded
by lI. gerund with -kyi, in wluch ca.se it is
almost pleona.stic; LuoX. giye ns the
603
Ssk. word for
it,
which however seems not
to
agree
with its use.
t L<:r.
,0*
1. v. the
following.
2. v.
^
j'l/i-tc
B. and (.'. or if
not,
or
else,
or
also,
in
double-questions
after the ter-
mination am of the first
question.
ri'
^dn-pa
I.
deaf,
also to be
deaf; <dn-
pa-pa, ^6n-pa-po, ^.dn-po
a deaf
man,
^dn-pa-mo, ^on-mo
a deaf woman Cs.
; ^on-
lo/'t deaf and blind. 2. to
give,
to
bring,
chiefly
as
imp.
<6n-cig
Dzl.
^on-scii,
with
byed-pa,
to
pay
atten-
tion,
to watch,
to
spy
Sch.
^ob
1. also
ipbs ditch, trench, pit Dzl.',
me-^6b fiery pit;
also
fig.:
the
fire-pool
of
passions.
2. v.
yob.
^dm-bu
1.
tamarisk, Myricaria
Med.
not
unfrequent
near the rivers of Ti-
bet. 2. Sch. : 'a
town,
settlement'
(?).
qr;
f
or 1.
dropsy,
viz the
species anasarca,
nif.,
pdgs-cu;
dbu-^or
prob.
id. Med.
-
2.
eddy, whirlpool
Sch.
^r-ba
1. to
put
or
lay
down Cs.
-
2. to
feed,
e.
g.
a little child W.
,oZclover, trefoil,
viz.
snail-clover, medic,
(Medicago);
^ol-fdn
a
plain
covered
with such
clover; *'ol-kyoy*
W. snail.
ol-mdud v.
}
ol-mdud.
-.
pa
vulture
&/*.(?)
^61-spyi
in a
general way, generally
speaking, about,
,^--s/ >//'/'
id. Sch.
; +61-
spyi
ts<hn-<ltt dm
inuydm-mo they
are about
contemporaries
Tar.
^dl-ba
black horse
Mil,
Ld.-Glr.
(Ts.
^dl-mo
Ld. *oh-moP besom, broom,
brush,
stag-^l
birch-broom, zed-^dl
hair-broom 6s.
g^j.jjr^.
^ol-mo-se
Wdn. an officinal
plant;
Cs.:
^ol-ma-sa
1. a certain small
berry.
2. a small
weight'.
suitable;
becoming, appropriate,
with
tcnnin.
inf.,
in later times and
vulgo,
with
the
root,
sbyin-par
f
os it is
becoming,
it i-
meet to
give; O
di
yzigs-par
mi
,o
it is not
decent to see
this;
*ka-lon cd-ce 'oa* W. he
is
worthy
to be a
vizier;
*i'-8am la tan mi
'os* W. he is not worth such
high wages;
*la ndn-te tan 'os* W. he deserves extra-
pay; yid-smdn ^os
to be
wished, desirable;
pyag by
a
-
bar
^s -par <gyur
he becomes
adorable; stdd-^os
to be
praised,
laudable;
bkur-^os
deserving
honour
6's.;
fams-cdd-la
pog-^os-pai cdd-pa
the
punishment condign
to all
;
rarely
with
genit.
:
kun-gyis
bkvr-zin
mcdd-pai ^os
Mil. he is
deserving
of uni-
versal honour and
respect,
and even :
rjei
^os
min he was not worth to be a
king,
for
which more
frq.
the terniin. is used
:/)-
mor
^ds-pa zig
Glr. the one that is the most
deserving
of
being mistress,
i.e. she that
has the
genteelest appearance,
that is most
of a
gentlewoman; grogs-su ^ds-pa
he is
worthy
to be his
colleague,
nif. Mil. 2.
more
particularly
in
colloquial language:
right,
W.
*ds-can, o-tian*;
with a
negative
*mi-ds-pa,os-med,os-min*
W.,
*mi-o-pa*
etc.
C.
wrong (for
the
rigs-pa
and
mi-rigs-i>u
of earlier
lit.);
mi
^.ds-pai
spyod-pa byed-pa
Glr. to entertain illicit
intercourse;
rdzas
^ds-pa
a
lawful,
mi
^ds-pa
an unlawful
matter
Schr.;
*<i-min-ghi
i
im-gdl*
C. a
wrong,
immoral
act,
sinful
transgression;
*'os mi-
6s
face*
W. to discern between
right
and
wrong;
with
regard
to a man's
words,
cre-
dible, trustworthy,
or the
contrary.
--
Sch.
has besides:
<os
ci
yod,
'what other means
or
way
is there?' and:
^os spyi-ba
'to finish
(a thing)
for the most
part
;
to be
good
or
tolerably good'(??).
&I.', word for ir., wLLich h()wuu IIOL
to agree witil UW.
f.('1?:" ..O,..tll;' - {,tor.
.0'1-11 lJ. Illid C. or if nat, DI' else, or
J also. tI,eter-
miollliou (1m of the question.
.oo-pa 1. deal, «1-.0 to be deal; ..on-
..6n-pa-po, ..tin-Jlo a delle IDIlU,
..1It1-1XNHO, ..o,,--mo • deaf woman w.; .&11-
lOti dellf alld blind. - t. to give, to bring,
cbien)' as imp...oo-hg JJ:I.
..o_li, ,,·jtb 6yid-p", to pay atten·
;"l tion. to watch. to spy &h.
f{::r JJb 1. abo J>I.- ditch, tnnc:h. pit D:l.;
,,*..60 fiery pit; .lso fig.: tbe Gre-pool
of jJ&SSKms. - 2. v. yoh.
,d",,-tm 1. tamarisk,. M}'riCllria Moo.
bot nnfrequcnllletll tbe rivers aCTi-
beL - 2. I,.:" town, Hltlement'(?).
ai,' ..flI I. dropsy, vilt \he speciell anasarca,
"'\ nif., _ du-p !lrob. id. Mtd.
- 2. "ely, whirlpool &/1.
/Jt'-lxJ 1. to put or lay down u. -
2. to feecl, e g. Il. little ehild W:
Cl{..f .oJtloyer, trefoil, medic.,
(Medicago); 401-(d" .. plam covered
.... itl. sDcli clover; "ol-iyo1' w: snail.
fl/-md.d \.. 'o/·n/dud.

"dl-pa vulture &/..(?)
'f..r
u
in I general way, generally
S id. &1/.; 4M-
'J'yi ,.';1/1-4[" dIU nmydm-mo the)' arc about
contem]>oraries Tar.
horse MiL, l.d.-Glr. ('1".

Af...j·5f I,d. -o,j·"wr besom, broom,
brush, .t(JfJ-..o1 bir<'lL-broom, :«1-
hair-broom (....
af...j·Gfil· 4 01•1Iu.Ht! Wd,t. un offitinal!,lnlll;
Gi.: ..a 1. n cer\.lliu small
berry. - smnl! weight'.
4011 I. v. tile following. - 2. v. 4(Ni,
4tt.-pa I. vb, and adj. 10 be wortny,
suitable; Heoming, lpprClpriale, widl
lermin. inf., in lAter limell and vulj{o, with
tbe root, w1/(n-par it i becoming, it ill
meet to give; .di r::ig.-par mi 4011 it not
deant to see this; °!a·ldn ld-et '0.. IV. lie
is .....ortl.)' to be a Yixier; ·j.·.um la tali rr&i
'0.. IV. he is not worth 'Dch higb wages;
·Uo rufn-u tali '0.. IV. be deseneli u:ua-
pay; yid.-wJn to be wished, dt1'irable;
F!J09 bya - bar 41lll - par .9Y"r he become$
lLdo",blej to be laadable;
blilr-..t» deserving honour U.j
#!r 'bid-po the puni!hment condign
to all; with geniL.: ftn-gyi. bair-:ili
MldJ-pai MI1. he is deserving of uni-
versal houour tuld lU"pect, and even: f'jt:t.
Wli,. he was not worth to be a kiog, for
which more frq. the \ermin is used: rt,o.-
_ GI,.. the one that is the mO<lt
descn-ing of being i. e. she tbat
hail the genteelest llppell.r.tGCe, that is 1ll0000t
of ll. gentle,,'olDlU1; grdyJ-ftl 4tt.-pa he iii
.....·orthy hi be bis colleague, ni r. MiL - 2.
more IlllrtiCUlllrlJ ill colloquial. lauguage:
right. II: ,';.,um.j ...... ith A oepti\'e
·mi.....pa,6I-'Iftid,ot-mill· 11'., ·mt-rpa·etc,
C, "'roog (for the rig"rHl and 7tli-rigt-pu
of earlier lit.)j 'IIi .]¥Xl-pa bytd-]Hl
GI,.. to enl.ert:tin illicit inlcrooUr;l6; rd::a.
a. lawful, mi an unlawful
wallcr &hr.j • ( i"i-gdl"<..: a wrong,
intmoral ::\Ct, O'Qt "'t-
o. i'-ct· 11': to discern belween right and
WI'Ol1g; witl. rl'gll.nlto a lnan'S ... cre·
dible, trustworthy, or the I;onlrary. - &/1.
has besides: Ci yod, ',.,'llIIt olher mealls
or way is there?' Itud: 'I'!Ii-ba 'to finish
(It tiling) for thl'. most parl; to be good or
tolerably good'(??).
of
504
ya-ma-zun
yj
7/a
1. the consonant
y, pronounced
like
the
English
initial
y,
in
yard, yoke etc.,
in C.
deep-toned; yd-btags, yd-ta
Glr. the
subscribed
y
or ^. 2. num.
fig.
: 24.
yt-
ya
I. often with
^ci^,
one of two
things
that
belong together
as
being
of one
kind,
or
forming
a
pair,
also one of two
opponents; mig ya-ycig
loh-ba Pth. blind
of one
eye
;
lham
ya-ycig
Glr. one of a
pair
of
boots,
an odd
boot; lag -pa ya-ycig-tu
yser fogs, lag-pa ya-ycig-tu
bu-mo Krid-de
Dzl. in one hand
holding
the
gold,
with the
other
leading
his
daughter; stoh-pa danysdl-
ba
ynyis ya
ma brdl-bar
Thgr.
the
empty
and the clear
(emptiness
and
clearness) being
inseparable
from each
other; ya-gydl
one
of
several, e.g.
of three
things Gram.;
of
six Lex.
; *yd-do*
in W. the common word
for
grogs
or zld-bo
associate, companion,
as-
sistant, *yd-do
co-ce* to
assist; *nyl-ka ya
yo'*
C.
they
are
equal
to each
other,
a
match,
one as
good
as the
other,
*K6-la
ya me',
or Ko
yajh/-Ken
mi
dug*
C. he finds none
that is a match to
him,
*di le-ke
ya
ne mi
tub* C. I am not
equal
to the
task;
Kaiya
v.
Kd-ya; ya-med
=
do-me'd; O fdb-ya
ad-
versary, antagonist; ya-zdr one-eyed; ya-
ma-zun and
ya-md-brla, ya-ya
v. below.
II. root
signifying
above,
up
etc.
(opp.
to
ma),
cf.
gon; adj. yd-gi (also yd-ki Mil.),
pu yd
-
gi
the
upper
or
highest part
of a
valley Glr.,
ri-bo
yd-gi
the hill
up yonder
Mil.;
yd-gi upper
=
heavenly Mil.,
opp.
to
md-gi; yar andyas
v. the
respective
articles
;
the
word, otherwise,
occurs
only
in com-
pounds: yd-rkan palate; ya-gdd (for s/cad)
ladder
Sch.;ya-gon above,
over
Sch.;ya-mgdl,
ya-mcu,ya-fem, ya-fog, ya-rdbs, ya-re, ya-so
v.
mgal etc.; ya-mfd
the
upper
end,
i.e.
the
beginning
e.
g.
of a
word,
opp.
to ma-
mfa the end
Cs.; yd-sa esteem, honour, love,
shown to a
person
W.
(=
ze-sa
B., C.), *y
ri-
se
spe-ra* expressions
of
respect; *yd-se pi-
la zer-na*
if one
speaks respectfully ; ya-
sa-med-Kan
uncivil, regardless, reckless,
un-
feeling; *yd-sa
co-ce* to show
love,
regard,
to treat with
tenderness,
to
fondle,
a
child,
animal
etc., opp.
to
md-sa,
which however
is less in use.
y<*-tf
a mutual
revilings
Ma : ma smdd-
la
yah yd-Ka sgrags
mother and chil-
dren abuse one another. Cs. :
yd-ga
bad
reputation (?).
yq-na(-ba)
C. also
*yd-na-bo*
(prob.
for
yyandn-pa)
shuddering,
fright, anguish,
with
genit.
or accus. of that
which is the cause of it Do.
;
yd-na-bai dmag-
fsogs
Mil. a formidable
host; yd-nai gegs
terrible
danger
Pth.
'
yd-ta
v. letter
ya.
yt?
y
a
-
tra
(procession
and
ra^
feast,
in honour of some
idol)
W. :
festivity, reveling,
in beer with
dumplings
and
pastry,
held in autumn or
winter,
in
memory
and for the benefit of
the souls of those that died
during
the last
year.
y^'^T
yd-do
v.
ya
I.
^'
yd-po
butcher;
executioner Schr.
*^"
yd-ba prob.
=
yya-ba.
Mil. ?
q'rrjM^" ya-ba-ksa-ra
Ssk.
saltpetre
Med.
yd-ma
1. the
temples.
2. a severe
cold,
catarrh. Med.
; *yd-ma rag*
W.
I have a bad cold. 3. n. of a
goddess,
=
brtdn-ma.
.
ya-ma-zun unsymmetrical,
incon-
gruous,
not
fitting together, e.g.
two
unequal shoes;
of
religions, languages,
'!JfJ I. the consonnnt y, prollouncC(llike
tho EIlglisn initial y, in yard, yoke etc.,
in C. deep.toneJ; y4.lJtags, yU-ta Glr. tne
subscribed y - 2. num. fig.; 24.
ya 1. often with reig, one of two things
thaL belong together as bcing of one
kind, or forming a pair, also one of two
opponents; mig ya-yNy Mil-ba Pth. blind
of one eye; UUlm ya-l'i:lf/ GIl'. one of a pair
of boots, an odd boot; lay-pa ya-rNg-tu
I'M!/' fogs, lug-pa ya-rNg-tu z,u·mo fdd-Je
Dz!. in one hand holding the g'old, with tne
otherleading his daughter; stOli-pa danl'sul-
ba l'nyis ya 1IIa lwul-bar Tllgl·. the empty
and the clear (emptiness and clearness) being
inseparable from each other; ya-gydl one
of several, e.g. of three thingll Gram.; of
lix L8Ji ; ·yd-Jo· in W. tile common word
for f/MgI or ::ld-bo associate, companion, as-
sistant, ·yd-Jo Cd-u· w assist; *nyl-ka ya
yg'·C. they are equal to each other, l\ mutch,
one as good lIS the other, ·'M-la !la nll',
or l.'f! ya)M-Jt!n mi dug" C. he finds none
that is a match to him, *di U-l.t va iii 1Ili
tub· C. I am DOt equal to the task; lla; ya
v. A'd-!la; ya-mid = do-midj ",(db-!la ad-
vCJiiary, antagonist; ya-zdr one-eyed; ya-
ma-::Illi and ya-ma-brla, ya-ya v. below. -
II. root signifying above, up etc. (opp.
to ma), d. gon; adj. ydili (also yu.Jd Mil.),
flu ya. gi the upper 01' highest part of a
valley Gir., rl-bo yd-gi the hill up yondcr
Mil.; yd-gi upper _ heavenly Mil., opp. to
md-gi;yal' nndy," v. the respective articles;
the word, otherwise, occurs only in com-
pounds: yd--rkan palate; ya-ydd (for d'ad)
ladder Sch.;ya-y&iI above, over Sch.;ya-mgid,
ya-rll'tU,ya-thn, ya-(6g, ya-ralA, ya-re, ya-s6
Y. myal etc.; ya-tnfd tbe upper end, i. e.
the beginning e. g. of a word, opp. to 1IIa-
m(a the end Q.; .yd.s(l. esteem, honour, love,
shown to a person W: (_ te·sa B; G')l·ya-
Sf: spl-ra· expressions of respect; ·yd-st: Pi-
la zit·-na· if one speaks respectfully; YII_
sa-mM-Ran uncivil, regardless, reckless, un-
feeling; ·yd-Ja ?:doc? to show love, regard,
to treat with tendernClis, to fondle, a child,
animal etc., opp. to md-.ia, which however
is less in use.
'-'ff!' yd-Ca mutual revilings Ma.; ma smdd-
la !Jail yd-I.'a s:J1'<lfJS mother und chil-
dren abuse one another. Cs.: yu-ga bud
reputation (?).
ya-gydl v. ya 1.
yd-lia(-ba) C. nlso ·yd-lia-bo*
(prob. for r!Ja ndn-pt!) shuddering,
fright, anguish, with geniI. or accus. of that
which is the cause of itDo.; yd-,ia-bai dmug-
(sd[p Mil. n fonuidnule host; yd-liai
terrible danger Plh.
yd-II./. v. letter ya.
prop. 04'.... ya (procession and
feast, iD IJonour of SOlUe
idol) IV.: festivity, reveling, in !Mer witIJ
dUlllplings und pastry, held in nutumn or
winter, in memol'y und for the benefit of
the souls of those that died during the last
year.
yd-dQ v.!Ja 1.
04"'fyd-po butcher; execulioner Scill'.
yd-ba prob. = rya-IJu. - ;\Iii. 'I
ya-ba-kJii-l·(I. &1:. saltpetre Aled.
-A
'"
t.l.!'·,;:r yd-mu 1. the temples. - 2. a severe
cold, catarrh. Med.; ·!la-ma mg· W.
I huve a had cold. - 3. n. of a goddess,
- l".tdn-1IIa.
ya_lIIa_zu,i unsymmetrical, incon-
gruous, not fitting together, e. g.
two unequal of religions, Innguages,
o
customs,
that have
sprung
from
heteroge-
neous
elements;
of behaviour:
inconsistent;
unheard of,
prodigious,
<V
//W// magic
feats
Tur.
yflMwa-Wo, "yo-JikWa*,
U:
ya-
ma-la-po,
Ts.:
*i/u-nni-l<'n-te*,
/./>.:
=
8ttytn-po~med-pat mi-bden-pa
vain,
unstable,
fickle, not to be trusted or
depended
upon.
yd-mfsan
1.
wonder, miracle,
super-
natural occurrence,
adopted
also as
the term for the miracles of
Scripture
('hi-.
I
'rot.;
ltds-sam
yd-mfsan
ii.
Itynii
J):l. what
signs
and wonders have
happened? yd-
infsan-du
^yyiir-ba
Dzl. to
happen,
to come
to
pass
in a marvelous
manner; yd-mfsan-
ste l*th.
being
a wonderful
man;
Kyod-la
O
di-tsam
riy-pa-med-pani yd-mfsan-ceo
that
you
are so
ignorant
is
very strange (wonder-
ful);
*yd-fsem-po*
C.
marvelous, miraculous;
yd-fsam-can
\d.Schr. 2.
wonder,
astonish-
ment,
amazement,
t'</ydl-po yd-mfoan
cen-po
skyh-te
Tar the
king greatly wondering;
*ydm-fsan fsur-ce,
co-ce* W. to
wonder;
yd-
mtsan-yyi ynds-so
Tar. it is a
thing
to be
wondered
at;
de-tsam
yd^mfsan-ryyu
med
Mil. that is not so
very astonishing.
yd-ya
1. (.'s.:
differing, diverse,
yd-ya-
ba
diversity; yd-ya-bor yyur-ba
Sch.:
a
subject
of
dispute, contrariety
of
opinion.
-
2.
yyd-ya.
ya-y6 crooked, wry,
col. 6s.
yu-lad
corselet and
helmet, mail,
ar-
mour,
yser-yyi
of
gold;
also
fig.
B.
'
yd-ka
v.
ya
II.
ya-hu-dd Judah,
ya-hu-dd-pa jew
Mr. Prot.
"
y^-ho-u-n
Jehovah C/u: I'mi.
ydy-pa
a small
mattock,
hoe,
cdy-yay
iron
hoe,
bin-yog
wooden hoe Ts.
yfy-P> P
rov- also
J
a
9-P>
seldom
in
B.,
but otherwise common in C.
and W.
good,
in all its
significations,
both
as to men and
things,
=
bzdh-po;
*
del
pi-
la di
ydy-po*
W. for that
purpose
this is
good, fit, serviceable;
*yug-^o }h-pa*
6'.,
505
*cd-&?*
W.,
c. c. /. to
caress,
to
flirt,
also
in ;ui
obscene
sense; ydy-po ydy-po well,
well!
,//
1.
(accented), again,
once
more;
likewise, also, further, frq.. //a// yah
Mil.,
yaii
</(th
ydh-du Tar., ydh-nas ydh-du
Dzl.
again
and
again; joined
to
adj.
and adv.
denoting
a
higher degree,
still:
y<tii
cuh Mil.
still
smaller, O
di
ci-yah-las yah dyd-ba big
byuh
Mil. that was still more
pleasing
than
any thing
before; yah syos
Mil. still more
in
detail; *ydh-hon-zay*
W. the third
day
before
yesterday.
2.
(unaccented,
throw-
ing
the accent back on the
preceding word),
after the final letters
g, d, b, s, gen. kyah,
after vowels often
,a/i, also, too,
the Latin
quoque,
na
yah, bdag kyan
I
too;
bu ce-ba
yah
Dzl.
my
eldest
boy
too
;
bsod-nams dan
yaii Iddn-pa
Dzl.
having
also
merit; yah
yah
,
both and
; O
di
yah
de
yah
both this and
that,
pyi-rol yah
nah
yah
both outside and
inside;
followed
by
a ne-
gative,
neither
nor; yah singly,
with a ne-
gative:
not
even, kar-sd-pa-ni ycig kyah
mi
sbyin-no
Dzl. I shall not even
give
a
cowry
for
it; yah
with a
comparative (as
above) Still,
shdr-bas
kyah Ihdy-par
still
more than
formerly;
as effect of a
preced-
ing cause,
SO
then, kyeu
de
yah
fse
O
das-so
Dzl. so then the
boy died,
bsdd-pa yah
graiis-med-do
Dzl. so then there were
people
killed without
number;
emphat.,
even,
rlh-
por
ma
Ion-par
smra
yah
ses-so Dzl. within
a short time he was even able to
speak;
sha-cdd
kyah
Dzl. even before
this;
kar-
sd-pa-ni O
burn
yah
even so much as a
hundred thousand cowries
(i
would
give);
also
joined
to a verbal root: fams-cad
O
dus
/y/rt/ieven
if all without
exception
be
gather-
ed
; although,
btsal
kyah
nut
rnyed
although
they
were
seeking, they
did not
find, or,
they
were
seeking
indeed,
but did not find
;
this latter turn is
frequently used,
where
we use
but, yet,
nevertheless etc.
'
yah-skydr
1. sbst.
postscript.
Cs.
-
2. adv.
again,
afresh, anew C.
yuh-ye
v.
ydii-po.
")5
CUSt.oID8, that 11I\\,(I sprung from hcteroge-
noou!! elements; of hell/wiaul': inconsistent;
IInheard of, prodigious, w.oprlilmagic fcnt6
Tur.
!/(I.ma.bdll, *!jfl-Jllll.lu*, 0: !Ja.
r:.:- mil-fa-po, 1.. : *flil-J/la-lm.te-,
Lu.: - .1IyiJi-po·/Ile(]-PIl, mi.lxUn-pa vain,
unstable, fickle, not to be trusted or depended
upon.
va-mtS/1Il 1. wonder, miracle. super-
natural occurrence, nd0l'tcu nlso M
the term for the mifllclcs of Scripture Cllr.
Prof.; lttis-Mllt yd-mfsatl ,i b!Jwi LJzL whnt
signs nlld wonders Imve 1H\llllClIcd? yd-
m(aim-du o!l!Jur-ba D::l. to happen, to colne
to pass in n nlll.f,'clolls manner; lId-'lIl(S/I.1I-
lIe Ptk being a wonderflll lUau; I?!JOd-w.
odi-/,$a/ll J;y-pa"lIIld-.palli yu-m(s(lli. '(/'0
YOU lI.reso ignorant is \'cry strnnge (wonder.
ful); *!Ju.(-rlll.po* r..:.marvelons, miraculous;
id. Sclll', - 2. wonder, astonish-
ment, amazement, rV!JJ.l-po ebl-po
slqJh-tt Tar tbe king gl'eatly wondcring;
·ydm-(sall (Wi"i:c, M-U* IV. to wonder; yd-
]'IUU-30 Tal', it is " thing to be
woudered at; di-ttJam !Jd-m(sUlH'[JYU mffl
Mil. that is not so \'ery astonishing.
<J{':J,j' yd-ya 1, (.:.,: differing, diverse, ya-ya-
ba diversity; yJ.-yu-001' !J!J.ir-ba Sell.:
a subject of displ1tc, contmriety of opinion.
- 2, fyd-ya,
t.\i·af !Ju-yd crooked, wry, 001, fA,
ya-lad corselet and helmet, mail, ar·
mour, rtll'-yyi of gold; also fig. lJ.
yd.Ja v. ya II.
ya-llU..M JUdah, Yll-ku-da-pa jew
-""r.; Cltl'. ltot.
ya'/w-ICJ Jehovah CllI'. Prot,
o
yJ.g_pa a small mallock, hoe, My-yuy
iron hoe, ii"-vag wooden hoe 1•.
yag-po, prov, also Jug-po, seldom
in n" bl1t otbel'\\isc common in C.
and W. good, in ull its significations, both
1\8 to men and things, - lIza"'-po; "iki pl'_
fa di ydy-po" W. for that purpose til is ill
goo<1, fit, sel'viceablc; "yr;rrpo )h!-pa" C.,
tI
"i:&-le" W:, c. c. la, to caress, to flirt, "Iso
ill an obscene .'Idy-po yuy-pD wtll,
well!
t.\jl:;' yal' 1. (l'Cccutcd), again, once more;
likewise, also, further, frq.,!jwi yali Mil"
!JaI' dan YUli.du Tar., !jan-nus ya,i-du Dzl.
again and again; joioed to adj. and adv.
denoting a highcr degree, still: yUH blh Mil.
still smaller, "di li_y,ui_lll. !filii d!Ja-ba
bVUli Mil. thnt WIlS still morc pleasing than
UDy thing before; !fu,i 'yOfJ Mil, still more
in dctail; ·1/aii-wm-za!l W: the tlJird day
before yesterday. - 2. (un:l.ccented, throw-
ing the accent back on preceding word),
after the final lettel'1l g, d, b, s, J.yu,i,
after vowels often _an, also, too, the Latin
quoque, ,ia !J'Ui, lx/au k1/u,j I too; bu U·bu
!la,j Dd. my eldest boy 100; bsQd..na"", dun.
yail. Man-pa Dz/. having also mcrit; !J'l,j -
!fuii -, both - and -; o,/i yan - dt yllli
bOlh this and that, P1Ji-rol yuh 1/llIj
botll ouL,;ide aml inside; followed by a ne-
gative, - nor; 1/wi singly, with a ne-
gative: not rei!J kyul'
1/Ii sbyin.lIo D=l. I :.hull not e\'eu give a
cow!'y for it; ywj with a coml'tt.rative (as
above) still, sildr-bcu k1/un fMy-par still
JUore than formerly; I\S effect of l\ preced-
ing cause, so l:!Jeu de !Ian (u "din-3/)
D:l. so then the boy died, wdd - pa yan.
gra,iHlltd-do Dzl, so tbcD tlJere wcre people
killed witLout number; clllphal, even, ,'if,·
pol' lila 161l-par sml'a yun ih-w D:::l. with-iu
a short time he \\'I\S e\'ell able w speak;
siill-Md kyan Dzl, e\'en before this; Iml'-
'J. -pa -1/i obI/III !la,j even so much IlS a
hundred thousand cowries (I would gire);
also joined to a verbal root: (allls-i:ad odu.
I.?/w' even if all without exception be gather-
ed; although, bual I.·yuh tll4 '''lytd alt.hough
they were seeking, they did llot find, or,
they were seeking indeed, but did DOt find;
this latter tUTU is frequeut.ly used. where
we usc but, yet, etc.
yan-dyur 1. postscript.
:;::I _ 2. adI'. agam, afresh, anew r.,:
,
yuu-ge v, !Ju".po,
506
f/an-sgos
ydn-sgos
v.
yah
1.
yaw-ear
Shot, and
ya
v.
ydii-po.
ydn- jug
the second of two final
letters,
viz. s after
g, n, b,
m.
ydn-tri, ydh-gi-Ua (spell-
ing uncertain),
is said to
be the n. of a
green stone,
which is worked
into handles of knives etc. W.
U^'^TTO"
ydn-dag-pa
v.
ddg-pa.
y,
. _.
ydn-na or,
in
5.,
com.
pleon.
after the
'
affixed am
(gam,
nam
etc.),
which
in itself
already expresses
the
or;
it is also
preceded by
dan; further, Thgy.;
either
-
or
, yan-na (ni) yan-na (ni)
.
^'
ydn-sprul
v.
sprul-pa.
ydn-po
6s., *ydn-mo*
C. and
W.*ydn-
ghe*
Ts.
adj., ydn-ba adj.
and
sbst.,
light, lightness, opp.
to
Ici-ba, q. cf.;
fig.
Qjam-zin ydn-ba
what is soft and
light,
com-
modious and
easy
DzL;
of food cf. Ici-ba II.
;
weak,
*de san
ydn-mo yin*
W. this is a
weaker,
less
emphatic,
word than
that;
*no
ydn-mo* 6'.,
W.
cheerful,
happy.
ydn-ma early barley,
v. nas I.
Sch.
~
mes
~P 9
rea^
grandfather,
ydn-mes-mo great-grandmother
ydn-rtsal very high skill,
consum-
mate art Mil.
y
an
~
rtse *ne
highest Pi
n
t, summit, fig.
the
height
of
perfection.
ydn-fsa great-grandson
Sch.
'x?
ydn-raW. buck, ram, he-goat, =pd-ra.
,"f^|"
ydt'i'la prob.
=
ydn-na S.g.
ydn-sos
n. of a hell
Thgy.
y<*>ns-pa
1. also
-po, wide, broad,
large, fan, sa-yzi
a
large
or wide
field,
plain Glr.; yans-sin rgya-ce-ba large
and
spacious,
of a house
S.O.; *gu-sa (or
ydn-pa
ne-sa) yan-pa dug*
W. here is much
room;
fig. *mig-ydn*
6'.,
W.
liberal,
generous,
boun-
teous; *yan-med-la, yan-ydn-pa-la*
W.
sudden, unexpected,
unawares;
*
yan -lug
co-ce* W. to
hang
or throw a coat
over,
without
getting
into the
sleeves; yan-sam
byed-pa
id., Sch.;
*yan-lilub*
6'.,
W.
wide,
of clothes. 2. v.
yyen-ba.
x'
ydns-pa-can,
Ssk.
%^TT5ft,
DzL
'
and
elsewh.,
city
in ancient
India,
now Allahabad.
yan ( ya
II
,
opp.
to man III
q. v.)
what is
uppermost, man-yan
below and
above
6s.; ydn-na
6s.:
above,
in the
begin-
ning,
in the first
part; gen. yan
stands as
adv. or
postp.
with
accus.,
=
ydn-la, yan-
cdd(-la), yan-cod(-ld), above,
in the
upper
part,
lte-ba
yan
sten-la
yod-de
Glr. lit. above
the navel
standing
out of
(the water),
i.e.
standing
in
(the water) up
to the
navel;
sta-zur
yan-cdd
DzL above the
hips;
lo-
brgycid yan-cdd
Pth. above
eight years
old;
otherwise when
referring
to
time, always
till,
to
;
often
preceded by nas,
from . . .
forth,
Glr.
'
yan-ljitl
dulcimer,
musical instru-
ment in Ts.
ydn-pa adj.,
free, vacant,
unoccupied,
having
no
owner,
of
places
and
things
that are common
property,
like the
air,
rocks
and stones etc.
; Kyi ydn-pa
a
dog
without
a
master, vagrant dog; gral yan
-la
yod
there are
yet places unoccupied;
of fields:
unfilled, fallow-ground; yan Kydr-la
ma
ca,
v.
Jcydr-ba; ydn-gar-ba separate, apart, by
itself
Lis., rgyal-rigs ydn-gar-ba zig
a se-
parate dynasty,
a
dynasty
of its own
; ydn-
gar-du
id,
adv. Was.
(281); rgya-ydn
the
external
world, rgya-ydn(-gyi) ynyen-pa
Glr. a
helper
from the external world
;
sems
rgya-ydn-du
ma sor-bar
byos
take care that
the mind be not distracted
by
outward
things; *yan
ca-ce* W. to
disperse, *lug,
nor
fsan-ma, sam-pa yan
son*
W.,
the
sheep
have
dispersed (or
a
sheep
has
strayed),
the fortune is
gone,
the
thoughts
are
lost,
wandering; ydn-du jug-pa
to suffer
(the
sheep)
to
disperse
on the
pasture
;
nad
yan-
ydii-.got \'. yail 1.
ydA-/ur Wwt. and &lrr.
"ICt yaH-JCI ". ""'-po.
tJ,(.::'c:.=.:rr ydit-Jug the second of IwO fiolll
....... Ietten!:, 'l"iz•• after g, 10, b, fit.
u.,'t:;V
mg uncertain). IS saId to
be dIe D. nf Ii green stODe, which is worked
into hlUldles of etc. W
ydil-dlJg-pa v. ddy-pa.
!Jdri.71a or, in lJ., com. ploon.aft.er
affixed um (gum, num etc.), which
ill itself alrendy upresses tIle or; it is nlso
preceded by dail; further, 'l'hg!J.; either-
or -, ya,;-nu (ni) - lIUJ;-na (m)-.
yM-aprul v. sprlil-pa.
ydri-]XJ Ca., -yan-foo- G: and 1V. -!ldil-
gM' T•. adj., yali.-ba ndj. and sbst.,
light. lightness, opp. to ll:i-ba, q. d'. j - fig.
Jam-Zili yuli-ba 'III·lIat is soft and light, com-
modious and ew;y frJ,.j offood cf.LH-ba 11.;
weak, -tk Mri yUri-mo yin- IV. this is a
"'caker, leg emphatic, word than thnt; -,,;0
ytbi...W- e, 1V. cheerful, happy.
yu,,-nw earty barley, .,. naI J.
ytiit-Jnn-pIJ great. grandfather,
yuoi-mn-MO great-grandmother
s".
t.\'I::gar ytiri-rt3Ql very high skill, cOl\$lJm-
mate art Mil.
ur-,',g- yd,;-rlM the highest summit, fig.
the height 01 perfection.
u..:rt:.'a;:' yuli-f.a great-grandson &/,.
ydJi-ra w: buck, ram,he·goal,_/JU_I'Il.
!lUI••la prob. ,., y'/Ii-na S.g.
yu,i__ n. of a. hell TI".!y.
ylhi',pa 1. also -pt), wide, broad.
large, fwi, 'll-yZi II. In.rge or wide
field, plaiD Glr.; yaM-lili luge
aDd spacious, of a bOll5e S.D.; -glt'M (or
7fi-.a) yali-pu dug- IV. here is mllt:h room;
fig. -mifJ-!Jd"- C., IV. liberal, generous. boun-
teous; -!Ju>i-tnid-la, ya,;-ydli-pa-la- Iv.
liUdden, une.s.pected, uDa"'uK; .yait -Iii!!
Cd-h- W. to lwtg or thro,,' Il COllt O\'er,
"'ithollt gelting iuto the s!OO\'es; yali-iulfi
byid-pu id., &J,.j -yaic-Mil"- C:, 11'. wide,
of clolha. - 2. Y. ryH.-bu..
ydic.-pa-<aN, D:L
nnd else",·b., city in -.ocient
India, DOW Allahabad.
ytlN (- ya 11, opp. to maN 111 q. y.)
what is uppermost, man-yan beklw aud
above u.; !Ian-nil ('.: above, in the begin-
ning, in the first pari; geu. !Jun stand! as
ad\". or \\;th nccus., - ydn--la, !JfJ.1l-
cM(-la), !Jun-COd(-Ia), above, in the upper
ltc-bu llanllbl-la yd<l·ik Gfr. lit. above
the D1wel staodiog out of (the water), i.e.
staotling in (the wat.er) up 1.0 tJle navel;
,Ia-zil,' !Jail-eM. D::l. lLoo\'e tbe bips; w-
br9yJd ytln-ood Ptl, . • bo,·(' eight yl!nr5 old;
otherwise wIlen refeniug to time, always
till, tOj often preceded 1Iy nfU, from ... forth,
Gir.
u..l.'t".£!I'"' !J"71-ljiJt dulcimer, luusie.1 iostru-
-,., --
::; ment in '1,.
ytiJl-PU adj., free. 'aeant, unoccupied.
tlaving no owner. of placl!S and things
thntlU'e common propc:rt)',like the air,roeh
IWd stones etc..; J!yi. ydn-pu a dOl; "'itbont
a. maSter, \'agrsot dog; gral yan -Ia yod
tbere are yet placel ullOttupied; of fields:
untilled, fallow-ground; !/Un tyd,..la mil i'll,
". j!yur-ba; ydn-gar-Jxa separate, apart, by
itself LiJ., rgyaI-ri!J' yd"'1Jar-oo ng n se-
parate dJnast)', a. dynasty of its own; '!JUII-
gar-dll id" ad,'. lVUI.(281); I'f/Yu-yun the
external world, rgga-ydn(-Y!fI) m!Jht-pa
Glr. n lIelper from the external world; Bem8
rgya-ydll-du 1Ila bp tlLke care tbilt
the mind be not distrncted by outward
things; -yan 11': to disperse, -lug,
1Wr {Mli-11Ia, aam-pa yan IOn- W, the sheep
have dispersed (or a sbeep bu strayed),
the fortune is goDe, the thoughts are lost,
waudering; ydn-dll .JrirnHl. to suffer (Ibe
s.heep) to disperse OD tb6 pasture; nad yUx-
wandering (contagious)
lis<-a>',
=
yams
.
(t/<in-/i
to run
about,
to wander <SVA
,
is rather
doubtful).
i/,hi-l<i<i
1.
member, limb,
ydn-lay
//HI aim>.
1<-^.
and head
AI/'i;/.:
*k-i/<'i-!-<in.
an
injured
or defective
linil) /,/./.:
</tin-/<i<i
iii/ttmti-pa
weak in the
limbs, decrepit, crazy,
=
zd-ba Lex. 2.
fig.
branch of a river,
branch of a
tree; dge-
lixiiifim-yyi ydn-lay yzuii-bur byyio
Do. was
explained:
I wish to be counted a
branch,
i.e. a
member,
of the
community
of
novices;
appendage, something
subordinate to a
great-
er
thing,
like branch-establishment Tar.
lib,
3;
also with reference to books:
appendix,
supplement
Tar. 3. branch, section,
sepa-
rate
part
of a doctrine or
science,
frq.,
a
par-
ticular head,
point, thought,
in a treatise.
y
ab
->
resp.
for
pa, father,
rgydl-po yab
yum ysum
Glr. the
king
and his two
consorts; rgydl-po yab yum
denotes also
king
and
queen
as father and mother to
the
country
Glr.',
yab ryydl-po-la ysol-to
Dzl. he said to his
royal
lather;
yab-wd&
father and
son,
in a
spiritual
sense : master
and
disciple; yab-mes
l. father and
grand-
father. -J.
progenitor,
ancestors Glr.
U
b
-V
a
i nJ
db
-P
a h to
lock,
lock
up, secure,
cover
over
<SV/<., yab-ca
things
well
secured,
under
safe
keeping; ydb-yob-pa
to
hide,
conceal
Sch.
;
yyab
or
yyab-sa
covered
place,
covert,
shelter
<SV//.;
yal> riii-po portico, veranda,
e
g.
of the
monastery
at
Tashilhunpo; <f/a6-ru.s
awning,
tent Sch. 2.
( . to
skim,
to
scoop
off,
from the surface of a fluid. 3. W.
to move to and
fro,
hither and
thither,
v.
yyol-
pa.
'
y
db
-
> Yy<*
b
-
mo 1 the act
of
fanning, waving, ldy-pa
ydb-mo bycd-cin O
ci-ba
dying
whilst
waving
the hand to and
fro,
considered as a
sign
of
peace
Do.;
yos-kyi ydb-mo byed-pa
Glr. to
beckon
by waving
with one's
clothes;
hence
fig.
2. the
bringing
on, provoking, dyi-d-boi
of an
enemy Alii., Opun-)'::it
a
calamity
Mil.
;
ydb-mo )/te'-pa
or
yydy-pa
to beckon to
come,
to
bring (something adverse) upon
507
one's self. 3.
fan, riia-ydb
a. a
yak-tail
fan C*. b. kettle-drum stick Sch.' sbran-
ydb fly-brush
(
's.
rluii-ydb ventilating-
or
cooling-fan
C*.\
bxil-i/dib pankah (/////.),
a
large
fan
suspended
from the
ceiling
and
set in motion
by
means of a
string.
4.
sail Cs. 1
*q*
udm-bu rdo-fadd v. rdo com
p.
N3
"
yam
-me-ba 1. Sch. :
coarsely,
roughly,
of a coarse
make,
rough-
hewn. 2. Mil.: cut Kd-na
par-la ydm-me
yseys
he walked
softly gliding
across the
water to the other bank.
yam-yom
Cs. also
yam-yam Thyr.
tottering,
not
steady
Cs.
yam~y6m
byed-pa
to totter.
yams, yams-ndd
6s.,
nad-ydms
Glr.
epidemic
or
contagious
disease,
plague,
md-yams
a
plague
caused
by
evil
spirits,
v.
md-mo.
yar,
from
ya, up, upward,
also
ydr-la,
e.g. yziys-pa
to look
up
Glr., ydr- gro
mdr- aro
byed-pa
Glr. to travel
up
and
down;
yar
mar
O cdy-pa
B., *ky6d-ce*
W.
resp.,
to walk
up
and
down; ydr-la Kyer
soy bring
or fetch
up
Pth.;
yar
ma
sayugs
mar ma
Ofon-par
Pth. as it would
go
off
neither
up
ward
by vomiting,
nor
downward;
ydr-nas
mar-la from
top
to
bottom;
yar
fun-
pa Thyy.
to come
up again,
from a
depth;
*yarmar
fsan-ma-ru* W. in
every
direction,
all
over;
in such
expressions
as
yar
laii-ba
to
rise, get up, yar Opel-ba
to
increase,
it
stands
pleon.; ydr-la
also denotes a relation
to that which is
higher,
the intercourse
with,
the
deportment
towards,
superiors (mdr-fa
the
contrary)
Glr.',
esp.
with reference to
the
transmigration
of souls and their final
deliverance:
yar ycod-pa
to cutoff the
way
to the three
upper
classes of
beings,
the so-
called
'good
natures', yar skye-ba
to be re-
born in the
upper
classes,
the reverse of
which is mar
Ogn'b-pa
to sink down to the
lower; yar Odrm-pa
to draw or lift
up
to
heaven.
ydr-Uos
imitation Sch.
pa - ya_
&11. C!d"'J'<I to rLln aOOUI, to "l'ander &11 ,
jj doubtful).
:;..:,,"'::rr p ...tog t. membet'. limb, yd,..,wg
... -, illu. 'll'lll, Iqr->, aod J/Hfi.;
d16,..;a,. an illjure<l or defoctive
limb Lu.; yUM-lug nyu_l'" "-ealt in the
dK-rcJlit, ern)', - - 2.
lig. branch of a ri,tf, brand! 01 a tree; dyt-
btnyht-fIYI" !<;,t-Juy r:Nit-bar bgyitJ /)0. 111-&1
txlll,ioe<!: I 'Aish to he counted" broncll,
i.e. a 1»elOlJer. of the eomlDunity of novices;
appendage,sometl,iog subordinate to Ilgreat,.
er thing, like branch-establishment Tur.175,
:1; also with reference 10 bookj: appendix,
supplement '1'u.r. - 3. branch, section, sepa·
rate part of It doctrine or science, frq., n par·
ticular head, point, thought, in a trelliisc.
yab, for Ihl, father, I'!!!Jcil-po !lub
!fllln ,sum Gi,,, the king ao\1 !lis 1'1'0
coni>Ortlli 'yydl-po !Jab !fum denotes nlso
king and queen as f:ltber nnd mother to
tile country Gir.; yah "!!!Jai-IJO-/1J tadi-to
D::I. lie !!aid to his royal lather; yuJr..rti.
lather and son. in A spiritual muter
and disciple; yah-lith J. father and grand.
fatlter. 1. progenitor, anceJtors Gir.
:ro..'.:;r.:r Jdb-po., nJdb - pa l. 10
, T' lodl.lock uP,lecure,cover
over &4., yab-& things well seeured, under
SAfe kcepiug; Jdb-yoirpa to hide, ('on«AI
&1.; rya/J or nJoo- covered place, covert,
sheller &11.; ".Ib nit -lJO portico, veranda,
e g. of the luonAsteryAtTasbilhunpo; yab-rtu
awning, lent Sdt. - 2. C. 10 skim. 10 .seeop
oft, from the ,urface of a Quid. - 3. lY.
to move to and fro, hither and thither, \'. ry6b·
pa.-
r).{.:r;f r!Jdh-1I.10 1. the act
, of fanmng, waving, /dV1X1
yah-lIIe bgNi-HI; ."[1-00 dying whilst wn"iog
the hand to lind fro, considered ns a sign of
lienee Do.; gtk-J.yi yuh-me byM.-pa Gl,'. to
l>eckon by waying with one's clothcs; hence
fig. _ 2, the bringing on, provokint* dgr'rJ..Wl
of r.o enemy J\/il., .p"N-iSi a Mii.;
ydb-wlQ )1tI.pa or )'!lUg-po to beckon to
COllIe, to hriug (.....melbing ad"erse) UIIUU
007
one', self. - 3. fan, rita-ydb A. A yak-tail
fall w. b. kettle-drum ,tick I..; abrait_
yUh ny.brush l.a.; rlllit-!Jdh ventilating- or
cooling-fan u..; Mii-ydh pankah (/lilfd.), a
Illirge f-.n sosp<'nded from tile and
- t ill motion by of a string. - 4..
sail ( .. ,
y<lm-lnl - rdo·6«d y. rOO COlDjl.
"'1%4",if:J. yam-fN-/)a 1. SeA.:
roughly, of a ctarse mue, rtl.
hewn. - t. Mil.: Cui fd-1M fxjr-/a ydm-7M
,'Utp he walked soflly gliding across the
water to the other ballk.
yum-ydmu. algo yu."I-y(;'" TN.!".
lottering, not steady C•.
byld-pa to totter.
Ya/JII, yunu-111ld C." 1lUd-ydriu Gb·.
epidemic or contagious disease, plague,
mJ-!l(wl. n plnguc Cllused by el'il spirits, '•.
ma_mo,
t./o.t.::..' !lar, from ya, up, upward, Also yur-Ia.
e.g. y::i[p-po to look up Glr., yJr-.f/'rt'
mar-o!Iro hyld - pa GIr. to tra\·el up lUld
dowo; yar 'IPIar .lay-pa /J., .kydd-h. IV.
to walk up l\Dd do..·o; yd,.../IJ
icy bring or feteh up !'tit.; yar ",a '!I!fII9'
WIGr _ .fthl-po:r PtA. as it would go off
oeitherop..-anl. by,·omiting. nOldo.n.ard;
9flr-- mtir-la from top to bouom; yo:r.em-
1'0 TItt./Y. w come up agAin, frolll a depth;
·!fOr INGr W. ill t!,·ery direction,
all ovcr; ill soch expressiooi as yar la;,«
to rist, get up, yar J;a.ba to increase, it
5tMd picon.; !lar-/a also denote! ... relation
to thRt which is higher, tllC intercourse with.,
the d"portmeot towllrd;l, superiors (nldr-la
the contnu1') Gir.; esp.....ith reference to
the tomsmigrntion of souls and their final
deli\'ernllcc: yal' rMd-pa to cut off the Vl'fl.y
to the three upper c111Sses of beings, tile so-
c"lIed 'good natures', yar d.yi-ba to be re-
born in thc upper classes, the re\'erse of
.... hich is '11lal' ogrih-pa to iink dowil to the
lower; yar odrm-pa to draw or lift up to
he,well.
ydr.lto. imitation &It.
508
ydr-ba
yi-ge
__._.
ydr-ba
to
disperse, ramble, stray
C.
(= *2/aw
cd-ce*
PP.);
to
spring
or
leap
off C's.
;
to be scattered &?A.
.
yar-lun
Glr. a
large tributary
of
theYangtsekyangcomingfrom
the
north,
in western
China,
east of the town
of
Bathang;
nevertheless Tibetan
historians,
from a
partiality
to old
legends,
describe
it as
flowing
near the mountain of Yarlha-
sampo.
V.
Kopp.
II,
50.
y.^.
a
j.p-..g<r'
Yarlhasampo,
a
snowy
moun-
tain,
between Lhasa and the
frontier of
Bhotan,
near which
according
to tradition the first
king
of
Tibet, fnya-
ttri-ytsdn-po, Nyatitsdngpo, coming
from
India,
first entered the
country.
ydl-ga
branch, bough, frq., ydl-gai
fsul-du ramified S.
g., ydl-ga-can
branchy,
full of
boughs; yal-prdn
6s., y
al-
ga preu
Sch. small
branch, twig; yal-
ddb
a branch full of leaves Cs.
yl-ba
to
dwindle, fail; disappear,
vanish,
drod
yal
animal heat
(in
a
living being) diminishes, (an
inanimate ob-
ject)
cools
down, grows cold;
nad
yal
it
evaporates
Lt.
;
of beer : to
get
stale,
dead
(W.:
*yal cd-ce*}; *(s)kug(s) gydl-Kan-la
yal
ca
dug*
W. the stake is lost in
going
to the
winner; Qja ydl-ba
bzin-du Glr. like
the
vanishing
of the
rainbow; yal-sul
Wdn.
in a fruit the remnants of the withered
blossom;
to be
obliged
to
yield,
to be
dislodg-
ed Glr. fol.
25,
but
perh.
the
signification:
to
disappear
is also here
admissible;
lus dan
srogyal
Dzl.
body
and soul are trifled
away,
are
lost;
*go-ydl* (v. sgo-po)
one who has
lost himself
by gambling
and has thus be-
come the slave of
another;
ydl-bar O
dor-ba,
Jbor-ba,
I. Sch. to
annihilate,
annul. 2. Cs. to
despise, yzan
other
people.
Cf.
ydl-ba.
y
a
l-ydl
*. 1 00 000
octillions,
yal-
ydl
cen
-
po
a nonillion
;
yet
cf.
dkngs-pa.
Usjor&PT,
-vwy
al
~y
6l
i -y^
1
inconstancy,
^
inattention,
carelessness
6s.,
Sch.
y
a
*->
fr m
y
a
,
1 from
above, Jbdb-pa
to come down from above 6s.
; above,
yds-kyi
the one
above,
the
upper
one Do.
;
yds-nas
from above C
1
., yas mas,
a. from
above and from below 6s. b.
upward
and
downward
6s.;
yas-byon coming
from above
Mil. 2.
off, away, yas yton-ba, Qpan-yds
ytoit-ba, ytor-yas byed-pa
Glr. and
elsewh.,
to throw
away.
3. in
comp.
without,
tnfa-
yds
without an
end, endless,
frq.; bgran-yds
numberless Gram.
ju-
yi,
1. num.
fig.:
54. 2. in some com-
binations inst. of
yid,
so
yiycod-pa yi(d)
cdd-pa
\. to
forget, e.g.
a benefactor Glr.
2. more
frq.
to
give up,
to
despair
Dzl.;
de-
spondency, despair Mil.; yi-pri-ba
a
disliking,
hatred 6s.
;
yi(d}-mug-pa, yi-mug-par Ogyur-
ba to
despair, frq.; yi-rdn-ba
to be
glad,
to
rejoice,
v.
rdn-ba;
yi-ysdd-pa
Cs.
=
yi-
mug-pa.
y
l
-9
a
appetite, yi-ga Ogag, Idog
the
appetite
is
lost,
aversion,
disgust
is
felt,
yi-ga
sdan id.
Sch.; O
cus id.
Med.; yi-
gar ^on
it is
grateful
to the
taste,
it tastes
well Med.
ukrzrr
y*~ff
e ^n com
P- yig->
1-
letter,
yi-ge
dbu-
'
can(
W.
*rom-yig*}
theTibetan
printed
letters, dbu-med( W.*ta-yig*}
current hand-
writing,
of which there are
again
different
kinds:
dpe-yig
the more distinct and care-
ful,
used in
copying
books,
Jfyug-yig
the
cursory
and often rather
illegible writing
in
letters,
and
Qbam-yig,
the
very large
and
regular style
invented for the use of ele-
mentary writing
-schools
(v. specimens
of
all of them in the
lithogr. supplement
to
6s.'s
grammar). yi-ge-drug-pa
the six-
syllable (prayer),
theOmmanipadmehumG^
1
.
and
elsewh.; yi-ge-bditn-pa
and
brgyd-pa
Mil.?
yi-ge bsldb-pa
to learn
reading
and
writing, yig-rtsis reading, writing,
and
cy-
phering; kd-yig
the letter k. 2.
anything
that is
written, note, card, bill, document;
inscription,
title
(mor^ accurately #a-^),esp.
letter, epistle; yi-ge bzdg-pa
a
deposited
do-
cument,
bond
C.;
dge-sdiy-gi yi-ge register
of virtues and
iniquities
; yi-gei
Ian a written
answer
Glr.;
yi-gei
subs a.
envelope,
b. letter-
case, pocket-book; yi-ge O
bri-ba to write a
letter,
sprin-ba
W. *kdl-ce* to send
off,
fob-
508
yUI'-ba to disperse, ramble, stray C.
(= ·!Jan cd-u· IV); 10 spring or leap
off GiJ.; to be scalleNld &11.
!Jar.lun Glr. a large tribnt..'\ry of
the Yangtsekyangcoroingfrom the
nortil, in western China, east of the town
ofBathang; nevertheless Tibetllll historians,
froro a to old legends, describe
it a:; flowing near the mountain of YarJlm·
SlImpo. V. Kiipp. II, 50.
..;.r'f Yal'lha.iampo, asuowy moun·
'<; I • - • tain, between Lha:;a and the
frontier of Bhotan, near which according
to trodition the first king of Tibet, T1Iya-
Nya(iu,dnfjpo, cODling frOm
Jndia, first entercd the country.
!N1lI'=l']' yal1Ja branch, bough, frq., ydl-fJai
fsU/-d« ramified S.y., !Jul.ga-can
branch)", full of boughs; yal-pdn <d., yul.
ga p'reu Seh. small brooch, twig; yul·oddv
a brnnch fuJI of leaves ("
!Nr.lf'r yul-va to dwindle, fail; disappear,
vanish, drod !Jal animal heat (in a
lh'ing being) diminishes, (an inanimMe ob-
ject) cools down, grows cold; ,iad yal it
e,"aporntes Lt.; of boor: to get stale, dead
(lY.: ·!Jul Cd-te-); fl!Jdl-T:o.n-w
Nul co. dug· IV. the stake is lost in going
to the winner; Ja !JdMa bZfn-du GIl'. like
the vanishing of the rainbow; yal-sut Wa,l.
in a fruit the remnants of tlle witbered
blossom; to be obliged to yield, to be dislodg·
ed Glr. fo1. 25, but perh. the signification:
to disappear is also here admissible; llU dUli
srog yal Dzl. body and soul are trifled aWllY,
are lost; ·yo-yal" (v. $yQ.-po) one who has
lost himself by gambling and has thus be-
come slave of anotber; ytll·b«r odJr-I.Ju,
oh6r.ba, I. Seh. to annihilate, annul. 2. C6. to
despise, other people. Cf. ydl-ba.
yal.yal G8. lOOOClO octillions, !Jal-
yal Un. po a nonillion; yet cr.
dkriq&-pa.
!Nr..fV:Pr !Jal- yel, .yUl inconstancy,
, "o,;S inattention, carelessness G8.,
Seh.
!Jas, from '!Ja, 1. from aboii'e, ovdb-pa
to come down from above £:s.; above,
ya.-kyi the one abo"e, the upper oue Do.;
ya$·ntu from above C., yWJ mas, a. from
above and from below <d. b. upward and
downward C•. ; !JM-bydn coming from above
Nil. - 2. off, away, yas rtdti.-b«, jJali-yd3
rM,j.ba, rtor-yaa v!JM.pa Glr. and e1se.....h.,
10 tbrowaway. - 3. in compo without, mfa-
!Ids without an end, endless, frq.; bgrU1i.yds
numberless Gram.
1. num. fig.: 54. - 2. in some com-
binations ins\. of yid, so yi reM-pa yi(d)
cdd-pa I. to forget, e.g. a benefuctor Glt-.
2. more frq. to give up, to despair Dzl.; de-
spondenCY,despair Mil.; !Ji-pri-ba It disliking.
hatred G8.; !Ji(d)-mug-pa, yi--muy.par c1JY"r-
ba to despair, frq.; !Ji-rdn-ba to be glad,
to rejoice, v. rai1-ba; yi-r$dd-pa G8. = yi-
mug-pa.
lI
l
'1Ju appetite, yi-ga o,ag, ldOff the
appetite is lost, aversion, is
felt, yj.ga wa,j id. &/1.; oCu$ id. Med.; yi.
g«1' it is grateful to Ihe !nste, it tallies
well
Ui'ay yi.ye in compo !Jig, 1. leiter, yi-!J<! dM-
can( lY. ·r6m-yi!l) theTi Letan printe<l
letters, dbu-mM( W. *(a-yif!) cuneot hand-
writing, of wbich there are again diffel'ent
kiuds: dpl-!Jig the more aDd cal'C-
ful, useu in copyinA' Vooks, oRyU!J-!Jig the
cursory and often rather illegible writing in
letters, and oOOm-yig, the very large and
regular style invented for the use of ele-
mentary writing.scbools (v. specimens of
all of them in the litbogr. supplement to
Cs.', gI'aHlmar). - !Ji-!J<!-drog-pa tbe six-
syllable (I)rayer), the OmmanipadmehumGil'.
aud elsewh.; !Ji-[lt-bdim.pa and brfjyd.pa
Mil.'! lIi.!Je vsldb-pa to learn l'eadiug ..'\nu
writing, !Ji!J-J't8i. rending, writing, and cy-
pbering; I..d-y(y tbe letter k. - 2. anytbing
tbat is writtea, nole, card, bill, document;
inscription, title accurately Ild-yiy),
letter, epistle; yi-ge bMg-pa a deposited do-
cument, bond C.; dgNdIg-gi yI-t;e register
of virtlles and iniquitics; yf,.gei tun a wrilten
answer Glr.; !Ji-gei SUN a. envelope, b. letter·
case, pockel.book; yi-ge ovri-ba to write II
letter, itpl'bl-ba if. to send olI, fob-
yid
pa
to receive u
letter;
yi-ye
deb a letter
arrives;
///-</<
r
Jn-l-ba DzL, Oy6d-pa
to com-
pose,
to
pen
down
;
yi-yer Jbrir jug-pa
to
get copied; ,'//-//"'
/"'is
joy pa
literis man-
datum
,/,'i>i>mrc; xkii-yig
letter,
circular
epistle; />/-///</
v.
above;
cdd-yig contract,
bargain; O cdms-yig dancing-book,
rules re-
lating
to
religious
dances; O col-yig
letter of
recommendation
Cs.;
rtdg9~yig
1.
stamp, sig-
nature
(
*. 2.
certificate,
credentials
W.; ynds-
yig description
of a
place; sprins-
or
Q prin-
yig
=
skur-yig; bu-yiy
1.
copy.
2. commen-
tary, opp.
to
md-yig
\.
original,
first
copy;
2. text
Cs.;
^dzin-yiy
=
rtdgs-yig
2 W.
;
2w-
///// memorial,
petition; Idn-yig
letter in
answer,
reply; Idm-yig
1.
hand-book,
road-
book,
guide,
sdm-bha-lai
lam-yig description
of the road to Sam bhala
(a
fantastical
book).
2.
itinerary, travelling-journal (?).
3.
pass-port
ft
yi-dwags (from etymol. subtility
written also
yid-tags
or
yid-biays),
,
the fifth class of
beings
of Buddhist
cosmography,
condemned in a fore-hell to
suffer
perpetual hunger
and
thirst,
a
grade
of
punishment preceding
the final and full
torments of
hell;
they
are
represented
as
giants
with
huge bellies,
and
very
narrow
throats,
inhabiting
the air
Kopp.
I,
245.
jn-Mv
yi-dam,
less
frq. yid-dam
(
dam-
bca)
resp. fugs
-dam 1.
oath, vow,
asseveration, promise,
yi-dam-la brten-pas
because he
firmly
adhered to his word DzL
-
2. a
'wishing prayer' (v. smon-lani), yi-
dam bcd-ba to make a vow
DzL,
to
pro-
nounce a
wishing prayer
DzL 3. medi-
tation
(this signification
rests
only
on the
analogy
with
tugs-dam,
and has
yet
to be
confirmed
by quotations
from
literature).
-
4. also
yi-daiii-lhd
tutelar
god,
a
deity
whom a
person
chooses to be his
patron,
whether for his whole
life,
or
only
for some
particular undertaking,
and with whom he
enters into an intimate union
by
meditation:
frequently
also it is adefunctsaint or teacher
(so e.g.
the
yi-dam
of
Milaraspa
was rdo-
r)e- can);
sometimes such a connection sub-
sists from
infancy through
life,
or the
deity
makes advances to ttie
re-pective person
by special
revelations,
so in the case of
king
Sron-btan-sgam-po
Glr. 5. ace. to Ci.'a
proposition: sacrament;
yet
our Christian
converts
preferred
the more
popular
dam-
yi~9
e as an
affix,
v.
yi-ge.
yiy-b$kur,
also
yig-mgo, epistolary
guide, containing
the different
addresses and
customary phrases
used in
writing
letters W.
- -
yiy
-
Kdft
library
'
chancery
Schr.
yiy-mKan secretary,
book-
keeper,
clerk Glr. and elsewh.
yig-ca
Glr.,
Tar. written
accounts,
records,
books of
history.
-
yig-dpon
a 'master-writer
1
6.
--
yig-
preii line,
written or
printed. yig-
brii
a
single
letter.
--
yig-fsdii
1.
archives,
re-
cords,
documents Glr. >. book-case Glr.
-
yig-
dzin written
contract,
bzdg-pa
to indent
(articles
of
agreement).
yid, resp. fuys,
I. 1.
soul, mind, esp.
the
powers
of
perception,
volition and ima-
gination,
cf.
bio;
yid
bzin-du as one would
wish,
to heart's
content, frq.; yid-bzin-gyi
nor-bu a
jewel
or talisman that
grants every
wish;
yid-du
^on-ba adj., rarely yid-^on-po
Mil.
engaging, winning, pleasing, skye-bo
mdn-
poi yid-du
^6n-ba
Do. beloved with
many;
nice, pretty,
of
girls,
houses
etc., frq.;
al><>
yid-kyi
inst. of
it,
e.g. yid-kyi
mfo a
pretty
lake
Sbh.;
nai-yid
^oit my
dearest!
my
darling!
Pfh.;
yid-du-mi-^oit-bai fsig
smrd-
ba Wd/'t. to
say
some
unpleasant
word;
whereas W. : *da
yid
-la
yon
or
juh*
now
it comes into
my
mind
;
na
yid-du
mi
rag
I do not
recollect;
6'.:
*yi'-la
ina son* it
would not
go
down with
him,
he had no
mind for
it;
iiai
yid-la
mi
O
bab Tar. it does
not
please
me,
I do not like
it;
yid-la
.v//-
kyaii
i'<) mi
>////<
>it Mil.
though you may
fancy
it in
your
mind,
yet you
do not
per-
ceive the taste
;
yid-la byed-jxt,
</c
///-/>
W.'.
*c6-ce,
bor-ce*,
to
comprehend, perceive,
re-
member, mind,
take to heart,
tY<|.; yid-kyis
Ityt'd-fKi
to do a
thing
in one's
mind,
fancy,
e.g. sacrificing,
like
dmigs-la Thgr.\ yid-kyis
fancied,
imaginary,
ideal
Cs.;
*yi'-
P" 10 l'ccei,'c Il leLter; yi-pt II. lettcr
Il.rrives; .'JI·i-ba D::l., o!J&l-pa to com-
pose, to I,en down; !li-fltr "brir J'ip-pa to
get copied; yi-flt" Jdg pa littl" 111(.11.-
flatlllil ,.bi - yifJ letter, circular
epistle; fli-yig v. above; cdfl-yi!! contract,
lmrg:lin; "cdlll$-yig dancing-boole, rules re-
Inling to religious ,lances; ,,'ldl-yig letter of
recoDlInendation rtflg8.!!i!! l. stamp, sig.
nature C,. 2. certificate, credentials IV.; yndl-
yig description of Aplace; or"lwin-
,'fiB 31.:111'-110; M-.1JI9 J. copy. 2. commeu-
tM)', opl'. to lIId_yig t. original, first copy;
2. te1t G.; "d::ill-yifJ - rtug&-ljl9 '2 lV.; zu-
$if} IDemorial, petition; Mn - yiJ letter in
answer, reply; Ialll-yig I. hand.book, road-
book, guide, iUNl-blta-{ai {am-Y'9 description
of the rOll.d toS:unbhala (a. fantastical book).
2. itinerary, IraveUing·joumal(?). 3. pass·port
(".
yi-dIl:Il[JS (from etYlllO!' suutility
written also yid-tafP or
lhI, the fifth class of beings of Buddhist
condemned in a fore-hell to
suffer perpetual hunger nml thirst, II grnde
of pUDisllment preceding the final and full
torments of hell; they are rel,resented as
gi:\llts with huge bellies, and "cry narrow
throats, inhabiting tile air KQI'P' 1, 245.
less frq. yid-dam ( ... dam_
bea) (ugs-dllm 1. oatil, vow,
asseveration, promise, yi-dllll/.la bJ'tbt-pas
beenuse he tirmly adhered to his word D::l.
- 2. a 'wishing prnyer' (v. smon.lam). yi-
dam bCd-IJa to make lIo ,'OW D::l., to prO-
nounce a preyer J)::{. - 3. medi·
tation (this rests only on the
analogy with tu[p-dam, and Ims )'et to be
confirmed by qUQt.I\tions from literature).
- 4.lIlso yi-dam.Yld tutelar god, a deity
whom n person chooses to be his pAtron,
whether for llis whole life, or only for some
Ilarticullll' undertnking, nnd witb whom be
enters into IIIl intimate union b)' meditation;
frl'quently also it isadefunctSflint. or teacher
(su e.g. tbe yi-dam of Milnrl\Spa was rrio-
,je-"cmi)j somctimes such II cOllncction sub·
sists from iuflUlc)' through lifc, pr tbe deit)'
,
Illllkcs ndvnnces 10 the rCSI,ectil·e pcn-on
by speeilll revelations, so in the case of king
S'YJli-buan-lJ!Jlllli-po Glr. - 5.lIcc. to u·.
proposition: sacrament; yet our Cliristill.n
converts preferred the more popular dlllll-
bell.
6.l::rr !Jl9 - as au affix, v. !Ii-ye.
y;:t-!J3A-ilI',also !J19-11lyd, epistolary
guide, coot.aiaing- the dilTerent
addresses nnd phrases used in
writing letters IV. - !jig. fd,j library C.,
chancery &/.,.. - yig-mllan secretary, book·
keeper, clerk Gl,'. nnd elsewh. - yi[J-ca Glr.,
7'm·. writtenaccounls,records, books of hislory.
- yig_dpon a 'mtl.ster-writcr' {,il. - yirr
1)";,i line, written or printed, - yi[J-"bru
a single letter. - yig_(lJuio I. archives, reo
cords, documents GIl'. 2. book-case Gbo.-
yifJ·"dzin written contract, bZdfrJXl to indent
(articles of agreement).
yid, resp. (ufjS, I. .1. soul, the
. powers of perception, ,'ol.tlon and Ima-
gination, d. b{o; yid as one would
wish, to heart's content, frq.; yid.b:in.gyi
nQr-bu a jewel or talisman that Rro.nts every
wish; yid-tllt ..OIi-ba adj., rarely yid•..o,j-1)O
Mil engaging. winning, pleasing, 1J.:yUJO ma,i·
poi yid.dll Do. belo\'ed witll many;
nice, pretty, of girls, etc., frq.; IIlso
yid_kyi inst. of it, e.g. yid-kyi 1/1(0 a pretty
lake SM.; nai-yid my dearest! roy
dl\rlillR! Pth.; yid-dll-mi-.n,i-Imi ($19 nl".d-
ba Wd,i. to sny some unplettSaDt word;
whereas -00 yid-Ia yon or )wi- DOW
it comes into my miut!; ria 1/Ii NlfJ
I do not recollect; C.: -yt-la ilia $01i- it
would not go down with him, he had no
mind for it; ,ia; yid-la lIli obah Tm'. it does
not please mc, 1 do not like it; yid-la iar
kYUliro 1/1; /llyoli Mil. though you mil)'
fRllcy it in your mind. yet you do not pc....
cei\'e the tnsle;,yid-{a byid-pu, ocCiri-pa iV.:
-cQ..ct, Mr-U', to comprehend, perceive, re-
member, mind, take 10 heart, frq.; yid-Iqfl;
byM-p;1 to do 1\ thing ill one',. mind, fnllc)"
e,g. SAcrificing, like dmig8-w Thor.; yid-l:yu
fllucicu, imllgiD>\f)', ideAl C,.; -Y'••
510
yid-tags
yin-pa
kyl log-pa*
C. to read
mentally, softly,
in-
audibly;
before
many
verbs
yid
stands al-
most
pleon.: *yid
kul-ce* W. to
exhort; yid
/cul-ba Sch. 'mental
suffering', perh.
better:
to be
uneasy,
troubled,
harassed
; yid Jtrul-
baio be
mistaken; yid-cad-pa
\.
yi-ycod-pa',
yid-ces-pa
to
believe,
with the accus.
or dat.
of the
thing
which one
believes,
with the
dat. of the
person
whom one
believes,
. . .
par,
that . . .
(cf. dad-pa); Kyod-la
cun
zig
yid
ma
ces-pas
Mil.
having
become a little
distrustful towards
you; *yid (or den)-ce-
ce'i
spe-ra*
W. credible
words; yid-brtan-
dkd-ba Tar. not to be
depended upon, hardly
to be believed
; yid-ynyis doubt;
fe-fsom dan
yid-ynyis
ma
byed cig
Mil.-, yid Opdm-pa
Mil. to be cast
down, dejected, depressed;
yid Opr6g-pa
Mil. to
prepossess,
to
infatuate;
yid
bloh-ba to be
afraid,
full of
anxiety (?)
Sch.; yid Obyun-ba, resp. fugs- byun-ba
Mil.
to be
sad, unhappy, discontented,
la,
on ac-
count
of;
na Kor-bai cos-la
yid-byun-nas
Mil. I was wearied of the
way
of
(con-
stantly moving in)
the orb of
transmigration;
yid-Jbyin-pato
make discontented or
weary;
yid-mug-pa
v.
yi-mug-pa', yid Ofsim-par
gyur-baDzl.io
become
satisfied, contented;
*yid
fsim co-ce* W. to
satisfy; yid-log-pa
to be tired or
weary
of
Sch.;
yid-fun
Dzl.
forward, rash, overhasty; yid-
duns
v.duns-,
yid-myos
fuddled,
tipsy ; yid-smon
v. smon-
pa; yid-yzuns
v.
yzuns;
yid-srubs Lexx.,
Sch. : 'a
refractory,
stubborn
mind',
which
however does not suit the connection.
2.
symb.
num.: 14. II.
=
yud, yid-tsam
for
yud-tsam,
Wdn
frq.
cv
U^TWj^J"
yid-tags
v.
yi-dags.
JU<T*T yin-pa, resp.
and
eleg. lags-pa
I. to
be,
with
neg.
ma
yin
or
min,
W.
*man*;
/cyod
su
yin
who are
you?
bsa de-ka
na
yin
Mil. I was the
leopard (you saw) ;
with
genit.,
nai
yin
that is
mine, belongs
to me
;
*di-rin
za-nyi-ma yin*
W.
to-day
is
Sunday
;
gdn-nas yin
Mil. whence are
you
?
O
di
med-pas 'yin
Pth. it is because this is
not here . . .
;
na bu-moi dus-na
yin-te
Glr.
when I was still a
girl; *yin kyait* 6'., *yin-
na
yan*
W.,
C. for
^on kyaii yet,
neverthe-
less, notwithstanding
;
yin-gran(-na)
v.
grdn-
ba extr.
; yin
for
optat
or
imp.:
de
yin
1. SO
it
is, yes.
2. that
may be,
mi
O
dod run
deyin
Mil. if
you
feel no
inclination,
never
mind,
let it be so !
dgrd-bo yin-na-^n yin
Mil. if
he is an
enemy,
let him be so !
yin-na
stands
also
pleon.
with adverbs etc. : snar
yin-na
=
snar
Mil.;
yin,
so it is!
yes! min,
W.
''man*,
no!
yin-min
truth in a relative
sense,
yin-min-gyi
fe-fsom bsal Glr. it removes all
doubts as to the
truth, e.g.
the historical
truth;
ma
yin-pa, min-pa
1. vb. not to be
a
thing.
2.
adj.
not
being
a certain
thing,
ma
yin-par,
adv.
;
cos ma
yin-par
'not
being
law',
i.e.
contrary
to the law of
religion,
wrong, unjust,
=
mi
rigs-par; yul,
dus, fsod,
rigs-pa
ma
yin-par spyod-pa Thgy.
to do a
thing
at a
wrong
time or
place,
without
observing
due
measure,
in an
improper
or
unnatural
manner;
hence also
ma-yin-pa
alone :
wrong, unjust; *ma-yim-pe cff-pajhe'-
Ken-la
ten-sig
zer* C. whoever commits an
improper
action is called
*fen-sig*;
hence
also
yin-min right
and
wrong.
3. v. min.
Cf. moreover
yod-pa
and
Odug-pa,
which
may
be used for
yin-pa,
but not
inversely.
Sometimes it
implies
to
mean,
to
signify
: rna
de ci
yin
Glr. what does this
drumming
mean ?
rgydl-po
Kon-rdfi
yin dgons
the
king
thought (the prophecy)
meant
him,
referred
to
himself;
fog
-ma
ned-kyi pyir
ma
yin-
pas
Dzl. as from the
very beginning
it was
not aimed at
me,
had no reference to
me;
also in other
instances,
where we have to
use words of a more
precise
character:
Kyod-
kyi
lo
gan yin-pa
-la Ko-wo
dgu-gis
Tar.
whilst the
sensibility
that was with
you,
i.e. the discretion shown
by you, gives
me
much
pleasure.
-
II.
yin
is
joined
to a
partic. pres., quite analogous
to our
English
construction:
^ro-ba yin
I am
going Mil.,
C.;
Kyod-la
Idm-mlcan
yod-pa
e
yin?
Mil.
(are you having)
have
you
a
guide?
dei
ndn-na su
yod-pa yin?
Glr. who is within?
it is also
joined
to a
partic. pf.,
when re-
ferring
to the
past:
na-rdn-la
skyes-pa yin
Glr. I have born him
;
cdd-pa yin-pas
Glr.
!11O
Iryl lllg-pa- C. to read melltally, softly, in-
RudiLl)·; before IDRDy verbs yid stunds al-
most pleon.: -yid J.. lV. to exhorl; !lid
oC-ul-ba &h. 'melltal sulfe1'ing', perh. better:
to be uneasy, troubled, harassed; yid )b'itl.
va to be mistaken; lIld.cad-pa v. yi.J'Cod-pa;
lIEd-IfC8.pa to believe, with the aceus. or dat.
of the thing which one belie\'es, with the
dat. of the person whom one .
par, thaL .. (cc. dJd-pa); 1i9tkJ..la zig
yid ma m.pas Mil. h8\"ing become a little
distrustful towards you; -yid (or
Cei spe-ra- W. credible words; yid-brron-
dkd-ba Tar. not to he del,ended upon, haruly
to be believed; yid.ynyi$ doubt; (e-flWmdal;
yid-ynyis ma hyed Mil.; yid opll1ll.pa
Mil. to be cast down, dejected, depressed;
'!lid oproy-pa Mil. to prepossess, to infatuate;
yid hloli-ba to be afraid, full of anxiety (?)
&h.; yid J.I!JWi-ba, resp. (UfJs·obl/Uli4Ja Mil.
to be sad, unhappy, discontented, la, on ac-
count of; Ror-ba;' 'Cos-la yid-byuil.nas
Mil. I WIIS wearied of the way of (con-
stantly moving in) the orb of tnlnsmigration;
yid-J,yin-pa wmake discootented or weary;
yid-muu-pa v. yi·muU·pa; yid isJm..par
of/Yur4JaDzl. to become satis6ed, contented;
-yid (si1ll ro·Ct- w: to satisfy; yid-log-pa
to be tired or weary of &h.; Dzl.
forward, raSh, overhasty; yid-dufls \". dill'S;
fuddled, tipsy; yUl-snlon v. smOll-
pa; yid-rzufls ". )'Z-uJis; yid-slitlA Leu.,
&h... 'a refracwry, stubborn miud', which
howe"er does not suit the connection. -
2. symb. nUIll.: 14. - 11. -lpMl,
for yud-l$am, lVdli frq.

yill-tags v. yi-dag8.
yin.pa, resp. and eleg. ld!Js-pa lto
be, wilb neg. 'lfia yin or min, lV.
-man-; Ilyod au yin who are )"ou? Ina de-ka
ria yin Mil. I was the leopard (yon saw);
with genit., rim' yin that is mine, belollgs
to me; -di-ri" za-nyi_ma yin- lV. to-day is
Sunday; gati.lIQ8 yin Mil. whellce arc youl'
"di med-paa yin Ptll. it is beClll\SC this ill
1I0t here ... ; Ija bIi-moi dUs-na yllI-ft Glr.
when I WQS still a girl;
na !Jai;' Iv., C. for kyati yet, neverlhe-
less, notwithstanding; yin-gl'ati(.na) \'. gl'lIl'.
ba ex\l',; yill for optat or imp.: dt yin I. so
it is, yes. 2. that may be, mi odod 1'1.Oi d4 yin
Mil. if )"ou feel no illCliolltion, never mind,
let it be so! dgrll4JO yin-lIU'-.,(1/1 yin Mil. if
he is an enemy, let him be so! yin-na stands
also pleon. with adverbs etc.: 81,(.11' yin-na
= 81iur Mil.; yin. so it is! yes! min, W:
-man-, no! yin-min truth in II. relative sense,
yin-mfll--!!!Ji fe-faom baal GIl'. it removes all
donhts as to the truth, e. g. the historical
truth; ma 1/ln.pa, min.pa l. vb. not to be
a dling. 2. adj. not heillg a certain thing,
'lfla yin-par, ndv.; loa ma yin-par 'not being
law', i.e. eontrary to tbe 111.1\' of religion,
wrong, unjust, - mi ,"ius-par; !JUI, dus, (wd,
rig8-Pu fila yin--pul" apydd-pa TI.gy. to do a
thing at a wrong time or !Jlace, without
observing due measure, in an improper or
unnatum! manner; hence also ma-yin-pa
alone: wrong, unjust; CIJ'·pa)M.
rtn-la tf1l-3ig u," C_ whoever commits an
improper action is called -(rll.Uf!; hence
also yill-'min right and wrong. - 3. v. min.
Cf. moreover yixl.pa and oduu-pa, which
IW\Y be used for yill.pa, but 1I0t inversely.
Sometimes it to mean, to signify: ,'Jia
de Ci yin Gll". whlLt doell this drumming
mean? l'gyal·jXJ /loi/-ra;! yin dgoJia the king
thought (the pl'o)Jhecy) meant him, referred
to himself; (dg.1I1a Md-I"!!i ]f!!ir ma yin_
pas D::l. as from the "ery beginning it was
Dot nimed at me, had no reference to me;
also in other illstanees, where we have to
use words of a more precise character: /fyM-
kyi io ga.l; yin-pa.ia Ko-u:o dgu-gis Tar.
whibt the sensil.Jility that was with you,
i.e. the discretion shown'by you, gives me
much pleasure. - n. yin is joined to a
partie. pres., quite ILllalogous to our Englisb
construction: ,ffI'o-ba yin I am going Nil.,
C.; J.'ytJd..la Wm·mJ.'a/l yM-pa e Mil.
(are )·ou hM'iog) have )'OU a gwde? dei
nan-na au yQd-pa !fin'! GIl'. who is withill?
it is nlso joined to a partic. pf., when re-
ferling w the past: -fla-rll/l-Ia aklfls·pa yin
Glr. 1h.'We born him; cdd"Pa yill-pas Glr.
,
yib
511
yin',
-HI >i
lit- i> tlr.Mvndrd t'nuii . .
.;
ii
bifiiii-
IHI
////;,
(ilr. \\hathasbecomeofhim? (/<-
r///-s
cibya*-jHi /////
.U/7. what were
you doing
ju>t
then? so
esp.
W. :
*zer-pa yin, zer-pen*
I ! has said
it,
*kdl-pen*
it has been sent
off; joined
to the
partic.
fut.
, (or
to the
partic. pres.
or
pf.,
in as far as these are
sometimes used also for the
fut.)
it ex-
presses futurity:
si-ba
yin
Pth. I shall
die;
ii su
$fe-pa-la
bskiir-ba
yin
Glr. she shall
be
given
to
him,
that will know
her,
find
her out from
amongst
the
rest;
^ro-ba yin
mod Glr. indeed
you
will have to
go
now.
When
joined
to a
root,
it is
only
in W. that
it denotes the future : *leb
yin,
leb-bin* he
will
come,
*tdn
yin*
he will
give.
Comp.
*
yin-tog-can*
W.
thinking
one's
self to be
something (great), proud,
con-
ceited.
--
yin-fsul
Mil.
property, attribute,
ni f.
yin~lugs
\.
circumstances,
condition
(= ynds
-
lugs?); K6ii-rnams-kyi yin
-
lugs
brjod
Mil. she related to him her circum-
stances. 2. nature or essence of
things
Mil.
yib,
v.
car-yib
eaves, shed Mil.
nt., yet
cf. the
following.
yib-pa
to hide one's self
6'.,
W.
;
car
yib byed-pa
Pth. to take shelter from
the
rain;
*yib-te
bor-cc* W. to
hide, conceal;
yib-nia something
hidden
8ch.-, yib-sa place
of
concealment, hiding-corner.
y>
termination of the instrum. case
after
vowels,
po.
^j-
yu
1. sbst.?
yu byed-pa
to calumniate
Ns
Sch.
(?) ;
yu-na
if it is true Sch.
(? ?)
2. num.
figure:
84.
UsJ'ETT
.TO" }i
u
~9
u
->
-Ku
Oats,
or a similar kind
^
NS
lo
of
grain, which,
in case of
need,
may
serve for food C.
UsJ'cn'-Bc*
yu-gu-bin
officinal
tree,
yielding
N
>J a
remedy
for wounds a*hd sores
S.ff.;
also
fig.
Wdn.
-
yu-gur, yu-ge-ra,
n. of a
country
and
people,
6s.,
which Sch.
gratuitously
identifies with Tait-
giid-,
however Glr.
p.
32 is
stated,
that Ti-
bet derived mathematical science and works
of art from the
east,
viz. China and Mi-
nyag (i.e. Tan-yiid}*
laws and
specimen-
ni
workmanship
from the north, vi/. II :
and
Yugera (which
are
frequently
mention-
ed
together A/a.)
a
passage
which N/-//.
(History
of the Eastern
Mon^uls,
328)
trans-
lated,
but
owing
to an
obscurity
in the Mon-
gul text,
he failed to
recognize Yugera,
instead of which he has the word
'Gugi',
questionable
even to himself.
{Sch.
on the
'Phantom of the Turkish
Uigures',
v. Preface
to Dzl
IX.).
yj'n' yu~b
a
handle, hilt, shaft,
yri-yu
haft of
a
knife; stdr-yu
helve of an
axe;
dcbs-
yu
handle of an
awl; Ihdm-yu leg
of a boot
6s.; yu(-ba)-can provided
with a
handle,
yu-mcd
without a handle
Cs.;
yu-bcad 'shoes,
slippers'
Sch.
(?).
'
yu-bu-cag
Cs.
^.u-bu-cag.
V
1
*'**' yu-
mo ox
'
cow
'
navin
g
no horns
6's.;
for
yu-mo
Sch.
has
k
hind,
female of a
stag' ;
it seems to be
little known,
yu-mo srol-goh
and
yu-mo
mdeu-Jbyin
names of
plants
Wdti.
Usjcn*
yw (
=
^^s
)
!
P'
ece ^ c'*n or s^
'>
N
'
gos-su ras-yug ycig-las
mi
bdog-ste
Dzl.
as
they
had but one cotton cloth for their
clothing.
Cotton cloth is
generally
of
very
small
width,
but the silk
fabric, designated
by dar-yug,
seems not to exceed much the
breadth of ribbons Glr. 2. for
yud
Mil.
Usjzn*f
y"9~P
i
Ld-
*ty-p
a oats
> P
r b. the
same as
yu-ku.
za
mourning
for a
deceased husband or
wife,
and the state of
uncleanness
consequent
to
it,
the duration
of which varies
according
to
circumstances,
whether the first or second
spouse
has
died,
and also with
respect
to the different coun-
tries
;
yug(s}-sa-pa,
also
yug(i)-sa
widower.
yug(s)-sa-mo
widow;
yug(s}-sa pog-pa
be-
ing
unclean in
consequence
of
mourning;
sdns-pa
cleansed,
viz.
by
the
expiration
of
the time of
mourning
Cs.
.,
*i/itn-pe* W.,
turmeric.
yiiii-iiia,
for
nyuit-ma. turnip
Glr,
bet'Alise he is dei'CCllUed fl"Om ... ; (oj b!l'iil.
btl !Ji,l, GIl'. whnllllls de-
dUll ti bya3-l'a yiJI Mil. what were you doing
just Ihen? 80 esp. W.: ·:.b--pa yin,
he h" snid it, ·ktil-l"Jtll· it 113S been sent
off; joined to tIle pnrtic. fu1., (or to the
plUlic. IIres. or pf., in ItS fllr ItS these are
sometimes used Also for the fut.) it ex-
presses futurity: U-ba yin Ptll. I shll.1I die;
lio Pt ish-paola btkur·ba yin GIl'. she shaH
be gi\'en to him, that will knoV>' her, find
her out from tlutongst the rest; .,grIrba !p'1l
mod GIl'. inlleed you willluwe 10 go now.
When joined to It root, it is only in lY. tbnt
it denotes the future: ·Ub yill, leb-bin· he
will come, ·ta,j yin· he will gi\·e.
Compo ·!ll'n-Ioy-cun* lV. thinking one's
self to be something (great), proud, coo_
ceited. - yin-lsul Mil. property, attribute,
oi f. - yin-Illffl J. circumstances, condition
(- )"l.is - bigs r); ((Jli - 1'11/111/8 - k!Ji !Jin - lugs
br)od Mil. she related to him her circum-
stances. 2. llature or essence of thioA's Mil.
6:1.::r !Jw, \'. fal'-yib eaves, shed Mil. nt., yet
cf. tbe following.
yib-pa to hide one's self C., W; car
!Jib bgld-pa I'll!. to take shelter from
tbe rain; *!Jib-te bd,..c(J* W: to hide, cUllccal;
!Jih-ma something hidden Sell.; !Jib-SlL place
of concealment, hiding-corner.
ylfJ, term;n"tiun of the instrum. cnse
lifter vowels, po.
UoJ'!lU 1. sbst.? yu b!JM-lla to calumniate
""'oQ &/1. (?); fJu-na if it is true Seh. (??) -
2. num. figure: 84.
tJ,J'ttr -r=r !lIt-flU. -1..'1l oats, or l\ simill\r kind
""'oQ"",' "'" of 8'I'll.in, which, in cnse of need,
lIlay I'tervo for food C.
!lil-glj-Al,i offieiutll tree, yieldinA'
""'oQ"", 1\ remedy for wounds rtnd sores
S.g.; also fig. Wdti.
UoJ':lf' t.I,J-:fj'''' 'flU-gil", n. of
',.;"'" ,',.; country nnd people, Cs.,
which &h. gmtuitously identifies with TIII'-
grid; ho,ye\'er Glr. p. 32 is stated, that Ti·
bet deri\'ed matllCmat;cnl science "nd works
of art from the cnst, viz. China and .Mi-
Ilyag (i.e. Ta';-Vitd), laws and
.sf I
of workmlln&hi'l from the nortll, yiz Hor
/lUll (which fire frequently mention·
ed together Ma.) - /l. passage which .$ell.
(Ilistory of theEastemMonguls, 328)trans-
Inted,but owing ro an obscurity in the
gul text, he failed ro recognize Yugera,
of which he hns the word 'Gugi',
question3ble even to himsclf. (&h. on the
'Phantomof the Turkish Uigures', V. Preface
to D::I. IX.).
!J'l'.q' fJ"-OO handle, hilt, shalt, gri-yu baft of
',.; a knife;MJr-.lfll hel\'e of an axe; dCb8-
!III. handle of lin awl; IhJm-yu leg of a boot
a..; .lJu(-ba)-can provided witl. p, handle,
YU-1'IM without a bandle C,.; yu-bClid '.-shOOl>,
slippers' Seh. (?).
yu-lm-i:ag (,;. -
UoJ':q:' UoJ'a:f yu.bo, yli-'1no 0:1, cow, ha";ng
',.; , ',.; no horns (t.; for !jli-mo &h,
has 'hind, female of 1\ stag'; it seems to be
little known. yU-1I/o st'Ol_g6Ii and yit-mo
1Ildeu-
o
b!Jin names of plants Wdli.
!Jug (-lmbs) 1. piece of cloth orstuff;
gONu rCig-l1L3 1/Ii bIMg-ste D::f.
as they hud lJUt one culton cloth for thcir
clothing. CoUon cloth is generally of very
small width, but the silk fabric, Ilesignated
by dcuo-yug. secms not to exceed much tbe
breadth of ribuons Glr. - 2. for yuel Mil.
!Jug-po, U;. oats, prob. the
same lIS
!Jil{J(i)-
""'oQ ',.; .::a mournmg for a.
deceased husband or wife, I\nd the state of
uncleanness consequent to it, tile dumtion
of which I'uries according to
wbcther the first or second spouse IlIlS died,
Md nlso with to tbe different coun-
tries; also !fI,g('raa widower,
widow; Y',,c,)-sa,xJg-pa be-
ing unclean in consequence of mourning;
sd,;,-pa cleansed, \·iz. by the expiration of
the timo of mourning (".
H',..· ...· •. 1/_,1 * , .. * """ .
::::J- -. .y'I'I-</U ....., !J1Il'ope ., wrmenc.
!/ll"-1t/(/., for n.y"li-lIIa, turnip GIl',
512
yuns-(d}kdr
OT
yul
y-v
_.
ywfo-(<T)kdr
white
mustard,
yuns-ndg
black
mustard; yuns-
O
bi'u
grain
of
mustard-seed, yum-Jyt^u
tsam
as small as a
grain
of mustard-seed
S.g. ;
yuns-mdr
oil of mustard.
yj;r*
yud\. rarely /w^,
a
very
small
portion
^
'
of
time, moment,
ace. to
S.g.
=
stated to be a
space
of time
varying
from
8 seconds to 2
minutes; yud
tsam
(zwj),
yud
re but one
moment, yud-tsam-pa
Do.
of a moment's
duration;
fse
O
di
yud
tsam
yin pyi-ma-la
mta-med this life is but like
a
moment,
the future without end
;
yud-kyis,
yiid-du
in a
moment, e.g. ynds-su pyin-pa
to
get
to a
place S.g.',
for a
moment,
ndm-
mfca-la ltd-ba
looking up
to heaven Wdh.
2. ace. to
Stg. Ku,
fol.
53, yud
is a
space
of time of
longer duration,
48 minutes
;
ace.
to Schr. in Bhot.
=
cu-fsod 24 minutes.
3. a black or coloured
stripe
on woven fa-
brics, yud-can striped,
black or white W.
=
yu-bu, ^u-bu
Cs.
(?).
yud-yud
Sch. :
yud-yud faid-pa
a
dim and indistinct
glimmering
be-
fore one's
eyes.
-yun time,
when
denoting
a certain
space
or
length
of
time,
klog Okyug-pai yun
tsam ma
Ion-par
der
pyin-nas
Mil. in no
longer
time than a flash of
lightning
takes
he arrived
there;
yun rih-po,
W.
*-mo*,
n
long time, yun rin-por, yun
rin-du
during
a
long time, yun rin-po-nas
a
long
time
since or
past; *yun
mdn-po
bud ca
dug*
W. a
long
time
passes; *yun
rin-ni Jcd-na*
W.
by degrees, gradually; yun-du
Grlr. for
a
long
time to
come;
yun
ci srid-du how
long? yun
fun-ba a short time.
yum,
res
P-
f r ^
?
1-
mother,
btsun-
mo
yum, yum
btsun
-
mo the
queen
mother. 2. Ssk.
^TTfTefiT,
title of the third
and latest
part
of the sacred
writings,
which
contains the
Abhidharma,
or
metaphysical
portion (Kopp. I,
595. Burn.
I, 48);
Sch.
mentions also an extract of
it, yum-cun.
WJ$TJ"
yu
m
-P
a
>
on
ly
W- to
strew,
salt on
food,
ashes on the snow.
yur-ba
I. vb. 1. to
slumber,
W. also
*fom
yur-ce*.
2. v.
yur-ma.
II. sbst.
aqueduct, conduit, water-course,
ditch
Glr.;yur-po
ce a
large trench, channel,
canal,
yur-prdn
a small
one;
sbubs-yur
a
covered,
subterraneous canal Cs.
; yur(-bai)
cu water
conveyed by
a canal.
Usj^'&r
yur-ma
the act of
weeding 6'.,
W.
;
*yur-ma yur-tva*,
C.,
W. also *co-ce*
to
pull
out
weeds; metaph.
to
purify
the
mind,
cleanse the
heart, e.g. by
disburden-
ing
one's conscience.
'yul
1-
place,
a. an inhabited
place,
as
opp.
to
desolation,
fan
ston-pa
mi dan
yul
med-cin Pth. a desert in which there
are neither men nor
dwelling-places;
b.
place,
with
reference to a sacred
community
(college,
monastery etc.)
near
it, e.g.
some
of the
students live in the
college,
others
in the
place
: so
yul-dgon village
and mon-
astery, yul-dgon-rnams
Mil. for
yul-mi
dan
dgon
-
pa
-
pa
-
rnams
laymen
and clerics.
c.
place, province,
country,
in a
gen. sense,
yul-(gyi^)
skad
provincial
dialect, provin-
cialism; yul-(igyi}
mfil,
mcog
chief
place,
capital ;
yul cen-po brgyad
chief
places
;
as
such are enumerated in
Pth.,
without
any
regard
to
geography,
Singhala, Thogar, Li,
Balpo, Kashmir, Zahor,
Urgyan, Magata;
r
9y
a
~9
ar
(.-9yi} y
ul India
; rgyd-yul, bod-yul,
sog-yul
India
Cor
China), Tibet, Mongolia ;
whenever
yul precedes
a
word,
as in
*yul
wa-ra-na-ser*,
it is to be understood in this
way
: as to the
place (situation),
in Banaras
;
skyid-yul
a
lucky place, sdug-yul
an
unlucky
one; pa -yul fatherland,
native
country,
home;
ran-yul
one's own
country, yzdn-yul
a
foreign country; Jbrog-yul country
con-
sisting
of
steppes, ron-yul country
full of
ravines
lha(i)-yul
land of
gods,
abode of
the
lha,
also
fig.,
a
particularly pleasant
country
or
scenery; mi(i}-yul
abode of
men,
(07 oixovfttvrf)
the inhabited
world, earth, yet
in the Tibetan sense
always
as
opp.
to the
abodes of
good
or evil
deities;
mii
yul-na
mi
^on
Glr. in the world such a
thing
is
not to be
found;
rndm-ses
dbdn-poi yul-las
Odds-pa
Wdn. the soul that has left the ex-
512
yuita.(d)ktir while mustard,
"'<> yu"...rni,black mustard; ylllis·
•bri grain of mustard-leed, tJUni
M smaU as a gmin of IDWlUlrd-seed S{/.;
yUli,.-mar oil of mustard.
yud J. rurely!JV9, a very smaU portion
of rime, momenl ace. to S g. - lRl1,
stated to be a space of time varyiog from
8 seroods to 2! minutes; !lild (30m
yud rl but Doe moment, yUd-.wzlll-pa Do.
of A moment'. duraooD; 6e odi yud tMm
yt'JI P!fi-aa-la mtu....td tbis life is but like
a momen", lhe future without end j y.d-Jryia,
yWd-dM io ft lIloment, e.g. }"l""- Ji!/ill-po
Kl get to :to plaee 8.g.; (or a moment, 1uim-
lIlta-la lUi-ba looking up to beaven lrd".
- 2. ace. to Sig. Ew, fol y1Ml is a space
of time of longer dUJ'fttion, 4S minutes; ace.
to &ltr. in Bhol. - ev-h6d 24 minutes.-
3. a black or coloured stripe on woven fa-
brics, yuJ-bz,. striped. bile" or white W
yWId..JJu - yi<-bll., ..tt-b" w. (?).
, -v.J-' yw.d-gild &11..; yud-!J1«l brid-pa a
"'00 -...:; dim and indistinct glimmering lie-
fore one', eyes.
flU" time, wben deootiug Ii certain space
"'" or length of time, klho )yUg-pui VU"
ham 11/a ldn-par tkr 11Ji.mu .'Iii. in no
longer time tban • f1asb of ligbtning takes
be arri"ed thel"e;!/UII riit-nn, If. .-mo. l\
I' -'r-,
ong time, !JIm rlti-por,!fUn rhi-du during
a. 10llg time, !filII rlti·PO·1/tu a long time
smce or past; ·yun 1Utiri-po bud la dt/O·
W: a long time passes; ·ylm rl,j·ili fa-ria·
If. by degrees, gradunll)'j y(u"..du Gil". for
a long time to come; yun Ci 'rid·du how
100g? ytm {(l.Ii../)a n short time.
ylllll, tesp. for ma, 1. mother,
-..:; 1/10 .'fUm, Yllm bfsun. mo the queen
mol.her. - 2. &1. title of the third
and Il\test Plut of the sacred writings, which
conlnins the Abhidharma, or nH:tl\ph}'sical
portion (Kopp. I, 595. Burn. I, -I8); &·h.
also an extract of it, !flJ.nt-'Hut.
yum-pa, only W. to strew, F.lIlt on
"'" food, ashes on the snow*
yui
!jWr-ba 1. \'b. L to slumber, IV. al:.o
"'" '(om yur-«"'. - 2..... yur-1tla.
11 sbst. &t1ueduc4 conduit, water.eoune,
ditch Gir.; yitr-po h a large trench, channel,
canal, yur-imi.n .. small one; .bubs-yur a
covered, subterraneous mnaJ 0.; yur(-lJai)
Cu water con\'eyed by a canaJ.
yitr-ma the atl of weeding C., nr:;
"'" W.also·CfrW
to pull out weeds; lUetllph. to purify tbe
mind, cleanse tile henrt, e.g. by disburden-
ing one's conscience.
tAr..f yul l. place, L an inhabite4 place, as
opr. to dellOlntioD, (ali ,wli,ptJ "'i dali
yrll 111«i-Hit. Ptlr, II. desert in .... hich there
are neither !Den nor d1l"elling-plllCetl; b.
place, with referenee \0 a sacred community
(college, mona.o:tny etc.) nenr it, e g, 90IIIe
of the studeotll live in the college, others
in the place: so YNi-dgOn village and mon-
:l<itery, vul.Jg6n-,.,.a1/U Mil. for yiti-ftfi dUli
tIgh • po • pa - ",,"Nil laymen ond c1tm.
c, place, proYince, country, in a gen. Sf'n5t,
yitl.(gyi) skad provincial diole'Ct, provin_
cialism; yul-(gyi) m(ii, mlog chief pltw:e,
capital; yul kn-po brg!JUd chief places; IlS
such are enumertlted in Ptlt., without an}'
regard to geography, Singhala, ThOW'r, I,i,
Balpo, Kashmir, Zllhor, Urg)'lIn, Mngata;
'1Iyi) yul Indin; rgyd-yui. bOd.yui,
wJg-yul Jndia (or China), Tibet, Mongolia;
whenever !/Nl preeed8ll ll. word, ns in '9"'
Ica-ra-'.la-Mr", it is to be understood in this
wll.y: 1'lS to the place (situation), in BanlirlLS;
akyM-yuia lucky plnce, sduy-yul an unlucky
onc; pa. yul fatherland, DatiV€; couotr}',
home; ra,i.yul one's own country, }:an.yul
l\ foreign country; o61'0fJ-yul country con-
sisting of steppes, rQli-yul country full of
ra\;nesj* Ilw(£)-yul land 01 gods, abode of
the Iha, also fig., II JllHticulorly plellSlU1t
country or scenery; lJIi(t'}yul abode of men,
(J} O/KOI/IIi,,']) Ihe inhabited world, earth, yet
ill the Tibelun sense always a::l 01'P, to the
abodes of good or e...il deities; filii yUl.lIa
mi GIl'. in the world such n thing is
not to be found; dbri."-poi yill-la&
lVd,i. the soul thaI hm! left the ex-
,,,//
l
ternal world,
(yet
el', no.
2); xpydd-i/ul, q.v.
J. the
object
or
objects
of
perception by
means of the
senses; ///// _/////
<////</
tin-
pro-
vinces of the six
senses,
viz. forms
(the
ex-
ternal
appearances
of
bodies),
sounds etc.
Mil.:
so
prob.
also :
yul-mams-la lons-spyod-
///
rninits- f<> Wdn. dead to sensual
plea-
>un-s:
i/id
mi
Odzin-pa,
or
yzdn-du O
dzin-
pa Thgy.
to
perceive things
either not at
all, or not
correctly; br)6d-pai yul-las O
dds-
pa
is stated to
imply
:
exceeding
the limits
of
speech, unspeakable, unutterable;
bsdm-
byai yul-las Odds-pa
=
bsdm-gyis
mi
Kydb-
pa frq. unimaginable, inconceivable,
which
term, however,
does not seem to be
fully
adequate;
also Was.
(311)
translates
yul
with
object;
cf.
ynas,
5.
--
3.
weather,
or
rather in a more
gen. sense,
climatic state
of a
country,
and condition of the
beings
in
it,
v. below
yul-ndn, yul-bzdfi.
Comp.
and deriv.
yul-Kdms kingdom, e.g.
of
Nepal, China,
Glr.
yul-Jior country,
province
Glr.
--
yul-gru
id. Glr.
yul-
dgon
v. above.
yul-ndn
C.
tempest, yul-
ndn-gyi
fsub-ma the turmoil of the
tempest
Glr.
;
also
public
calamities,
such as
famine,
murrain etc
,
Glr.
yul-can
1 .
suited,
pro-
per, being
in its
place, fulfilling
its
purpose,
('s.
(?)
'2. that which is treated
'objectively'
Was
311,
cf. no. 2 above.
yul-cos
charac-
teristic
properties,
manners etc. of a
country.
-
yul-ljoiis district,
tract of
country.
*yul
turn-turn* Ld. the
separate
villages
of
a whole cluster
bearing
one common name.
-
yul-sde
I. district
C.,
W. '2.
village magi-
strate.
yul-pa
inhabitant,
native,
gan yul-
pa yin
whence are
you
? what is
your
coun-
try
?
citizen, burgher
Mil.
;
yul-pa-rnams
the
people,
the
public
Mil.
yul-po gen.
with
ce,
a
large country,
Mil.
yul-dpon
village magistrate,
district
judge.
--
yul-
pyogs region, neighbourhood
Mil.
- -
yid-
ma a native woman.
--
yul-nii
1.
=
yul-
pa.
2.
countryman, compatriot
Do.
--
yul-
med l.
improper,
not in its
place
<
*. J. /v///-
snan
yul-mvd
bstdn-du
ysol
Glr. was ex-
plained:
what has no
place
in
my
mind,
what I do not know or
understand,
1
beg
you
to teai-h me.
yul-fso village, borough,
=
yrdn-fso.
-
*yul-fadd-zum-lfan*
W. land-
surveyor, engineer. yul-ybi*
v.
fzu.
-
yul-bzdii
fair weather
6.,
yet
cf.
yul-ndn.
yul-yod-pa
=
yul-can
C.
yul-len
the
mode of
forwarding
letters from
village
to
village,
instead of
expediting
them in
longer
and
regular stages. yul-b$dd geography
or
topography. yul-sd
dwelling-place,
habitation W.
yul-srid government
of a
country
Schr.
yul-srtd
=
yul-la Od6d-pa
attachment to one's native
place,
the love
of
country
and of
home,
Mil.
UsIflTfl*
y
ul-ba
>
less corr.
spelling
for
nyul-
ba Tar.
U^.
yus
1.
boasting, bragging, puff, yus
He
don cun Mil. much
bragging,
and
nothing
in
it, yus
ce ses cun Mil. one that
boasts
much,
and
knows
very
little;
yus
brjod-pa, byed-pa
to boast C*. 2.
pride,
Kon
yus
ma ce
zig
do not take too much
pride
in
y
ourheart
Mil.;
Ids-la
byas yus
ce-na
no-so cutithe moreaman is
pleased
with him-
self after his
deed,
the less
(real) happiness.
-
3.
blame, charge,
accusation
Sckr.(?\
false accusation Sch.
(?) , yus byed -pa
to
charge,
accuse Schr. 4.
ardour, fervour,
transport,
ddd-pai yus-kyis
in the fervour
of
devotion, e.g.
to shed
tears,
to fall down
on the
ground
l*th. 5.
yus Ofud-pa
to
fasten one cord to
another,
to knit or
join
things together
Sch.
*
ye,
1.
Cs.:'ye-ma beginning
and
eternity,
ye-lddn
eternal'. This word is known
to me
only
as an
adv.,
completely, perfectly,
highly, quite; yc-nas id.; ye-ddg quite
clean,
ye-rdzog$ quite perfect, ye-nas
bzdn-po
al-
together good;
with a
negative following,
not at
all, ye
ma
O
dod I felt no inclination
at
all,
ye
ma
zig-par Odug
Mil. he was not
hurt at
all, yc-nas
mi
byed dgos
that is not
to be done
by any
means
; ye-ses (vulgo
Ld.
*'-<?") "^TT,
toe
perfect,
absolute,
heaven-
ly,
divine wisdom: less
frq. resp. ye-mkyen;
//,'-*/*
l/ia the five kinds of divine
wisdom,
of
which,
ace. to
some,
every
Buddha is
possessed,
ace. to
others, only
Adibuddha;
ye-ses,
in a
great
measure at
least,
is inherent
33
temlU world, (yclcf. no. 2); q.v.
- i. the object or objects of perception by
means of the senses; 111ii !I'll drug the pro-
,iuccs of the six viz. forms (tbe
terll"l apl)('I\rUllCeS of sounds ele.
.lfil.; so IJrob. Illio: yIIl-,."allls-la lQlis-sp!Jod-
1#1" ,.",Oi1S-tt IVdn. dead to sensual jllen-
ylll 1/1; oddn-pa, or r::ult-du odzin-
pa Thy!!. t.o percci\'c things either not at
1111, or not corre<:tly; ll/jdd-pai yu.l-lus odJ.-
11(l is stnted to impl}': excceding the limits
of Spt:e<:II, unspe:..kable, unutterable;
byui ylil-ku odM-pa - bsum-U/lis mi f!lub-
pa frq. unimngiMble, inconceivable, which
term, however, does not seem to bc fully
adequnre; also lV/J.$. (311) trlUlsllltes yul
with object; cf. fllas, 5. - 3. weather, or
rntller in n more gen. sense, climatic state
of n cOlilltry. ond condition of the beings in
it, v. below yui-Mn,
Comp. and deriv. yul-I.'ums kingdom, e.g.
of Nepal, Cbinn., Gl,.. - couutry,
pto\'ince Gll'. - yul-gru id. Gir. - yul-
dgdn v. 1I.00\·e. - yul-liun C. tempest, yut.
i1dn-!J!li (,ub-7IIa the turmoil of the tempest
Glr-.; ulso public ctl.lamities, such as famine,
murrain etc, GIl'. - I. suited, pro·
per, being in its place, fUlfilling its purpose,
(,. (?) 2. that which is treated 'objectively'
lVIU 311, cf, no. 2 Above, - yUl-eoa charac-
teristic propertie-s,mnDDcrsetc.of n country.
- !JUl-ljails district, trll.ct of ('ountry.-
·fJul tutll-tlim· Ld. the separate villllgcs of
whole c1ustcr bearing one COmmon name.
- !/Ul·ldi 1. district C., w: 2. village magi-
strate. - ylll-pa inhabitant, native, U(vj !JUl-
pa yill whcncc are }'ou? what is your coun·
try? - cillzen, burgher Mil.; yill.pa·1'71ams
the people, the public .Mil, - !lM.po gen.
with Ct, n. large countr)", Mil. - yul-dpoll
\·illl\f;c district judgc. -
'P.'fd9s r('gion, neighbourhood ATil. -
11I0. II. native womw. - !JUl.mi l. ... yul-
pa. 2. countryman, compatriot Do. - !/tIL-
mid I. improper, not in its place (il. 2.1'(1,.·
31'luti !lui-mid J'Wl Gl,.. w:,s ex·
plained: what has DO place in my mind,
what I do not knOv.· or uoder.;tand, I kg
t e,
you to tCltel, me. - village, borough,
- !l'"Q,j-(ISC. - lV. b.nd_
sun-eyor, engineer, - .lj1tl-rH. v. f1:i•. -
YIlt.!Jzdli fnir weather (,., yet cf. !JUl-lid".-
yul-!Jod-pa - yul-can Ci. - the
mode of forwarding lettcrs from village to
village, instclid of expediting them in louger
lind regular stnge&. - yut.bidd geography
or topography. - yul-ad
Imbitntion w: - 1/lll-srid government of a
country Senr. - yuz.-.,.id _ Yllt.la oddd-pa
attn.ebment to one's native ptn.ce, the love
of country nnd of home, Mil.
tkJ!ll·.::r less corr. spelling for nyi4t.
..;.,,; ba 'lw·.
!JUS 1. boasting, bragging, puff, !JtU 'tt
don Cu'; Mil. much bragging, and
nothing in it, yta Ct us eun Mil. one tbll.t
boasts much, and knows very little; !flU
brJod-po, bytd-pa to boast Ct. - 2. pride,
Ito,i yrn rna Ct zig do not take too much
pride in your heart Mil.; lds-l«b!JlU yus u-1Ia
,;6-30 Cun the moreaml\.n is pleased with him-
self after his deed, Ihe less (real) happiness.
- 3. blame, charge, accusation &hr. (?),
false accusation &4. (?), !ltu byM.. pa to
charge, accuse Sen.,.. - 4, anfour, fervour,
transport, ddd-pai yitll-k!Ji3 in the fervour
of devotion, e.g. to sLed teaN, to fall down
on the ground 1"/11. - 5. yu' otud - pa to
fnsten onc cord to :..nother, to knit or join
things together &11.
ye, 1. Cs.;<ye-ma beginning and eternity,
ye-lddn eternar. This word is known
to me only an ad"., completely, perfectly,
highly, quite; yl-fl/J.$ id.; ye-ddg quile clean,
ye-,.d::ri[js quite Ilcl"fect, bzdli-po
togetber good; witb a ncgll.ti\·c following,
not at all, !It 1IIa llod I felt 00 inclination
lIL all, !It ma zifl"pa,. odll!J AliI. hc was not
hurt at nU, mi /)yed dgo. that not
to be done by any mel\.ns; ye-Ji, (vulgo Ld.
·'i-dell·) "IIT'f, the perfect, ab"olute, hea"en-
I)', divine wisdom; less frq, resp.
ye-Jts l,ia the fi\'e kinds of di\'ille wisdom,
of which, ace. W SOllle, every BuddhA ii
po88C8scd, ace. to others, only Adibuddha;
1/t-ih, in"- g,re:\t meASure at lust, is inherent
..
514
*
ye-ftg
to all
great
saints and divine
beings ;
it will
suddenly
break forth from tbe bodies of the
terrifying gods
in the
shape
of
fire,
which
puts
the demons to
flight Glr.; ran-byun
ye-ses
the
self-originated
wisdom occasion-
ally
is
personified
in a similar
manner,
as
Wisdom is in the Proverbs of Solomon
;
in
later times this
conception
coincides in the
po-
pular
mind also with
stoh-pa-nyid.
2.
pro-
vine. for
yin
Glr. 75. 3.
provinc.
for ...
am,
Kyed
bld-ma-can
Ogro-ye
Mil. are
you going
to the Lama? 4. in
comp.
for
ye-ses,
v.
ye-fig.
5. num.
figure:
114.
y
e
-%9
Scn' - 'the
trace, line,
or mani-
festation of divine wisdom'.
ye-ddns
Bal. for
nytd-rdn, you,
the
pronoun
of
polite
address.
y
e
~Jb
r
fy
a
contagious
disease Cs.~
ace. to oral
explanation: injury
inflicted on the
soul,
harm done to the
mind,
which
may
take
place
in 360 different
ways
Mil
-
W'-^C"
y
e
~
ran n> f a c
ity,
next to Khobom
(Katmandu),
the first in
Nepal
Mil.
"
ye-re
v.
yer-re-ba.
VJ
ye-$u
Jesus Chr. Prot.
Ns
'Z]'
yegs-pa rough, shaggy, hairy
Cs.
*q*
yen-ba
v.
yyen-ba.
*
yed-po provinc.
for
ydg-po.
IMS*
y
en
->
P
r k- on
ly
m
yen
-la
joined
to
1
yton-ba
and
synonyms,
to bestow liber-
ally, amply, plentifully;
zas dan
spyod-lam
yen
-la
f
tad
-par bya
food and
exercise
should be
amply provided
for Lt.
"
yer
Lt.
ynyid-yer q.v.
?
pydg-tu yer-pa zig
mdzdd-
nas to raise one's hand with the
palm
turned
upward,
as a
gesture
of
(wil-
lingly
or
respectfully) offering,
Mil.nt.
(This
term
might perh.
be
applied
to the
'waving'
of the
wave-offerings,
ordained
by
the Mo-
saic
law.)
y&r-ba sprinkled, sputtered, spouted(?)
Sch.
yer-re-ba pure, clear, genuine,
un-
adulterated Mil.
;
sno
ye-re
a
pure
blue,
dkar
ye-re
a
pure
white C.
y
el
~y^
Pth' fr(
l-'
e
'S-
dans
yel-
yel, sen&-dgd yel-yel clear, light,
bright
or
something
like
it(?).
y^^l'^l^l'
yes-mes
ancestor Sch.
U^"
yo
numerical
figure:
144.
y^~9
a Ssk.
=
rnal-Jbyor, yo-gi
-
yo-
ga-pa, yo-gi-ni
=
yo-ga-ma\
more
about this word v. Williams Ssk. Diet.
Dsfq*
yo-ba
1.
adj.
and
sbst., oblique, slop-
ing, slanting, awry, crooked;
obliquity,
slope, slant;
cun-yo-ba
a little
slanting,
crooked Glr.
;
Ka
yo
the mouth
awry S.g. ;
yon-po,
col.
*yon-te
!:
', adj.,
id.; yo sron-ba,
yon-po bsran-ba, Lexx.,iQ
make the crooked
straight;
*zdm-pa yon-yon
co
dug*
W. the
bridge
is
unsteady, swings
to and
fro; fig.
twisted, distorted, perverted, erroneous; yon-
dpyadvtrong interpretation,
false
judgment;
going
crooked
ways, deceitful, crafty,
and
sbst.
crookedness,
deceitful
dealings
Cs.;.
more
frq. yyo.
2.
everything, altogether,
whole
(?)
Sch.
Osfqs*
yo-bydd, tools, implements, chattels,
'
household
furniture, necessaries, O
fs6-
bai necessaries of
life; mcod-pai requisites
for
sacrificing; yo-bydd sbyor-ba
to
procure
the
needful,
to make
preparations
Dzl.
; yo-
bydd t'ams-cdd-kyis (or bzdn-pos) stob-pa
Tar. to
provide
a
person
with
everything
necessary,
to fit out
well;
yo-bydd
srel-ba
id.
(?)
Sch.
; yo-bydd-kyis Q
brdl-ba to be in
want of the
needful;
nor
pyugs yo
-
bydd
money,
cattle,
and
furniture,
as a
specifi-
cation of
property.
yo-Jbog
Wdh. n. of a
tree,
which
by
the Lamas of Sikim is stated
to
grow
in
Tibet;
Sch.:
elm,
and in another
place:
rii
yo- bog
linden-tree,
less
prob.
for
^og below,
down
stairs, yog
-Kan
ground-floor;
cellar. 2. v.
yyog-pa.
to all great saints and divine beings; it will
suddenly break forth from the hodiell ofthe
terrifying gods in the shape of fire, which
puts the demons to flight Gir.; raii.bgun
yNk lhe se1f-<lriginated wisdol)l occasion-
nlly is personified in a similar mauner, as
Wisdom is in the Proverbs of Solomon; in
later times thisoonceptioncoincides in the po-
pular milld also with 3uJll-pa.nyid. - 2. pro-
vine. for yin Gir. 75.- 3. provine. for _. .am,
llyed bld·ma-&ln o!Jrd-ye Mil. are you going
to the Lama? - 4. in compo for ye-JC3, v.
ye-fig. - 5. num. figure: ] 14.
ye.fig &/1.: 'the trace, tine, or mani·
"'l 'I festation of divine wisdom'.
... ye.d(ili3 Bal. for nyid-rdn, you, the
I pronouD of polite address.
yc-olmlg n contagiolls llisClise C"j
ooe. to oral explanation: injury
inflicted on the wul, harm done to the mind,
which may take pbce in 360 different ways
1I/il. -
ye-ra/i n. of a city, next l() Khobom
(Katmandu), the lirst in NellalllJiI.
ye-re v. yer-I·e-kJ.
yt-iu JesllS CAr. Prot.

yfgs-pa rough, shaggy, hairy Cs.
yen-ba v. ryin-/m.
yed-po provine. for yrig-po.
yen, prob. only in yen - wjoined to
rtdli-ba and synonyms, to bestow liber·
ally, amply, plentifully; ;;as dail ,pydd-Iarlt
yen -la rtad. par bya food lUld exercise
should be amply provided for Lt.
yer Lt. = )7IyW-yer q.v.
t.\t.r:Z::J' y/:r.pal pyag-iu yer-pa zig m<kJd-
nas to raise one's hand with the
palm turned upward, as a gesture of (wil-
lingly or respectfully) offering, Mil.nt. (This
term might be applied to the 'waving'
of the wave.offerings, ordained by lbe:Mo-
saic law.)
ylr-ha sprinkled, spuitered,spouted(?)
&h.
yer-re-ba pure, clear, genuine, un-
adulterated Mil.; ,lio ye-re a pllre
blue, dkar ye-rl a pure white C.
yel1J'fl, Pth. frq., e.g. mdails '!.Iel.-
!lei, st11B.dfja yel-yel clear, light,
bright 01' something like it(?).
yes-me, ancestor &h.
CXf yo numerical ligure: 144..
JjO-ga Sll. - 1·nal.-
o
hyiJr, !Jd-9i .. yo-
ga-pa, yo-gi"'1li _ y6-ga-mu; more
about this word v. Williams Ssk. Diet.
ar.q· yQ-6a 1. adj. and sbst., Oblique, stop-
ing, slanting, awry, crooked; obliquity,
slope, slant; Cull - yO. ba n lillle sllUlting,
crooked Gb·.; yo the mouth awry S.9.;
yon-po, col. -yon-Ie-, adj., id.j yo ,r<,;,i-ba,
yQn-po blrml-ba, make the crooked
straight; -zdm-pa yon.-y6n co dug- IV. the
bridge is unsteady, swings to and fro; fig.
twisted, distorted, pel'Yerted, erroneous; yon--
dpyadwrong interpretation, false judgment;
going crooked ways, deceitful, crafty, and
sbst.. crookedness, deceitful dealings 0.;.
more frq. ),fJO. - 2. everything, altogether,
whole (?) Seli.
yo--bydd, tools, implements, chattels,
household furniture, necessaries, o(so-
bai necessaries of life; mCod.-pai requisites
for sacrificing; yo-bydd sby6r.ha to procure
the needful, to make prep1U'ations Dd.; yo-
byad (or bzan.pos) sfOb-pa
Tar. to pl'ovide a person with everything
neccsi>ll.ry, to lit out well; yo-blJdd ,,11-kJ
id. (?) &h.; yo-bydfJ.kyis obral-ba to be in
want of the needful; Mr P!J«gs yo hydd
money, cattle, and furniture, as a spccifi.
cation of property.
yo-J)og JVdli. n. ofa tree, which
by the Lamas of Sikim is stated
to grow in Tibet; &11.: elm, and in another
place: rii YO·oMg linden.lree, less prob.
u:f.qr yog 1. col. but also sometimes in B.,
for below, down stairs, !J09 - Itdli
ground·floor; cellar. - 2. v. fydrJpa·
515
pole
01 stick for
stirring
the fire,
poker
.I///. ///. 2. v.
yyog-po.
>/<></-}
<'i" <>nc that is
wotting
his
bed Sc/t.
"'''"'
I
1
*-.'/'"'*
" S(
'
( l
throughout
(except
in
Balti,
where
they
>a\
"on-c(is*);
not
unfrq.
also in later lite-
rature,
for
^on-ba
to come: Sck. has also
yon-cad (-fsad?)
time and
place
of
coming,
and
yoit-ye
ever
before,
at all times
(?).
yof'in,
all,
whole, mgo-ndg yons-kyi
/)<
Git: lord of all the black-haired
(i.e.
of all
men); yons-
du-
fsal-gyi po-bn'i/i
Mil. the
palace
in which all wish to
meet,
nif.; yd/is
-su adv.
wholly, completely,
alto-
gether, i/ons-su
ddg-pa quite clean, yons-su
tpdn-ba
to
give up entirely; y6ns-su
bslad-
de
quite
lost in
perverseness ; generally,
uni-
versally,
zcx
;joit*-su yrdgs-so
Glr. so he was
universally called;
yom-grdgs-kyi
bu cen
bzi
Mil.nt.,
four
disciples, followers,
of uni-
versal
fame; sdug-bsndl-las yons-su
ma
tjrnl-la Stg.,
seems to mean : he is not
yet
quite
delivered;
cf. however
ye-nas
with a
negative. yons-grub
the
absolute,
what
is
independent
and
complete
in itself Was.
(202).
-
yod-pa, resp.
and
eleg. mas-pa
1. to
be,
=
ym-pa, sgyu yod
Dzl. it is de-
ceit,
humbug;
often with the
termin.,
like
Odug-pa, dud-pa
ltd-bur
yodGlr.it
is smoke-
coloured;
sin-fu
mfun-par yod Odug-pas
Glr. as
they
are
very
intimate with each
other;
with a
participle joined
to it
(or
a
gerund, vulgo, esp.
in
W.}, gro-ba yod
it is
becoming, growing, getting
lib.;
*<ir-j
r
>yogs-
su
bstdn-pa yod
it is
pointing
towards the
east,
stsdl-nas
yod
he
gives,
has
given;
brlxig-na* yod
he is
building,
he was build-
ing; *U>b(s)-te yod*
W. he is
(has) come;
\vit Ifa root often
pleon.
: rias
bsags yod Kyod-
kijis
Kol
</';/
Mil. I
have been
splitting (the
tree)do you carry
it
away now;
nan c&ii-
po byas yod
Glr. he has been
committing
a
great
evil;
son
yod -pas
l*th. as he was
gone.
2. to be in a certain
place,
da- rd~iii-
bu^ig ydd-pai
ndn-na Dzl. inn
pond
which
\- \<, that
place;
tint
yul-ini-la*
bu-mu
jHi-mam
Dzl. the
girls
that are
among my
subjects;
*dc. t/<i/'/-//</
i/t'n/-/,nn
fxii/'t-ma* W.
all that is in
it; y6d-sa,
pop.
for
gdn-na-ba,
place
of abode. 3. to
exist, to be on hand.
bde-bayodmayin
l*lh. no
happiness
exists;
i-iiii-zad
yod kyafi rid-kyi
Dzl. as
possibly
a little
might
still be on hand
;
V
yod
is,
or
are there
(even now)
? Glr.
;
xnd/i-ba
ydd-
pai
dus-su
Thgy.
whilst there is
day-light.
-
4. with
genit.
or dat. for to have
(like
the Latin eat mihi I
have): su-la-^anyod
ma
yin
Pth.
nobody
has. .
.;
rgydl-po-la
Odod-pa cen-po yod-^par Odug
the
king
seems
to have
yet
a
great
wish
;
rgydl-moi yyog-
mo
zig yod-pa
de Pth. a maid-servant whom
the
queen
had
;
so in a like manner without a
case:
grizig yod-pa
de Mil. the knife which
he had about
(him);
yod-pa Thgy.
the
things
which one
has,
ra
vnaQ%ovTct',
Kron-
pa O
dom
bcu-dgu
yod-pa
Glr. a well
having
a
depth
of 19 fathoms. 5.
yod-par ^yuf
a fut. of
yod-pa
shall or will be. b. to
origi-
nate,
appear,
bsd/is-pai
sul-du da-run
yai'i
yod-par gyur-nas
Dzl. as in the
place
of
(the gold-pieces)
that were taken
away,
al-
ways
new ones
appeared,
c. to
get, receive,
Kri
ydugs kyah yod-par gyur cig
Dzl. the
throne should also receive a
canopy! yod-
par byed-pa
to
beget, produce, effect,
frq.,
bu
yod-par gyis sig
Dzl.
get
her a child!
Comp.
Cs.:
yod-pa-nyid existence,
yod-
min
-
nyid
non
-
existence;
Sch.:
yod-
fan
'thoroughly
clear'
;
yod-fsod yin
'it has the
semblance of
being' (?); yod-med
a.
being
and not
being, yod-med go-bzlog
snan
op-
tical
illusions,
when one
imagines
to see
what is not
existing,
or the reverse, b. in
W.
yod
is also used
merely
to
give
force to
med,
as
*yod
med* there is not at all ...
y
n !
9'tt- offering,
of free
will,
to
priests
and mendicant
friars,
frq.,
zds-
yon
a
gift consisting
in
food,
yon Jbvl-ba
to bestow a
gift,
to
bring
an
offering; yon-
du
J)ul-ba
to
present
as a
gift; fee,
sindit-
yon physician's
fee 6*.
;
yon
sno-ba to bless
the
gift
received,
to return a
blessing
for
it. 2.
=
yon-tan.
!Jd9-pO I. &/1. yOfj-tIlO, lV. !/Oy.Ji,i,
pole orsliek lor stirring thefire,poker
Mil.m. - 2. v. '1yQy-po.
one that is wetting his
bet! &/,.
D;fc:::,'.::r !JIi';-ba, l,fo yo,ia, throughout.
Tibi't (except. in Balti, where they
not unfrq, "Iso in Ill.tf'r lite-
rature. for to come; &1., 111\8 also
!jQ,i-cfld (-('ad!) time "nd [llaee of eoming,
and yo,i_y; ever before, "t "II times (?).
yo';s, all, Whole, 1ngQ.lldg yd,i.-kyi
rJe Gil'. 101·d of all the hlnek-baired
(i.e. of 11.11 men); !JO,ia-odu·o(wl-gyi fxJ-bNili
MiL the pnbce in which all wish to meet,
ni f.; yd,js.au adv. wholly, completely, aJlo-
gether, yOHNU dag-pa quite cleAn, ydlia-sll
111'ali-w to give up entirely; yd'i84/t lnlJd·
de quite lost ill pel','ersellC&Sj generally, L1ni-
versally, Zl'a y&,ja-au [lrdgs.so Gir. so he wns
universally CAlled; lm lm
bzi J/il. nt" fOLlr followers, of uoi-
\'eTsal fnme; wug- {]$jl(il-laa yo,i, - au ma
gr&.la Stg., seems to mell.ll; he is not yet
qnilc dc\i,'ercd; cf. however ye-nas witb ll.
negative. - yo,i'-grlil.l the absolute, what
is indelleDdent nnd eomll]ete in itself WIUI.
('02). -
D;:f::;'i' yM-pa, resp. And eleg, m'S.-pa 1. to
be, :: yin-pa, tgyu yOO D:L is de-
ceit, Illlmbug; often with the termin" like
otllig"PU. dud-pa ltd·bu,' yodGlr. it is slUoke-
coloured; Un-fu lIl(,i,I-par yod odug-pas
Gir. AS they arc "cry intimate with each
other; with a participle joined to it (or"
gerund, vulgo, esp. in IY.), grQ.-w yotl it is
becoming, growing, getting Pth,; jdr-F!logs-
,u hstdn-pa ycxl it is pointing to\\'llrds the
east, .18Iil·/I1U1 !lOll he gives, has 'gi,'en;
bruig-naa yod be is building, he Wll.il
ing; °lib(!)-te lV. he is (hIlS) comej
wilh) root often ploon.: ,iaa Wa!P yod J,!yOtk
k!Ju I!ol i:ig Mil, I have beeo splitting {the
you enrry it away now; ,jan chi-
po bya! yod Gil', be lias beell committing
a graM e\'il; ao,j ydd-1'«1 1'lI,. I\S be was
gone. - 2, to be in a certain place, del' ,v1:(,j-
ImJig yM-pai 1Id,;·tla D::i
1
in:! which
'"
iii ir, that 111..::e; ';ui yUl-mi-w. M-71lO yOd-
/Ja·l'Ilaln Dzi. tile girls that are a.mong my
subjeclll; ·Je 'ld,;-7la yOd-lian (Irlti.ma· W.
nil th"t is in it; ydd-aa, pOI" for
Illace of abode. - 3, to exist,. 10 be on hand,
bde-hu yod1n1,l yin PtA. no hlloppineso exists;
hiJi-zud yod kYUli "id-kyv, IJzi. AS possibJ)'
"little might still be on hano; "yod is, or
nre thel'e (e"en now)? Gi,..; a1ldti-/)u !ldd-
paj d,i.-!u '1'/'[lY. whilst there is dll.y-ligbt.
- 4. witli genit.. or uat. for 10 have (like
the Latin at lIIild I hn.ve): yod
111a !jilt Pill. nobody 1i:\S •.• ; r!Jydl.po-la
odQd-pu chl110 yMpar odug the king seems
to hn.ve yet a. great wish; I'f!!Idl-11Wl Jydt)-
1110 zig ydd-pa de Pt/•. Il. maid-sen'ant whom
the queen hll.d; so in a like manner witbout a
case: gl'i zig ydd-pa de NiL the koife which
he had IIbout (him); ydd-pa TJ'Oy. the
things which one has, 'fa im&(JXfWfa; /{rQII-
pa odom u?:u-d!p, Gir', a well baying
a deptb of l!) fathoms. - [I, yOd_par o!lyur
a fut. of yM-pa shall or will be. b. to origi-
nate, appear, sUi-du da·rij/j !lUI;
ydd-pm' gyul·-na. Dzi. as in the place of
(Lhe gold-pieces) that were taken away, al·
ways new ones II.flpeared, c. to get, receive,
llri rdugs kya,i ,ydd-par gyuJ' Cig Dzl, the
throne "'hould also receive 8 cunopy! ydti-
par byld--pa to beget, produce, effect, frq.,
bIt !lOd,pflr iifl D::l. get her A child!
Camp. C,.: yod-pa-->lyid existence, yod-
min - "yid lion - existence; &It.: y<Jd - (a,i
't.horougbly clell.l·'; yod-t.dd yill 'it hns the
of being'(?); yod-mtd 11.. beiog
and not being, yod-m«l gtrb::ldy lIIati op-
tical illusions, when one imagines to see
whAt is not ('xistillg, or the re,·erse. b, in
lY. yod is "Iso used merely to give force to
med, ns -yod there is not aL all ...
1Xf"5j' YO" 1. gift, offering, of will, to
priests lind mendiclloL friars, frq., :d.·
!jQ>l a gifl consisting in food, yon obttl.JJa
to bestow fl gift, to bring an olTering; yOn.
du obitl-ba to present l\S a gift; fee, ,,/ldn-
y<m ph)'siciflD's fee c..; gO/l .>iQ-ba to bless
the gift. received, to return a blessing for
it, - 2...
516
yon-tan
yya
Com
p. yon-mcod
1 .
=
yon-bdag
Glr. 2.
for
yon-bdag
dan
mcod-ynas
Mil.
dispenser
(of gifts)
and
priest.
- -
yon
-
bdag vulgo
and in more recent literature for the
sbyin-
bgag
of earlier
writings, dispenser
of
gifts,
entertainer
,
host
,
in
point
of fact identic
with
house-owner, citizen, farmer,
and also
at the
present
time used in that sense with-
out
any religious bearing;
it is also the title
generally
used
by
mendicant friars in their
addresses, something
like
'your
honour'.
yon-ynas
the receiver of a
gift
Cs.
yon-tan 3jTjf (opp.
to
skyon) l.good
quality, excellence,
valuable
proper-
ties, e.g.
the medicinal virtues of
plants;
also
acquirements, accomplishments,
attain-
ments, yon-tan slob-pa
to learn
something
useful Pth. and
vulgo ; O
di bui
yon-tan yin
Dzl. for that
you
are indebted to the
boy.
this is the
boy's merit;
property, quality,
in
gen., e.g.
the different tastes and effects of
medicines
Med.;
also
mystic
or fantastic
properties
Glr.
bdag
blus
kyan yon-tan
med
Glr.,
even if one would ransom
me,
it would be to no
purpose,
not worth
while;
Odod(-pai) yon(-tan)
v.
Odod-pa; pan-yon
v.
pan-pa.
2. num.: 3.
*
yon-po
v.
yo-ba.
yb, <ob, stirrup Cs.;
yob-goii
in-
step
of the foot Cs.
;
yob-lcdgs
'the iron of the
stirrup'
Cs.;
yob-cen
=
yob
Cs.
;
yob-tag stirrup-leather Cs., yob-mfil
the
footing, yob-lun (Sch. yob-Ion)
the
hoop
of
the
stirrup.
J"
yob-pa
v.
yyob-pa.
yom-pa
Cs.
vb., adj. sbst.,
to
swing,
totter, tremble,
to be
unsteady; swing-
ing etc.,
the
swinging etc.; yom-po, adj., yom-
yom Pth., yom-me-ba
Mil. id.
yor-po
1.
dull, heavy,
blunt
Cs.;
Tar.:
yor
-
yor
-
ba
;
but the
expressions
fom-yor shaking, tottering, trembling,
like
an old man
Mil.,
and
mig-yor mirage,
seem
to indicate that the
proper signification
is
trembling.
2.
oblique, slanting,
C.
y
6l
-9> yol-ma
earthen-
ware, crockery Schr., Cs.,
dkar-yol china-ware, porcelain, frq.; yol-gor
cup, bowl,
Sch.
yol-ba
I. sbst.
curtain, yoi-bas Jbre-
ba Glr. to stretch a curtain
over;
yol-ba fen-pa
Glr. to draw a
curtain; yol-
ba
ycod-pa
to close the curtain
(of
a
door),
yol-ba Obyed-pa
to
open
it
Cs.;
dar-yol
silk-
curtain,
ras-yol calico-curtain;
sgo-yol
cur-
tain before a door. II. vb. 1. to be
past,
nyi-ma-pyed yol mid-day
is
past,
it is after-
noon
(about 2o'cl.)
Wdk.
(v. nyin-zdg');
srod
yol
son the
evening-twilight
is
gone,
it is
complete night (about
11
o'cl.) C.;
nyi-
ma
yol-la
Kad
day
is almost
over, evening
is
drawing on,
Dzl.
?%, 6;
dus-las
yol-ba
to be
past,
both
impers.,
it is
past,
it is
over,
and
pers.,
he is
past
his
prime, old,
decrepit
Dzl.;
rlun dan car dus-las mi
yol-bas
wind
and rain
setting
in and
ceasing
at the
pro-
per
time Dzl. 2. also
yyol-ba C, dbyol-ba,
Jbyol-ba
to
evade, shun,
to
go
not to a
place.
mig yol-ba
to look
away; *le-yol cem-po
yin*
he is
very shy
of
work,
averse to la-
bour C.
2/os,
1 .
slightly
roasted
corn,
m
ostly barley
or
wheat,
which on account of its trans-
portability
is
generally
taken
by
travellers
along
with
them,
as their fare on the
road;
fresh
prepared
it is much relished
by
the
people; Jbrds-yos rice,
thus
prepared S.g.
2.
hare,
but
only
as an astronomical
term,
yos-lo
the
hare-year.
cnUspr
yyag, ^*fT->
tne
Y^
Bos
grunniens
'
(reckoned by
the Hindu
among
the
antilopes),
fern. v.
Obri-mo; po-yydg
male
yak; pa-yydg
uncastrated
yak-bull; yyay-
rii horn of a
yak,
also n. of a
plant,
Morina
Ld.
; yyag-rog-zol-cen
a
very long-haired,
shaggy yak
Sch.
yy
ari I- ^s^-
^? synon. dpal, happi-
ness, blessing, prosperity, yyan cdgs
blessing
comes
(from), grows (out of),
nif.
Mil.
;
sor it
departs,
it is
gone
; yyan-skyob,
yyan- gugsSchl. 263, *yan-Kug*
W. a
calling
forth of
blessing,
sacrifices and other cere-
monies
performed,
in order to secure
happi-
ness and
prosperity. yyan-skdr propitious
stars or
aspects;
the lunar mansions no.
5Hl
Compo yM-1IlC6d j. - yon-bdag Gb·. :l.
for yOn-bdag dati Mil. dispenser
(of gifts) and priest. - yim - bdag vulw>
and in more recent literature for the 3byin-
bgag of enrlier writings, dispenser of gifhl,
entertainer, hosi, in point of fnct identic
with house·owner, citizen. farmer, and also
at the present time used in tbat sense with-
out. Rny religious bearing; it is also tbe title
genernlly used by mendiClmt friars in theil'
addresses, something like 'your honour'.-
ycln-ynm the reeei\'cr of n gift L8.
yQn-ian (opp. t03KYQn) J.good
quality, excellence, valuable proper-
ties, e. g. the medicinal virtues of lliants;
also acquirements, accomplishments, attain·
ments, yOn-tan 3l6h-pa to learn gomething
useful Ptli. and ,'ulgo; odi bui !JOn-tan yin
D:.:l. fOI" thnt you are indebted to the boy.
this is the boy's merit; property, qualily, in
gen., e.g. the different tastes aod effects of
medicines MM.; nlso mystic or fantastic
properties Gll'. - haag blU3 k,yait yon-tan
1ned GiI'., even if one would nlnsom me,
it would be to no purpose, not worth while;
oMd(-pai) ydn(-Ian) v. oddd-IXl; pan-yon
V. p'an-pa. - :l. num.: 3.
yon-pr> v. y6-ba.
i):f::r q::r!JOb, stirrup w.; yolJ-g6,i in-
, step of the foot (S.; yob-lbltp
'the iron of the stirrup' (S.; yW-cell _ !JOb
Cs.; yoh-fdg stirrup-leather C3., yo!Mllfil the
fooling, yob-luli (&h. yob-loii) the hoop of
the stirrup.
D:f.:r.:r !JI;b-pu v'l'yrJb-pa.
yJm-pa (S. vh., adj. sbst., to swing,
totter, tremble, to be unsieady; swing-
ing elc., tlte swinging elc.; y6m-po, adj., yom-
y6m Pth., yom-mt-ba Mil id.
!fOr-po 1. dull, heavy, blunt c,.; Tar.;
y6r - yoI' - ba; but the
fom-yOr sbaking, fottering, trembling, like
tin old man Mil., nnd mig-yOI' mirnge, seem
to indicate that the proper signification is
- 2. Oblique, slanting, G.
afr'..rEtf, yol- g<J, yrJl-1Ilu earthen-
ware, &lirJ Ct?
dJ.:ul'-!fdl China-ware, porcelain, frq.; yol-gdl'
cup, bowl, SeA.
i):fr.p::r y6l-ba I. ijbst. curtain, y6l-bat. obri-
ba GIl'. to stretch a curtain o"cr;
ydl-ba fen-po. Gil'. to draw a curtain; yJl-
ba rCod-pa to close the curtain (of n door),
ydl-ba obyM-pa to open it C8.; dm'-ydl silk-
curtllin, ra3-!l0I cnlico-curtain; 8fjQ-y6l cur-
tain before a. door. - n. vb. 1. 10 be pasl,
nyi-ma-pyed yol mid-day is pust, it is after-
noon (about 20'cl.) Wdk. (v. n,yin-zag);
31YHl yoi 30" the c\·eniog-twilight. is gone.
it is complete night II o'el.) c.; lIyi-
rna y6l-la day is almost over, evening
is drllwing on, Dzl. 'Pt., 6; yol-va
10 be past, both impers., it is past, it is over,
and pers., he is past his !,nme, old, deerepit
Dzl.; rtuJi dan cal' dm-w mi ytJl-bWl wiud
ancl rain in nod censing the pro-
reI' timl1 Dzl. - 2. IIlso 'YyoUJa C., dbyol-ba,
oby6l-ba 10 evade, shun, 10 go not to a place,
mig yol-ba to look awny; *Ii-yol cern-po
yin* he i6 very shy of work, averse to la-
bour C.
1.slighUyroasled com, mostly barley
or wheat., which on account of its trons-
portability is generally taken by travellers
along with them, as their fare on the road;
fresh prepared it is much relished by the
people; J.mis-.lfJ8 rice, thus prepared S.g.
- i. hare, but only as aD astronomical term,
yd3-w tile harc-year.
f"Jag, the yak, Bos grunniens
(reckoned by the Hindu among the
tlntilopcs), fem. \'. obri-rno; iJ{)-)'1Jdg male
yak; j)a-fgdg uncastrated yak-bull; n;ag-
ni horn of a yak, also n. of a. plMt., Morina
Ld.; l'yag-rog-zol-Un a. very long-haired.
Shllggy )'ak &h.
l'Yr",i 1. &k. m, synon. dpal, happi.
ness, blessing, prosperity, r!lan cdtp
1I1essing cOllies (from), grows (out 01), nif.
Mil.; Sot· it departs, it is gone; f1/aii-slcydb,
f!J(lJi-of!U!p&hl. 263, *.ya1i-Mug* W: a calling:
forth of blessing. sacrifices and otber cere·
monies performed, in order to secure hllp/li-
ness and pros/,erity. - ry«ti-d:dl' propitious
stars or aspects; the lunnr llIansions no. S
517
yi/l
,
to yv \.
/V/V//-N/,
iif.
)i/u/i-l,'iiii beggar's
baQ
of theLamas.
--///</
/J-m//
happy, blessed,
prosperous, yydii-nu'd
the
contrary. ///""-
///'/
;i written benediction Glr.
yyan-llin
a
deity
of the
Shamans,
dispensing happi-
ness Sch. 2.
gulf, abyss,
in-n.
yydi'i-mi
also
-yzdit;
ji-lwm
info f>~in
yydii-sa
ce SO
as
you
stand,
so
deep
is the
gulf;
lus
thi
ytoh-ba
to
plunge,
to
precipitate
one's self
Dzl.\
yydn-du
or
yydh-la
Itun-ba
to fall down
Zte;
mcd/t-ba to
leap
(?//.;
/'idn-son-gi yydn-la Jk'or
1'f/t. he totters on
the brink of the
abyss
of hell:
yydh-sa-las
c <.kin-pa
to snatch from the
abyss,
to save
.]
brag-yyan-yzdrTooky precipice M-Ag.
yy
a"~f
-'
&'^- : '^ie
precious
stone
chas'.
fyan-fse
Mil.
nt.,
6'. a bowl or
cup
of
clay
or wood.
yzdn-aos
Skin of an
animal,
used for
clothing;
Mil. also
fig.:
bzod-pai
yyaft-lugs gyon
he
wrapped
himself in the
mantle of
patience; yyait-yzi
Le.v.
^f^T,
skin of an
antilope,
the
customary
couch
ofthe members of
religious orders;
also
skin,
couch,
covering,
in
general
Pth.
yyun-pa
J->exx. w. e. Sch. : a cuta-
neous
eruption,
akin to the
itch,
which is said to invade
any part
of the
body,
and to be combined with a
copious
dis-
charge
of
matter;
hereditary,
and not con-
tagious.
,
)'yub-pa, yydb-mo
v.
yob
etc.
y-yam
Sch. :
l
the
following
a
good
or
bad
example,
with the
respective
consequences (?)'.
yydm-pa
Sch.: 'a certain
stone';
*yam-pdn*
W. a slab of
slate,
roof-
slate,
for
yya-spdn.
ZTTWQ" I'M"
1 '
rus
^'
mcorr-
verdigris; Icays-
lyd id.;
Icagsgya
caf/s
IA. iron
rusts;
*ya for,
or
jun,
or
yoit*
W. id.;
*ya
cdd-
ce* W. to
scrape
the rust off
(from metals),
to
clean,
polish; yya-ddg-pa
freed from
rust,
clear,
polished, e.g.
a
mirror;
yyd-pa rusty
Sch.; fig.
for
infection,
contamination Mil.:
t
n
,/,-iff-fnt to be
mouldy
Sch. or more
<
nn. to
get rusty,
to
get
covered with foul
extraneous
matter;
If-i'-lu
y>)<i-
<lritl
byed
Lt.
the
tongue gets
furred. 2. also
Yijd-ma,
vulgo *yd-mdti*,
slate, slab of
slate;
yya-
spdit
l.id. '2. ^s. also oil of vitriol,
sulphuric-
acid
(V)
3. in ('.
verdigris; )','/<(-?>:/
1. a line
drawn with a slate- or
lead-pencil.
.. slate-
pencil, lead-pencil,
also
yya-smyug.
3.
bolt,
bar,
yija rgdb-pa
to
bolt,
to
bar, yya pye-
ba to
unbolt,
to
unbar;
yyd-xir
=
yya;
*
dzin-
ya*
C.
pin.
4. v.
yyd-ba.
2TTUJQ."TJ'5J*
Tydrkyi-ma
Lt. n. of a
plant,
^
\nLh. asmall
high-alpineS;ui>-
surea.
yyd-ba
1. to shrink, to start
up,
in
consequence
of a sudden
irritation,
tickling
etc
,
to
shudder, skyi-yya-ba
id. Mi/.:
W.:
*ya cug-ce*
to cause to shrink or
start,
to
tickle,
Cs. also:
yyd-ba
to feel a horror.
-
2. to
itch,
del lus
yyd-bas
Dzl. because
he felt an
itching.
yya-yaV- V-^/*y
es! in
speaking
to inferiors.
yy<*-ti maple *S/X-.;
the dried leaves
of it are said to be boiled
by
the
poor
instead of tea.
T
yar-ddm
Lex., oath(?)
Sch.
yydr-ba
to
borrow,
to lend
;
to hire
;
with reference to
money, only
provinc. (LA., T!s.); po-bran-nas
mar- me
yydr~te
Glr.
having
borrowed a
lamp
in the
castle;
ynas-fsdn yydr-ba
Tar., C., *<Jdn-sa
yni'-ce*
W. with
la,
to ask for
reception.
night-quarters; Kdii-pa rydr-mKan
lessee,
tenant, lodger; yyar bycd-pa yydr-ba
Mi.;
*pan-ydr
co-ce* W. to succour a
person by
an advance of
money; pa-yydr step-father,
ina-yydr step-mother, hu-yydr adopted child;
yydr-po
credit for what has been
lent,
ad-
vanced
;
*ydr-po
tdii-ce* W. to
lend,
a
thing,
Nr ///. to
let,
lodgings.
yyar-fm&
food,
nourishment,
vict-
uals Sch.
;.'/<'<-/'
r
'9h* yyda-mu
the
right
hand,;v/as-/m
on the
right (hand),
)'yds-su
to the
right, yyds-nas
from the
right;
r!J'IIt-t
i
to /'t. \'. - )"fJwi-IMg beggar's
bag of the happy, blessed,
prosperous, {yail-IIIM tile contrnry. - lVII,i-
!Pt/ a. written ueuediclion Gl,.. - ryu,i-lnd
II. of the SlmulllM, hl\l'l'i-
lIess &11. - 2. gull, abyss. gell. ryuli-Sll :llso
nlllil-r::UII; ji-Uam m(o bzitl {yu,i-su fe so
high l\S you stnnd, so dccl' is the gulf; lll.
ryd,i-4.11l ftQli-ba to plunge, to precipitate
olle's self D::l.; nJdli-dll or )'lJd,i-lu ltli,,-bu
to fllll down D::l.; mrxlJi-ba to leal) Gll'.;
,iall-IO,j-!1i ryuri-la PM. he totters on
the brink of the abyss of llClI; }'yd,i-sa-la.
od::ill-pa to snatch from the :'abyss, to snve
1'1'!I!J.; bl'ag-yyu,i-r::rirrocky I,redpicc M,iy.
t"ymj-ti &Ii.: 'the precious "tone
elias'.
ryll,i-(u Mil. lit., C a uowl or cup
I ,- '"
of clay or wood.
y'VllIi-liI[Js C. also !lu" -lIis, -
'"' skin of an nnilOnl,
used for clothing; Mil. :llso fig.: b::rkl-pai
ryait-Iugs 9!JO'1 he wrnpped himsclf in the
mnntle of patience; nJu,i-rzi 1..A>.£. owm.
skin of an antilope, the customnry couch
ofthe memhers of religious orders; lIhoskin,
couch, covering, in general l'tk
J'!Jull-lIa ]"a,"(. W.C. Scll.: a cutu-
neous eruption, akin to the itell,
which is said to invude allY parl of tbe body,
nnd to he combined with n. copious dis-
charge of matter; bcredittlry, and not con-
tagious.
ryab, rydb-pa, )'ydb-1no \', yuh Cll'.
yyam Sd,.: 'the following II j.';ood or
lmd example, with the l'espectil"e
oonscqueuces(?)'.
rydm-pa Sell.: 'a certain 8tone';
°yam_{uiJiO W: a slab 01 slale, roof-
slale, for n!"-spait.
J"ya I. rusl, incorr. verdigris; It'-ays-
[JlJd id.; U'ag$ gya (1.1.'/$ U. i,'On rusLs;
·ya for, or jll,i. or !Jo,io W: ie!.; ·YII Md-
i:t" IV. to the rust ofT (from metnls),
to clean, polisl.; yya-day-pa freed fro,"
c1eaf, polisbet!, e.g. n \Ilirror; J'yd-pa rusty
Sdl.; fig. for infection, contanrinalion Nfl'b
ry,j od,'i<l-ba to he lIIould)' Scli. or more
corr. 10 get rusly, to get fO\'crecl with foul
extraneuus mlltterj lce-la J"ya-
o
drifl0Jed I,t.
the tongue gets furred. _ t. :.Jgo )yaollna,
vulgo ·yd-Jnd,j*, slale, slab of slate; rya-
3pd,j l. id. 2. (;1:. al$O oil of vilriol. sulphuric-
acid0) 3. in (,: verdigris; rya-fi!1 t. a line
drawn with a slate- or lead·pencil. '!. slale-
pencil, lead-pencil, also J'1Ja-sllly,lg. :1.
bar, ryu rgdb-pa to holt, to Llllr, ryu w-
ba to unbolt, to unbnr; rlJa-lil'- r!JUj·od::in-
yaO C. pin. - 4. v. ryd-ca.
nJd-kyi-7<'U Lt. n. of a plant,
in Lit. llslllnll higll-nlpineSllus-
surca.
fyU.-ba I. 10 shrink. to start up, in
consequcnceof a."udden irrit.ntion,
tickling etc, to shudder,sAyi-ryu-oo id. Mil.;
IV:: ·!Ja t'tig-h" to cause to shrink or sLart,
10 tickle, fl. also: ryd-ba to leel a hOl'l'1lr.
- 2. to itch, dl!i lus ryri-bu3 D::l. hecause
lie fclt au itclling.
°!Ja-.lJu"yes! in speaking
to lnfenors.
ryd-li maple Si1:.; the dried lell\'cs
of it nrc Sl!.id to he boilf'd by tile
Iloor instead of tell.
fUl'-dam Lu., oath(?) &1,.
rydr-btl to borrow, to lend; to hire;
wilh l'eference to money, ouly
11l'O\"inc. (Lh., T3.); po-braii-tl.lU mdl'-IM
r!J!i,..u Gz". having borrowed 1\ lllillp in the
castle; fIlcu-(lldli rydl··ba T(lI'" r...:, -,,/riii-sa
YI;" - ct'- W: with la, to ask lor reception,
nigllt-quarter5; !(d1i-pa lessee,
tenant, lodger; ryUl' bynl-pa - ryar-ba &/,.;
"]in/I-ydl'ro-U' 1v. to succour a. person by
lin Ild\"llnCe of money; fta-)'Ydl'step-Iather,
ma-y.IJar step-mother, bu-ryur adopted child;
l'!Jal'-PQ credil for wlJnt hAS !leen lent, ad-
\'aoced; ·yar-po ld,i-U' to lend, a. thing,
ScI,,·. to let, lodgings.
food, nOUrishment, vicl-
uab Sd,.
ryris.pa righi, r.IJlU-lIIa the rigllt
hllnd, lyrit-Ha ou llle rigbt(hlllld),
to n;J,."as from the rigbl;
518
yyen
mig-)'yds
the
right eye, lag-yyds
the
right
hand, rkan-yyds
the
right
foot;
yyas-hos,
-pyogs,
-logs
the
right (hand)
side:
yyas-
yyon right
and
left; yyas-yyon-la
ltd-ba to
look all
round; yyas-ru
1. the
right wing.
2.
p.n.,
district in
7s.;
*
Yp-ru
tsdn-po*
n.
of the
principal
river in Tibet v.
; tsdn-po.
yyiil-du
or
yyul-nor zugs-pa
to
go
to battle
Do.
;
yyul som-pa
to
prepare
for battle
Lex.;
dug li>aiyyul-no zlog-pa
to
repulse
the war-
like host of the five
poisons
Mil.
' err n-
to be hindered
6s.;
Lex.:
yyer-mas yyic/s-pal
/i^
turkois, m<^m-/i/Mthefront-turkois
in the head-dress of
females; prd-yyu
little
turkois-stones; /ym' frq.
for turkois-
blue
; *yu-ddn*
W. the ribbon on which the
turkois-stones ofthe head-dress are fastened
;
yyu-mfso
a
blue-glittering
iake, po. Mil.;
*
yu-zun-men-tog*
forget-me-not Sp
;
yyu-
rdl a mane of turkois-colour Glr.
yyu-
run for
yyun-drun
Glr.
ty-pa,
incorr.
spellingfor dbyug-
(also /a-
fsan),
the cross
cramponee
-}->,
the
principal symbol
of the
Bonpos,
but also
much in favour in Buddhist
mysticism
and
popular superstition; yyun-drun-pa
=
bon-
po; yyun-drim dgon-pa
the Buddhist mo-
nastery
Lama Yurru in
Ladak,
v. Cun-
ningham.
^J"
yyuii-ba tame,
opp.
to
rgod.
yyun-mo (Lea;, f^f^^rr,
a libidi-
nous
woman),
6s. : 'a woman
having
always
the menses'.
'
yyur
1.
sleep
Sch. 2. v.
yyul-Ka.
yyur-ba
Lex.,
C. also
*yor-ba
f
to
droop,
to
hang
or sink
down,
of fad-
ing
flowers etc.
;
yyur
zd-ba Lex. w.e.
;
Sch. :
what has become
ripe
and eatable.
qiujor
yy
ul Schr.:
army;
6s. :
battle;
neither
\*
of the two
meanings appears
to be
quite
exact
(cf. dmag}\ prob.
both
yyul&n&
yyul-
no denote an
army
facing
the
enemy
and
ready
for battle
; yyul-las rgydl-ba
and
pdm-pa
to
conquer
and to be
conquered
frq.
;
yyul ^yed-pa Do.,
sprod-pa
Do., Pth.,
O fdb-pa
to
fight, strive, struggle,
dan with
;
thrashing-floor;
both
these words
appear
to be not
everywhere
current,
but
provine.,
cf.
Ko-yyu', yyul-Ka
fcog-pa
Sch.,
*yur)he'-pa*
C. to thrash.
yyt*
~
ba
>
less
fr<l- yen-ba, pf.
(f)yeiis,
to move a
thing softly
to
and
fro, e.g.
an infant on one's
arms,
to lull
it to
sleep Thgy.; esp.
with reference to the
water: cm
yyens-te
moved
by
the waves to
and fro Dzl.
;
fig.
to run to and
fro,
like a
hunted hare
Ma.;
to stream
into,
to
overflow,
yul-Kdms-su
a
country,
to inundate
it,
of
floods,
hostile armies etc Ma.
;
to
rummage.
turn
over,
dpe-rnams
books Mil 2. to turn
off the
attention,
to disturb the
mind,
rgydl-po
spyan yyens-pa
dan Glr. the
king looking
away, directing
his attention to
something
else
;
sems
bdud-kyis yyens
Mil. the soul is
disturbed
by
the
devil;
cos
Odod-pa-rnams
yyei)s-par byed-pa Thgy.
to
put
out or con-
found those that are
seeking religion ;
ma-
yyens-par nyon cig
now be all attention!
yyen-ba, yyens-pa sbst., inattention,
wander-
ing,
absence of
mind, yyens-su Ojitg-pa Thgr.
to
give
one's self to
inattention;
adj.
rndm-
par yyens-pa very
absent,
wandering ;
rndm-
par mi-yyen-ba
or
-yyens-pa quite attentive,
not to be disturbed
by anything,
inexcit-
able,
a character in which Buddha
excels,
and which
every
one of his followers must
strive to attain. 3. sbst.
yyehs-pa
diver-
sion, pleasure, recreation,
*ydn(s}-pa-la
cd-
ce*, resp. *fug-ydn(s)-la (s)kydd-ce*
W. to
take a
walk, *ydh(s)-pa
se-ce* W. to be
playful,
like
children,
kittens etc.
; jest, joke.
*ydn-pa
man,
don-ddm
yin*
W. I am not
joking,
I am
serious; *ydn(s}-pa-can*
W.
jester,
buifoon; yens- dod-kyi
Ka-kfdm ma
yin
Mil.,
these are no falsehoods
spoken
in
jest. yyens-ma,
a wanton
female,
prosti-
tute Sch.
yy
m<^
yyen-sbyor-ba
S.g.
to calum-
niate nif.
m(fj-nI1b the tight cye, lag-1Yds the tight
hand, rkan-}lId$ tbe right foot; ryus.,;()g,
-hIOgs, _Mg, the I'ight (hand) side: Y!lQ$-
7ydll right lind left; ltJ-ba to
look all round; "IYIU-fif. I. the right wing.
,. (. (' ,"- .. lJ, I" ..
:l.p,D., UIS riC III 1.11.; L'-I'U n.
of tbe priuciplll river ;n Tibet Y•• t.uhi-jW.
.:@' ryi, dbyilynx (e,:,. erron. ermine).
YlIlg(s)-pa 10 be hindered (4.;
"'r "I Lu.: JY;Nna, yyifls-pa1
tm,IJ' ryu turkois, mdim-l!1uthe frout.-turkois
"N in the head-dress of females; ,,'rJ-nlu
little turkoiS'-st.ones; fllui feq. for turkois-
blue; "!Ju-dan" 11': the riUOOII on which the
turkois-stonesoftbc head-dress arc fltStened j
r.VU-m(1I(} n blue-glittering lake, po. Mil.;
"yu-::im-men-wg" forget-we-not Sp; }'yu-
ral a mane of turkois-colour GIl'. - J'YII-
'oUli for fgun-dmli GIl'.
fyufna, ineorr. spellingf""dbgug_
pa.-
fguli-ddlli, (nlso yza-
13(ui), the cross crampOllee+, lhe
principal symbol of the Bonpos, but. nlso
mnch in favour in Buddhist mysticislll and
popular sUllerstition; r!JllIi-Jl'illi-pa - Wn-
po; r!Juli-dni,i dgm.pa the Buddhist mo-
nastery J,lllna Yurru in I,adnk, I'. CUll-
ninghilm.
f!rU1i..fJa lame, urp· to I'!i()(l.
fyun-,"", (/.£J." fir...." a libidi·
nous woman), 01. :'awomlln having
always the menses'.
f!lur 1. sleep Seh. - 2. v.fyul-l'a.
uJ"., C. also ·yor-oo· to
droop, to hang or sink down, of fad-
ing flowers etc. jfYu,' zU-Qa J..e.>:. w.e.; &It.:
what lias become ripe and eatable.
Y!Jul SclO'.: army; e3.: battle; neither
.of the two meo.nings to be
quite e.xad (cf. Jmog); prob. both f!JU1 find
fYui- iid denote an army facing the enemy
and ready for baltle; Y9M-la3 1'9ydl-ba lind
pam.pa to conquer and to be "Conquered
frq.; ryul dI!Jed-pa Do., 3prM-pa Do" llt/l.,
•fdb·pa to tight, strive, struggll', dan with;
,
yyul-du or ryul·Mr ::ugs-pa to go to
Do.; yyul i01Jt-pa to prellnre for hattie
dug biai fy,ll-no zldy-pa to rel'ulse the wllr-
likc host of the Jive jloisond Mil.
f!Jul-.(afJ
, thrashing.floor; bolb
tbese words nppear to be not everywhere
current, but provine., cf. I!trr!JU; y/lul-Ru
ycdg-pa &/1., ·yur)M-pa· C. 10 thrash.
lybi-ba, less frq. yeli -1m, I'f.
(y)yni8, to move a thing softly to
and fro, e.g. an infant ou one's to lull
it to sleell TllfJY.; esp. with reference to the
water: (us rydls-tc moved by tbe WIlI'es to
nnd fro Dzl.; fig. to fUn to and fro, like a
hunted hare Ma.; to stream into. to overnow,
n country, to inundate it, of
floods, hostile armies etc Ma.; to f\Immage.
turn over, dpe-rnalll$ books Mil - 2. to tum
off the attention, 10 disturb the mind. rgy/U-po
8pyan yyens-pa dal; GIl'. the king looking
aWIlY, directing his attention to something
else; !elmr bdud-lryi3 ryells Mil. the ."oul is
disturbed by the devil; lOll .dtid-pa-rnams
ylftli:s--pal' byN-pa '1'ngy. to put out or
found those that lire seeking religioD; ma-
yyiit3-JXlr n!Jtm Ng now be all attention!
yycli-ba, f!Jbis·pa :>bst., inattention, wander-
ing, absence of mind, yyc,is.w Jug-pa nfl".
to gi\<e one's self to inattentiou; adj. nlo.lII-
11m' Y!l,is-pa very ab<>ellt, wandering; /'nUIII-<
par mi'Y!Jbi-ba or -yyhis-pa quite attentive,
not to be disturl>ed by anything, inexcit-
nble, a character in which Buddha excel;;,
lind which ever)' one of his followers IDU.«t
strive to attain. - 3. SbSI. f!lenS-pa diver·
sion, pleasllre, recreation, *!Jd1i(s)-pa-la cu-
ec·, resp. *(v,g-!Jdn.(s)-la (s)lrytid-ce* to
take a walk, ·y/lii(s)-pa st-c/!* IV. to be
llln}'ful, like children, kittens etc.; jest, joke.
*!Jallopa man, don.Jam yin* lV. 1 aIU not
joking, 1 am serivus; *!ld,i(s)-pa-i:all* U:
jester, l.>uffOOD; ybis-.dod·k!Ji 7Ila
yill Mil., these nre no falsehoods spokell in
jest. - J'1Jb18o-ma, a wantun felDale,
tute &h.
l'yell' fgell,w!Jur-1m S.9. to calum-
niale ni f.
519
ST, being
untrue in one's
dealings, acting
wrongfully,
which also
my
referees confirm-
'<! to be the
general
import
of the
word;
in
book-,
lin\v>ver,
it is
usually joined
to
O
dod-
/)//>-,
or
il<'il-}nt-l<t, adding ttg-par,
as:
O
d<></-
/><i-/,
t
It'iti-jHtr )'i/hn-pa,
or it stands alone as
in
)!/>'/// l>yt'
t
{-pa, signifying
'to commit adul-
tery,
fornication' Dzl and
elsewh.;
log-y^'m
sbst
yytr-Ka (vulg. *'er-Ka),
bell, set of
bells,
or
peal
Glr.
)'!i<'>'-po wise, prudent, circumspect,
thorough-going
Sch.
)'y
er
~bdg Lex.,
Sc/i.: a
light,
lu-
minous
place.
;yt'r-ma
Med.
frq.,
Guinea
pepper,
f
'(ipsicum
W.
*nyer-ma*',yyer-siii-
pa
medicinal herb
S.g.
yyel-bo,
1. to be
idle, lazy, slothful;
idleness,
laziness
;
yyel-ba-med-par
incessantly, continually, e.g.
to
pray,
to
guard Mil.,
S.O. 2.
tugs yyel-ba resp.
to
forget
W.
yyo (rarely yo) craft,
cunning, deceit,
more
frq. yyo-sgyu, yyo-zol; yyo-can
crafty, deceitful, yyo-med honest, yyo byed-
pa
to deceive.
yyo-ba
I.
vb.,
pf.
and
imp. yyos,
1.
to
move,
to cause to
change place;
to be
moved,
agitated, shaken,
ynam sayyos-
so heaven and earth were shaken
DzL;
des
ni sa
O
di
yyo-bar Ogyur thereby
the earth
may
be shaken
Do.;
to
bend, incline, tilt, e.g.
a
vessel;
*zug-po yos
ton* W. make a bow!
sku
yy6s-par O gyiir-to
the
image began
to
move
Glr.;
sa-yyos earthquake;
to
begin
to
move or to march Ma.
;
fugs
-
rje ytitt
-
nas
yyos-pai rtags
it is a
sign
that his heart is
moved
by grace
Mil. nt.
;
dge-bai pyogs-la
O
dw-.sv.s i'nii-zdit
kinn'i
ma
yyos
he did not
allow the least virtuous
impulses
to rise
(in
his
heart),
he
kept
down
every
sense of
virtue;
yyo-ba partic
, continually moving,
restless,
uneasy,
of the mind
A///.,
mi
-yyo-
ba unmoved,
immovable,
n. of Siva and of
other
terrifying
deities Glr.
(cf. Tjj^f Will}
2. to
prepare,
victuals for the table
)>/''>*-
.s
lnji'<l-i>a
id.
;
yyds-Kan
kitchen, bake-house,
yyos-wiKan
baker,
cook.
II. sbst.
moveableness, mobility, ydii-zin
; i/(>-li<i-iii/l<l
iin
easy mobility
\Vtlii.
usually occurring
in the more defi-
nite
i.ormyydg-pot
servant,
man-servant,
yyog-
mo maid
-servant,
female
servant,
waiting-
maid;
when
distinguished
from
K6l-po,
k6l-
mo and
bran,
it denotes a
higher degree,
e.g. yyog-mo ynyis
two
waiting-maids
and
besides 500IcM-mo maid-servants Pth.
;
yyog-
po
daii
ydn-yyog
dan
nyiii-yyog servant,
ser-
vant's
servant,
and the servant
again
of
these Pth.
;
mii
yyog byed-pa
to be in a
per-
son's
service,
to
obey
a
person ;
dpon-yyog
master
(mistress)
and
domestics,
master and
attendants,
frq.; nad-yyog,
a
nurse,
one that
tends sick
persons
Dzl.
;
yyog-Jidr
attendants,
e.g. yyog-Jcor bcu-drug
attendants and re-
tinue of 16
persons, Jcor
dari
yyog
id.
yyog-nah-zdn
a house-servant
C.
-
a,
pf.
and
imp. yyogs, rarely
yog-pa
1 . to
cover,
bu
gos-kyisyyog-
pa
to cover a child with a
garment/)^.,
mgo-la
rdzd-ma
yyog-pa
to cover one's head
with a
pot
Glr.;
also: rdzd-mai
mgo-la
drd-
bas
yyog-pa
to cover the
opening
of a
pot
with a wire
grate
Glr.
;
pyii pdgs-pa yyogs
the external cutaneous
covering appears (in
the
embryo) S.y.; ri-mgo
h'a-bas
yyogs
the
hill-tops
were covered with snow
Mil.;
to
pour
over or
upon,
to cover in
pouring, Krdg-
gis
with blood Dzl.
; to
overlay,
with
gold
Dzl;
to
sprinkle over, besprinkle. **ig-pa-la
tag*
W. the wall with
blood;
to strew
over,
*Kd-la
gog-fat?
W. ashes over the snow.
-
2. to
pour away,
to throw
away;
so
W.;
the
people
in W. understand the words Dzl.
GO,
6: *ma
yogs-pai Ihdg-ma*
the rest which
has not been thrown
away,
whereas
others,
e.g.
the
people
of Sikkim
explain
it: the
rest that has not been taken
possession
or
care of.
P/O//.S
1.
cover, covering, mgo-yyogs
Lex.
covering
for the
head, cap;
also
fig.
and
po.
for
self-delusion,
self-de-
yye".- ]J/l, Lu. f3f1QT"I'"tr, being
untrue iu dCl\lings, acting
wrongfully, which Also IllY conlirm-
eli 10 be tile f,:'encrnl import of the word; in
book", howe\'er, it is usually joined to
pa&, or "dding Mg-pal', liS:
pa-lll ryC1n-pa, or it stands alone us
ill )ylm byhJ.l'a, signifyiug '10 commil adul-
tery, fomication' D::l and elscwh.; w,-rybn.
"bst. -
yyk-I..'a (\·ulg. ·'t,.-/{Il), bell, set of
bells, or peal Gil'.
yfl"-po wise, prudent, circumspect,
thorough-going &/1.
1£.1:., &1•. : a light, lu-
minous place.
T!J'-'.r-ma Med. frq., Guinea pepper,
W: -llfJer-ma-;y!/t"-in',i-
po. medicinal herb S.g.
Jyil-ba 1. to be idle, lazy, sloiliful;
idleness, laziness; yyel-ba-lIlM-pal'
incessantly, continually, e. g. to pray, to
guard .MiL, 8.0. -:!. (1Ig! yyil-ba rCSI). to
forget W
)'YO (rorely yo) craft, cunning, deceit,
more frq. YYO-&Y!Jli, ryo-zol; ryQ.c(m
crnny, deceitful, ryo-'IIIU honest, rfJO b!Jid-
pa to deceive.
Y!lG-ba 1. ,·b., pf. nnd imp. yycn, I.
to move, to cause to change pll\Ce;
10 be moved, l\Sit3ted, shaken, ynal1llCl.f!ldo-
oW heaven and earth were shaken Dzl.; de&
ni &a .di tfJO-bar .,[J!lW· thereby the etlrth
InlloY be shaken Do.; 10 bend, incline, titt, e.g.
n \'e58el; ·zug-P"!JO& toti- W. llll\kc a !>ow!
&1.:11. the imnge began to
movc GIr.; ,a-yym cllrthqunkc; to begin 10
move or to march Ma.; {u!/S- Qt ttili-ll<U
yy*-pai rta!p it is 1\ l;ign that his heart is
moved hy groce Mil. 111.; dge-bai j;!J09&-la
cwi-zad klp,j flW he did not
nllow tbe Icnst virtuous impiliscs to rise (iu
his heart), he kel)t down every sense of
virtue; yyd.ba partic, continually mO\'ing,
restless, uneasy, of the mind -Ilif.,
fHI unmoved, immovaLle, n. of Sivil and of
other terrifying deitil'S Glr. (cf. ""f'Ifl! Will)
- 2. to prepare, \'ictuals for
&1.byid-JHI id.; yye.-Ita'; kitchell, bl\l..:e-llOuse,
1.'lo'...,'lltalt baker, cooll:.
JI. sust. moveableness, mobility, ydli-Zin
i1frbIJ-1fyill an ea'ly mobilit)· lVdti.
Y!JO!I (\'. Y"fI, TIJr. l\nd elsc\\"h.,
usmJly occurring in the more deli_
nite fOflll Y!J69-PO, servant, man-servant, Y.'1dg-
11I<:) maid-servanl, female servant, waiting-
maid; when from I!dl-]XJ, It&-
1110 and bran, it a higher degree,
e.g. yy&f!./llo Y1fyi& two waiting-maids and
besides 500If&·mo mnid-servants Pt".; rJdy-
po dan J/ri!'-}'!JO!J Jail nyili-Y!l1J9 servant, ser-
\·nnt's servnnt, ,md the servant again of
tllese l>r/l.; mii y!!O!f byM.-pa to be in "' per-
son's service, to obey II persou; Jpon-y!fdg
mnster (mistress)aud domestics, master Ilnd
attendants, frq.; nad-y!JOfJ, a nurse, ODe that
tends sick (It'rsOIlSDzl. ; Y.yog-.lorattendant.;,
e.g. Y!!O!f·iM,. bCu-dr«y Itttendants and. re-
tinue of 16 persons, .I!o,. dati )'yog id.

ttpf"=!,]·.:r pf. and imp. Y!JO!/S, rarely
ydg-pa 1.10 cover, bu 9d&-kyuY.'I&f!-
pa to cover II child with a garment Dzl.,
mgo-la "thd-ma yydt,rpa to cover one's head
with fl pot Gb'.; also: ,oJ.=d-1Ilai ?IlflO-la drd-
ba& )'IJC9-pa to cover the opening of a. pot
with a wire gmte Glr.; paflS-pa yyog&
the CJ:ternal cutltneous c<H'el'ing al)penrs (in
the embryo) 8.g.; '7wmgo lIa-ba& YyogI the
i1ill.tops were co\'ered with snow .Mil.; to
pour over or upon, to cover in pouring, 1.'o'd9-
yl8 with blood D:l.; to overlay, with gold
D;;/.; to sprinkle over, besprinkle, -&ig-pa-la
(d9' W. the wall willi blood; to strew over,
'fd-fa gog-{al" ashes o\'er the sno\\'. -
2.10 pour away, to throw nwl\.Y: l'oO W.; the
people in W. understand tile words
G: '1IIa lIuiU-JIIa- the re"t which
hl\.S not been thro.... n away, whel'ell.8 others,
e.g. the I}(!OI,!e l)f Sikkiw explnin it; the
rest hn.s not been lakeu or
cnre of.
)'!JO[/' 1. cover, covering. IIlgo-yydg&
co\'ering for the hClloO, cap;
also.Jig. nud po. fol' self-delusion, self-de-
, v
520
yyod
*
ra-sdoii
ception (prop.:
a
veiling
of the
head)
Mil.;
sten-yy6gs,stod-yyogs
upper-garment,
mantle,
toga, smad-yyogs
trowsers,
breeches Tar.
-
2.
cover, envelope, yyogs-can
having
a
cover.
'
yyod
C. the
large
intestine,
colon.
Pth
>
Cs-
=
w
6
crafty; perh.
also
fornicator,
as
yyon-ma,
ace. to Lex. and Sch. : harlot.
y!)6
n
-p
a
\^ yyon-ma
the left
hand,
yyon-na
on the
left,
to the
left,
yyon-du
towards the
left, yyon-nas
from the
left;
yyon-Ugs
the left side or
hand, fyon-
Idg-byed-pa
Pth.
left-handed,
fyon-ru
Sch.
the left
wing,
of an
army.
ryob-pa, pf. yyobs
to move
about,
to
swing, brandish, ysog-pa
the
wings;
rkan-ldg yyob-pa
to
kick,
to
strike,
with the
arms and
legs.
*> * sail
>
)"y^'-y6l
id
Cs.,
yyor-sin sail-yard Cs.,
also
mast,
in a rather obscure
description
of a
ship
in
Zam.,
where the sail is called
dar,
cloth.
2.
wave, billow, rgyd-mfsoi
Glr.
Note. Tibetan writers
knowing
of
ships
and
navigation
about as much as a blind
man of
colours,
the
obscurity
of
passages
relating
to such matters
may easily
be ac-
counted for.
ryor-ba
1 . v,
yyitr-ba.
2.
v.yydr-
ba. 3. v.
yor.
*
yyol-ba
v.
yol-ba.
P
rov- for
w*->
in
circumambulation from left to
right
(so
that the
right
side is towards the
person
or
object
that is
reverentially
to be
saluted)
Wdn. 2. v.
yyo-ba.
s^ra
1. the consonant
r,
always pronoun-
ced with the
tongue.
2. num.
fig.
: 25.
X*
'# stands for: 1
rd-ba,
2.
rd-ma,
3. rd-
mda,
4. rd-ro.
^'
rwa
(cf. ni)
1. horn W. *rd-co* id.
-
">
2.
sting e.g.
of the
scorpion.
3. Sch. :
'the inward
side,
the
horn-side,
of a bow'.
rwa-can horned.
rwa-snyih
the
pith
of a horn 6s.
rwa-myug
'the first
germ
of seed that
appears
after
sowing' Cs.;
rwd-
rfsa 'the root or bottom of a horn'
Cs.,
rwd-
rtse 'the
top
or
point
of a horn'
Cs.,
rwd-
t'sa
%.(?).
ni-gan,
in com
p. rag, brass, rd-gan-
gyi bum-pa, rag-bum
brass
cup, can,
vessel,
rag-dun
a brass
trumpet; rag-skyd
Sch.:
white-copper, packfong,
German silver.
f
ra
-sgo hoof,
clavy
C.,
W.
'
rd-nye, provinc.
for
zd-nye
lead.
rd-mnye
an officinal root
Med.,
Sch. :
carrot.
y.g;
rd-ti Cs. : 'a small
weight,
a drachm
(60 grains)';
but
^^ (not
to be found
in
Will.)
is
prob.
the Hindi word for
^f%feBT,
the seed or
grain
of Abrus
precatorius,
as
a
weight
about
=
2
grains.
rd-mda
help,
assistance
(Cs.
also:
companion,
assistant),
rd-mda
Jbod-
pa
to
cry
out for
help
Glr.,
rd-mdar sbron-
pa
Cs. to call
(upon
a
person)
for
assistance,
ra
Od#gs-pa
W. *ram
tdg-ce* (cf.
zabs
Odegs-
pa)
to
help,
to assist
Sch.,
ra
^dren-pa
id.
Mil. nt.
; rd-mda-pa
helper,
assistant Glr.
;
rd-
mdai
dpuh-fsog
auxiliary
forces or
army
Cs.
"
ra-sdon Sch.
weeping
willow.
520
eel/Lion (prop.: a "eiliog of the head) Mil.;
.uJi- mnotle,
to,;:a, trov;sers, breeches Tar.
- 2. cOYef, envelope, rN-cma ba\'ing l\
co\·er.
ryod C. the luge intestine, colon.
"Pfi r!Jdn - ".. Prh ; Co. - ryd - /0.
cl'llft.y; perb_ also fornicator, as
nPn-"1a, ace. to Lu. and &It.: haMot.
l",jdn-pa left, the left. hand,
flJdn- na on the left, to the left,
r¢n-du towanls the left) r.tjO,.,.ntu from the
left; rythl-ldip the left side or hand, nJon-
ldg-byed-pa /'th. left-handed, ryon-ru &11.
tbe lefl winS', of an army.
:rpf.::;rq. ryOb-pa, p£.)'Ift'» to move about, 10
swing, brandish, yldg-pa the wings;
rka;'-ldg ryQb-pa to kick, to strike, with the
arlDS Ilntl legs.
ra 1. the COP$OnlOl r, IlwlYs proooun-
ced with the tongue. - 2. num. fig.: 25.
;:;,: ra stands for: 1 ra-oo, l!. rU-Ma, 3. rd-
"Ida, 4. rd-,'V.
r"t('a (ef. nt) I. hom W_ ·ra-<d- id. _
<: 2. sting e.g. of the scorpion. - 3. &It. :
'the inwllro siue, the horn-side, of Il bow'.
- horned. - "ca..,n!!;" the pith
of 1\ horn (il. - f'Wa-mlJug 'the first gefm
of seed tbM I\ppcars after sowinR' Ct.; rlcu-
"[M 'the root or bottom of a horn' CR., "Ica-
rUt 'the tOIl or point of 1\ horn' rw,i-
f.a S.!!. (7).
rll-gall, in compo rag, brass, rd-gan-
!/!Ii lllilll-pa, rag-bu'll br!WI CUll, enn,
vessel, rag-d,,1i a br:LSS lrumpet; rag.Il.'!}d
&4.: wbite-copper, packfoog, Gel mAil sil ver.
.1\tf rd-lflO hoof, C., 11'.
fyO"-"1O l. sail. ill e..,
rlJOr4;Ji sail-yard lA., also wast,
in u. rather obscure description of a ship
in Zaln., ",here the hil is c.lIed dar, cloth.
- 2. wave, billow, rgyd-7IIWf Gir.
Note.. Tibetan writers knowing of ships
aDd navigation about as much as I blind
mao of colours, the obscority of pallSlge,;
relating to such Ulatters may cuil)' be a(:-
("ouoted for.
fYOr-ba 1. - 2. v·n,ar-
bu. - 3. v. yor.
ryOl-ba v. yOl-bo..
yyo. 1: provo for 1'YM, in ryo.·J:dr
circumllmbolation from left to right
(so Ihat the right side i9 townrds the person
(\r object that is reverentilllly to be sl\lutcd)
Wd.i. - 2. v. ryo-ba.
provine. for :d-/lyt' lead.
ra_lHllye 10 officillJ'll root Med., &.\.:
"""l
.:;;; rd-a (iI.: 'R Imlll weight, A drachm
(60 grains)'; but "{lft to be fOllnd
in Will.) is prob. the Hindi word for U1f1It,
the seed or grain of Abnu prnawrilU, as
n weight ubout _ 2 gl1l.ios.
help, assistance «(iI. also:
eompanioD,851i.tant), rd-mdaobdd-
pa I() cry out for help Oll'., 1'(j--mdar sbrdn-
pa e•. to call (upon llller60n) for assistance,
Ttl IV. ·,·am tOg-U' (cf. :aht. ,IJl9'-
pIJ) 10 help, to l\SsiSI &h., ra .I1dn-pa id.
Mil. ot.; rd_w,da_pa helper, assistant Gir.: rd-
mdaj dpun-Udy auxiliary lorees or army Q .
r«-Mdn &h. weeping willow,
521
'dg-pa
>'<t-xn>i
n. of a medicinal herb Wdn.
166,
=
syron-siti
iir-tree.
rti-lta 1 .
enclosure, fence, wall,
frq., esp.
in W.
,
also the
space
inclosed
by
a
fence,
wall
etc., yard, court-yard, pen,
fold etc.
;
rii-/Hin xk<>r-ba to inclose with a fence
Stg.,
rd-can(?),
ra-lddn
having
an
enclosure,
fence,
wall etc. Cs.
;
smyug-mai
rd-ba bam-
boo-hedge, bamboo-fence,
fs&r-mai rd-ba
thorn
-hedge,
thorn
-fence, siti-yi
rd-ba
wooden
fence,
fence of
boards,
pickets
or
rails
C.',
rd-mo
id.,
ra-mo-ce a
large pen
or
fold Mil. and
C.\ kun-dga-rd-ba, kitn-ra,
v.
kun-,
krims-ra
place
of
execution;
Icdn-
ra
garden
with
willow-trees;
nydg-ra(?}
wall of stones
put loosely together Ld.;
rtd-
ra stable or
pen
for horses
;
rdo-ra 1 . stone-
wall. 2. circle of
dancers;
pdg-ra
v.
rags.
-
bd-ra
cow-house,
pen
for
cows;
rtsig-ra
Sch.: wall round a
court-yard;
brtson-ra v.
brtson;
lug-ra sheepcot, sheepfold;
sin-ra
v. above. ra-sul the remnants or traces
of an old
pen.
- -
2. the first of the three
(or two)
months of a
season,
zla ra-ba.
rd-ma
(rarely
ra
Glr.) goat, she-goat,
frq. ra-kydl bag
made of a
goat's
skin.
ra-skyes
Tar.;
Sch.: a
gelded
he-
goat. rd-gu,
col.
ri-gu, young goat,
kid.
ra-rgod
wild
goat,
=
ra-po-ce Cunningh.
Ld.
p.
199.
--
ra-fug S.g.
and
pd-ra
he-
goat.
ra-fon 1. a
he-goat
of two
years
C. 2. a
gelded he-goat
W.
ra-do(?}
thread
made of
goat's
hair W.
ra-lpdgs goat's
skin.
ra-p'6
a
gelded he-goat. ra-lug
goats
and
sheep; ra-ma-lug id.,
when a
particular
stress is laid on the
impropriety
of both
species
of animals
being
mixed to-
gether;
also
fig.
of
improper
intermixtures.
ra-sd
goat's
flesh.
ra-slog
a coat made
of
goat's
skins.
*
ra-med
infallible, certain,
sure Sch.
ra-mo-ce n. of a
plain
near Lhasa
where the Chinese wife of Sron-
bt&ansgampo
ordered a
large
Buddhist
temple
to be built
Glr.\
as a com noun v. sub rd-ba.
ra-n Sch.:
ra-ri-nied-pa
neither
high
nor low.
ra-i'H
treddles, dung
of
goats.
ra-re
=
rfa-mos, *skyid dug
yon dug*
Ld.
good
fortune and mia-
fortune come
by
turn-.
rd-ro 1.
intoxication,
drunkenness.
2. intoxicated B. and col.
;
Sch. : rd-ro
ddh-po bag-med-pa,
v. sub
bag
I. rd-ro
ynyis-pa glah-po-ce smyon-pa
dan
O
dra
drunkenness while continued resembles a
furious
elephant,
rd-ro
fsum-pa
si-ro
O
dra
the end
(of it)
resembles a
corpse;
ra zi
or
sans,
also
ydans (?)
W. the drunken fit
is
over;
rd-ro-ba
B., C., rd-ro(-can)
W. in-
toxicated, drunk,
rd-ro-bar
bycd-pato
make
drunk
Dzl.,
rd-ro-ba-las sdns-te
having
come
to one's self
again
after a drunken
fit,
being
sober
again
Dzl.
ra-sa-
prul-sndn
n.of aBud-
dhist tern
pie
erected in Lhasa
by
the
Nepalese
wife of
Sronbtsansgampo
Glr.
rd-si Hind,
rope,
in Lh.
hempen rope,
and as such
distinguished
from
fdg-
pa, rope
made of
goat's hair,
which is the
one most in use in Tibet.
ra-sid
(Pers.
Ju*^),
receipt,
*ra-sid
ti-ked*
money-stamp.
and
WOT
ra
~
hu ftnd ra
'
hu
-
la v-
r\
>o
sgra-ycdn.
'
rakfa Ssk. blood,
saffron,
minium,
cin-
nabar Mil.
rag
1. sbst. v.
ra-gdn.
2.
adj. (Ssk.:
'
adhlna} subject,
subservient,
depen-
dent, rag Ids-pa
or
lus-pa
B.
} C., W., *rag-
Idom-pa*
W.,
with
la,
to
depend on,
de
Ky6d-
kyi nvs-pa-la rag-lus
that
depends
on
your
strength
Mil.', dbugs rhub-pa
sems-la
rag-
Ids-pa yin
breathing depends
on the soul
Stg.\ O
iso-ba
yzdn-la rag
-Ids-sin as
they
depend
on others for their lives
Tar.;Bhar.'l'l
Kyod rgyal-srid byed-la rag-go Schf.
:
'regno
operam
nava !' 3. W. for
reg, grags, dregs,
sbrag,
v.
rag-pa; rag-can
W. for
dregs-pa-
ean
proud, haughty
;
for
grdgs~can
famous
;
glorious, splendid; angry (V).
xrn'xr rdg-pa
1. vb. W. for
rty-pa
to touch.
feel,
and in a more
generalized
sense
33*
rlHnd n. of .. medicinal herb Wdli.
166, _ fir_tree.
,,'::r nE..oo 1. enclosure, fence, wall, frq., esp.
in l\1so the 5".« inclosed by a
feuu, ",allele., rard,court-rard, pen, loldetc.;
ro-btu Ihir--lKJ to inelO&e .....ith a Stg.,
rd-h,Jt(?), rn-/dQrl having lUI euciOlure,
renee, wall etc. c..; .myIJg-mai rti-JJa bRm-
l.oo-bedge, bamboo-feMe, (,"-,naa' rd-ba
thorn-hedge, thorn-fence, ¥ili-gi rd-ba:
wooden fcnce, of boards., pickets or
nih C.; ni-w> id., ra-wlo-a! pen or
fold Alii. alld c.; hUHlga-rd-IHJ, .t"1I-1"Il,
1'. .bU!;; lrirIu_ plACe of ueeution; IWli-
I'll garden with willo..·-treeli; "!lds- ra(?)
"'1.11 of ston put loosdy together Ld. ; rtd-
ra stable or!leD for hotsCS; I. MODe-
...an. 2. circle of dancers; pag..ra '". r4!1"
- oo-ru OOW-hoWIC, pen for cows; rtsig-ra
&A.: ....11;11 round a court_y.ro; brttd,,-ra 1'.
brtMm; lilg-rn sheepcot, sheepfold; ¥IIH-a
v.•OO1'e. - ra-Jril the remnants or l.racts
ohn old pen. - 2. the first of the three
(or 1"'0) months of season. zla ra-oa.
rd-ma (1'lU1!1y ra Glr.) goat, she-toat,
frq. - ro4ydl bag made of 0. pat's
skin. - ra-J.-yh Tar.; &II.: .. gelded be-
goat. - ni-gu, col. ri.!!". young goat, kid.
- ra-rgdd wild goaL, ... c.e""i1J9lt.
£d. p. 199. - ra-{"s S.g. llnd pd-ra be-
goat. - !'a-{oli I. n of two )'enrs
C. '1. n gelded he-go," IV: - ra-dO(?) thread
made o( goat's hair - ro-lpdgl goat's
skin. - ra-po n gelded be-g1)at, - ra-litg
goot3 and sheep; ra-ma-wg id., ",ben a
particulll.r is laid on tbe impropriety
of botb speeies of animals being miud tG-
also fig. o( improper intermi:ltures.
- ra-Jd goat's flesh. - ra-ddg a coat mnde
of goat's skins.
ra-mid infallible, certAin, sure SeA.
l'a-mo-U n. of /l. plain ncnr Lbtl3.
wbere the Cbinese wife of SroIi-
btlall.gampoordered alarge Buddhisttemille
to he builtGlr.; as 0. oom noun ". sub ni-ba,
ra-ri &11.: ra-ri-IIIJd-pa neitber high
Dor low.
ra-ra lreddltt, dung of goetl.
rOo-rI. - rh-mof., .Uyid dllfJ ra-rn
yoii dug· Ld. good fortane aod mit-
fortune COme by turns.
rd-ro I. intoxication, drunk.nnesl. _
2. intoxicated ll. and col.; &h..:
dan-po bau-.Iid-pa, v. sub bag I. t'd-l"O
,"p-pa glail-po- ce ""!JOA - 1'4 daIi. .dra
drunkCllness Yo'hile ronuDued resemblCl ..
furious elephant, ni-ro rhim-pa l'-ro .dra
the end (of it) resembles. corpse; fYI h'
or tIlIia, also ydtvi. (1) IV. tbe drunken fit
ii o\'er; rd_ro-ba. n., C., rd-ro(-ean) W. in_
wxicatl'd, drunk, ru-ro-6cz, IJyId-poto lI1ue
drunk D:1., r<i-ro-IJa-ltv uUi.-u havillg eome
to one's self apin after a dfllllke:nlit, being
sober again D-..1.
ro_oftnd·mdli n.of..Dlld-
..., dbisttempleerededinLbaM
by tbe Nepalese wife of Srori!JtMuUgaJfJPO
Gir.
ro-4i HiM. rope, in LA. hempen rope.
and as such distinguished from ftig-
po, rope made of goat's hair, which is tbe
onc mOISt in usc in Tibet.
N-lid (Pvs. receipt, ·ra-Iid
ti-i:td" money-stamp.
:wd ':;"';'Of rd-II.. nt-A.. -lo v.
t; ..... t; ..., "Fa-rro,..
raila &t. blood, saffron, minium, an-
,: nabar Mil.
9' rag 1. sbsL y. TOo-galt. - 2. adj. (&t.:
adAina) subject, sub8crvient,
dent, 'rO{lldl-pa or lNt-po B., C., W, .M9-
[J()'m-po. W:, with la, to depend on, rh A'yOd-
Ii!!i mi&-pa-la rag-lui that depend! on your
5trengtb Mil.; dbugl rnitb-pa HlIl..la rag-
ids-po. yin depends on the soul
Big.; otlO-ba rzdn-la rag-ldI-;ili loS they
depend on otbel'S(ortbeir live.; Tar.; nhar.22
A'yod rgyal-mw b!Jtd-la "09-go &111.:
O]Mmm naoo r- 3. W. for rtog. gra!!'.
Ibr'ag, \". rag-pa; rag-fan W: (or drl!Jl-pa-
can proud, haugbty; for graY'-MIt lamouI;
gloriolll, splendidj angry (Y).
9"q" niy-pa 1. \·b. W. for rlg-pa to louch.
feel, and in a IUOre generaJ.i:red &elise
:J3'
522
rag-ma
ran
=
O
fsor-ba to
perceive,
to
scent, taste, hear,
see, e.g.
*ddn-mo
rag*
I feel
cold,
*ddn-mo
rag-ga*
do
you
feel cold?
(but
*
dan-mo
dug*
it is
cold) ;
*
go-la zug rag*
(C.
*rig*)
my
head
aches; *tog-ri rag*
I feel
hungry,
*tog-ri rdg-ga*
are
you hungry?
*nai min
%6d-da
rag*
I hear
my
name
called;
*go
Kdd-da
rag*
I
perceive
the door
sticks;
*'i
lun-po Kyer-ra rag*
I
see,
the wind will
carry
that
away ; *go pe-te
mi
rag*
the door
seems to be locked. 2.
adj.
dark-russet,
brownish,
of
rocks,
horses W.
xrn-Ti' rdg-ma
1. W.
adj.
to the
gerund *rdg-
te*
(sbrdg-ste)
:
*be-rdg yu-ddn* (lit.
ydan) *rdg-te*
a fillet
together
with a
strip
set with turkoises. 2.
prop.
n. of a
village
Mil
1
rdg-tse
stone in fruits W.
rdg-sa
a bead of a
rosary,
ace. to
Lis. from
^g"TW Elaeocarpus
Jani-
trus,
the berries of which are used for such
beads.
^H'-A'
rag-si
n. of a
country.
ra
9
s 1-
dam, mole, dike, embankment,
also
cu-rdgs,
cu-lon 2.
any
con-
struction of a similar
shape
:
pdg-rags (also
pdg-ra} intrenchment, breast-work;
pub-rags
stack,
rick
; sin-rags
stack of wood.
ra
gs-pa coarse, thick, gross, Us-kyi
rndm-papra-rdgs-rnams
Wdn. the
more delicate and the coarser
component
parts
of the
body; rags-pai
dbdn-du
byds-na
Wdn.,
reckoning
one with
another,
on an
average; rough,
as in:
rdgs-rtsis-su by
a
rough
estimate Tar.-
rdgs-pai mi-rtdg-pa
dan
prd-bai mi-rtdg-pa
the
perishableness
of the whole mass and of the
single parts
Thgy. ; ydn-lag rags-pa prob.
:
strong,
firm
limbs Pfh.
;
of Buddhas is said that
they
appear rdgs-pai fsul-gyis
i.e.
bodily,
or sub-
stantially; rags-ris byed-pa
Sch.: to
work,
mould, form,
sketch etc.
roughly.
^-
ran 1. self B. and col.
(nyid,
with few
exceptions, is,
in W. at
lepst,
collo-
quially
not in
use)
na-rdn
Kyod-rdn
I
myself,
thou
thyself etc.,
in col.
language
also
=
I,
thou
etc.;
sometimes the
person
is
only
in-
dicated
by
the
context,
the
pronoun
I etc.
being omitted; ran-cag,
rdn-rnams
plur. ;
rdn-gi my, thy
etc.
;
cun-ma de
rdn-gi
lus-
la
cdgs-pas
this wife fond of
herself,
in love
with herself DzL
(yet
cf.
de-ran, below);
des
rdn-gi
ma
yin-par rig-nas
he
perceiving
that it was his own mother
Pth.;
ran -la
rdn-gis
skra bcdd-de
shaving
one's own head
Dzl.',
also in a
gen.
sense: rdn-bas
nan-pa
an inferior
person
than one's self
Thgy.,
in
like manner: rdn-las ce-ba
Thgr.\
rdn-la
bu med-na if a man has no son of his own
Mil.
;
rdn-gi
srun-ba to
keep,
to
guard
one's
own
property Thgy. ;
*ran mi-
dod-pe kyen
fsdn-ma* C. all the
disagreeable things
that
fall to one's
lot;
in
compounds:
ran-sems
one's own soul
(opp.
to
yzan-lus)
Mil.;
v.
also
O
dre-ba extr.
;
ran-rig rafi-ysal
ran-bde
ysum
self-created
knowledge, clearness,
and
happiness (the
three fruits of the
spirit)
Mil.
; ran-srog rdn-gis ycod you
will take
your
own life Glr. 2.
spontaneously,
of
one's own
accord,
zal-zds
ran-^on-no Dzl.',
rdn-byon-pa, rdn-byun-ba originated
of it-
self,
v.
below;
ran
Ogrol-ba
1. to
get loose,
come loose of itself. 2. to become clear or
intelligible spontaneously, by
intuition. 3. to
save one's
self;
rdn-sar-ba rdn-
grol-ba
2.
-
3.
just, exactly, precisely,
the
very,
de ran
the
very
same
;
de ran
yin
so it is !
exactly
so!
just
so! *dhd-ta ran*
6'.,
*dd-ci
ran,
ddg-sa
ran' W.
just-now,
*di-rin ran
just
to-day
W.
;
already,
snd-mo ran
already
early
in the
morning
Mil.
; barely, merely,
the
mere,
the
very,
na dan
prdd-pa rdn-gis
by
the mere
meeting
with me
Mil.;
mi ran
a
person travelling
all
alone,
i.e.
without
baggage,
horse or
companion
Kun.
;
mo-ran
v. mo.
really, indeed, actually, truly (the
verb
being repeated)
:
mi-la-rds-pa
de
yin
ran
yin
-
nam? art thou
really
that same
Milaraspa? *yonranyon-gi)uyin*
C. he will
truly
or
certainly
come; even,
sddn-po
ran
byas
now
they
even hated him Mil.
Comp.
raii-skal a
person's
own share.
ran
skyu (?) fub-pa
Sch.: to act after
one's own mind.
ran-skyur vinegar Cs.(?)
:i22
= to pen:eive, kl scent, taste, hear,
see, e.g. tdan-?1W rar" I feel cold, -dii'i-lIlf)
do you feel cold? (but -daJi-mo
dut it is cold); -gd-la zug Tag- (C. "rig-)
my head aches; ·Mg-d rat I feel hungry,
ttOy_ri rdg-[Ja· are you hungry? t,;ai mit;
Md-da rag· I hear my name called; .go
J.'dd-da rag· I perceive the door sticks;
""i lftn-p!! J..'yer-m rag" I sec, tiJe wind will
carry that away; ·go jJC-tt 1Ili rarl the door
seems to be locked. - 2. adj. dark-russet,
brownish, of rocks, horses IV,
mg-ma 1. lV, adj. to the gerund trag_
tl!* (3brd!J-3te): tbe-rag (lit.
rdan) trag_tl!* l\ fillet together with a strip
set with turkoises. - 2. prop. n. of a village
Nil.
rag.tae stone in fruits
"dg-8a a bead of a rosary, :loCC. to
1./is. from Elacocarpus Jani_
trus, the berries of w"hich al"e used fOI" such
bends.

.::tI'f1· rag-8i n. of So country.
rarJB L dam, mole, dike, embankment,
also lu.rdy8, - 2. an}' con-
struction of l\ similar shape: pag-rag8 (olso
pug-"a) intrenchment, breast-WOrk; jmb-rag8
stack, rick; Jiti.
f
rag8 stack of wood.
rags-pa coarse, thick, gross, lU8-kgi
7'1lam-pa pra-rdgs-rnama Wdli. the
more delicate aud the coarser component
parts of the body; Tag'-pai dbdli-du blJda-na
lVwi., reckoning one with another, on an
;werage; rough, us in: '1'dgs-ruis-slt by a
rough estimate Tar.; 1'figs-pai tni-rtdg.pa
d(lIi prd.bai mi-rtdg·pa the perishauleness
of the whole mass and of the single parts
T!lfJy.; ydn-lag rdgs-pa prob.; strong, firm
limbs Pih.; of Buddhas is said that they
appear rdfp-pai (!ul"fI!IU i.e. bodily, or sub-
stantially; 1'ags-ris byed·pa Sen.: to work,
mould, forlll, sketch etc. roughly.
,,1::: rali 1. self B. find col. (71yid, with few
exceptions, is, in lv. at leem, col1o-
quially not in use) na-ran I myself,
thou thyself etc., in col. language lllso. I,
u,
thou etc.; sometimes the person is only in-
dicated by the context, the pronoun 1 etc.
being olllitted; ra'i-l:ag, ra,;-manlS plur.;
rari-fJi my, thy etc.; Cii,i-ma de rd,i-gi lIIs-
la caY8-pa8 this wife fond of hCI'Self, in 101'e
with herself D::l. (yet cf. de-ra,i, below);
de8 niri.gi -rna y(n-pal' rig-na8 he percci\>iug
that it was his own mother Pth.; "(i/,-la
rari-gis d:ra W:Qd·de shaving one's own hend
Dzl.; also in 1\ gen. sense: Tati-bas nan.pa
liD iuferior peJ'S()u tliM one's self Thgy., in
like manner: rd,t·la8 Cl-ba TI.yr.; 1,uri.{a
bu med-na if a man has no son of his own
Mil.; rdit-gi sMi,j-Z,a to keep, to guard one's
own property '.rho!).; tl'wi k!len
(sd,i-ma· C. all the disagreeable thiugs that
fall to one's lot; in compounds: rwi-s6m
one's own soul (opp. to rzan-lUs) Alii.; y.
also odd-ba extr.; ra'/""-;g l'wi-)'8al rwi-bde
rsum self-created knowledge, clellruess, and
happiness (the three froits of the 6pirit)
Nil.; rm/-81oQg ruli-gis rM you will tllke
your own life GIl'. - 2. spontaneously, 01
one's own accord, Zal-zd.8 rali- D::l.;
rdti-b!JOn.po, rd,i-lnJU>i-ba originated of it-
self, v. below; rmi "gr&-ba I. to get loose,
come loose of itself. 2. to become clear or
intelligible spontaneously, by intuition. 3. to
save one's self; rdri"';ar-ba _ rd,i-ofI"ol-ba 2.
- 3. just, exactly, precisely, the very, de ralj
Ihe very same; dl! rali yin so it is! CJtactly
so! just so! ·dlld·ta raJi· C., ·dd-Ci "a/i,
ddg-sa ra,i
t
W: just-now, ·di·riil nil; just
to-day tv.; already, slid· '71/0 ,'0." already
earl}' in tho morning Mil.; barely, merely,
the mere, the very, na dan l}rdd.pa rd,i'gil/
by the mere meeting with moMil.; mil'wi
a person travelling all alone, i.e. withput
baggage, horse or companiou Kun.; '71i(H'(i;,
v. mo. - really, indeed, actually, truly (the
verb being repeated): lIli-la.rd.8-pa dIJ yin
rali !lfn - nom' lIJ"t thou roally that SlIme
Milarnspa? ·!JOn ralj !JOil-[l!JU !lin· C. he will
truly or certainly come; even, sddli-po "(1.1;
byas now they even hated him .Mil.
Compo t'ali-sJ.:al n. person's own share.
- ralt sk!JU (?) (ub-pa Sell.: to act after
ooe's own.mind. - rOli-skylJj' \'inegar w.(?)
528
ran
rait-Ini
/(///-/,
;
a Sch. rdri-bu? ran-K6na
=
raii-hiil
territory,
district C.
(?)
ran- Kds
one's own
worth, affairs,
necessities Sch.
raii-ijriili
not made or
produced by
men,
self-produced.
--
rdn-tlmi-bn free,
indepen-
dent,
rdii-(l;/ii-ji<t
an unmarried man Sch.
1.
Stg.
:
=
ran-sans-rgyds.
2. r<t/>-
<)i'6-b<t
Sch. : to live after one's
own
option
or
pleasure (?) raii-rgyii
Sch.:
'die
eigene
Ursache, Selbstfolge' (? !)
ran-
n6 one's own
nature, ses-pa
to know Mil.
rtu'i-nyid
himself,
herself
etc.,
one's self
Mil.,
raii-ni/id ^grol-ba
to deliver one's self
TJigy.,
btlml
raii-nyid
the devil himself in his own
person
Tar. ran-
fdg
mill,
water-mill.
-
i-ait-tnfoii
pride, self-complacency,
self-suffi-
ciency
Mil.
,
Glr. ran
-
don one's own
affairs,
one's own
profit,
ran-don
byed-pa
to
look to one's own
advantage Do.,
ran- dod
selfishness,
v. ran-rtsis. ran-sndn v. sub
sndn-ba;
Sch. also: self-born.
ran-po
Cs.
=
po-ran
an unmarried man.
--
ran-bdbs
v. bobs. rdii-bu 1. 6s.
single, alone,
rdn-
bur adv.
singly,
alone,
without a consort.
2. 6s.: a
single
life
(?).
3. Schr.: one's own
child.
rah-byui), ran-byon
self-born,
hav-
ing originated
of
itself,
=
rait
-
grub frq.
ran-dbati
independence, liberty,
ran-dbdn
fdb-pa
to become free
Glr.', ynds-la
ran-
dban-med
they
are not master of the
place
i.e.
they
are not free to choose the
place
Thgy.,
in the same
sense, gar skye
ran-dban-
med Mil.
;
*ran-wdu
^ug-pa*
to set free C.
;
ran-dbdfi-can free W.
ran-Jbar
6s. : 'mus-
ket',
in W. it is
only
used for
pistol ;
*ran-
bdr
(Jug-rag*
W. a revolver. rdn-mo Cs.
=
mo-rdn an unmarried woman. ran-rtsis
the
opinion
which one has of one's
self,
ran-
rtsis dan ran- ddd ma ce
zig
think little of
your
own self! Mil.
--
ran-bzin,
^*n^,
natural
disposition,
state or
constitution, na-
ture,
temper,
ran-bzin-las
yzdn-du ^yiir-ba
to
change
one's natural constitution Wdn
,
Jbab
de-ltar ce-bai
rah-bzin-gyis
as a natural
consequence
of so
heavy
a snow-fall Mil.
;
niit-bzin-yyis
of
itself, by itself,
from its
very
nature,
naturally, spontaneously DzL,
in col.
language,
ra/'t-te/n-nas
id.,
also for self in
the sense:
I,
he etc. without the aid and
independently
of
others; Obyiiii-l>n
litairan-
bb'n-can-yiji
lus
O
di this
body participating
of the nature of the five elements Wil/'i.;
(/rti
/'/-/in/ r<iit-bzin-can-gyi pyir
for ran-bzin-
can
yin-pai pyir
Sbh. 'ran-Zin
jo -pa*
C. needless
words,
where it is a matter of
course;
also: talk without
any
serious in-
tent;
*de da ran-zin-la z6r-ce
zig yod*
W.
that is
nothing
but talk. ran-bz6. 1. Lex. :
the
right, proper
form
(of
a
word)
? 2. self-
determination, opp.
to a
punctilious
adher-
ing
to tradition Mil.
--
ran -ran each...
himself,
each . . .
his, her,
its etc.
(not
reci-
procally,
as Sch. has
it), ran-rdn-gi
Krii
^6g-tu
sbas he buried each
(idol)
under its
own seat
Glr.,
ran-rdn-gi
leur
ysal
each
(subject)
will be
explained
in its own
chap-
ierLt. ran-ran-lao each
(final consonant)
has itself
(joined),
i.e. is doubled Gram.
ran-re 1 .
=
ran-rdn '. ran-rei
sna-fdg
ran-
r4s zun each
may
lead
himself,
may
be his
own
guide.
2.
we,
ran-rei
sgo
drun-na at
our own door
Mil.,
ran-re-rnams we
(the
Lamas,
opp.
to the
laymen)
Mil. 3.
polite
way
of
addressing,
for our
you
or the Ger-
man 'Sic'
Thgr.f
- -
ran-sugs-la
of
itself,
spontaneously
W.
rdn-sa,
ran-so one's
own
place,
rdn-sa
Odzin-pa
to maintain one's
place,
one's station
Mil., prob.
like
rdh-mgo
Ofdn-pa', rdn-sar,
rdn-sor 1.
bzdg-pa
to
put
(a tiling)
in its
place, fig.
for: to leave un-
decided,
to let the matter
alone,
ni f. Mil.
2. of
itself,
e.g.
rdn-sor zi
(a storm)
abates
of itself.
rati-sdHs-rgyas Pratyekabuddha,
i.e. a Buddha who has obtained his Bud-
dhaship
alone
by
his own exercises
of
pen-
ance,
but who does not
promote
the welfare
of other
beings.
r
rdn-ga-ba
Cs. coarseness, meanness.
rdii-ba, pf.
/<//}.<, to
rejoice,
s<wis mi-
rd/rt-]t<tr
discontented,
yid-rdn-ba
or
yi-i'dit-ba
id., frq.;
*dhe-la
ga-rdn-llidg-te*
highly pleased
with it C.
; yid
nm rd/m-M/i
mi
mgu-bargyur-te being very
much dissatis-
fied
Sfg.;
ma-rdii-bzin-du
unwillingly,
re-
luctantly.
"wi-fa Seh. - "(M-bur - rali-I/dlis -
r(lli-fHl territory, district C. (?) - rflli-o.l."da
oue's own WOnll, affnirs., &If.-
rau-9"lb not mAde or produced by men,
self.produced. - rJ';-i!ya-llfl free, indepen-
dent, I'flli-ilg(l'pa lUI unmnrried mlln Seh.-
"a';-''!l!Jfil I. St9': _ !·ali-rwis-"!fp. 2. rwi-
r!l!lIU-gY14 o'lrQ-Qa SeA.: lo li"e after one's
own option or plel\.Sure(i') - !'au-rgy,i Sell.:
'die eigene Ur.;flChe, Selhstfolge' (? !)-"Q1i-
ild ODe'" own nature, lts·pa to know
rwi-flyid himself, herself etc., one's selfMil.,
!'Q1j-1Iyid .!IloQl-ba to deliver one's self Thgy.,
lxluti rau"lyid tbe devil himself in his own
person 7'ar. - J'a,j-oflig mill, water-mill, -
l·mi·J/lfdJi pride, self-complacency, self-suffi-
cieDcy Mil., Glr. - ran - dOll one's own
ltffllirs, one's own profit, J'ali-doll byld-pa to
look to one's own oovanw.ge Do., rau-odOd
selfishness, v. rali-rtsill_ - rali-sllali '". sub
s1'lllu.bu; &11. nlso: self-born. - ranfO Cs,
_ yxrrQ1i an uumnrried man. - ran-bdbs
v. - rdn-bu I. Cs. single, alone, "d,i-
bur ad,'. singlYl nlone, without a consort.
2. w.: a single life (?). 3. ScAr.: one's own
child. - J'ali-byiui, rail-/)yan self-born, hll."-
ing originated of it.;;elf, - rUli· grub frq.
rali _dba/I independence, liberty, rwi-dbd,j
(db1JU to beeome free Glr.; ll1ds-la "alj-
dbati-1IIM tbey Me not master of tbe place
i.e. they nre not free to cboose the plMe
TII9Y., in the same sense, !Jur y.7j8 rali-dbmi-
med .Mil.; -rati-wa'l Jug-pa· to set free C.;
ra,i·(llxi,i-i:an free IV, - rwi-obal' Ca.: 'mus-
ket', ill W it is only used for pistol; -l'Qli-
bd,' 1V. a revolver. - ,·U,i·1I10 CB.
_1IIO-I'u,i an unmarried woman. -I'a,j-rws
the opinion which one hfl,S of one's self, rali_
rlsis dati rQiI-oddd mil ce Zig think little of
your own self! ,MiL - rali-Min,
natural disposition, statc or constitution, na-
ture, temper, J·((>j-b::in·laB r::dll-JU of/yfi,--ba
to chauge one's natuml constitulion Wdli,
obab di-ltlll' (i-bu.i rati-/)::in-gyi. as a natural
consequCtlce of so hcm')' a snow-fall Mil.;
rmi·b::(n-yyis of itself, by itself, from it.;; "ery
nature, naturally, spontaneously D::l., in col.
langunge, rali·b::i,l-lIQS id., N"P lot sell in
,
523
rdol-ba
the sense: I, he etc. without tbe Aid and
independently of others; iyu'i-bu. biai nuj·
bHIl.b.m-g!Ji ltu odi thi! body particil'ating
of the nature of the rh·c elements Wdti.;
al'an-poi rail-bzin-tuu"'fIlJi pyir for rali_b!:in_
((lU y(ll-pai ziyi.. SM. - -rm;-zin )(/-pa-
C. needless words, where it is a matter 01
course; also: tulk without nny serious in-
tent; -de dtl rmi·Zifl-la hg yod" W.
tllal is nothing but talk. - rali-bzd. 1. Lu.:
the right, )lroper form (olo. word)? 2. S<!1f.
determination, opp. lo a punctilious adher-
ing to tradition Mil. - 1'(J,i-ra,i each .. ,
himself, each." his, her, its ctc, (pot reci-
procnlly, ns Sell. hns it), rali-rdJi-gi I"In'i
1!ba3 he buried eacb (idol) under its
own seat Gl,.., rali-rdri_gi lellr }'3QI each
(subject) will be explained in its own chnt'-
terLt. - rmi·,·ali·lao each (final consonnnt)
lIas itSelf (joined), i.e. is doubled Gram. -
ra'i-re 1. - rmj_.,.dli: rari-rei rmi-
r13 zlllj each may lead himself, mny be his
own guide. 2. we, ra>j-"ji 3gO drU,i·na nt
our o"on door Mil., rmi-re-rnalll3 'l'l'e (the
Lamns, 0Pl). to the laymen) Mil. 3. polite
way of addressillg, for onr you or tbe Ger-
man 'Sic' Thgr.1 - ra,i-Jugt-la of itself,
spontaneously W: - rdli'$(J, rd,i-30 one's
own place, "d,i-aallz(n-pa to maintain one's
place, one's stntion .Mil., prob. like J'dti-mgo
o{on-pu; rd,i-au", rdli-;W1' I. bzdg-pa to Pllt
(n thing) in its place, fig. for: to leave un-
de<:ided, to lel the malter nlone, ni f. Mil.
2. of itself, e.g. rdn-wr zi (1\ storm) abates
of itself. l'mtyekabuddha,
i.e. a Buddhn who has obtained his Bud·
dhaship nlone by his own e.xereises of pen-
o.uce, but who does not promote tbe welfare
of other beings.
rdJi"!/a.w. U. meanness.
rdll-/)a, pf. ran., to rejoice, U'M fni_
"dtis-pal' discontented, yill-rdu-ba or
yi-rd'i-ba id., frq.; -dhl-la ga-l'd,i-t}IIdy-t?
highly pleased with it C.; yid fila rdlis-iili
111; 'miJU-bm'!J!JHI·.te beingverymuch dissntis-
fied Stg.; fllll_rali-/)z·i'l-dit unwillingly, re·
luctutly.
524
ran-ron-can
rabs
ran-ron-can Cs.
rough, craggy,
uneven.
,-
*rj-
ram-pa
1. v. ran-ba. 2.
nyin-
rdns-par
for
fo-rdns-kyi
dus-su
early
in the
morning
Tar.
Ill,
17. 3. in
W. for
rens-pa-
rdns-poSch. rough,
rude,
unpolished.
*]'
rdd-pa
W. for
bgrdd-pa.
rad-rod v.
rdd-po.
*
Tan-da
(Pers.
|j*Jj, Juj)
a
plane
Ld.
rdn-pa
1. vb. and
adj.
to
keep,
or
keeping,
the
proper
mean,
to be
pro-
portionate, just right,
adv.
raw-par
moderately,
rdn-par
sro warm
yourself moderately (tol-
erably) L#.,
zas-fsdd
rdn-par
zd-ba to eat
moderately >S.^.; O
di-tsam ni van-no this is
about the
proper
measure
DzL;
with the
root of the vb.: zin rnd-ran-nas as it was
(the
proper)
time for harvest
DzL, Ogro-ran
it is time to
go
Pth.,
si ma
rdn-par
si-ba
to die an
untimely
death; bag-mar ytan-
rdn-pa
dan when it was time to
give
her
in
marriage DzL;
not so often with a sbst.:
rtsds-ma rdn-tsa-na when harvest-time had
come Mil. 2. rfsa
rdn-pa
C.
shave-grass,
Equisetum
arvense. 3. col. for
Odren-pa
to lead
(water) ;
for
bran-pa
v.
fags.
j^q-
rob I.
superior, excellent;
the
eldest,
of
three
sons, opp.
to
brin-po
and
fa-cun,
frq.; gan-zdg dban-po-rdb-rnams very
able
or clever
persons (opp.
to
Obrin-po
or fa-
ma
having
moderate or
very
little
capacity)
Mil.,
Thgr.,
inst. of which rab
Jbrin ysum
is often used
Thgy.;
febs-na rab if
rightly
understood,
that will be the best
Thgr., frq.
for: so it is
right,
that will
do; much, plenti-
ful,
rab-skrdi
^og-nas
also with a full head
of hair
(you may
be a
holy man) Mil.;
rdb-
tu adv.
very,
with
adjectives
and
verbs,
rdb-
tu sdoms lock
(the door)
well
DzL;
rdb-tu
fcros-par gyur-te Tar.;
it occurs also in the
following phrases:
rdb-tu
O byin-pa
to re-
ceive or
admit into a
religious order,
rdb-
tu
Obyun-ba
to enter into a
religious
com-
munity,
to take
orders, slob-dpon
cos- bans-
las
being with,
or
being
ordained
by
the
teacher
Chosbangs; rgydl-poi rigs-las (to
take
orders)
as a descendant of the
royal
family,
of the caste of noblemen
Tar.;
rdb-
(tu} byun(j-bd)
he that has taken
orders,
a
novice,
or in
gen.:
a clerical
person;
rab-
byun
is also the name of the first
year
of
the
cycle
of
sixty years ; rab-(tu)
ynds(-par)
byed-pa, mdzdd-pa
c. ace. or
/a,
prop,
'to
make firm or
permanent',
to
consecrate,
to
hallow,
a new
house, esp.
a
temple,
an
idol;
by
this
ac
t a house is secured
against
ac-
cidents,
and an idol is
supposed
to
acquire
life and to become the abode of the
respect-
ive
deity,
which
occasionally
manifests it-
self
by sundry
miracles Glr.
;
rdb-tu
Jbyed-
pa (also
erron.
byed-pd)
Cs. to
analyze,
but
Tar. 96 it is
equivalent
to
Heft<TTf
treatise,
dissertation. rab-
bydms-pa
v.
Obydms-pa;
rab-^g
the second in
rank,
next in
value,
excellence
etc.,
thus DzL
9^L->
5
(as
a better
reading
for
Obrin-mo); rab-ydns very
wide,
very
extensive
Sch.; rab-ysdl
1 .
very clear,
quite
evident. 2. sbst. a small
balcony
or
gallery, frequently
seen in Tibetan houses.
3. Sch.
history (?).
II. also
rabs, ford,
rab-med without a
ford,
rab-so
=
rabs Sch.
-.S> .
rab-rib,
col. also
hrab-hrib, mist,
dimness, e.g.
before the
eyes,
in
consequence
of
impaired
vision;
*Ko srab-
srib mdn-na mi fon* he sees
only
a mist be-
fore his
eyes,
W.
;
skdr-ma rab-rib the faint
glimmering
of a star.
-
rabs 1.
lineage,
succession of
families,
race, family, rgyal-rdbs royal
family
or
lineage , nobility ;
succession of
kings ;
mi-rabs human
race;
rabs
-
odd a
person
whose
lineage
is broken
off,
i.e.
childless,
issueless,
rabs-cdd bza-mi
ynyis
a married
couple
without children Mil.
; yd-rabs
the
higher
class of
people, noblemen;
md-rabs
the lower
class,
also : one
belonging
to the
higher
or lower
class; collectively: rgdn-
rabs old
men, aged people,
yzon-rabs youth,
young persons;
sndn-rabs the ancients
(ve-
teres), pyi-rabs
men of modern
times,
de-
scendants, posterity
Glr.,
snon-rabs-sgrun
'"
tAo rough, craggy.
uneven.
nUit-pa 1. v. rali-bu. - 2. 1I!Jin-
,·an.-par (or (o-nili.-kyi dUNu
carly in the morning Tar. 111, 17. - 3. in
W.
rali.-po&h. rough, rude, unpolished.
rdd-pa IV. for bgrdd-pa.
""'<:<,' rod-<dd r. ,,,,,,,,,.
rdn-da (Pm. 1""";..1> •..>.i) a plane Ld.
run'pa 1. vb. p,nd adj. to keep, or
keeping, the proper mean, to be pro-
portionate, just right, nOv. rlin-parmoderately,
rdn-par.ro warm yOllJ'self modemtely (tol-
cmbly) Lt., zu,-(wd, rdn-par zd-ba to eat
moderately S.g. j ¢di-tsam ni this is
about the proper measure Dzl.; with the
root or the vb.: zi>i ,",jd..,.an--na, as it was
(the proper) time for harvest fri., "fro-ran
it is time to go Pth.., U ma rdn.-par Bi-ba
to die aD untimely death; bdg-7lIl1r rtcui-
rdn-pa dali when it was time to give ber
in marriage Dzl.; not so often with 1\ sbst.:
rtsd$-ma rdn-ua·na whell harvest-time bad
come Mil. - 2. rlsa rdn-pa C. shave-grass,
Equiaelum art.'ffiIe. - 3. 001. for "dren-pa
to lead (water); for bran-pa v. (ag6.
rab L ,uperior, excellent; the eldest, of
three sons, opp. to briii-po and fa-cun,
frq.; gari-zrig dha'i.-po-rdh-rnama very able
or clever persons (opp. to olmn-po or (d-
rna having modemte or very little capacity)
Milo, Thgr., inst. of which 'rab obriil rsum
is often used TJI9!1'; fibs--na rab if rightly
understood, that will be the best Thgr., frq.
for: so it is right, that will do; mUCh, plenti.
ful, rab--skrdi also with a full hcad
of hair (you may bea holy mao).Mi[.; Tdb-
tu ad,'. very, with adjectives aDd verbs, "db-
tu sdot1l610cl: (the door) well Dd.; "db-tu
9yi1r-te Tar.; it occurs also in the
following phrases: rd.b-tu "by{n-pa to re-
ceive or admit into a religious order, "db-
tu "bYlui-ba to enter into a religious com-
munity, to take orders., o/B-opa,i,-
las being with, or l>eing ord"illed by the
teacher Chosbangs; rlflll-lat (to
take orders) as a descendant of the royal
family, of the caste of noblemen Tar.; "db-
(tu) byun(-ba) he that has tnken orders, a
novice, or in gen.: a clerical person; rab-
byuri is also the name of tIle firat yenr of
the cycle ofsi:r.ty years; rah-(tu) rnd3(-par)
byM..pa, mdzdd-pa c. ace. or la, prop. 'to
mnke firm or permanent', to consecrate, to
hallow, a Dew house, esp. a temple, an idol;
by this act a house is secured against ac-
cidents, and an idol is supposed to acquire
life and to become the abode of the respect-
ive deity, which occasionally manifests it-
self by sllndry miracles Gll'.; rdh·tu ob!Jld-
pa (also erron. byM-pa) c,. to analyze, but
Tar. 96 it is equivalent to treMise,
dissertation. rab·obydms-pa v. obyuma.pa;
rab- the second in rank, next in value,
e:r.cellence ete., thlls DzL 5 (as a better
reading for obri,i.f/W); rah-yd.Hs very w'ide,
very extensive &h.; rab-}"ldl l. very clear,
qnite cvident. 2. sbst. a small balcony or
gallery, frequently seen in Tibetan bouses.
3. &h. history (?).
n. also ram, ford, rab-mld without a
ford, rab-ad _ raba &1,.
rab-rib, col. also hrab-hrib, mist,
dimness, e. g. brfore the eyes, in
consequence of impaired vision; irab-
ii1'1'b man_na mi (oli- he sees only a mist be-
fore bis eyes, lV.; skd"--ma rah.."b the faint
glimmeriug of a star.
rain 1. lineage, succession of families,
"' race, family, rgyal-rdln rOYli1 family
or lineage, nobility; succession of kings;
mi-rdw human rll.ce; rabs -lad a person
whose lineage is broken off, i.e. childless,
issucless, "abs-cdd bza-mi ynyU a married
oouple wilhout childrcn Mil.; yd-rabs the
higher class of people, noblemen; md·rab8
the lower clnss, also: one belonging to the
higher or lower class; collectively: rgdn-
raba old men, aged pcople, jMn.. rabt. youth,
yOtlDg persons; sl,on-rabs the ancients (Vf-
reres), p'yi-raba men of modern times, de-
posterity Glr., 1,km-raba-s,9''tili

525
an old
legond,
ancient
history
Zam.,
sndn-
yyi
rubs
bco-brgyad
the 18 Puranas Tar.
4,
11. 2.
generation DzL,
resp. ydun-rdbs
Glr.,
/n't-tnts
j
^ltt/t-^(^l>x
lin'i-pa-na
in the fifth
generation
after
me;
with
respect
to indi-
viduals, period
of
life,
viz. one of the
many
periods,
which
every person
is
supposed
to
l>;i through,
or sometimes
pleon. denoting
a
person
as
being
the
representative
of his
generation
:
sans-rgyds
rabs bdun the seven
Buddhas. 3. in
gen.; succession, series,
development ,
e.
g.
the
propagation
of the
Buddhist doctrine Tar.
205,
21
;
bskal-rdbs
successions of
Kalpas,
bskal-rdbs-nas bskal-
rdbs-su.
r<*m
-pa
1. W.
quick-(quitch-)grass.
2.
=
run-pa?
Lt.,
Glr.
Mvn*
rdm-bu 1.
prob. only
in: rdm-bu
Odegs-pa
to
join
in
singing,
to take
part
in a
song,
to fall in
with,
DzL
%l>,
13
(not:
to set
up
a dismal
cry Sch.),
v. also
O
col-ba. 2.
=
na-rdm
Polygonum
vivi-
parum.
rams 1.
indigo B.,
col. 2. Cs.: 'de-
gree
of
doctorship, snags-
or
go-
or
drun-^rdms-pa
one
having
such a
degree'.
^pj-
ral 1 .
goat's
hair. 2. rent
cleft,
pu
ralynyis
a
sloping valley dividing
into
two
parts
at its
upper
end;
ral-ysum
n. of
Lahoul on account of its
consisting'of
three
valleys
;
cf. rdl-ba. 3. v.
rdl-pa.
"
rdl-ka v.
rdl-gu.
'
rdl-Ka \.
rdl-gri.
rdl-ga
Sch.
=
ydl-ga.
rdl-gu
1. Sch.:
cleft,
chink,
fissure.
2.
dar-dkdr-gyi rdl-gu
and rdl-
ka PthJ
ral-gri,
col.
*ral-gyi, ra-gyi* sword,
also for
rapier
and other thrust-
blades
DzL', ral-grii O
ddb-ma or Ice
blade.
so
edge,
subs scabbard of a sword C's.
;
rdl-
gri-pa
Cs. a
sword-man;
a
fighting man;
rdl-Ka rdl
so;
rdl-Ka
sprod-pa
'to
bring
the blades
together',
to
fight
hand to
hand,
(ral-Ka
sbrad-pa
Sch. is
prob.
a
misprint).
rdl-pa long hair, lock, curl;
mane
(of
the
lion,
not of the horse
etc.);
rdl-
pa-ban having
or
wearing long hair,
n. of
a Tibetan
king
that
distinguished
himself
by
his
bigotry
and
by
his
servility
to the
priests;
ral-lcan a willow
planted
at the
birth of a
child,
under which a lock of the
child's hair is
buried,
when it is seven
years
old Ld.
t- rdl-ba
=
drdl-ba and
hrdl-ba,
pf.
of
Odrdl-ba, torn,
of clothes
etc.,
mtsdn-
gyis lacerated, slashed,
cut to
pieces by
the
sword
Dzl.\
zig-rdl-ba
id.;
zig-rdl breach,
destruction,
Kdn-pa-la zig-rdl byiin-na
when
the house
gives way
Glr.
; Ka-rdl, ma-rdl,
sna-rdl a
lip,
ear or
nose,
that has been
lacerated
by wearing rings
etc.
ras 1. sbst. cotton
cloth, cottons,
also
a
piece
of cotton
cloth,
handkerchief
etc.,
ras
sbdm-pa thick, strong
cotton
cloth;
Idg-ras,
pyis-ras
Cs.
handkerchief,
napkin;
fod-ras turban
6s.; prd-ras
a fine sort of
cotton
stuff,
=
kd-si-kai ras.
Comp.
ras-rkydn
cotton cloth. ras-
skud Cs. cotton thread.
ras-Kug
a small
bag
made of cotton. ras-fcra calico, chintz
Cs.
ras-gos
cotton
dress, gown.
re-
gd
a
strong
cotton fabric
brought
from
Sik.,
C.
ras bcos-bu Cs.
calico,
chintz. ras-
tag
fillet, bandage. rds-pa
a
person wearing
cotton clothes
Mil.,
frq.
ras-bdl raw cot-
ton. ras
-
bubs a whole
piece
of cotton
cloth. rds-ma a small
piece,
a
rag
Lex.
*re-ze'n* C. a
long,
loose cotton
garment,
shawl.
ras-yug
=
ras-bubs. ras-rii v.
re-ru.
ras-sldg
a furred
garment
covered
with cotton cloth W. 2.
adj.
Ka-rds
(*re*,
for
mis?)
hard snow that will bear a man.
rds-pa
1 .
vb.,
Ld. *ras-ce* to
get
or
grow hoarse,
*skad ras son* the voice
has
grown hoarse,
*skad ras-sa
rag*
I feel
a hoarseness in
my
throat. 2. sbst. v.
sub ras.
n,
also ri-bo
B., *ri-ga*
W. 1 .
mountain,
hill,
ri
po-ta-la
the mountain
(called)
Potala Lix.
;
ri-bo
dpal-
bdr
Mil.,
rgyal-
i////-,sv/
// Mil. the mountain
Pal-bdr, Gyal-
yyisri;
rir on the mountain
Mil.,
ri-la id.
ram-pa
An old legend, ancient history Zam., .tidn-
yyi row btWrg!lad the 18 PurnnllS Tor. 4,
11. - 2. generation D::l., resp. rdwi-T'aw
Glr., lia-naa rduti-raba lilu-pa-lIu in the fifth
generation Ine; with to indi-
I)eriod of life, viz. one of the mnny
periods, which every person is supposed to
pa!l8 through, or sometimes plean. denoting
a jlf'rson as being the representative of his
generation: .an.-rgylV raba Ixlun the seven
Buddhas. - 3. in gen.; succession, series,
development, e. g. the propagl\tion of the
Buddhist doctrine Tar. 205, 21; bakal.-raba
successions of I{:\!ptlS, {nl..al.-rdln-na. bd:al.-
raw-$U.
,qr.q· ram-pa L W: quick-(quitch-)grass.
- 2. _ rdn-pa1 Lt., GIl'.
l'am-bn 1. prob. only in: rdm-bu
odtga-pa to join in singing, to t:\ke
part in n song, to fnll in with, Dzl. 13
(not: to set up :\ disml\l cry Seh.), v. also
orol-ba. 2. "'" na-ram pQlygonum viei-
porum.
"aml 1. indigo B., col. - 2. a..; 'de-
gree of doctorship, anagl- or or
druti,,-oml-pa one bnving sucb n degree'.
..r "al 1. goat's hair. - 2. renl cleft, ftu
ral myia n sloping nJley dividing into
two parLS M its upper end; ,·al-y.um n. of
Laboul on account of its consisting'of three
"nlleys; cr. rdl-ba. - 3. v.ral-pa.
ral-Ira v. rtil-!l'"
rtil-Ita v. rtil-gri.
"r.l.r::rr rdl-ga &h. - ydl-ga.
ral-flu 1. &k: cleft, chink, fissure.
'\,;) - 2. da"-dkul'-gyi "ol-gu and "dl-
Ira Pth.'
ral-grl, col. ·ral-g!Ji, "o-gy," sword,
also for rapier and otber thrust-
blades D:l.; ral-grii "dab-ma or Ice blade,
50 edge, .!lin scabbard of II sword C•. ; rdl-
gri-po. c.. a n figllting Dlnu;
rdl-J..'a "" rallO; ral-l'a .prod-pa 'to bring
t.1Je blades together', to hlUld to band,
Ibrad-pa &h. is prob. 1\ I,llispriol).
525
rdl-pa tong hair, lock, curf: mane (of
the lion, not of tllC horIC ck); rdl-
having or wearing long hair, n. of
II Tibetan king that distinguished himself
by bis bigotry Ilnd by his servility to the
priests; ral· aan a willoW" planted the
birth of a ebild, under which a lock oC the
child's hl\ir is buried, 'fo'ben it is seven yurs
old Ld.
rtil-ba - dl'ol-ba and hrdl-ba, pf. of
odrdl-ba, 10m, of clothes etc., mfw,j-
ll\Cernted, slasbed, to pieces by the
sword D::l.; Zig-rol-ba id.; Zig-rol bre."ch,
destruction, ICdti-pa-la ziY-l·tii byil,j-na when
the house gives way Glr.; /{a-l'aI, rna-rdl,
.na-rol a lip, ear or nose, that bM been
lacerated by wearing rings etc.
raJ 1. shst. cotton cloth, cottons, fllso
n piece of cotton cloth, handkerchief
elc., raJ abOm-pa thick, strong cotton cloth;
ldg-rlU, c.. handkerchief, napkin;
fda-raa turban G.; prd-raa a fine sort of
collOll stuff, _ ka-$i-kai ral.
Compo ra.-rlyali cotton cloth. - raJ-
deu,l c.. cotton thread. - rat-llug a small
bag ronde of cotton. - r(J$-lira calico, chintz
Ct. ra.-gOI colton dress, gown. - re-Jd a.
strollg cotton fnbric brought from Sik., C.
ra' blQa-bu Ca. clllico, cbint%. - "(J$-{og
fillet, bandage. - rdl-pa Aperson wearing
cotton clothes Mil., frq. - raJ-lxil rAW cot-
ton. - raa - buba a whole piece of cotton
cloth. - rda-ma a small piece, /l. rng Ltz.
·'1-:;:fn· C. a long, loose cotton garment,
shawl. - 7'(J$_yug _ ral-bit/". - "al-ni Y.
re-,·u. - raa.aldg a furred Karroent covered
with cotton cloth IV. - 2. a.dj. !,'a·"d. erl·,
for reJi.,) bard s.now tbat willix-ar a man.
1. vb., Ld. ·r(J$-(:? 10 get or
grow hoarse, ·.kad "0' J(lif· the voice
lll\s grown hoa.rse, ·Jkad raNa rag· I feel
a ho"rscnesli ill my throat. - 2. sbst. Y.
sub ras.
£.. ';, also B., ·ri-ga·1V. 1. mountain,
hilt, ri prJ-ta-fa tbe mountain (ca.lled)
Potala Lu.; "i - bo Mil., rg!lul-
9y.....ri ,i .Mil. tile n\ountain Gyal-
!!!Jiwi;-1jjip. Lhc mountain Mil., n-la id.
526
r rig-pa
frq.
;
ri-fan-mfsams-su
at the foot of the
mountains
or hills
Med.\ rir-gdn-pa
one
living
in close
vicinity
to a
mountain, W.-,
gdns-ri
an
ice-mountain, snowy
mountain,
glacier, ndgs-ri
or sin-ri a hill covered with
wood, brdg-ri
a
rocky
mountain, yyd-ri
a
mountain or hill
consisting
of slate -stone
or
schist; span-ri
a hill covered with
grass.
2. brim of a hat or
cap;
side-leather,
side-
piece
of a shoe. 3.
symb.
num.: 7. 4.
num.
figure
: 55. 5. v. ri-mo.
Comp.
and deriv. ri-sked v.
rked-pa.
ri-skyegs Stg.,
v.
skyegs.
ri-Krod chain of
mountains, assemblage
of bills or
mountains,
esp.
as abode of hermits
who,
on that ac-
count,
are called
ri-Krod-pa:
also
directly
=
dgon-pa hermitage. ri-mgo
mountain
top. ri-rgydl,
rii
rgijdl-po
a
very high
mountain, e.g.
Tise
Mil.,
Gandhara
Sbh.,
esp.
=
ri-rdb, q.v. ri-rgyud
chain of
mountains, ridge
of hills. ri-can moun-
tainous, hilly.
ri-cen
t
ri-bo-ce a
great
mountain.
ri-nyin
the
sunny
side,
the
southern
slope
of a mountain.
n-rnyil
fall of a
mountain, land-slip
Sch. ri-stdn
v.
stdn-pa.
ri-deu
(or rdeu)
cun
Sch.,
*ri-
bog,
ri-
de-bog*
W.,
a mountain
spur
abound-
ing
in stones. *ri-dod* W.
(perh.
to be
spelled ri-fcrod)
a hermit
(living)
in the
mountains. ri-snd mountain
spur.
ri-
pa
an inhabitant of the
mountains,
moun-
taineer,
from a Tibetan
point
of view
equi-
valent to the Latin
paganus
and
agrestis
as
opp.
to
urbanus,
therefore
=
peasant, poor
uncivilized
person. ri-prdn
a little hill
or mountain. ri-bo
=
ri,
v. above. ri-
bor-pa Tar.,
Cs.:
ri-^or-pa;
=
ri-Krod-pa,
ri-bor-gyi gron
mountain
village
Tar. ri-
brdg, brdg-ri
rocky
mountain.
ri-J)6g
spur. ri-sbug
mountain cavern. ri-rtsd
foot,
ri-rtse
top
of a
mountain,
nyi-ma
ri-
rfse-la
pog-na
when the
rising
sun illumines
the mountain
tops.
ri-rfse-kan Cs. n. of
a
mischievous
spirit.
ri-rdzon mountain
fortress,
fort.
--
ri-rdb the centre of the
world and
king
of the
mountains,
the fa-
bulous Sumeru or
Meru,
also ri-rab-lhun-
po, ri-rgydl.,
ri-bo-mcog-rdb
Mil. ri-lun
mountain and
valley. ri-yseb
Sch.
=
ri-
Krod. ri-sribs the side not
exposed
to the
sun, shady
side,
north-side of the mountains.
^"ZTT
ri-gu young goat,
kid W.
NO
^*zff ri-rgyd
Sch.: foxes or fox-skins
(?).
'
ri-dwags
animals of
chase, game.
ri-ba W. *ri-be* to be
worth, gen.
as
adj. worth, *lug
di nul
cig
ri-ce
yin*
this
sheep
is worth one
rupee
W.
;
diiul
brgya
ri-bai rta a horse worth one hundred
rupees
Cs.. cf. rin and
rib;
ri-bai rin-fdn the full
price
Sch.
^gfr-
n'-6oVihare,
ri-bon-moCs. female
hare;
it lives in
Ld.,
but not in the smaller
valleys, e.g.
not in
Lahoul; ri-bon-gi
rwa
the horn of a
hare,
a
nonentity,
a
thing
not
existing,
cf.
mo-sdm-gyi
bu.
ri-mo 1.
figure, picture, painting,
draw-
ing, lha-Mn-gi Glr.\
ri-mo-mKan
painter; ri-mo-can,
ri-mo-ldan marked with
figures ; ri-morbyed-pa
to
represent by
means
of
figures
and
colours,
to
paint
Do.\
mark-
ings (streaks, speckles
etc.)
sai
markings
of
a
(tiger's)
skin Tar.
;
ri-fcrd
having stripes
of various
colours, spotted, speckled;
ri-mo
also
draught, plan, design,
and
fig. pattern,
rule of
conduct,
law written into the heart.
-
2.
=
rim-gro
reverence, veneration,
Ti-
mor
byed-pa
to
honour,
to venerate
Stg.
ri-lu
col.,
but also Tar.
63,
for ril-bu.
ri-s
,
=
dran-sron
q.
v.
^VT
ri-so n. of a medicinal herb Med.
xcn*
r/
iy
in Ld. col. and
provinc.
for
zig:
'
*man-na
rig* or*nyun-nu rig
ton*
give
much!
give
little!
rig-pa
I.
vb.,
1. to
know,
to under-
stand,
=
scs-pa
with the termin. of
a sbst. : to know
(a person etc.) as,
with
the termin. of the inf.: to know
that,
to
per-
ceive, observe, Kros-par rig-nas perceiving
that he became
angry Dzl.\ pd-la rig-par
gyis
let
your
father know
it,
inform
your
father of it
Tar.; zlog-tn rig-par byed (it
52G
ri
lTq.; ri-(aii-m{mm.-.u at the foot of the
mountains or hills Ned.; "';T-gall-pa one
lil·iDjl; in close vicinity to a mountain,lV.;
gd/is-ri un ice-mountrlin, snowy mountain,
glacier, or U';-/'l' l\ hill CQ\'cred with
wood, brag-ri a rocky mountain, fyd.,'i a
mountain or bill consisting of slMe-stone
or schist; .po,i-e; a hill co\-ered with grllSs.
_ 2. brim of Il hat or CClpj side.leather, side-
piece ofa shoe. - 3. s)"mb. num.: 7. - 4.
Dum. 6gure: 55. - 5. v. ".i-mo.
Compo and deriy. ri-skid v. rked-po. -
ri'8lrytgS Sty., \', skyt!fl•. - ri-frOd chain of
mouDtains,assemblage of bills or mountains,
esp. as abode of hermits who, on that ac-
count, are called ri-l'rOd-paj also directly
_ wj6n-pa hermibge. - ri-mg6 mountain
top. - ri-rg,ydl, n'j "'Y./fdl-po a very high
mountain, e.g. 'Jiss Mil., Gandharii SM.,
esp. "" ri -rdb, q.\'. - ri - ryyud c1lain of
mountains, ridge of hills. - ri-i:an mouu-
hilly. - ri-&n, ri-bo-ce a great
mountain. - ri-nyin tlie sunny side, the
southerD slope of a mountain. - n-Nlyil
fall of n. mountain, land-slip &h. - ri-3tll,i
v. ston-pa. - ri-Iieu (or rdeu) C'uli Seh., -ri-
bOg, W., a mountain spnr abound-
ing in slones, - -ri-dtkr lV. (perh. to be
spelled ri-I.'r&.l) a (Ih'ing) in the
mountains. - ri-rna mountain spur. - li-
pa au inhabitant of the mountains, moun-
taineer, from It Tibetan of view equi-
,'alent to the Jjatin pagallus and agrntis l\.S
opp. t.o urba1lus, therefore = l,easant, poor
nneivilized person. - ri-jil'un a little hill
or mountaiu. - Ti-bo = 1'i, \'. abo\'e. - ri-
bdr-l)a Tar., Cs.: = l'i-/JrOd'1)(l,
''1'-bdr-gyi yroJi mouotaill \'illage 'l'm'. - ri-
brdg, brdg." rocky mountain. - ri-JJ6g
spur. - li-sbug mountain caNero. -,'i-l't3d
foot, ,i-riU top of n mountain, ny{-ma ri-
l'f8i-14pog-1Ia when the rising sun illumines
the mountain tops. - rw-t8i-kan U. n. of
a mischievous spirit. - ri-rdzo,i mountuin
fortress, fort. - ri-rdb the centre of the
world and king of tlle mountllins, the fa-
bulous Sumeru or Mem, also ri-rab-lMn-
ptI, "i-1'f}ydl, ri-bo-meog_rdp ¥iJ.. '"'0 Tj-lli1
mountain nnd \·alley. - n"rMb &1•. - ri-
1frQd. - ri-srib3 the sidA not exposed to the
8un, shadyside, nortiJ-sideof the lnounmlns.
1'i-rJU young goat, kid lV.

ri-rgyd &11.: fOMS 01' fox-skins(?).
ri-d/Ca.Y3 animllis of chase, game.
..::r rl-ba 11': -ri-i:e- to be worth, geu. as
adj. warth, -lug di }iul cig ri-i:e yi,,-
this she<!1' iswortJI one rupee 11'.; dJiullJrg!Ja
ri-ba.i rfa a horse worth one hundred rupees
Cs.. cr. n"n and 1";6; ,of-bai rln-(dii the full
price SclJ.
n'-bQJi hare, female hare;
...., it lives ill IA., but not ill the slllll.ller
\'lIlIeys, e.g. not in Lahoul; ,,'-lxhi-gi "!l'a
the 110m of 11 hare, 0. nonentity, a thing not
existing, cr. fluNdm-gyi bu.
ri-1110 1. figure, picture, painting, draw·
ing, lha-ltdil-gi Gil'.; ri-mo-mlfan
painter; ri-mIJ-ca1l, rl-Ujo-ldan marked with
figures; ri-morbyM-pa toreprescntby meanS
of figures nnd colours, to paint Do.; mark·
ings (streaks, sllcekles etc.) sai markings of
a (tiger's) skin 'l'«r,; ri-Kru having stripes
of various colours, spotted, speckled; ri-mo
also draught, plan, design, and fig. pattern,
rule of conduct, law written into the heart.
- 2, ... rlm-gro rC\'erencc, veneration, Ti-
mor 0JCd-pa to honour, to venerat.e Stg.
ri-l!t col., but also Ta.r. 63, for ,'il-lnt.
r. d· , .
..... .., rl-8/, .I'll, - /'(1)1-3/'''11. q.v,
ri-.10 n, of a medicinal herb Mtd.
!'IfJ ill Ld. col. and pro\·inc. for z,ig:
-ma,;-tia or-nyuJi-Jiu"9 toti-gl\'e
much! give little!
fofg-pa 1 vb., I. to know, to under·
stand, _ 313-pa with the wrmiu. of
a sbst: to know (n. person etc.) as, witli
the tcrmin. of the inf.: to know tllllt, to per·
ceive, observe, l'r0s-par "lg_n(18 perceivillg
that he becnme angry D::l.; lJa-la rlg"1)ar
[JYis let your father know it, inform your
w.thC!.. of it Tm·.; zldg_f"-rffj_par 6yed (it
527
or
ho)
trarlir> how to
avert,
prevent
etc.
_' \ .
*<jri<i-pa.
II.
-I.
-i. 1.
knowing, knowledge; prudence,
talents, natural
gifts
(llr.:
r/'</-/><>
</(/,< l,l<'m-
l>ti
talented, rich in
knowledge,
learned />:/.;
rigp-pa^or-^
new
informations, disrlosmvs,
knowledge;
news.
I6g-gi rig-pa
l>^ires-na
if
one
compares
the absurd news Tar.
174,
*>/,/.
:
nt<i-rtg-pa
l. sbst.
^rfa3JT ignorance,
mostly
used in the
specific
Buddhist
sense,
viz. for the innate
principal
and fundamental
error of
considering perishable things
as
per-
manent and of
looking upon
the external
world as one
really existing,
with Bud-
dhists in a certain manner the
original sin,
from which
every
evil is
proceeding,
v.
Kopp.
I,
163
(but
cf.
yti-mug).
2.
adj.
void of
reason, unreasonable, irrational,
dud-
groma-
rig-pa
Mil 2.
science,
learning, literature,
ndn-gi rig-pa
the orthodox or sacred litera-
ture, pyii riff-pa
the heterodox or
profane
literature
6s., fun-mon-gi rig-pa
literature
or science common to both
religions (Bud-
dhists and
Brahmans) 6s.;
rig-pai ynas
and
I'lij-pa any single
science
(philosophy,
me-
dicine
etc.)
v.
rig-ynds
',
rig-pai
rol-fso or
r!<i-pai ynas
fams-cdd Cs. circle of
science,
encyclopedia.
3. soul
(prob. only
in later
literature), rig-pa
lus dan brdl-ba the soul
separated
from the
body,
rten dan brdl-ba
the soul
separated
from her hold or from
her abode
Thgr.
;
often
opp.
to bem Mil.
Comp.
t'ig-mKan, rig(-pa)-po
6s.,
Sch.
a
knowing person,
a learned man.
rig*
rgyud
character Mil.
-
rig -snags
a
spell,
charm,
magic formula,
rig-snags-mKan
a
per-
son skilled in charms.
rig-ynds
a
science,
one of the sciences
;
rig-ynds
cd-ba Ina the
five
great
sciences or classes of
science,
frq.;
these are :
sgrd-rig-pa
science of
language,
ytan-fsigs-rig-pa
dialectics,
yso-ba-rig-pa
medicine,
bzo-rig-pa
science of mechanical
arts,
nan-d6n-riq-pa religious philosophy;
of less
consequence
are:
rig-ynds
cun-ba
Ina the five minor
sciences;
and the
rig-
ynds
or
rig-pabco-brgyad(n\so
;
tsug-lag?j!j),
which need not be
particularly enumerated,
though they
are often mentioned mtheZI:/.
;
they
are named
by
f
'*. and Sr/i.
ri,/-[)a)-
po
v.
rig-mKan.
--
rig-byt'd
1.
conveying
l< in
\\lfdgo, instructive,
prob.
also
learned,
I'HI
riij-liiii'il 'jlii-niKan
ma
yin-te
I am no
schooled, accomplished, singer
Mil. '2. in-
struction,
a book
conveying knowledge,
a
scientific
work,
bzoi
rig-byed
a
technological
work Gli'. 3.
%^
Veda,
the
(four)
sacred
\\ritings
of ancieirt
Brahmanism,
hence 4.
as
symb.
num.: 4.
--
rig -ma,
%^rrpjf.
Veda-mother, Gayatri,
a certain
metre,
verse
and
hymn
of the
Rigveda, personified
as
a
deity
Mil.
rig-
dzin,
from
rig~pa Q
dzin-
pa
to
comprehend
a science with
ease,
to
be of
quick parts
Dzl.
,
as
partic.
: a man
of
parts,
a clever
fellow;
but
usually rig-
Q
dzin
(like rig-
ca/i,
of rarer
occurrence),
Ssk.
fa^TOT"
denotes a kind of
spirits
to whom
a
high degree
of wisdom is
attributed,
like
the Dakinis.
rig-ses
the
faculty
of reason
Tar.
90, 2, Schf.
^sn'^zjr
'nff-nff*
mi
ff rig-rig byed-pa
or
dug-
'
pa
to look
about,
esp.
in an anxious
manner,
shyly Tar.,
Mil.
rigs
1.
family, lineage,
extraction, birth,
descent, rigs-rus lineage
and
family
Gli'.,
mai
rigs-su nye-ba
or
ytogs-pa
a re-
lation
by
the mother's side
Dzl.',
emph.
:
noble birth or extraction:
rigs-kyi
bu or bu-
mo noble or honoured sir! honoured madam!
a
respectful
address,
which is also more
ge-
nerally applied;
thus in
Thgr.
it is the
reg-
ular
way
of
addressing
the soul of a de-
ceased
person; mi-rigs
1. the human
race,
mankind 6s. 2.
nation,
tribe Glr.
sde-rigs
tribe
(
s. 3.
rarely
=
sex,
mo-rigs
female sex
Wdn. 2. in a
special
sense: caste, class
in
society,
rank. In Tibet five ranks are
usually distinguished,
viz.:
ryydl-Hgt
royal
state,
royalty, brdm-ze-rigs
caste of
priests
(Brahman caste),
rjc-rigs nobility,
aristo-
cracy, dmdns-rigs
the
citizens,
ydol-pai rigs
the common
people.
When
speaking
of
India,
the
appellations
of these classes are
applied
to the castes of
Brahmanism, although they
do not
correspond
to each other in
every
respect.
3. kind, sort,
species,
ii
ysumyod
there
arethree sorts of
wheat,
or hc) tell(:lles how to Meri, prevent etc.-
, '
•. v. sg"/!!-pa.
II. sllst. L knowing. knowledge; prudence,
talents, natural gilts Glr.; 1'ig-}1(I (/1/1;
pi' talented, rich in knowledge, learned D:l,;
I'I!J-P« )'$I.lI·-ba new iII fOl'lliations, disclosure»,
knowledge; news, Idy-yi 11!J-pa bsgdNla if
compnres the nbsurd news '1'a,.. 174,
Scllj'.; 1II«-/i911« I. sbst. ignorance,
nl(lstly used ill the "peci.lic Buddhist sense,
\iz. for the innnte principnlllnd fundamental
errorof consideriligperislmlllethillgs :IS per-
lIl:111ent and of looking upon the external
world as one renlly existing, with
Ilhi"ts in n eert.'\in mnnllCl' the original sin,
fl'om which e\'ery evil is pro('eeding, v,
Kopp. 1,163 (but cf.rti-'/IIlY). 2, ndj. void of
renson, unreasonable, irrational, dud·<!Iro1IIa-
1'i.II-pa Mil. - 2. science, learning, literature,
u(ili-gi "i!J-p« the ol,tbndox or sncrcd litera_
ture, pyii rJirpa tbe heterodox or "rofune
literature C3., (Im-lIloli-gi riy-pa litern.ture
or science common to both religions (Bud-
dhists ond Dl'nhmaDs) (.S.; rig-pai fll/1.3 nlld
riy·pa nuy science (philosoph,-, me-
dicine etc.) Y. riY-)7lth; riy-pai rol-fso or
riY-pal' yM3 (al1u·Md C3. circle of science,
encyclopedia. - 3. soul (prob. oilly ill Inter
literature), riy-pa 1113 dati {m/l-ba the soul
separated from the body, ,·ten dali bro.l-ba
tile soul selmrnted from her hold or from
her Rbode '1'/lgl',; often opp. to Imll Mil,
Camp. I'ig-'lliflan, rig(-pa)-po n., Sch_
1\ knowing person, II learMd man, - 7·iy.
I'f/!Jtld character .Mil. - rig-sli{igs a spell,
charm, magic formula, 1'iy-S1wgNllltan a per-
son in dll\rnlS_ - lig-)'1ul8 n science,
ODe of the sciences; l'ig-yno.8 U-ba Ilia the
fil-e or c1n.sscs ofscience, fl'q.;
chese nrc: 3fJrti-riy-pa scieu('c of language,
yl/I1l-(3ig8-liy-pa dialectics, Y8&-ba-rig-pa
Illedicine, b:Q.-l'ifrpa sciellce of meehaniclt.l
am, llali-doll-ri1-pa religious philosopLy;
of less consequence nrc: rig-filth cliti-ba
liia tbe five minor l>cicnces; and the lig_
f1lli3 or 1'I'y-pabeo-bl'fJ!Iad(aIso, ulIly-lag)!..),
which need Dvt be particulnrl)' enumerated,
though tile}' lire oftcu melltioned ill,t)lcD.lI,j
they lire mUllcd by ('.lInd &11. - rig{-pa)-
po '-. riy-mllan, _ ";g-b,yl:d I. convoying
kno\\ledge. instructive, prob. alsll leMrned,
lia riy-bghl !Jbi-mA'ali 111a yi,He 1 :un no
schooled, liillger ..l/i1. 2. in·
struction, 1\ book con\'e)'ing knowledge, IL
scicntific 1\'01'11., b:<Jt rJ-g-b!Jhln technologicnl
work GIl'. 3. Veda, the (four) snered
I\'ritillg:J of allcielrt Uro.hnillnitilll, heDcc 1.
symb, num.:4, -lig-ma,
\' edn-mother, G/iyatl", aeertoin metre, \'erse
nnd hymn of the Higvedn, persolli.lietl ns
n deity JVil. - 1'19-od::lIl, from 1';g-pa od::in-
pa to comprehend II science with ease, to
be of quick IJarl..s D::l., as jJartic.: a man
of parts, a clever fellow; but uSllally
(like riY-ocali, of rorcr occurrence), &k.
mN" denotes a killd of spirits to whom
a high degree of wisdom i:J attributed, like
the D:ikinis. - tll(I fltculty of reason
Tal'. 90,2, Schf.
lig-";y, m;y ,'iy-rigbyM.-pa or dug-
"'" '1"""1 1 k L . ,
va to 00 DU-HUt, esp. III ltn anxIous
manner, shyly Tar" Mil.
lig31.family,lineage, extraction, birth.
descent, rifj3-r1t3 linellge and family
Gir., mai rigHU or ytdys.pa a. re-
lation by the motLer's side D:l.; emph.:
noble birth or extrllction: ,·iys-l..'!Ji {m or bU-
1/10 nohle or honoured sir! honoured mndllm!
n respeetfuladdrcss, whic11 i" also lilore ge-
nemlly applied; tblls in TI,!!,'. it is the reg-
ulal' way of nddressillg tbe soul of n de-
censed person; mi-liy3 L tile ImlURII rt\Ce,
mankind C3. 2, nation, tribe Glr.; fde.,ig3
tribe G" 3. rarely _ sex, mO-1igs ferunle sex
W,lii. - 2_ in II special sense: casie, class
in society, rank. In Tibet five mnks life
usually distinguished. viz.; l'!Jydl"';fjf ropl
state, t()'a1ty, brtim-:e-rigs cnste of priests
(Bnlbmnu cftste), r)c.riys noLility, aristo-
cmcy, dmdits-,,'Y3 tile citizens., rdOl-pai /'193
theeoUllDon poople. WIleDspeakingoflndia,
the appellations of tllese cl:ts"es "re applied
to the castes of Unlhmlluism, although they
do not correSIJontl to eo.cb otllcr io eyer)'
- 3. kind, sort. species, groi rig,
(If wheat, J..'dd_
528
rigs
rigs gos-rigs
mi- drd-ba different
languages
and
costumes; ci-rigs
of
every
sort, ci-rigs-
su in
every possible
manner,
e
g.
cos ston-
pa
to teach
religion; nyin-moi rigs-kyis
or
rigs-la by
the
day, by days, daily Glr.; rigs
is also used for
some, certain, ndd-rigs-la
mi
O
dzem-na if one is not on his
guard against
certain
diseases;
sometimes
pleon.: ydn-lag
rigs
bzi the four
limbs,
uiz.
hands and feet
Glr.; rgyal-cen rigs
bzi the four
great spirit-
kings Thgy., rigs ysum mgon-po
the three
tutelar saints
(spyan-ras-yzigs, pyag-rdor,
Ojam-dbydns)
Glr.; sans-rgyds rigs
Inai zin-
Kams
Thgr. rigs-pa
vb. to have the
way,
manner, custom, quality of, mgo pyir Jbyun-
bai
rigs-so
the
upper
end
(of
a
stick, part
of which is in the
water)
has the
way
of
sticking
out,
i.e. sticks out
;
often to be trans-
lated: must
necessarily (according
to the
laws of nature or to
circumstances) ;
as
partic.
or
adj.: necessary,
also
proper, suitable, right,
suited to its
purpose,
in the earlier literature
gen.
with the
genit.
of the
infin.,
sometimes
with the terrain, of the
infin.,
in later times
with the root of the
verb;
thus : fos-nas Iddn-
bai
rigs-so you
must
get up
as soon as
you
hear . . . Dzl.
;
da ri
zig
sndn-bai
rigs
now
a mountain must
appear
Dzl.',
bzdg-pai rigs-
sam would it not be
expedient
to
appoint.
. .?
Dzl.', rigs-kyi
dus-la bdb-bo it is
just
the
right
time
Dzl.',
mi smrd-bai mi
rigs-so
it
is not
right
to be silent Dzl.
; smdd-par
mi
rigs-so
it is not
right
to abuse
Glr.', ^.on-rigs
Odug-pas
because
(he) might possibly
come
Mil. nt.
; drdn-pa
mi zin
rigs-la
if he should
perhaps
notretain the recollection
of,
if there
should be
any danger
of his not remem-
bering Thgr.',
nan-son-du
O gro-bai rigs-la
as
there is a
possibility
of
going
to hell
Thgr. ;
ydul-bai rigs -pa
those fit for conversion
Dzl.;
lhar
skye-ba
ni
rigs-pa
ma
lags
his
being
re -born as a
deity
is not
befitting,
or also : not
possible,
not
probable
Dzl.
;
mi-
rigs-pa wrong,
not
right, unbecoming,
im-
proper etc.,
mostly
as adv. :
mi-rigs-par byed-
pa
to act
wrong,
to do
badly, frq. rigs-
kyi rjes-Jbrdn
Was.
(274)
v. sub Inn.
Comp.
rigs-brgyiid race, lineage,
extrac-
tion, family
Cs., rigs-brgyud-Q
dzin male
issue,
rigs-brgyud
Opel-bar Ogyur-ba
the
rising
of
a numerous
progeny
Dom.
--
rigs-nan
1.
low birth or
extraction, *Kyod
mi
rig-ndn-
pa
dan
nydm-po
de-ce man*
you
must not
mingle
with
people
of low
extraction,
with
common
people
W.
; rigs-nan dpon-du
sko-
ba to raise a child of low extraction to the
royal dignity
Glr. 2.
hangman
Dzl.
(cf. ydol-
pa). rigs-can^ rigs-lddn
of noble birth.
rigs-mnydm-pa, mfun-pa, O
drd-ba
of the same rank
etc.,
of the same
species.
rigs-nydms degenerated, rigs-nydms dge-
sloii a monk
disgracing
his
profession
Pth.
rigs-med
=
rigs-nan
no. 1 .
rigs-pa
1 . v.
rigs.
2. often erron.
for
rig-pa.
3.
adj.
si
rigs
:
rgydl-
rigs-pa belonging
to the
reigning family
or
caste;
ci-rigs-pai sgo-nas
in
every possible
manner Mil.
;
ci-rigs-par snydn-pai fsig-gis
with ever so
many
kind words
Dzl.',
also:
in
any way, any
how,
to a certain
degree
or
extent,
in
part, partly
Tar.
4,
3 etc.
4.
sbst.,
translation of
tTRT logic,
dialectics
Trigl.
15;
an
infallible,
not
deceptive
idea
Was.
(297).
-
rin-ne-ba continual
(?), daily (?)
ka-
fsd rin-he-ba Mil. nt.
every day
warm meals.
rin-ba I.
adj ,
also
riii-po 6'., 5.,
*rin-
mo* W. 1.
long, high, tall,
relating
to
space;
rin-mo*Kur* W.
carry
it
lengthwise;
it also
implies distance,
in which case
fag-
rin
(q. v.)
is the more
precise form;
da-dun
yul-las
rin-ste as he is still at a
great
dis-
tance from the
place
Dzl.
;
more
frq.
with
dan:
ynas O
di
gron-/cyer
dan rin-bas because
this
place
is far from the town Dzl.
;
mi rin-
ba-na at no
great
distance. 2.
long,
with
respect
to
time,
fse rin-ba sbst. a
long life,
adj. long-lived, rgydl-ba
dan fse rin-bar
soy
cig may
he be victorious and live
long! Dzl.',
yun rin-po (or mo) along time; yunrin-
po-nas
from a
long time,
a
long
time
since,
rin-por
ma
Ion-par,
less
accurately: rin-po
malon-par
soon
afterwards,relating
to
things
past, rin-por
mi
fogs-par
id. with
respect
to
the
future,
=
after a little
while,
in a short
rifP gtJ8..rig. mi·odrQ.-.ba different languages
and costumes; H·rig. of c,'ery sort, cj.ritp.
3U in every possible mallner, e g. &s ,<<In-
pa to teach religion; ll1/(n-moi ,ifP-J.:yi$ or
rigs-w. by the dny, by days, daily Glr.; rigs
is also used for some, certain, nad-rigs-La
mi o/bhn-na if ollcislIot OD bisgunrd against
certain diseases; sometilDes pleon.: ydn-lug
rigs /);i the four limbs, lliz. hands and feet
Glr.; ri!l' bH the {our grellt spirit-
kings 'l'ngy., rifl8 )'5U1II mg6n-po the three
tutelar saints ('P!Jon·ras-rzigs, rJ.'1«fl-rdlJr,
.,jam-dbyd,i,) Glr.; ,a,is-rgyas rig' lita; zili-
flumtJ Thgr. - "[p'pa vb. to have the way.
manner, custom, qUality of, mgo pyir .blfllJi-
bai ,igNO the upper end (of n stick, pllrt
of which is in the wnter) hIlS the way of
sticking ont, i.e. sticks out; oftell to betrnns-
lated: must necessarily (according to the
laws of nl'ltureortociI'CUlDstances); aspartic.
or adj.: necessary, also proper, suitable, right,
suited to its purpose, in the earlier litexature
gen. with the genit. of the infin., sometimes
with the termin. of the inlin., in later times
with the root of the verh; thus: ldtili-
ba; rigs-i/O you must get up as soon as you
heur. .. Dzl.; da ri Zig md4-bai rigs now
l\ mountain must appear Dzl.; bztig-pairlgs-
sam would iL not be expedient to appoint ...'1
DzI.; rifP-hJi dils..w. btib-bo it is jUf>t the
right time Dzl.; mi mi rigS-llo iL
is not right to be silene, Dzl.; smad-par mi
rigS-I;{) itis not right to abuse Glr.;
odUg-JkU because (he) miglLL possibly come
Mil. nt.; drli.n-pami;;in rigs-la if he should
perhaps not retain the recollection of, if there
should be any danger of his uot rcmem-
bering Thgr.; ogrd-bai rigt-Ia as
there is a possibility of going to hell Tllgr.;
rdul-bai rigs- pa those fit for conversion
Dzl.; Mar skye-ba ni rtf/f'pa ma wgs his
being re-born as a deity is not befitting,
or also: not possible, not mi-
wrong, not right, im-
proper etc., most.ly as adv.: mi4'(!p-parbyM-
pa to llCt wrong, to do badly, frq. - rigs-
kyi rj6s-
o
br,iti tva!. (214) v. sub lUli.
Compo t-igs-brglJUd race, lineage, oxtJ.·u-
tion, family Ca., rigs-bl'fl'jUd·odzi1l male Issue,
rigs-brg!fl,d oiMl-har 09yur-ba the rising of
n numerous progeny Dom. - "$&-"U1I l.
loll' birth or e.J:traction, olJ!Jod mi rig-"dn-
po dati nyam-po man
o
you must not
mingle with people of low extrnctiou, with
common people W; 1'IgNitin dpdn--du s.M-
ba to raise n child of low extraction wthe
ro}'nl dignity GIl'. 2. hangman D::l. (ef. rdol-
pa). - rlgs-Mtin of DollIe birth.
- rigs - mnydm ·pa, mfun - pa, odrd - ba
of the same runk etc., of the ffiIDe spoeie'S.
- rigs-nyatm degenerated, Tlgs-nyams dge-
a monk disgrucing his profession Pth.
- rigs-med _ f'i<J8-tidn no. t.
'''{!p-pa I. v. rigs. - 2. often erron.
for rlg-pa. - 3. adj. of rigs: rgydl-
r(fJf-pa belonging to reigning family or
caste; M-rigs-pai sgd-fl113 in every possible
manner Mil.; ,'i-rigs-par 1I1llJan-pai ffig-gu
with ever so many kind words Dzl.; also:
in any way, allY how, to a cert.'\in dcgree
or extent, in part, partl}' Tar. 4, 3 etc. -
4. sbst., translation of..-r", logic, dialectics
Trlgl. Dll infallible, not decepti\'e idan
WI13. (297).
rlii-i1Hm continua/(?), daily(?) ita-
!sd rin-,i,- ba Alil. nt. ewry day
warm meals.
£::C::'z::r rili-ba 1. adj , also rhi-po C., R., °tili_
mo" W: 1. long, high, tall, relnting to
space; ri,j-mo ""UI;fI W carry it lengthwise;
it also implies distance, in which case fag-
ri,i (q. v.) is tbe more precise form; da-dilli
yid-ws rili·sfe as he is still at a grl.'ut dis-
tance from the place Du.; more frq. with
da,i; rnas "di dalj rbl-h113 ueeause
tllis place is far from the town Dd.; mi riti-
ba-na at no great distance. - 2. long, with
respect to time, fse riti-ha sbst. a long life,
adj. long-li\'ed, r!!ydl-ba da,i f86 n·ti..bar Jog
Hg may he be victorious and live long! Dzl.;
yun riti-po (or mo) a long time; yun rin_
•[KHI113 from a long time, a loug time since,
riti-por rna 16n-par, less accurately: rbi-po
malQn-par soon aftcrwards,relating to things
past, riJi-por rni fogs-par id. with respect to
the (utu,re, _ after a in a short
*
rib
time,
frq.
;
mi-rin-bar id.
Tar.;
dd-nas mi
riii-lntr not
long
after that
Tar.;
n/i
^
a
long time,
rin
^ Ion-pa
da/'i after a
long
time/);:/.;
r*/i
ziy-tuadv. long,
a
long while,
for a
long time,
////
zig-tu
ma
^oiis-pas
as
lie (lid not come for a
long
time Dzl.
;
////
:i<i-ini itt'trr or
during
a
long
time
Glr.]
////-
A/,
resp.
sku-riii-la
c.genit. during, at,
nyin-
gyi
riit-la in the
day-time, during
the
day
/V//., ////
l>:ags
rin
(provinc.
for
n'/i?) O
fso-
.'</> or
rgyags provisions
for the time of his
stay
Mil.;
'<p.
of
kings
etc.: under a
king;
during
the
reign
or life of a
king, frq. ;
de-
riii
/?., 6'.,
*di-
j
riti*
(more
correct
form,
but
only
in
W.) to-day.
3.
old,
rin
zig-na
Sch.
long ago, long since,
v. also
rin-lugs.
II.
length,
distance
etc.,
more definite
form,
but of rare occurrence:
rin-ba-nyid,
di'-nas
mi-riii-ba-nyid-na
a
very
short time
afterwards Tar.
Comp.
rin-Kydd length.
*rih-tcib* W.
length, copiousness (of account).
riti-fun
1.
long
and short. 2.
length, relatively.
rin-gdg,
also
stod-gdg jacket
or waistcoat
of a
Lama,
without sleeves.
rin-lugs
Cs. : 'the sect or follow-
ers of a
person',
Sch. : 'old cus-
toms';
Glr.
92,
2(?).
rin-bsrel
('things
which are to be
preserved
for a
long time'), \ncf,
relics of a Buddha or a
saint,
viz.
small,
hard
particles,
ace. to Burnouf the remnants of
burnt bones.
riiis sometimes for rin.
rins-pa
Swift,
speedy,
rI
its-par rgyug-
paio
run
fast,
to
hasten,
hurry;
rIits-
par yod
I am in a
hurry
Mil.
;
*rih-pa
ton*
W. be
quick!
make haste! riiis run
though
you
be in a
hurry
Mil.;
rins-pai bsod-snyoms
alms,
gifts
of
charity (requiring haste),
ur-
gently requested,
and out of the common
course,
Bum.
I,
269. 628
*za-rins, O
fun-
riiis*,
waiting
impatiently
for one's
meal,
*
^rul-riiis*
for
setting
out W.
;
rins-stabs-su
most
speedily
Mil.
rid-p<*
1.
meager,
emaciated Dzl. and
elsewh. 2. Sch. also : rare.
"
rid-pdn
the Neosa
pine-tree
Kun.
rin 1 .
price, value,
rin
ycod-pa
to
fix,
to
determine the
price
Cs.
(cf. tan\
rin
rtog-pa
to ascertain the
price,
to
estimate
the value
6s.;
rin
Jbtbs-pa
to
abate,
to lessen
the
price
Cs.
;
rin
Jbdb-pa,
rin
O
bn-ba to
go
down,
to sink or fall in value
Cs.;
*rin team*
W.,
*rin
gha-fso*
C. how dear
(is it)
? what
does it cost? rin-la mi
cog
Sch. to sell under
cost-price;
rin -can
dear,
costly;
rin-med
worthless,
also: for
nothing, gratis; rin-go/i,
rin-fdn,
rin-fsdd Tar.
%?%,
17
=
rin\
rin-
cen-po, rin-po-ce
v. the next article. 2.
for
rih,
v. rin-ba
I,
2.
rn-po-ce,
i .
very dear, precious,
valuable
;
usually:
2. sbst
,
-^
a
precious thing,
trea-
sure, jewel, precious stone, precious metal;
metal in
general;
Glr.
7,
five
jewels
of the
gods
are
enumerated,
sapphire, indragopa
and other
three,
prob. fabulous, stones,
and
five
jewels
as the
property
of mun:
gold,.
silver,
pearls, corals, lapis lazuli;
in other
books other
jewels
are
specified
as such. In
the
Buddha-legends
frq.
mention is made
of the
rin-po-ce
sna
bdun,
i.e. the extra-
ordinary
treasures of a Tshakravartin
king,
viz. the
precious
wheel
(v. A:0r-fr>),
the
pre-
cious
elephant,
the
precious horse,
the
pre-
cious
jewel,
the
precious wife,
the
precious
minister and the
precious general (or
inst.
of
him,
the
precious citizen)
v.
Gyatch. chap.
III.
Sometimes
rin-po-cei may
be under-
stood
literally: consisting
of
jewels,
of
pre-
cious
stones,
at other times it is
merely equi-
valent to:
valuable,
precious; rin-po-
gliii
Glr. seems
frq.
to
signify
a
holy, happy
land inhabited
by gods
3. a title, used
not
only
in
rgya-mfso rin-po-ce
and
pan-
cen
rin-po-ce (the honorary
titles of the
high-priests
of Lhasa and of
Tashilunpo),
but also a tide of
every
Lama of a
higher
class.
rin-di W.
(riii-dn Bun.}
1. lead.
2. musket-ball.
rib
=
ri-ba Sch.
(Dzl. 97V,
8.
15,
and
in Sch.'s
dictionary): worth, costing,
34
time, frq.; mi-ri,i-bar id, Tar.; dl-nal "'i
rili-bar not long nfler that Tar,; "'·Ii zig a
long time, rili. !:jg MlI-pa dwi tlfter n long
tilllcD.:L; rili. .tig_lludv, long. a long willie,
lor a long time, ri'i Hg_ht ma tIS
be dill not C<lIDe for a long tilDe D:l.; rili
!:t'g_'1a after or during n time Glr,; rbi_
ia, resp. d:tl-/'iJi-la c. gcnit. during, at, nll(lI-
gyi r;'i.[IJ in the day-time, during the day
l'tk, .Jir b::Ug3 rin (provinc. for riJi1) .fl#)-
ca, or T'lJ!lag3 provisions for the tiule of his
stuy Mil.; of kill,tr-l etc.; under n king;
during the reign or life of n king, frq.; dI-
rili n., C., ·di-ri,jO (more correct forlll, but
ani)' in to-day. - 3. old, rili ::ig-na &11.
long IIog0, long since, v, nlso I'ili-lug'. _
II, length, distance etc., more definite
form, but of rore o('currence; rill-ba-n!Jid,
(M-nas,"i-,·j/i-ba-n!lid-na n very short time
Aftcrwarlls Tar.
Comp, rili_l.'ydd length. - ·,·ili-trib· lV.
length. copiousn('ss (of account). - n·'i-fiui
I. long nnd short. 2.1engtl1, relatively. _
rill-gag, also 'lod-gag jacket or wnistcon.t
of n Lnmn, without sleeves.
riil-lug, C,.: 'the sect or follow-
ers Ofll person', &11..; 'oldcus-
tOIl1S'; Glr. 92, 2(?).
. ri/i-Im'il ('things which nre to be
presen'ed for a long
of aBuddha or a sainI., viz, small, hurd
particles, acc. to Burnouf the remnants of
hlltDt hones.
ri'i' sometimes for rUt.
=r ,i!i8-paswift, speedy, rili'-par rg!l'ig"
pato run fast., to hllstcn, hurry; ,i,j8-
par y<Jd 1 urn in a !lImy Mil.; ·,ili-pa toti·
11'. lJe quick! mnke IUlste! ,i';8/'lui though
you be in a hurry Mil.; ,i,i3"']XJi
alms, gifts of charity (requiring haste), ur-
gently requested, Md out of the common
course, Burn. I, 269. 628 ·za - rili', .fll,j-
,,'';'., waiting impntiently for one's menl,
·o9',ll-.i,i8" for setting out 11'.; ,,'I;S-3taW-31t
most speedily Mil.
I, meager, emaci.aled D::l. and
else,\ h. - 2. &h. also. rare.
029
rib
rid-pail the Neosa pine-troo Kun.
rin I, price, value, rill ft'.dd-pa to fix, to
determine the price (a, (cf_ (U/i), rin
I'I6g-pa to tlSCertain the price, to estimll.le
the value C,.; 'in obtW-IJa to abate, to lessen
the Ilrice C,.; rin .bdb-pa, n'n obrl-ha to go
down, to sink: or fllll in value (;.; ·rin filam·
11':, ·,.,'n G: how dear (is it)? wbl\t
does it cost? rin-la 1IIi Cog to sell under
cost-price; rin-Call dear, costly; ,in-mid
worthless, also: for nothing, gratis; rin"fl6,i,
rin-fd'i, rin-f,dd Tar. :P.<, 11 = rin;
Un-pt:J, rin-po-le v. the next article. _ 2.
for ri'i, v. rili-ha J, 2.
also rin-po- CI,
I. very dear, precious, valuable;
usually: 2. shst, V'lf, a precious tiling, trea-
sure, jewel, precious stone, precious metal;
metal in general; GIl'. 7, five jewels of the
gods nre enumerated, sapphire, indragopa
nnd other three, prob. f:lhulous, stones, and
five jewels as the property of mlln; gold,.
silver, petltls, coreUs, lapis la.zllli; in other
books other jewels are spe('ified lIS su('1. In
the Buddhll.-Iegends frq. mention is m:w'e
of the '1n-po-(I 8116 bdun, i.e. the exttll-
ordinllr)' treasures of n. Tslmkro\'nrtin king,
viz. the precious wheel (\'. olror-lo), the prc-
cious elephntlt, tbe precious horse, the pre-
cious jewel, the preciou,. wife, the preciou,
minister and the preeious genernl (or inst.
of him, the precious citizcn) ". GYlltcb. e1Ulp.
Ill. Sometimcs I'in-po-i:ei WIl)' be under-
stood litcrally: consisting of jewels, of pre-
cious stones, at other times it is merely equi-
mlent to: \-alua.ble, precious; rin- po_ cei
glill Glr, seems frq. to signify 1\ 11(1)', hllppy
lnnd inhabited hy gods. - 3. a titre, used
not only in rgya-l/IflSO "ill-po-« lind pmJ-
(fen (the honorary titles of the
high-priests of Lhasa and of Tll.shilunpo),
but also 11 title of ever)' Lftma of l\ highcr
class.
.. "in-di w: (ri;,-dri BUll.) 1. lead.-
'1 2. musket-ball.
,·jb - ri-ba Sen.. (D:l. ')JV, 8. 15, and
ill S£h;.'8 dictiooary); worth, oosting,
at
530
rib-ma
ns
standing at;
to the Tibetans asked
by
us the
word seemed to be
unknown,
and the MS.
of
Kyelang
has ri-ba in the above cited
pas-
sage.
*
rib-ma*
W.,
*dib-ma*
C., fence,
hedge,
enclosure to
protect
the fields
from cold
winds,
intruders etc.
*
rim-gri resp.
for
ff
ltogs-ri* hunger
W.
demons;
*t'u-rim* W.
dysentery, diarrhoea,
bloody
flux
;
rims-sd the 'tooth' of an
epi-
demy,
i.e. its
contagium,
virulency.
C"
ril-tin Ld.
=
sa-rdg.
rim-yro
or rim-
gro, resp.
sku-
rim
honour, homage,
shown more
esp.
to
gods,
saints,
and
priests, offerings
and
other ceremonies
(v.
sub
sku), rim-gros
far-
bar
Ogyur
he will
yet
be cured
by religious
ceremonies
(if
medical advise should
prove
insufficient) S.g.
;
dei
rim-gro-la
as a cere-
mony
for him
(the
sick
person)
Mil.
;
zan-
zin-gi rim-gros by offerings
in
goods,
cattle
etc.)
Mil.;
rim-
Qgro cen-po byas
he
arrang-
ed a
great
sacrificial festival Pth.
;
rim-gro-
pa
servant,
waiting-man,
valet de chambre.
^3TJ*
r
'
im
-p
a
->
Ssk-
sR*T,
1.
series,
succes-
sion,
rim-(pa) bzin(-du} Dzl.,
rim-
par
Glr.,
in a row or
line,
in
rows,
by turns,
successively,
one after
another,
also
=
by
degrees, gradually; rim-gyis, rim-pas
Dzl.
id.
; rim-pas ddn-po mcog yin pyi-ma
dman
v. sub
dmdn-pa; byd-ba
fob-rim bzin
byed-
pa
to do a business
by turns,
each
taking
a certain share of the work Glr. 2. the
place
in a row or
file,
constituent
part
or
member of a
series,
dei
mi-brgyud rim-pa
Inas
rgydl-sa
bzun five members of his lin-
eage occupied
the throne
Glr.,
and in a still
more
general
sense :
sgo
rim
-
pa
bdun a
sevenfold door
Dzl.;
rim-lddbs Sch. and
nyis-rim S.g. double;
rim-ycig
=
lan-ycig
one
time,
once. 3.
order, method, Ocdd-par
Ogyur-bai rim-pa O
dis
by
this method which
will be
explained immediately, Sbh.;
rim-
bral
disorderly, irregular
Cs. rim
ynyis
v.
skyed-rim.
(5X*\
rims(-nad) contagious disease,
epidemy, plague,
nan -rims id.
.\
rims
yton-ba
to
send,
to cause a
plague,
as demons do Dzl.
;
dus
ydon ynyis-kyis
ma
skyedrims
mi
Jbyun plagues, epidemies,
are
caused
by nothing
but the season or
by
'
vil-ba I. more
frq. ril-po,
ril-mo
B.,
C.;
*ril-ril* W. 1.
round, globular,
in
C. also
cylindrical;
srdn-ma ril-mo
peas
are
round
Wdn.;
*ril-ril* W. also sbst.: a
round,
globular object,
such as a
cabbage-head,
a
round
lump
of butter etc.
;
ril-bai
spyi-blugs
Glr.,
Sch.: 'a
bottle,
narrow in the
middle,
a
gourd-bottle'.
2.
whole, entire; wholly,
quite
*Kon-ril*
quite crippled,
lamed
(7.; *nay-
ril-ril* W.
very black, quite
black
; rtdg-pa
dan
ril-por Odzin-pa
to consider a
thing
lasting
and entire
(not
compounded) Thgy.;
ril-por
na dbdn-na if it
belongs
to me en-
tirely
Mil.
;
ril-po
the
whole,
the entire
thing
(opp.
to a
part),
also in arithmetic
Wdk.;
ril-poi Ihdg-ma
the remainder of the whole
Wdk.',
bubs-ril lus the whole
body S.g.',
ril-
gyis yyogs-pa entirely, completely, envelop-
ed,
or
wrapped up
Sch.
; ril-mid-pa
Sch. :
'to swallow a
thing entire'; de-dag
daiiril-
gyis
mci-am
pyed
dan mci-ba bka-stsol
cig
tell me whether I am to come with
all,
or
only
with one half
(of them)
Dzl.
9^S%,
5
(ace.
to the
manuscript
of
Kyelang); ril-bu,
col.
*ril-lu*,
small
ball, globule, pill,
ril-bur
bsc/ril-ba
srdn-ma tsam formed into a
pill
of
the size of a
pea
Lt.;
ril-ma
globular dung
of some
animals,
byi-bai
ril mouse
-dung
Mng. (where Piper longum
is
compared
with
it), gld-bai
ril
dung
of the
musk-deer;
lug-ril
tirdles,
sheep-pellets,
sa-ril 1.
dung
of the
argali
Ld. 2. small meat-balls C.
-
II. I.W.: *ril-ce*
(for gril-ba)
to fall.
-
2.
Bal. *ril-cas*
(for sgril-ba)
to
wrap up.
xxi-
?'is !
cognate
to ri-mo and
perh.
to
O
bri-ba :
figure, form, design, pddma-ris
the
figure
of a lotus-flower
Glr., mig-man-
ris-su
bris-pa
Glr.
painted
like a chess-
board; skya-ris
the blank
parts
of a
picture,
fson-ris the
painted parts
of a
picture
6s.
2. Cs.:
part, region, quarter,
hence mfo-ris
heaven,
v.
mfo;
dban-ris share of
power
or
of
territory;
mna-ris id and n. of a
part
of
standing: at; to the Tibetans IlSked by WI the demons; u-l'im' w: dysentery, diarrhoea,
word SCf'nlcd to be unknown, nod the MS. bloody flUX"; rims-3o the 'tootb' of aD epi-
of Kyelang has ri-ba in the abO\'c cited pas- dewy, i.e. its contagium, \·irulency.
sage. rit-tili Ld. - sa-rag_
'rib-ma' '1ib-nw' G, fence,
hedge, enclosure t() protect the fields ril·ha I. more frq. ril-po, Til-1M H,
frolll cold winds, intruders etc. C.; 'm·ril' lV. 1. round, globular, in
"" C. ulso cylindrical; min-ma "I[-mQ peas lire
...,,;.j'I:l"I' rim-!Jri T1'lSp. for 'U6g8-ri' hunger W.
.;,j round Wdn.; ',-il-rif,- W: aillO sbs!.: a rOUDd,
rim-grQ or rlm-o!Iro, resp. 3!.,u-- globular object, such as a cal;lbaj.\'e.head, a
rim honour, homage, shown more round lump of bntter etc.; ril../.Jai 8p!Ji·blugs
esp. to gods, saints, nud priests, offerings and Gir" $ch.: 'a bottle, narrow in the middle,
other ceremonies (v. sub sku), ,itrl-flroB (ar- a gourd-bottle'. - 2. whole, entire; wholly,
bar ,,[Iyur be will )'ct be cured by religious quite ·R"oJi-rll"'quite crippled,lamed C.; ·na9-
ceremonies (if medical adl'ise should prove n·l-ril'" lV. very black, quite bluck; ,tdg-pa
8.9.; dei rimllro-la as a. cere- daN ril-por odzin-pa to consider a lhing
mony for h,im {the sick person) Mil.; za,j- lasting and entire (not compounded) Th9!].;
zi,j-gi rim-fll'O$ by offerings iu goods, cattle ril-por ria dbd,j-na if it belongs to me en-
etc.) Mil.; rim-ofll'O "len-po 0Jus he arrang- tirely Mil.; ril-po the whole, the thing
ed a great l;.'\crificia.1festival Pth.j rim-gro- (oPP' to 1\ part), also iu arithmetic lVdk.j
pa servant, waiting-man, valet. de ehambre. ril-poi lhdg-ma the l'cmainder of the whole
rim-pa, &Ie. lti1l", I. series, succes· lVdk.j bub8-rfllus the whole body 8·9·j Til-
. sion, rim-Cpa) bzin(-du) Dzl., -rim- g!lis r!lOgs-pa entirely, completely, envelop-
par Glr., in a row or line, in rows, by turns, ed, or wrapped up Sch.; ril-mid-pu &h.:
one after another, also _ by 'to swallow a thiug: entire'; de-dug da,i ril-
degrees, graduallYj n'm-gyis, rim-pfU Dzl. gyis mei·am hed dan m'(i·ba
id.; rim-p(JJJ da'i-po m&y !lin py[-1fW, dman tell me whether I am to come with aU, or
v. sub dmdn-pa; byd-ba (ob-rlm b?:in byid- only with one half (of them) DzL 5
pa to do a business by turns, each taking (ace. to the 1iI-bu,
a certain share of the work Glr. _ 2. the col. ·n1-lu·, small ball, globule, pill, ril-bur
place in a row 9r file, constituent part or bs!p'il-ba srdn-11Ia f$am formed into a pill of
member of a series, dei mi.brgyud 1im-pa. the size of a pea Lt.; rll-ma globular dung
lnfl$ rgyaI-<$a bzwj five members of his lin- of some animals, byi-bai ril mouse-dung:
enge occupied the throne Glr., and in a. still M/ig. (whtlre Piper longum is compared
more general sense: sgo rim _pa bdun a with it), glri-bai n1 dUllg of the musk-deer;
sevenfold door Dd.; rim _Ulribs Sch. and Mf/-ril tirdles, sheep-pellets, ia-ril 1. dung
nyi&-rim S.g. double; rim-rag _ lan.rCig of the argnli Ld. 2. small meat-balls C.-
one time, once. - 3. order, method, "cdd-par II. 1. lV,: ·rll-l:" (for g,U-ba) to fall. - 2.
,,[Iyu,-bai rim-pa odis b)' this method which Bal. *ril-cfU· (for sgriI-ba) to wrap up.
will be n:plained immediately, SM.; rim- ris 1. cognate to ri-WiO and perh. to
bral disorderly, irregular Cs. - rim myu obri-ba: figure, form, design, pddma-ris
v. sl'/pd-rim. the figure of a. lotus-flower GIr., ffl19...mali-
rims(-nad) contagious disease, r'U-su bris_pa. Gir. painted like II. chess-
epidemy, plague, nan-rims id. bonrdj skya-ris the blank parts of n picture,
Gir.; rims yto,j-6a to send, to cause a plague, fson-rli the painwd parts of a picture c". -
as demons do Dzl.; dU3 rOOn myis-kyiJl11la • 2. u.: part, region, quarter, henee mEo·m
skyed rims mi obyuti plagues, epidemies, are heaven, v. mlOj dbati-ris share of power or
caused by nothing but the season or by of terril(lr)'; mna.-ris id and-no of a part of
*'
531
;
/''yogs-fix party;
<
x. has also: ruii-ris
one's own
party, fzun-ris
another's
party,
rix-(\tti
partial, prejudiced,
>-i*-ninl
impartial,
indifferent,
hence also
hermit,
because he
flight
to feel indifferent to
every thing.
B
>
'//.: V/.s-sw
difference,
ris-su cad
-pa
equality'(??).
--4.
ris-yza symb.
num. :
7,
derived from the number of the
great pla-
nets
together
with sun and moon.
x-
ru 1.
horn,
=
rwa;
rd-ru
goat's horn,
liig-ru
ram's horn. 2.
parts
of vessels
etc.
resembling
a
horn,
e.g.
the handle of
a
stew-pan
Mil. nt.
;
*go-ru*
C.
door-post.
3.
part, division, dmdg-gi
of an
army Stg.,
wing
6s.;
of a
country, dbu-ytsdh-ru-bzi
Mil.', yyds-ru
the
right
side or
wing, yydn-
ru the left side or
wing, yzu/i-ru
the middle
part
or centre 6s. 4. as num.
figure
: 85.
Comp.
ru-ddr Wdk
, Mil.,
ru-mfson Sch.
military ensign, banner, colours, O p'ydr-ba
to
display,
to hoist
(a flag).
ru-snd division
of an
army
Sch.
ru-pa 'troops,
advan-
ced
posts
of the
enemy'
Sch.
ru-dpon
commander of a
regiment,
colonel.
ru-hd
hatred,
grudge, malice, (of
rare
occurrence) ;
ru-ria-can
spiteful,
mali-
cious.
'jt-
ru-rtd 6s.: 'a kind of
spicy
root';
in
Lh. Inula Helenium.
r -Brn-
or 2qrr
ru-fdg
or
ru-rdog
C's. n. of a
i
'
district in Tibet
contiguous
to
Ladak;
an extensive
plain,
east of lake
Parikon.
"
ru-pa
v. ru.
'
ru-po
ram W.
r'n'
Qr
x
-cnr-
ru-ba or
re-yur
a tent-co-
NJ
vering
made of
yak's hair;
ru-ba-
pa
a
person living
in such a
tent;
ru-bai
fsogs
a number of such
tents,
a tent-
village.
ru-ma curdled
milk,
used as a ferment
6
1
., ^6-mar
ru-ma
blug-Q
dra as when
sweet and curdled milk are
put together
S.g.;
as to its
effect,
it
may
also stand for
leaven.
ru-fsdr
fringes
Ld.
=
Ka-fsdr.
ru-rakxa Med.
;
Cs. : a sort of
berry.
ru-ru
Stg.;
Sch.: a kind 6f
deer;
a
species
of fruit-trees.
ru-teb
'flat-horn',
ace. to Sch. the
reindeer
(sd-ba
ru-leb the domesti-
cated,
a,nd
brog-(/iru-Mb
the wild
r.),
more
prob.
the
elk,
v. Ka-$a.
m
<)-yt appearing (?),
bin snum
rug-
ge
the field had a luxuriant
appear-
ance Mil. nt.
rug -pa
1. Cs. a kind of
potato.
-
2. IT.
to
collect,
gather, pluck,
v.
sgrug-pa.
'
ru/t-Kan Cs.:
bake-house,
kitchen.
ba 1. vb. to be
fit, calculated,
suitable, right,
and
adj.:
fit
etc., gen.
with
termin.,
rarely
with the root of the
verb, fsig O
di
jigs-su
run this word is cal-
culated to
terrify,
is terrible
DzL;
btson-du
run it is
salable,
vendible
ZteJ.;
slob-dpdn-
du mi run he is not fit to be a teacher DzL
;
yzdn-du
mi run he is
good
for
nothing else,
but also in the sense: he is too
good
for
anything
else, nothing
inferior can be offer-
ed to him Glr.
;
grub
run-du
yod-pa
one that
is able to
perform
it
Tar.;
mi
myed
mi run
it must be
procured by
all means
DzL,
mi
byar
mi run it must be done
DzL;
nydl-du
mi run it would not do to
sleep
DzL
;
med
kyan
run I
(you etc.)
can also do without
(him)
Glr.
;
dei fse
ytdn-du
run-nam mi run
would it not be as well to let him
go
once
more?
DzL;
ci-ltar
yid-ces-su
run how can
one believe
you?
DzL; *kon-c6g
zun zcr mi
run* W. God cannot tell a
lie; O
di
yah
run
this, too,
is"
correct,
will do Gram.
;
fsab run
tsam it
may perhaps
be used instead Wdft.\
nd-la
mds-pa
ma
byas kyah
run-ste that
they
do not show me
any
honour is not so
great
a
loss;
but . . . Mil.
; O
dis run-nam is that the
right thing?
will that do? de-ltar run
(W.
*cog*}
well,
let it be so! for
aught
I care!
2. several other
phrases
with run : a. lus
O
di ci run
why
should we care so much for
this our
body?
DzL;
esp. cimaruii, pre-
ceded
by
na or
(rarely) by yaii
:
why
should
Tibet; party; C•. has also; ran·ri.
one'. own plUty, r-all-lis aoother's party,
riwan partial, pN!judiced, impartial,
indifferent, hence Also hennit, because he
ought to feel indifferent to CVCIJ' thing. -
&h.: ·'';.-.u difference, riJ-.u cdd - pa
equnlity'(??). - •. m-rza .}'tub. nUIn.: 7,
deri\'cd from the number of the grcill pla-
nets togt!lher with sun and moon.
t" J. horn, - rl(.·a; rd-"" goat's horn,
LUg-ru ram's horn. - 2. parts of vessels
ct<:. fC!Semblillg n horn, e.g. the handle of
l\ stew-pall Mil.nl.; -g6--ru- C. door-post.-
3. part, division, dlt/fig_gi of lin army Stg.,
,,.illg c..; of a country,
Mil.; ryaHu tbe right side or wing, r!;dn-
ro the left side or wing, )'Zuti-ru tbe middle
pnrt or centre W. - 4. as Dum. figure: 85.
Compo ru-ddl' Wdk, Mil., TU-1II(SOn &11.
militnry ensign, banner, tolours, opydr-ba to
displny, to hoist (n Jbg). - 7'Il41ld di"is;on
of an army Sdl. - ru-pa 'UOOIIS, advnn·
ted posts of the enemy' Scli. - ",.dpjn
commnnder of n regiment, colonel.
",,"Ii" hatred, grudge, malice, (of rorc
occurrence); ru·,ia-tan spiterul, moli-
cious.
... ru·rid C•. : 'a kind or spicy root'; in
'<l} Ln. Inula lJelenium.
or ru--fdg or rur-rddg C•. n. of l\
" i'l district in Tibet contiguous
to Ll'Ldnk; an extensive plain, east of lake
Pwilwi.
rli-pa v. ru.
ril.-po ram lV.
or rU_ba or re-gur n tent-co-
-....;-... vering wade of yak's h:..ir;
ro-ba-pa a person living in such ll. tent;
ni·bai fwgs a numuer of such tent;;, a tent-
village.
rU-ma curdled milk, used as It ferment
C., rli·ma blug-odra AS w!Jen
nud curdled milk art' put toget!Jer
S.g.; as to its effect, it wny nl!>O stllnd for
leaven.
fringes IA. _I/a_fsdr.
5"
''U-f'al:.a Mt<f.; £4.: Il SOI1. of berry.
i+
ru-I'"lt Stg.; SeA.: a kind of deer; Il'
'" species of fruit-treCll.
ru-Iib 'flnt.horn', ace. to Sen. the
"'i reindeer Od-ba ru-Mb the
cated, and obrdg-fJi ru--Ub the wild r.), nl0re
prob. the elk, v. Ila-Ja.
1"Ug-gt appearing (?), Zi/i snurn rog-
the field had n luxuriant appear-
ance Mil. nt.
rUg_pa 1. u. a kind of potato. -
2. lV. to collect, gather, pluck, ".
sgrUg-pa.
r6/j·,{'wi C•. : bake.house, kitchen.
nili - ba 1. \·b. to be calculated,
'" suitable, nnd l'Ldj.: fit eko, gcn.
with !.ermin., rarely with the root of the
"crb, fsif! oJi JigHU rU/i this word is cal-
culated to terrify, is terrible Dzl.; bt4QIi-dll
run it is whble,. "cndible Dzl.; slcb-dpjn-
du lIIi run he is not fit to be a tcucher D::l.;
yzdn-du ml run he is good for nothing else,
but I\lso in the sense: he is too good for
nnything elsC', nothing infcrior CM be offer-
ed to him Glr.; flI'Ub Tlhi-du ydd-pa one that
is able to perform it TOo,..; mi mytd nlj run
it must be procured by all means D::l., mi
byo.r mi ",Ii it must dooe D::i.; nydl.du
fill run it would do to sleep D::l.; mM
KyQ.1i rUJ; 1 (}·ou etc.) ClIO also do without
(him) Glr.; dcj tfe ytd,i.du l'll,i-li(l/ll mi ru,i
would it not be AS well to let him go once
wore? D::I.; a-ltar yld-cerr-IU rllli how can
one you? D::l.; °/oon_Cdg ::lIn zer 1IIi
rulio W. God cannot tell a lie; oJi 1/0.'; ,·w;
this, too, i,; correct, will do Gl'am.; f,o,b rUJi
(,am it may perhaps be used instead Wdti.;
,id·la "uJ.I-pGrna "yail. rthi-si, that they
do not show me AD)' honour is not 80 grellt
n loss; but ... Mil.; odis ,'U';->iam is tlmt the
right thing? will tbllt Jo? ck-ltar noi (w.
0Cog") well, let it be so! for aught 1 care!
_ 2. seHH'nl other phrases with ruli: a. II"
odi i:i ru>i .....11y should we cilre so much for
this our body? D::l.; esp. ci ma "u", pre-
by 1m Ql' (mrely) by !Ian: why should
532
rud
rus-pa
not...?
i.e. that! would that!
Odibddg-gi
yin-na
ci ma run would that this were mine !
Thgy. ;
nai bu-mo min-na ci ma run I
only
wish,
she were not
my daughter!
would it
were not
my daughter!
Pth. b. run
=
yan
after a verbal root : de tsam
zig
bsdad run
though
I have been
sitting
so
long Mil.;
mi
dgos
run
though
it is not
necessary
MiL;
ses run mi
ses-pa
Itar
byed-pa
to
plead ig-
norance
although
one knows the
thing
Mil.
;
ci-la
fug
run whatever
may happen
to
me,
=
at all
events,
at
any
rate; ciyin
run what-
ever it
may
be
Mil.; log yin
run min run
whether it be an erroneous
(opinion)
or not
Mil.;
si run
yson
run whether I live or
die,
living
or dead Pth.
; gan yan run,
ci
yan
run whosoever he
may be,
whatsoever it
may be, frq.;
sa cu
gait yan
run-ba-la on
earth,
water or whatever it be Do. c. mi-
run-ba illicit,
improper, unfit,
v.
above;
mi-
run-bai
yzi
bcu ten illicit
actions,
differently
specified
Tar.
33, 9,
Kopp. I, 147,
partly
moral
offences, partly only
infractions of
discipline;
but
ma-run-ba,
ma
-runs-pa
\.
pernicious, dangerous, atrocious,
as
enemies,
beasts of
prey, malignant gods
and
spirits,
reckless
destroyers
etc. 2.
spoiled, destroy-
ed, ruined,
ma-run-bar
byed-pa
to
destroy
etc.,
ma-run-bar
^gyur-ba
to be
destroyed
etc. Dzl.
xr-
rud a
falling
or fallen
mass,
as : Ka-rud
'
snow-slip, avalanche,
cu-rud
deluge,
inundation,
flood
(by
the
rupture
of an em-
bankment and the
like),
sa-rud
land-slide,
descent of a
great
mass of earth
;
rud-zam
a
snow-bridge,
formed
by
avalanches.
rrrx-
rub
-
cu
prop, n.,
a district in the
^O
^ ,11-7-7
south ot La.
r
q-q
rub-pa
to rush in
upon,
to
attack,
as-
sault, pyag
zabs kun-nas rub -rub
)us-te rushing
in
upon
him from
every
side
in order to touch his hands and feet Mil.
;
bzdn-la rub
-pa
to
pounce
on the
prey,
to
fall
upon
the food Glr.
;
*
do-rub tdn-te sdd-
ce* W. to kill with
stones,
to stone
; *cog-
cig-la rub-pa*
W. to
press
or crowd
together
towards one side
;
Ka-rub
byed-pa
to out-
cry,
to bear down
by
a louder
crying
Mil.;
*
go-rub-rub Odug* C., "go-rub
tan
dug''
W.
they put
their heads
together;
*srod rub
son,
or mun-cu rub son* W. darkness draws
on,
night
is
setting in,
for which in C. *sa rub
son* Is said to be
used,
so that it
might
also
be translated
by
to
darken,
to obscure.
rub-so currant W.
xxr
rum 1 .
womb, uterus,
=
mnal,
but less
frq.:
rum mi bde-ba sensations of
pain
during pregnancy
Dzl.,
rum-du
)ug-pa
to
enter into the womb.
-
2.
darkness,
ob-
scurity, mun-pai
rum Glr.
, gen. smag-rum.
-
3.
prop, n., Turkey,
the Ottoman
empire,
the site of which is but
vaguely
known to
the
Tibetans, though
some commodities from
thence find their
way
to
Lhasa; rum-pa
a
man from
Turkey,
a
Turk;
rum-sam
(*L;;)
Syria
Cs.
xorn*
rul-ba to
rot,
to
get rotten,
to become
putrid,
to turn rancid
etc.,
rul-bar
Ogyur-ba
B.
}
*rul cd-ce* W. id.
; ^o-ma
rul
son the milk is
spoiled,
Ka rul the snow
does no
longer bear,
*be rul* W.
drift-sand,
quicksand; rul-skyur
'sour
by putrefaction'
Sch
;
rul-dri a
putrid smell; rul-po
for
hrul-po
Cs. Cf.
O
drul-ba.
xxr
rus
1.,
W.
rus-pa, lineage, family,
min
dan rus ni
O
di-ltar-ro their name and
lineage
are such and such
Glr.;
*na-ran-ahi
(or
na-ran
dhan) ru-cig-pa
or
-dd-wa*C.B.,
*rus-pa cig-cig*
W. we are of the same fa-
mily; rus-ycig-pa y
sod
-pa
a murderer of
persons
related to him
by
blood Lex.
;
fu-
mi rus Lea.:
Thu-mi,
a
family-name;
rus
mfd-ba
high
extraction,
rus dmd-ba low
extraction Cs. 2. v. the next article.
rus-pa (resp. ydufi)
1.
bone, rus-cdg
fracture of a bone
Med.; rus-pai
dum-bu
prob.
small bones of which the Ti-
betan
anatomy
enumerates 360.
mi-rus
human
bone;
rkdn-rus bone of the
foot;
mgo-rus
bone of the
skull; rus-pai rgyan
Mil. a decoration of
terrifying
deities and
magicians, consisting
of human bones sus-
pended
from the
girdle; rus-pai rgyan drug
Pth.,
the like
ornament,
but fastened to six
different
parts
of the
body,
the
top
of the
532
not •.• ? i.e. 0 that! would Ihal! od; bddg-gi
yiTl-fla ti ma nu; would that this were mine!
TI'!IY.; riDi bW-mo miTl-fla ti ",a ruN I only
wish, she .....ere not my daughter I would it
were not my daugbter! POI. b. no; _ yan
after a verbal root: tU tMIm z-S blJad nui
though I ha"e been sitting 80 long Mil.;
mi dgoc rwi though it is not MiL;
ill nul: 1fti M-pa ltar to plead ig-
norance ahhough one kno",,'s the thing .Vi/.;
ti-lo. (ug rwi whalaver may happen to me,
_ at all et"eJIt!, at any rate; ti yin ruli: what-
ever it may be MiJ..; log yin rvli mi" ""i
whether it be ll..ll. erroneous (opinion) or not
MiL; ii"£Ii ruli whether I or die,
li"ing or dead PllI.; go.li yaic nllt, ti y(l1l
nut. whosoever he may be, whatsoever it
may be, frq.; IQ h go.it yaIi nili-loa-la on
earth, wiler or whate,·u it be Do. e. ",i-
rWli-loa illicit, improper, unfit, v. abo,'e; mi-
nili--loai.,zi bCu ten illicit Bctions, differently
specified Tar. 33, 9, KOpp. I, 147, partI}.
moral offent.es, plrtly only infractions of
discipline; but ma-rlilf-bo, tna-nilil-pa l.
pemlcioLlS, dangerous, atrocious, as enemies,
beasts of prey, malignant gods and spirits,
re<:k1ei1S destroyers etc. 't. spoiled, demoy-
ed, ruined, ma-ni/i-bar byld- pa 10 destroy
etc., ma-rin-bar .,!JyVr-6a to be destroyed
etc. D:;J.
rud a f&!ling or fallen mass, (18: /{a-rlid
snow_slip, 3valancbe, "6l-rlid deluge,
inundntion, flood (by the rUIJlure of lUI em-
bankment and the like), I(J-I.."d land-slide,
descent of ll. great mass of ellrth; rild-zam
a &low-bridge, formed by ll.\'!i1allches.
I'Uh - eli prop. II., Jl, district in tbe
SOUUI of IA.
:5,:::r'f f'/ih-pa to rush in upon, to attack, as-
sault, liya!/ zal!& kUIi-flCU l'Uh-nib
Jia-re rushing in IIpon hiw frOlll cI'ery side
in order to toucb his Imnds and fect Mil.;
bzan-la rlih-pa to pounce on the prey, to
fall IIPOII thc food Glr.; -do-ruh Ui!'-(e,1id-
U' lV. to .L:ill wilh St(,nes, to stone; -log-
Cig-la ,.,ih·pa- 11'. to press or crowd together
towlU"ds oue Bide; lia-ruh byM-pa to out-
cry, to bear dllwn hy n. louder oryiog AII1.;
-.,go-ruiM-Uh odug* C., (an
they put their head.. together; -lrod"Ih .0.. ,
or mlin-eu ruh .son- W: dll.rklle5S drnv.s ou,
night usettiug in, for \\·hich in C. -16 nth
w/i- is said to be used, SO that it migbt also
be translated by to darken, to obscure_
ruh-Jd currant IV.
':;'e.l" ntlll I. womb, uterus, = mlial, bnt 1es8
...., frq.: rum mi 6de-IJo. sensauons of pain
during pregnancy D:L, ritm.du Jj,g-pa to
eJItu into the womb. - 2. dartntss, Db·
scurity, mlin-poi rum GIr., gen. ,mag-rum.
- 3. prop. n., Tultey, the Ottoman e..pire,
the site of which is but \'agilely to
the Tibeu.ns, though some commoditieefrolJl
thence find their ",...y to Lhasa; "''"-PO D
man from Turkey, a Turk; rvm-ia...
Syria. Ca.
.:;,q.::;r rj,l-6a 10 to get roUM, to become
...., putrid, to tum rancid ek., ritl- bar
"gyWr-6a B., -rul Cd-U- lV. id.; ../).1fI(I nd
IOn tbe milk is spoiled, fa ntl the snow
does no longer bear, Mlr W. drift-sand,
quicksand; rul-M.yilr 'sour b)' Ilutre&cuon'
&/1 ; ritl- dri .. pntrid smell; nil- po for
hrul-po l.i. - cr. odrvl-loa.
TUI I., Iv. rw-pa, lineage,lamity, mili
dan TUI xi odi-ita,.-ro tlieir nlUDC nnd
lineage lU'esllch and sucbGlr.; -;,a4'aJi-yhi
(or ria.,-wi dlt.ari) ry-Hg-pa or -4d-u:a-C.B.,
-",sf" Cig-Cift W: we nre of the sallIe fa-
mily; rus·rCig-pa /'IM-pa Ilo murderer of
pefllOllS rel:\led to him by Mood Lu.; (lL-
fII( nlS La.: TAu-mi, n fnmilY-ll.l\me; 1'IU
mfd-ba high u:tmction, 1'U5 dflld-ha low
extraction Q. - 2. v. the next article.
'!'Us-pa (resp. rduh) 1. bone, f'W/.M.g
fracture of n. bone Med.; rus - pai
dum-bu prob. small bones of whicll lhe Ti-
betan anatomy enUlDCl'utes 3GO. - 'ni..,·us
human bone; ,.kdri-nu bone of tbe foot;
mg6-rm bone of the s.L:ul1; ru.,.pui t'!J'jQll
Mil. a decoration of terrifying Jcitieli llud
Illaf;icill.ns, consisting of ]IUillun bones
pended from the girdle; niI-pai rg!Jun drug
1"tlt.., the like orlllUUent, but fllStened to six
differeD\ parts of the top of the
re
head,
the
ears,
the
neck,
the
upper
arm,
the
wrists,
and the
feet;
rus
O
b<>l-ba men-
tioned as a morbid
symptom
Lt.f "2. the
stone of
apricots
and other stone-fruits
6'.,
W.
;
grape-stone
Wdii. 3.
energy, snyh'i-
///
Mil.,
gen. snyiit-rus q.v.
4. v. rus
Comp,
rtis-krd/'i
skeleton,
*rus-tdit
fsog-
se* W. he is
nothing
but skin and bones.
/V/.S-//M IA.
bone-broth(P). rus-grog
Sch.: a
dry
bone
('?).
no-b&td Lt. ? rus-ndd
W. caries.
-
rus-bu 1. small bone. 2. bones
in
general
Dzl.
rus-fsdd,
rus-fsod Med.?
-rus- sin 1. Sch.
firmness,
perseverance,
repentance.
2. n. of a
part
of the
body (?)
Lt
x
re 1. indefinite num. or
pron.,
single,
a
single one,
some
(persons),
something;
one to
each,
one at a
time,
re-re or re
every,
every one, every body, each,
rdn-la bu re
med-na
yid- pam-pa
re
ydn-gi Oduy,
des-na
Kyed-la-aii
bu re
dgos despair
comes from
having
no
son,
therefore
you, too,
should
have a son
Mil.; yud
re for a
moment,
=
yud
tsam
Thgr.
;
Ian re Ian
)nyis
once or
twice Mil.
i
mi
brgya
re tsam zon
cog-pa (a
horse) sufficiently (large)
for
being
mounted
by
about a hundred men Glr.
;
lo re tsam
ma
-yfogs
with the
exception
of one
year
about
Git'.;
ras-yos-rkydii
re a
single
cotton
garment
Mil.
; cos-Jbrel
re a small amount
of
spiritual
instruction
Mil.]
W.: *bal re*
some
wool,
*su-gu
re* some
paper
(= zig),
*ku-su re* some
apples;
bi-u-la
pur-pa
re
ytdd-nas handing
to each of the ten &
pur-pa
I
'tit.]
Idy-na
ddn-tse re-re
yod
in each of
his hands there was a
gold-coin
Dzl.
; nyin
re-la sems-can Kin re bsad Glr. he
slaugh-
tered
every day
10 000
living beings,
ra
lha lita bsad five
goats (every day)
;
mi res
lug
re bsad each man killed one
sheep
Glr.
;
in a somewhat different sense: *lo re-ne lo
re cun-se
yod*
W.
they grow
smaller from
year
to
year; nyun
re little at a time
Glr.]
r<'-rc
yiiyix-ynyis
one and
all,
one with an-
other, indiscriminately Mil., re-re-bzin-gyi
mgo every single person's
head
Tar.]
re
zig
somebody, something;
some
(persons),
a
little;
(with
or without
dus)
a little
while,
re
zi<j
533
sdod wait a little! I>:l.\ re,
zig i-ig-na
after
a little
while,
Bhar. 87
; once,
one
day,
one
time,
at a future time,
also dus re
zig-gi
fse
I'f/i
-
2.
mutual, reciprocal (in
this sense
it is
perh.
to be
spelled
res,
though
it is cer-
tainly cognate
to
re), dpon
slob re
J>an Obyun
Mil. there arises mutual discord between
teachers and
disciples
Mil.
] different,
differ-
ing?
re-lta-bu 'of a different kind or na-
ture' Sch. 3. sbst. a. the wooden
parts
of a
door,
re Hzi the four
parts
of a door-
frame,
yd-re
the
head-piece,
the
lintel,
ma-
re the sill or threshold
(= yd-fem
and md-
fem), *yd-re
ma-re dal ton* W.
pull
it down
entirely! logs-re
the side
posts (C. sgo-ru).
b. v. re-mos and reu. 4. In such forms
as
mdr-ra-re, mcis-sa-re, gyur-ta-re (Dzl.
VL,
1
?,
9.
??, 2)
it
may
be rendered
by
an
adverb,
as:
certainly, undoubtedly.
5.
vb.,
v.
red-pa
and re-ba. 6.
par-
ticle, mostly put
between two
closely
con-
nected words:
nyams-re-dgd,
blo-re-bdeGb\,
^o-re brgydl, skyug-re-log
, ze-re-^jigs, yi-
re-muy, don-re-cun, snyin-re-iye (this
last
very frq.)
5
without
essentially modifying
the
signification, yet only
used in
emphatic
speech.
7. num. for
drug-cu
in the ab-
breviated forms of the numbers 61 to 69.
8. num.
figure:
115.
x-^rx'
re-skdn
(etymology?),
ace. to the
'
passages
which came to
my
know-
ledge
a
strong negative (like
oi
/uij), by
no
means, never, yon
re
-
skan Mil.
frq.,
that
can never
happen,
that is
absolutely
im-
possible (parallel
to
yon
mi
srid) ; fsim-par
(?yur
re-skdn
they
never can be satisfied
with it Tar.
re-skon n. of a bitter medicinal herb.
*
re-Kd Sch. a
picture, painting.
re-kdn v. re-ba.
^.-
.
rc-Jhiii
Sch. :
re-Jfdit Jbyun-ba
to
be not too much
(?).
'
re-guv
v. re-ba sbst
re-grou
addition, increase.
re
IlCad, the ClIrs, tlie neek, tllC uppcr 1I1'nJ,
the wrists, and the foot; f'UlI /)lIl-OO mcn-
tioned liS n lllorbid symptonJ IA.' - 2. the
stone of ",pricots and otllcr stone-fruits C.,
11'.; grope-stoDe Wdn, - 3, energy, lIly(,i-
sf Mil" gcn. 811yiit-I'IU q.v, - 4. \'. J'UI
Comp, 1'118-.ertin skeleton, "'I'u,-{(hi ('Oy-
K" IV. lie is nothing but skin and bones. -
rll,.J.!u Lt. bone-brothel). - f'U'-!lrdg SeA.: ll.
dry bone (1). - ru,-Mud LO - I'lU-Jltid
IV. clu·ies. - I·!i.-OU I. small bone. 2. bones
in general Dzl. - ''UI-(sud, ,m-(sdd .lled.1
- Un I. &/1. firmness, perseverance,
l'epenwce. 2. n. of n. pArt of the body m
Lt.
re 1. indefinite Dum. or pl'on" single, a
-... single one, some (persons), something;
one to each, one at a time, re-Ii or 1'/1 every,
every one, every body, each, ran-Ia bu J'e
'IIM-Ila yid-
o
Palll"]I(J I'e !J6Ii-gi odug, dea-na
J!yCd..[«_wi bu ,'e dgm dcsll:lir comes from
Im"ing no son. t1lerefore you, too, should
Imve ll. Son Mil.; yud re for a moment,-
!JI1d uam 'l'Jlgr.; lmt ,'e Ian }"1lyis once or
twiee Mil.; mi brgya re l3«m ;Olt rog-pa (II
horse) suflieiently(lnrgc) fur being mounted
b}' :'Ibout a hundred men Glr.; 10 re t8am
1IIa - f(&,]' witli the exception of one year
about GIl',; ras-[/()S.1'Iqjuli ,.e n single cotton
gnrmeut Nil,; cOIJ-obrill'e n small umoullt
of spiritua.l Nil.; W: "'fwl re"
some wool, "3U-gu re" some Il:1per (_ Zig),
-.e"-3U re' somc llPllles; bi:u-Ia iJill'-'pa re
ftdd-nas handing loeaeb of the ten (J. Pu"-pa
ltig-lIa dcj,j-t:se re-rl! yod in ellch of
-Ilis hlluds there WllS fl gold-coin Dzl.; nyill
re.w I'e baad GIl', he slaugh-
tered e\'er)' d1\Y 10000 living beings, ra
lita ltia baad live goats (every day); mi Tl?3
lug 1'/1 "sad eltd.l m:lIl killed one sheel' GIl',;
in a somewhat diffcrent sense: "10 to
re CH,i-u yoo' HZ they grow smaller from
year to ye4r; nyu'; re little at a time Gl,'.;
J'/1-I'e )'11y;"-rnyi" onc nnd all, one with l\n-
other, indi"crilOinlltel)' Mil., re-re-b:in..,yi
111[/0 evcry hend Tar.; re ;;g
somebody, something; some(pcrsons),a little;
(with or WiUlOut dll-') a little while.) re ?:if}
[,33
.aod wnit n little! Dzl.; re 't;g No-nu .ftcr
1\ little while, JJIw,'. 37; once, one day, one
lime, at a future lime, also dll, re 'tig-gi fu
PtA - 2. mutua4 reciprocal (in this stllse
it is Ilerh, to be spelled I'/:'l. though it is
minI), cognate to re), d]JOIt ,lob re orw; o"JIU';
Mil. there arises mutulll discord Uetween
tencbcrs nnd disciples Nil.; different, differ-
ing? re-Ita-lm 'of a dilTerent kind or na-
ture' $eh. - 3, sbst. a. tlte wooden parts
of n t!OOl', re b'ti the four parts of n. door-
frnme, yd-re the hcad.piece, the lintel, ma-
re the sill or threshold (= yei-fem lind 1IId-
(em), "yu-re rna-I'e «al ron" IV. pull it down
entirely! logs-rl the side posts (C. 'fjO-ru).
b. v. ,'e-1II0$ and J'/1U. - 4. In such forlOs
liS JIUl!'·l'a·re, mN,·aa-re, gyu.r_la_re (D:l.
Vi.-, 1. r--e,9, :Jel, 2) may be rendered
by lin :'Idverb, ns: cerlllinly, undoubtedly.
- 5, vb" v. rtd-pa - 6. par-
ticle, mostly put between two closely con-
nected words: llyama-I'e-dgti, blfJ-re-b&Glr.,
brgydl, s.eyuy-re-lOg, ze·re-.,)igs, yi-
re-mug, "I}pti-re-rye (tbis Inst
very frq.), without essentially modifying
the signiliclltion, )'et only used in empbntic
speech. - 7. num. for (lrug-ro in the ab-
breviated forms of the nuwbers 61 to 69.-
8, num. figure: 115.
::-'m· 1'e - ,.etin (etymology?), n.cc. to the
-... r'rJ l'ussages which came to my know-
ledge a strong negative (like tlt by no
means, never, !IOn "e· skan J1fil. ft'q., that
caD never hllppen, that is absolutely im-
p08silJle (parnllel to yoil 'IIi arid); (s;"l-PO"
09YUl' re.Mdn they Dever can be satisfied
with it Tal'. '
n. of a bitter me(licinal herb.
re-id &11. a picture, painting.
re-okan ,'. re-ba.
J'e·1uiJ &!l.: l'I1-
o
ftiii ovyw,i-ba to
1'- be not too much (?).
Te"fJllr v. "e-ba sbst.

''/1-g,.';11 addition, increase,
534
re-lcdgs-pa
or
reu-lcdgs-pa,
Med.,
a mezereon with white blossoms in the
South-Himalaya,
of which
paper
is made.
s
^
re-to
pumpkin
Kun.
'
re-dogs
v. re-ba. vb.
re-lde v. re'-6a sbst
5J*
re-sndm v. re-ba sbst.
w-opfy* P
r
P-
n
-> Triloknath,
a
much
frequented place
of
pil-
grimage
in
Chamba,
with a famous
image
and
sanctuary
of Avalokitesvara.
"
r#-ba Cs.
sbst.,
also
re-bo,
ace. to some
sbre-bo,
W.
*re-snam*,
Cs.
sack-cloth,
a kind of cloth of
yak's-hair,
a tent-cloth
(also
re-lde and
re-yol Cs.); re-gur
a tent
of such cloth.
re-ba I-
vb.,
1 . to
hope,
fams-cdd mfon-
du reo all
hoped
to see Dzl.
;
de-la
pdn-du
re-nas
hoping
it
might
be
good
for
it Mil.
;
su-la re in whom should
they place
their
hope,
in whom should
they
trust? Ion
yod-du
re-la whilst
you
are
hoping
still to
have time
(enough)
Mil.
;
re-zin
ltos-pa
to
look
up
full of
hope
Glr. 2. to
wish,
v.
II.
3. to
beg,
to ask
alms,
to
go
a
beg-
ging,
for
victuals,
*Ko re-a-la
yon*
W. he
comes to
beg.
II.
^rnSTT
sbst.
hope; wish, frq.,
re-ba
skon-ba,
re-ba
sgrub-pa
to fulfil a
hope;
rnyed-pa, fob-pa
to
get
it
fulfilled,
to obtain
what one has
hoped for,
re-ba Itar
Ogyur
it
goes
to one's
wish,
as well as one could
wish;
re-ba dan
Iddn-pa hoping,
full of
hope,
re-ba
med-pa hopeless, despairing.
Comp.
re-fdg
v.
fdg-pa. re-dogs hope
and
fear,
re-dogs
med
being
without
hope
and without fear
(the principal
aim and
prerogative
of
ascetics)
Mil.
re-(bai)
ynas
Cs.: room for
hope; prob.
also
=
re-
sa the
person
or
thing
whereon one's
hopes
are
placed
6
1
.,
W.
r
f-<>s,
res-mos
turn,
se-
ries,
or more
accurately
:
the order or
change
of the
series,
ned-la
Teg-pa
sdug-pai
re-mos bab then misfortune came
to be our turn Mil.' re-mos-su
Pth.,
*re-mos
cds
-
la* Ld.
by turns, alternately, e.g.
to
strike one's breast with the
hands;
*re-mos
re-mos* W.
by degrees, gradually;
re-mom
id. Ma.
*
re-zig
v. re 1.
re-rdl n. of a medicine Med.
^x- /x^T'x
"j>\
re
-
ru
(ras-ru?)
W. the
spread-
or
warp
-beam of
a loom.
"
re-sa v. re-ba.
re
9
1- &ch.-
reg-yzig-pa
'notes taken
down,
and extracts
made, during
a
course of
study'.
2. v.the
following
article.
reg-pa
I.
vb.,
1.
(
W.
*rdg-ce
=
nyug-
ce*,
the latter
being
more in
use)
to
touch,
to come in contact
with,
Ida
-pa
sd-la
gar reg-par
where his hands touched
the
groundZte/.;
rlun
ydl-ga-lareg-na
when
the wind touches the branches
Dzl.\
Kd-
reg-pa
c.dat. : to
eat,
to
taste,
to
take, dug-
la-Kd-reg
re-ba
yod
in
taking poison
there
is
hope, (viz.
so bad are the
times)
Ma.
;
*fsd-big
zal
rag
dzod orzdl-la
rag*
W.
please,
taste a little of it ! sd-la Kru
gan tsam-gyis
ma
reg-par Jbyon-pa
to walk not
touching
the
ground by
an
ell,
i.e. to move in the
air,
about a cubit distant from the
ground
Pth.;
reg-pa-med-pa intangible, unapproach-
able,
out of
reach,
Glr. 2. to
feel,
to
perceive
Cs.? II. sbst.
reg (prob. only
abbreviation of
rey-bya) feeling, touch,
sense
of
feeling S.g. 10,
5?
Comp.
reg-dug ('poison
that has entered
the
body by contact') S.g. 29,
is said to
signify
now in C. venereal
disease, syphilis.
-
reg-bya
1. what is felt or
may
be
felt,
anything palpable
or
tangible, reg-bya
mi
fsor what
may
be felt is felt no
longer
Wdn.
1
2.
feeling,
sense of
feeling,
pdgs-pa-reg-bya
the
feeling
of the
skin, liis-po pyii reg-bya
grdn-la
whilst the outside of the
body ap-
pears
cold to the
touch, reg-bya-rtsub rough
to the touch Med.
reg
-ma Cs. n. of a
goddess.
'3'
or re-U:dg8·pa OJ'
-3 "I "I" reu-1M!J3-pa,
Ned., a mezereOD with white bloSSOlU8 in the
Soutb-Himllb.ya, of whiuh paper is made.
"e-Io pumpkin Kun.
re-dlJg8 \", ,'Ua. vb.
re·ldi v. ri-ba sbst

1i-3ndm v. re-ba ,bst.
re-oP'ufP prop. n" Triloknath, II
much frequented plate of pil-
grimage in CbamLa, with II famous image
and sanctuary of AvalokiteAI'cwu.
re-ba sbst., also ri-bo, ace. to some
IV. '"re-mam·, 08. sack-cloth,
II kind of cloth of yak's-bair, n tent-doth
(also re-ldi and re-,yrJl G.); re-[Ilif n tcut
of such cloth.
".l-ba 1. vb., ]. to hope, (amJJ-cad m(on-
du reo all hoped t<J see Dzl.; de-fa
iJtin-du ri-na8 hoping it might be good for
it MiL; 8u.·la re in whom should they place
their hope, in whom should they trust? lOli
ydd-du re.Ia whilst yOIl are hoping still to
have time (enough) JJiI.; ri-}i,j lMs-pa w
look up full of hope Glr. - 2. to wish, v.
II. - 3. to beg, to ask alms,' to go a beg·
ging, for victuals, -fro rk-la yo,i- w: he
cornell to beg.
lJ. sbst. hope; wish, frq., rl-ba
3kdli-ba, rl-ba 'gritb-pa 1.0 fulfil a hope;
myM-pa, fob·pa to get it fulfilled, to obtain
what one has hoped for, rl-ba ltar o!J!lur
it goes to one's wish, as well as one could
wish; 'fl-ba dail !dan-pa hoping, full of
hope, 'fe-ba mld-pa hopeless, despairing.
Compo 'fe-fag V. (dg.pa. - re-d6gt hope
and fear, re-ddfp med being without bope
and without fear (the principal Dim and
prerogati\'e of ascetics) Mil. - rl-(bai)
rna' Cs.: room for hope; prob. olso _ 'fl-
,a the person or thing whereon one's hopcs
are placed C., W
'fl-mos, rh-17U1' turn, se·
, ries, or more ACcurately:
the order or change of the series, Md-t"
<.1,
Mlug-pai rl-m03 bab then misfortune came
to be our turn Mil.; re-m03-'" Pth., -rl·mOl
M$-la- LA. by turns, alternatel}", e.g. to
strike one's breast with the hauds; -rl·mos
rl-'/IU)8- W; by degrees, gradually; re-m6ri,
id. Ma.
'fMig v. 'Ie I.
re-ral u. of a medicine
('fa.5-rol) lV. the
spread- or warp - bcnm of
a loom.

rl-3a v. rl-ba.
rrg 1. Sch.: 'feg-rzig-pa 'notes taken
down, and extmcts made, during a
course ofstudy' .-2. v. the following article.
rcg-pa 1. vb., 1. (W: -r&g.ce - nyug-
cl', the latter being more in use)
to tOUCh, to come in contact with, ltig-pa
'rl-la gal" rig-par where his hands touched
the groundD::l.; dwl '!Jul-ga-la reg-na when
the wind the branches Dzl.; IM-
ng-pa c.dat.: .to eat, w taste, to take, dug-
1a--1U-rrg re-ba yod in taking poison there
is hope, (viz. so bad are the times) Mo..;
-(sd-big zal 'fag dzod orZtiI-la raft W. please,
tUtile a little of it! 'ti-la ltru gan uam-gyU
ma reg-par /lgJn-pa W walk not touching
the ltrouod by an ell, i.e. to mo\'e in the
air, about ll. cubit distant from tlJe ground
11k; int.'mgiblf.>, unapprooch.
able, out of reach, Glr. - 2. to feel, to
pereeivD u.1 - 11. sbst. "rg (prob. only
abbreviation of "eg-bya)feeling, touch, sense
of feeling S.g. 10, 5?
Compo reg-dug ('poison tbat has entered
tbe body by contllct') S.g. 2U, is said to
signify DOW in C. venereal disease, syphilis.
- "Ig-bya I. what is felt or may be fel4
anything polpabJe or tangiblc, rtg·bya mi
(,or what may be felt is felt no longer WdJi.
1. feeling, sense of feeling, p«gs-pa-reg-bya
the feeling of the skin, lits-po p:vii rlg-bya
grall-la whilst the outside of the body ap-
pears cold to the touch, rig-bya-ruub rough
to the touch Mtd. - reg-ma ("4. D. of a
goddess.
irii-lin ro
ren-lm,
pf.
ir^s to be
stiff, hard,
rigid,
rniai irii
t/ii/ans
to remove the hard
parts,
of a wound
(to clear,
to
cleanse)
HV//.;
*/v///.s son* W.
(the blood)
lias
coag-
ulated, congealed,
also of a dead
body
: it
has
grown
stiff;
*rdn-te dad
dug*
W. he
makes liimx-lt'
stiff,
he
struggles against;
-
pa
solid
(opp.
to
liquid), coagulated,
stiff,
hard; iriix-par lnjed-pa
to make hard
or
stiff;
ti-. : stiffnecked.
obstinate, unwilling,
Do.
^q-
reh-bu 1.
pastil
for
fumigating Lt,
\.
spos.
2. Sch. :
separate,
not be-
longing
to
anything
else.
>e/iS someti mes f r
ran*,
v.
nyin-retis,
fo-reiis.
re/is-po
Sch.
alone, single.
xr'r
red-pa
1 . to
be,
=
yin-pa,
in
Sp.
and C.
y
rarely
in
B.;
also
rt-pa (rJ-ba)
is met
with; Kyed pyugs-rdzi
ma red
rdo-r)e-sems-
dpar
snan
you
are not a
herdsman, no,
you
are
Vajrasattva (viz.
a
deity)! Pth.;
*cah
yo-pa
re*
me'-pa
re'*? is there
any
beer
here or not? C. 2. Cs.: to be
ready,
red
mda a
ready
arrow
Cs.;
red dan ma red
rma a healed wound and one not
yet
heal-
ed
(?)
Sch. 3. to be withered Ts.
reb-reb-pa
Sch.: to be in a
great
haste or
hurry,
to be
very zealous,
W. : *reb
log
co-ce* to do
something
wicked
a^ain
and
again.
>'wn-pa>
vb. and
adj. (to be) strong,
vigorous, durable, sound,
hearty,
of men and
animals,
*rem-pa
son* W. now
I feel
strong again;
*gy6g-pa
dul-ce-la
ren>-pa
co!* W. exert
yourself
to walk fast!
co
spyod
rem show
your ability,
in
per-
forming
ceremonies or
incantations
Mil.;
r&m-cig rem-cig Od>'e-faogs->*nams
be
strong,
ye hobgoblins,
show
your power;
do
your
best!
(ironically)
Mil.
reu Mil.
prob. panel
or
square,
of a
wainscoted
wall,
of a chessboard etc.
;
re(u)-mig
id.
rer termin. of
re,
to each
individually;
... a
piece.
res 1. inst. of
n.
--
2.
change,
turn.
time, times,
<la ned
bi^d-pai
rfa-la. h
//-
.s//> it
being
now our turn of
acting
Dzl.
;
*di-rin cu-re
Koiyod*
W.
to-day
it is his turn
to
irrigate (the field);
res
byed-pavt\i\i
verbal
root,
to do a
thing by
turns with another
person,
can-la
O
fu/i-ri's
byed-pa, resp.
: skems-
la
ysol-res mdzdd-pa
to vie with one another
in
drinking
beer Glr.
;
skyea Jbul-res bytd-
pa
to send mutual
presents
to one another
Glr.',
res
jog-pa
to
change
Sch
; res-kyis
relieving
one another
(in service), doing (a
thing)
alternately
or
by
turns,
e
g. nydl-la
me'l-fse
byed-pa
to
sleep
and to
keep
watch
Dzl.
;
res is also used as an adv. : 1 . res &
res cun now
great,
now
small,
or
partly
great, partly
small;
res
yod
res med at one
time it is
there,
at another not Cs. 2. at
a
time,
every
time,
distributively:
res
pye
fur-mgo
re tsam
Qgams
I
always
take the
tip
of a
spoon
full of meal at a time Mil.
;
res
ycig once,
once
upon
a time
Tar.,
res
^ga sometimes,
res . . . res now
now,
at
one time at
another, frq.;
*lu~re* W. a
change
of
singing,
an alternative
song;
res-
mos v.
re-mos;
res-yzd
a
changing (wander-
ing) star,
a
planet 6s.;
res-
grogs-zla-skdr
the stars with which the moon is
successively
in
conjunction
Sch.
^J"J"
res-po old,
v.
bgre-ba.
%?
ro I. sbst.
taste,
flavour, savour,
Ka-ro id.
;
ro-myon-ba
to
taste;
six different kinds
of taste are
distinguished:
mndr-ba
sweet,
skyur-ba sour,
Idn-fswa-ba
salt,
Kd-ba
bitter,
fsd-ba
acrid,
bsku-ba
astringent,
and the me-
dicines
accordingly
are also divided into six
classes;
ro
brgya
dan
Idan-pa
of a hundred-
fold
taste,
i.e. of the most
exquisite
and
manifold
flavour,
frq.
II. sbst. 1. alsord-
ma?
resp.: spur,
dead
body, corpse, carcass,
mi-ro a dead
man,
rtd-*ro dead
horse,
srin-
bui ro dead insects Dzl
;
ro
sreg-pa
to burn
a
corpse.
2.
body.
v.
corap.
3.
residue,
remains, sediment,
fsdg-ro (or Ofsdg-ro)
that
which remains in a sieve or
filter,
impuri-
ties,
husks
etc.,
jd-ro
tea-leaves in a tea-
pot,
fsil-ro the remains of bacon after
having
/'tIi-lm
rtfj_lxJ, Ilf. 10 be sliff, hard, rigid,
rll/oi I't,; JJyCl1t' to remo\'o the hllrd
ptlrts, of a wOlilid (to clear, to clelluse)
Wtbi.; -r(l,;lf soli- W. (the blood) ba8 cong-
ulMed, congeliled, also of a dead OOdy: it
has grown stiff; -rans-tt dad dllY· 11': he
makes >.tiff, he IIgll.illst;
rtli. - pll solid (opp, to liquid),
sliff, hard; rf,is-pal' to make hard
or stiff; fig.; stiffnecked, obstinate, unwilliflg,
Do.
rl,i-bll 1. pastil for fumigaliflglA., v,
'pos, - 2. Sell.: separute, not be-
longing to nnytbing else,
1V',i. sometimes for ratis, v'''!Jill-''elb,
(O-I'fn•.
rtli.·po &11,. alone, single.
..q' rM-pa 1. to be, - yin-pa, iD Sp.ande.,
..., rarely in n.; nlqo l'l-pa (rl-ba) is met
with; A'y«l p!JUgs-rd:;i 11la red rtfo.r)e-Sffl1g-
dpar mali you aril not a herdsmun, no, you
are Vo)rasotrt:a (,·i1.. a deity)! Ptl,,; -ca,i
YfF-pa ,'c· mt-pa ,.,-, is there allY beer
h('re or not? C. - 2, C.,: to be ready, rfd
mdo a ready arrow c".; red JaiL 1M rtd
,-rna l\ benled wound nnd ODe not ),et he:ll-
cd. (?) &h, - 3. to be withered 73,
rtb-reb-pa &1,.; to be ifl a greal
haste or hurry, to be very zealous,
W: -roo lOf} i'd-l,· to do something wicked
again ILnd ilgUin.
rem-pa vu, nod adj, (to be) strong.
vigorous, durable, sound, hearty,
of men and aDiml\ls, -rem-po so,,· lV. now
I fet'l strong lignin; -OyQg-pa <hil.ff-la
rbn-pa col" lV. exert )'ourself to walk fast!
Cor rem show your ability, in per-
forming ceremonies or inellntntions Nil.;
rbn..cig rtnt-tig be str01lg,
ye hobjl;oblins, show YOllr power; do your
best! (ironictllly) Mil.
rm Mil. prob. panel or square, of n
wninseoted ",nil, of l\ chessuoard etc.;
re{1l)-mig id.
rtl' termin. of 1't, to ell.ch individually;
. ,. a piece,
1'0
"CJ l. iast. of ,'t, - 2. change, turn,
time, timn, da lied byld-pai d.·ltl!xi&-.
.It it being now our turn of acting DzL;
·di·ri,i "Cu-rUoi yod' W: kHlay is his turn
toirrigllte(the field); rt'. byU,.pa with verbal
root, to do n by turns witla another
rerson, UiI-la,,{u,j-rir byhl-po, resp,: rkbrM-
la r$JJl"Y8 mJ::dd-pa to vie with one another
in drinkiog beer Glr,; J.'!p, "bul-rer bytd-
pa to send mulual presents to one another
Glr.; rea J&ff·pa to eh:lDgc &h; rl,·kyi$
relie\'ing one anotber (in ser... ice), doiog (a
tbing) alternately or by turns, e g. flydl-fa
mil-{M byM-pa to nnd to keel' watch
Dd.; 1'/1 is (llso used as nn adv.: l. rtl It
rc. cUli now great, now SIII(lll, or partly
gr('nt, partly small; '1'/1 yod rn '/IUd nt one
time it is there, at allOther not Cs. 2. at
a time, every time, distributively; 1'/1 pyt
flir-mfJO re fMIm "galll. I all"nys take the
tip of n spoon full of menl at a time Mil.;
rn rCig once, once upon n. time Tar., rCJ
09a sometimes, ,'t., ,. res now - now, n.t
one time - at Mother, frq.; -lu--rr W: II.
ehnnge of singing, an alternative song; re.-
mos .... 1'e-mos; rf'-r:11 a changing (wander-
ing) stnt, a planet Ca.;
lbe stars with which thc moon issueeessively
in conjunction &/"
Th-JX' old, v, bgre--ba.
'1'0 I. sbst. tasle, flavour, savour, Ita-ro id.;
ro-my&ri_ba to taste; six different kinds
of t:me are distinguished: mliar-lta s,,'eet,
.k!J1i/·.lJa salt, Ild·ba bitt('f,
(sJ.lJa acrid, lwai-!Ja astringent, and the me-
dicines ACcordingl)' are also di"ided into
classes; 1'(1 bryJya da,i of n hundred-
fold taste, i.e, of the most aDd
mnnifold Unvour, frq, - II, sbst. J. 11.150 rQ..
mar resp.: .pur, dead body. corpse, carcass,
m(-ro a d('nd milD, ,'td-ro dell.d horse, ',;n·
bui TO dead insects Dd ; TO .rly-pa to burn
II corpse. - 2, body, y, comp. - 3, residue,
remaifls, sediment, fsJg-"o (or ofrdg-ro) that
whieb remains in a sieve or filter, impuri-
ties, husks etc., )11.,'(1 ten.-lell.vu in n. tell-
«mllinsofbllcoD after baving
536
ro-nye
Sf"
rol-ba
been
fried, greaves; gdl-ro, rdo-^o,
sd-ro
rubbish
;
skud-ro the ends of threads in a
seam
;
v. also ro-to.
Comp. ro-Jcdn,
col. *rom-Kah*
place
for
burning
or
burying
the
dead,
a favourite
spot
for
conjurations
and sorceries. ro-
grib
defilement
by
contact with dead bodies.
-
ro-rgydb
back,
back
part
Lt.
ro-sgdm
coffin. ro-to Ld.
(= roll, 3) residue;
*ran-
sii ro-to*
wax; *sig-pe
ro-to* ruins of walls.
ro-stod the
upper part
of the human
body,
chest and back
Stg. ; esp.
back Mil. ro-
dom fees
given
to the Lamas for
performing
the burial or cremation ceremonies Mil.
ro-bug
Sch.
grave,
tomb.
--
ro-mydys
v.
myags
- -
ro-smdd the lower
part
of the
body
Med.,
ro-smdd sbrul-du
Jvyil-ba
the
lower
part
of the
body
like a
winding serpent
Wdk. ro-rds cloth of cotton for
wrapping
up
a dead
body
before
cremation;
upon
it
incantations are
frequently
written
against
demons and
malignant spirits
Pth. ro-
lans
=
7jff|^ (evil) spirit,
or
goblin
that oc-
cupies
a dead
body ( Will.)
Tar. 158. ro-
sin wood for
burning
a dead
body.
^\
$"
ro-nye Stg.
=
ra-nye, za-nye
lead.
ro-ma 1 . sometimes for ro
6s.,
Schr.
2. v. rtsa I.
ro-tsa, ro-ytsa
sexual in-
stinct,
carnal
desire^ustlfei,
rd-tsa
skyed-pa
to
excite,
to increase the
carnal
appetite by
medicine Cs.
;
also : to feel
it;
ro-fsa-ba 1.
voluptuous, sensual,
lustful
Mil. 2.
exciting
or
animating
the sexual in-
stinct Wdn.
2fcn*f
r
9~P
1- C.
black,
cf.
bya-
and
po-
rog.
2.
W.=rdg-pa
reddish, yellow-
ish-brown. of rocks.
rog-ge-ba shining
dimly;
zed
Odzum-ndg rog-ge-ba
with a face
glowing gloomily
as it were Mil.nt.
rog-
rog
1 . C.
jet-black.
2.
'dark-grey' Sch., prob.
=
rog-po
2.
3,
rogue,
villain 6s.
(a
man
of dark
deeds?).
r
9
s
> vulgar pronunciation
oi
grogs,
friend,
companion, associate,
assistant
v.
grogs', rogs-med
ycig-pa quite
alone
Pth.;
*rog-rdmco-ce*
W. ra-mda
bye'd-pa; *rogs-
po*
Ld.
adulterer,
*rog-po
co-ce*
(of
a hus-
band)
and
*rog-mo
co-ce*
(of
a
wife)
to
commit
adultery.
2^--
TOU narrow
passage, defile,
cleft in a
hill,
also
valley; brag-ron
dell or chasm be-
tween
rocks, ravine,
ron-rtsub a
rough country
full of
ravines,
so Tibet is called Glr.
;
roh-
yul id.; roh-mi, ron-rta,
roh-lcaii a man
coming from,
a horse bred
in,
a willow
grow-
ing
in such a
country.
'
rod
pride, haughtiness
Ts.
r
d-pa-, rod-po stiff,
unable
to
help
one's
self,
rod-lei-
ba Sch. id.
;
Ld. : *rod-da-rod-de* of
decrepit
or sick
people.
"
rom-Haii W. for ro-Kati.
ro'm-po
W
(for sbom-po C., B.) thick,
big, stout,
of
men, trees, sticks;
mas-
sive, massy, plump; deep,
of
sounds, opp.
to
prd-mo. rom-yig type, types,
letters used
in
printing, opp.
to
pra-yig,
v.
yi-ge.
5^1-
rol 1.
side, only
in the
comp.
: ndn-rol
inside, p'yi-rol
outside, pd-rol,
fsti-rol
etc.
; mdl-gyi pyi-rol
the outside of the bed
(e.g.
has been
soiled) Glr.; mostly
as
post-
position
:
ydns-pa-can-gyi
ndn-rol-na within
the town of
Yan-pa-can
;
ndn-rol-nas
Jbul-
ba to
reach,
to hand from within Dzl.
;
cui
pd-rol-na,
fsu-rol-na
(or
t'su-rol-tu)
on the
other side or on this side of the
water; yyds-
rol, yyon-rol
the
right side,
the left
side;
also in a looser sense:
pyi-rol-tu
bzun-ba
to look
upon
a
thing
as
externally
or
really
existing
Mil.;
often
pleon.
: snon-rol-nas be-
fore, previously Thgy.\ ^og-rol-tu
im
^.og-tu
after
Pth., Tar.; O
di-nas
nyi-ma-nub-kyi
pyogs-rol-na
to the west from here. 2. Sch.:
rol(-foi) bsdd-pato destroy completely,
to kill
on the
spot(?).
3.
(6s.
also
rol-mo) furrow;
rol
rmod-pa
to make
furrows,
to
plough.
r-a-
rol-rta Sch. : the near horse in a
team,
the
right-hand
horse.
l"
rol-pa sprul-pa,
v. rol-ba 3.
-
rol-ba 1. to amuse or divert one's self
(synon.
\vi\hrtse-ba),
thus one of the
twelve actions of a Buddha isbtsun-moi.Kor-
536
beeo fried, grea"eil; &d-ro
rubbish; akltd-ro the eods of threads in "
seam; v. also r(J-td.
Compo J"(J-ldJi, 001. -rom-tait- pla1:e for
boming or burying the deAd, a f"foorite
spot for coojuratioDii IUld son:e.rit$.. - ro-
grlbdefilenu!nt by oontl\Cl with de..d bodies.
- ro.rggd.b back, back pari Lt. - ro4gdm
coffin. - r(J-t6IAl. (- ro 11, 3) residue; -rll>i-
Ri ro-to- wax; -.ig-pe ro-ttr M1ins: of 'nils.
-nHtOd the upper ptlrt of tile bum.a.n body,
chC8t aod back StU'; esp. back Mil. - ro-
ddm fce.J giveo 10 the I,amu for performing
the borial or ceremonies Mil. -
ro-bWg &/t. gra"e, tomb. - ro.mydgt Y.
"yagI - rfMmdd tbe lower part of the
bod)' Mtd., J'O-4lHdd .iyt'l·ba the
lower part of tbe body likea winding 5f:rpeot
IVdt - cloth of cotton for .....rapping
op "dead body before crematioDi npon it
iocantatioDll Are frequendy WritleD against
demoDll and malignant spirits PtA. - ro--
lwi..... 'it1rrtf (evil) spirit, or goblin that 0c-
cupies .. dead bod)' (WiLL) Tar. 158. - ro-
.....ood for boming a dead body.
ro--lIyi &g. - lead.
::;-,;r rd·"UI I. sometimes for ro w., &hr.
- 2. v. rlsa I.
?(t' rd·risa sexual in-
, Itincl.camaldesire,lustMtd.,
rd-tsa .hjld.pa to e.s.cile, to i01:rease the
carnal nppet.ite by medicine A.. i also: to feel
it; rO-(.a--ba I. "oluptuous, llCnsual, lostfnl
Mil. 2. uciting or nnilMting the suull! in-
stinct lVdn.
"OU·]}() 1. C. black, cf. b!Ja- and p'(J-
rJg. -2. W._rd.g-pu reddish, yellow-
ish.brown, of rocks. - rdg.ge-ba shining
dimly; zal .d:/lm-lldgl'6g-Ue-bu wilu ll. face
glowing gloomily ns iL were A/il.m. - rog-
TOg j. C.jet-b1ack. 2. 'durk.grey' Seh., prob.
_ rdg-po 2. - rogue, villain {j,. (a mao
of dark deeds?).
rou" "ulgBr [lronuncill.l.ion of gTO!P,
friend, companion, associatt, assistant
v. grog'; rogt..'mid yHg.pa qllite alone Ptli.i
-roy-rdlllM-U· W•.,. ru-mdabl.Jl!d-paj
po. IA. adultuer, -rou-po C6-U' (of Il hus-
bund) nnd ·rdg-mo M-t,· (of n wifll) to
commit adultery.
ron narrowpassage, defile, cleft iu l' hill,
also valley; brag-I'llio deU or chasm be-
tween rocks, ravine, TOIi-rtsub • rough country
full of mviocs, ;;0 Tibet i!l called Glr.; rdJi-
!fill ill.; roJi.1NJ·, r6.oi-Ita, rOn-ita" amlin
coming from, 1\ hOrllCbred in, 1\ willowgrow·
ing in sucb a country.
rod pride, haughtiness 71.
rdd-pa, rQd.po stiff, nDl\bll'
to help one'll *!If. 1'dd·/0'-
ba &k. id.; IA.: °rod.da-l'Od_dr of decrepit
or sick JlCQ[lle.
rdm·.fwi W. for Nrlail.
r6m.po W (forab6m.po C., IJ.) tltick,
big. stout, of men, trees., nicb; .......
sive, massy, plump; deep, of sounds, opp. to
pro-mo. - nJm-yig type, t.ypes, leuers used
ill. printing, opp. to fra-yig, v. yt.ge.
rol 1. side, 0111)' in tbe (;(Imp.: Jlan-rol
inside, pyi-rol ootside, fxi-rol, f••-rol
elc.; mdl-gyi jiyi.rol the outside of the bed
(e.g. bas been soiled) Glr_; illOitly as post--
position: yd"'-pa-/an""f/gi 1I1hi-l"Ol-na within
the town of Yati-pa-€ani ndit-rol-nal_blJ.
ba to reACh, to hand from within D:l.; ell'
pa.1"Ol-'na, 6u--ro/·"a (or f.u.rol-tu) 00 the
other side or 00 this side of the wnter;
rol, y!Pn-rol the right side, the left. side;
also in II looser sense: py£.rol-tu b:uli-loa
to look npoll a thing as ezterDlI.lIy or reall)'
existing Mil.; often pleon.; .ridn-ro/-1lal be·
fore, prevIously 1'lif;y.; #OU·rol·tu for A,.-tu
after PtA., Tar.; .dl·lIal n!Ji.'IIIa-nub.k!Ji
p1J6!p-rol-natothc we"t from here. -:l. &h.:
role-tu) bldd-pato destroycompletely, to kill
on the spot(1).- 3. (G'. nlso rol-mo) furrow;
rot nrnJd.pa to make furrows, to plough.
r&l-1ta $ch.: the near horse in a \.earn,
} the right-hand horse.
J(ro.of'f rdl.pa = Iprail-pa, v. rdl-ba 3.
rdl-ba 1. to amuse or divert one'. self
(s)·non. withrtU--ba), thus ODe of tbe
tweJyeoocions of a Buddha
/////;
/// rdl-bu
diverting
himself with his
wives;
bdag-ydd
<l<'< /<;/-// to divert one's self \vith
:i married \vonmn
(sensu obsc.)
Schr.;
in
ri/i/<i-t-i'i--i'6l-jxt (v.
sub
>//'/")<
: ""' i"
i'<>l-pa
I'-IKI (the
n. of a certain kind of con-
templation Gyatch.\
it is used fur
playing.
2. to take, taste,
eat,
drink,
x
mo
Erdg-la
rol-lxt witches or
ogresses
revel-
ing
in blood Mil.
;
rol-pai
stdbs-su
bZugs
there
he sits with
greedy
mien. 3.
=
'spn'd-ba
to
practice sorcery,
to cause to
appear
by magic
power, mam-par rdl-pa
=
mam-par spi-ul-
j'ti; j/<'-fH's rol-pai fcyeu
Ina Pth. for:
ye-ses-
ki/i xjn-i'fl-pa
incarnations of the divine Wis-
dom;
rol-pai
mfso
prob.
enchanted
lake,
oc-
urs in the
description
of the
Sumcru,
but
no Lama seemed to know its exact
meaning.
-
4.
vulg.
: to
thrash,
to
cudgel.
rol-ma 1. v. rol 3. 2. col. for
sgrol-ma.
rol-mo
(cf.
rol-ba
1).
1.
music,
rol-
mo
byed-pa,
W. *co-ce*
}
to make m
usic,
rol-mo
spydd-pa
Sch. id.
- -
2. musical in-
strument,
=
rol-moi
ca-byddDzL,
rol-ca
Cs.,
in W.
esp. cymbal.
r .
intj
s.qr
rla and
rlag
sometimes for bla
*
'
andglags.
*
rldg-pa
v.
rldg-pa.
i'ldm-pa vapour, steam,
Ka-rldns
breath,
exhalation,
*Ka-ldn tdn-ce*
to
breathe,
to exhale
W.;
*gan-ldii*
cloud-
like snow-drifts on
liii^h
hills,
cu-rldns
steam,
watery vapour;
rldns-cu
Odon-pa
Schr. to
distil.
rm* rlan 1.
moisture,
humidity,
rlan
spdn-ba
'
to avoid the wet
Med.^
rlan sten
nydl-
ba to
sleep
in the wet Lt.
- -
2. a
liquid,
rlan-rttn
id.,
rlan-rlon can the
liquid (called)
beej
Lex.;
rldn-ban
moist, wet, humid,
e.g.
a
country,
rlan-med
dry.
Cf.
rlon-pa,
bdan.
-
rldb(s)-pa
Sch. : 'to
remove,
to
clear
away'.
r
q^y-
rlabs
wave,
billow, flood,
rgyd-mfsoi
rlabs Med.
;
cu-rldbs and dba-rldbs or
rba-rldbs
=
rlabs\
dus-rlabs ebb and
flood,
tides
Stg.
;
rlabs
yyo-ba orjfrug-pa
the tumult
of tlu- \\MVC-
'
N. ;
r/ii/ix-ftn-ri'
or rlabs-.
Lf.i::
4<ftni
a
large
wave or
billow,
a
rolling
swell of the
sea, surf,
surge;
also
fig.:
a
high degree, e.g.
of
diligence Thgy.
rli'nn-pa
v.
rlom-pa;
da///-/
>/<',
S>-/,.
pride (?).
rliij-pa, resp./s//-/7/V/,
testicle, stone,
Jbyin-pa, Opyid-pa,
W. *ton-a>* to
castrate,
emasculate
(a man),
to cut or
geld
(an animal), rlig-pyuh, rlig-mtd castrated,
emasculated, rlig-can having testicles, rlig-
ycig-pa having only
one
testicle;
rlig-bu,
///</-
.W//AS
scrotum; rlig-skrdns
swollen
testicles;
rliy-rlugsLt., rlig-blugsS.g.,
id.
(ace. toG's.),
rlins Sch.
good, quick,
cf. brlin-ba.
rlid Sch. a closed leather-
bag.
rlid-buSch.: 'a
whole,
alump
or
mass';
but this seems not
applicable
in the
phrase
dud-
groi
rlid-bu Lex.
,
and other-
wise it is not known to me.
i-
rlug(s)-pa
l.Cs.: 'to
purge,
mnal
rlugs-par byed-pa
to cause an
abortion,
rlugs-byedipurgmg, procuring
abor-
tion; rlugs-ma
Sch.: 'the
casting out,
effu-
sion'
;
ace.
tooneZ/&. excretion of
indigested
food. 2. Ts.: to
overthrow,
to
pull down,
v.
lug-pa.
3^--
rlun
^rg
1- W.
rlun-po breeze, wind,
NS
rlun 16-ma-la
reg
the wind touches
the
leaves
DzL, rluri-gisskyod(&\\\\ng)
is moved
by
the wind
DzL,
blown
away by
the wind
Glr.
;
*lun Ian*
C., *lun-po pu dug*
W.
y
the
wind
blows,
also for: there is a
draught
(here) ; *lun-rag mdn-po yon dug*
W. one
feels the wind
(here) very
much
;
rlun am-
po
MIL, drdg-po
a
high wind,
a
gale;
sdr-
rlun east-wind
etc.,
car-rliin rain and
wind;
skdm-rlun a
dry
wind
6s.;
*lun-po ydb-ce*
W. to
fan; ^og-luh
wind
(from
the
stomach),
flatulence
Lt.] fig.: Ids-kyi rluit-gis
<7<W-(/<
impelled
or
pushed
on
by
the wind of
ac-
tions,
i.e. involved in the
consequences
of
one's
actions;
and in a similar manner in
other
instances, frq.
2.
air,
atmospheric
air, rh'iii-gyi dkyil-Jtor atmosphere;
rlhn-gi
Opriil-l
:
or
air-pump
<'*., rliin-gi gru
air-
balloon ('$. 3. in
physiology:
one of the
34*
d" 1'01·1H1 lIivertillg bimself wilh I_is
lxiO{/-yOd dQIi rdJ.-bu to dinlrl. one's Aelf lI'ith
a married '/l'oman oll.c') &hr.; in
''f/!J(J,-(W-rdl-l'(J (\. sub r!l!I'J), find in nJl-pn
hMd-pn (the II. of Q. certain kind of con-
templfttioll G!fIltdi.), it iii used for
IIIA)'illg. - 't. to lake, tasle, eat, drink. ,rift_
_It.rdg..w Nll-ba wil.dlti or ogreuell
ingill blood MiL; rtU-puiJtdb.-,u Ihel'f:
!Ie sits ....ith greedy mien. - 3. - 'lmfl-ba
to practicuorcery, locausetoappearb)' magic
power, ,.,.tiln1JG" r6l-po -
1'0; yi-Mf rdl.pai .&ytv.lHa 1M. for:
kyi. sprifl-pa incarnations of tbe dirine Wis-
dom; "x-poi ....(,o prob. enchanted lake, oc-
curs in the deseriptioo of the Sumeru, but
no Lamfl :.eemed to know ill eJ:W mIMing.
- 4. vulg.: to thrash, to cudgel.
rdl-'IfNI I. v. rot 3. - 2. col. {or
......
(d. rdl-ba I). 1. music., "!'i'"
rnobyid-pa, W .M-«", tomnke mUSIc,
Tdl..mo .pydd-pa &.l id. - 2. musical in-
strument, - rOl..,noi lll-bydd D::l., n1l-rtl C'o,
in Iv. esp. CfInbal.
_. d -:rr ria and ,-ulg !lOmetimes for bla
.=:0 ao ;:;'-1
t.J and gla!!,.
rldg-pa ". rlOg-JXl.
rltUif-pa vapour, steam, f(a-ridns
t:.l brtath, nhalation, °l!a·wri ((iii-h·
10 breillhe, 10 exhale IV.; ·,ail·ld"· doud·
likesnow-driflSon hil:;b hill" Cu·rldri. stenm,
wntery '·Ilpour; rldR.·lu .dOn"'fl Sehr. to
distil.
- - dan I. moisture. humidity, rlan apdIi-ba
to Rvoitllhe wei Metl., dan .1('" Ilydl·
ba to &Ieell in the wei Lt. - 2. a liquid,
rlall.rMnid., rlan·,.fdll ea,; the liquid (en.lIed)
bet>1 rldn·tun m(Jist, wet, humid, e.g.
n country, rfan.'Jll!d dry. Cf. ,·M'l."a, b,·lan.
rldb(.)-pa &/,.: 'to remove, to
I:J dellor oway'.
,·lab. wave, billow, flood, rgya-m(IIJ1,'
I:J rlaQeJ\led.; lu.,·/db. lind (1!H,·,·ldbt or
Iw·rldbt - rlabl; ([u.-rlaw t!ub and tlood,
rlab, yy6-boor oA'ri'frpa the tumult
of the WAVes ('.; rlab.-p(rU pr ,·I(liM.cro
l
rim;

Lu.: 1I"{tfii, a large wave or billow, II
rolling Sl\'ell of the lie&, surf, surge; ,,150
fig.: a high degree, e.g. of diligence TIttJ!J.
.:..;,r:r rld"..pa ,'. rl6ul.pa; rlaln-Iyi,. &i1.
':["' lltide(?).
£':rr.:r rlj!f1'4, resIJ·]'IaIi-rlig, testicle,st",.,
t:.l -I obyill-p4, oiJ!lid.pa, IV. ·16,.-«· to
castrate, (a U'llU), to cui or geld
(1m anilllal), rlig.p!JMif. rliy.,,1id C&6tBted,
rlifj-<a" hluing tCllticlu, rl;'"
rC'!f'1)(J havingonl)" ouetesticle; ,.zig.JJw., "'if;.
,,0. scrotum; ,.zig-4trdiM
rlj:r,.zifyJ Lt., rlig4H.'!1'S'!J" id. (ace, tou.).
,.zi/is &11. good, qu;ck, cr. brtin.lxJ.
,.zWl &11. • closed leather-b.g.
£--',:r rlid-b.&!I.: 'awhole,alump or mass';
t:.ll-<l but this seems not applicable in the
phl1\se dud-o!/raj ,.zid--lnt Lu., and olber-
.ise it is not known to me.
.:.::n rl'¢..)-pa 1. C,.: 'to purve, ...
,.zilga-par to cause an
abortion, rltup-b!Jidpurging, procuringabor·
tion; rlMfll·_ &h.: 'the casting out,. effu-
sion'; ace. of indige5led
food. - 2. n.: to overthrow, to pull d01l'n,
v. lUfHHl.
-,... rill'; 1. JV. rluoi-po breeze, wind,
16-ma-la I'tg tbe wind touches \110
lelwesDzl., rfaui-giulyod(a thing) is 1110\-00
b)" the wind D::l., blo".n by the wind
Glr.; ·'ll'; foli· c., ·'oili-po pa dllg· the
wind blows, lllso for: Lhcrc is 1\ drl\Ught
(here); ·,,;'j-ray mati-po yoli dllg
O
lV. ODe
feels the wind (hllrc) "llry much; "Iuli m.·
po Mil., (Iro.g-1'O II. high wind, A gale; io.r_
}'lwi ellSj,..wind etc., lar-rlluj min And \\·ind;
akam./,l!lIi Il. dry wiod Ct.; ·lIl/i-po yOb-(,.
W: to fnn i fifj-11ll; wind(from the stolllach),
flatulence Lt.; fig.: lm-I:yi rll;';-!J" dld.<ftJ
iDlllelled or pushed Oil by the wind of ac-
tions, i.e. iD\'oh'cd in tbe of
ono's actions; nnd in n "iruilar maoner in
other illMances, frq. - 2. air, atmOlipberic
air, /·liu.-gyi d!yil••ll(H' atmosphere; rlo.il-gi
.J'wil[-/for air-pump IA., riilli· vi !1"' air·
balloon (,•. - 3. in IIhp'iolog)": one of the
"'.
538
"
rlun
brla
three humours of the
body (v. nyes-pa) sup-
posed
to exist in
nearly
all the
parts
and
organs
of the
body, circulating
in veins of
its
own, producing
the
arbitrary
and the in-
voluntary
motions,
and
causing
variousother
physiological
phenomena.
When
deranged,
it is the cause of
many diseases,
esp.
of
such
complaints
the
origin
and seat of which
is not
known,
as
rheumatism,
nervous affec-
tions etc. This rlun or humour is divided
into five
species,
viz.:
srog-
dzin cause of
breathing, gyen-rgyu faculty
of
speaking,
Kyab-byed
cause of muscular
motion,
me-
mnydm
of
digestion
and
assimilation,
fur-
sel of
excretion;
rlun-las
gyur-pa yin (the
disease)
arises from rlun Glr.
;
rluii-gis
bzuii-
sterlun-ndd-kyis
btdb-ste. These notions
concerning
rlun are one of the weakest
points
of Tibetan
physiology
and
pathology.
4. in
mysticism
rlun
Qdzm-pa
seems to be
=
dbugs bsgydn-ba,
and to denote the
drawing
in and
holding
one's breath
during
the
pro-
cedure called
ytum-mo (q.v.),
which is as
much as to
prepare
one's self for contem-
plation,
or enter into a state of
ecstasy
Mil.
;
rlun sems-la dban
fob-pa Mil, frq.,
is said
to
imply
that
high degree
of
mystical ecstasy,
when rlun and sems have been
joined
into
one;
he who has attained to the
mgyogs-
rlun is able to
perform extraordinary things,
e.g.
with a
heavy
burden on his back he
is able to run with the
greatest speed,
and
the like.
Comp.
rlun-rta the
airy horse,
n. of little
flags, frequently
to be seen
waving
in the
wind on Tibetan
houses,
on
heaps
of
stones,
bridges
etc. The
figure
of a horse which to-
gether
with various
prayers
is
printed
on
these
flags signifies (ace.
to Schl.
253)
the
deity rta-mcog.
Hue also mentions
super-
stitious
practices
that
may
be called rlun-
rta. rlun-mdd Sch.
air-gun.
rlun-ndd
disease caused
by rlun,
v. above.
-
rlun-
dmdr,
rlun
ndg-po prop, dust-storm,
a storm
whirling up
clouds of
dust;
further:
storm,
tempest
in
general,
also a
gale
at sea Glr.
and elsewh. rlun-fsub
whirlwind,
snow-
storm Mil.
rlun-sems v.
above,
rlun 4.
rlun-ser, rlun-bser-bu,
rlun
bsir-ba,
a violent
wind 6's.
j.
rlubs 1 . in C. :
corner, hole, place
for
hiding
a
thing;
Lex. : fcun-bui rlubs.
-
2. Sch. :
ditch, pit, pool, abyss,
mei rlubs
fire-pool.
rlog-pa, pf. brlags,
fut.
brlag, imp.
rlog(s), Mag,
vb. a. to
ldog-pa,
1.
to
overthrow,
to
destroy ;
fdl-bar or
rddl-du
rlog-pa
to reduce to
powder,
to
destroy
entirely Thgy.
and
elsewh.;
rtsa-ba-nas,
or
mam-par,
to
annihilate,
e.g.
all the infidels
Pth.,
to
break,
to smash
e.g.
a vessel
6'.;
to lose
6'.,
*'d-ma
lag
-son* I have lost
my
mother
C., *lug cig lag
son* one
sheep
has
perished
C. 2.
fig.
to
pervert,
to
infatuate,
nyes-pai
dri-mas
yons-su brldgs-te quite
cor-
rupted by
the filth of sin Dzl.
;
cun-mar
Odzin-pai bsdm-rlags-fso
those infatuated
by
thoughts
of
marriage Glr.;
brldg-po foolish,
stupid,
of a little child
Thgy.
r^*
rlon sometimes erron. for klon or Ion.
rlon-pa
I. 1.
adj. (6s. 'moist')
W.
wet,
fsan-rlon
quite wet,
wet
through;
hence of
meat, vegetables
and the
like, fresh,
green,
raw B. and col. 2.
vb., pf.
and fut.
brlan,
to make
wet,
to
moisten, cus,
car-pas
Dzl.
II. Sch.: to
answer,
with
Ian,
also
glon-pa,
ldon-pa, bldn-pa, zlon-pa.
rlob-pa, pf. brlabs,
fut.
brlab,
imp.
rlobs,
v.
byin.
rldm-pa
I.
vb.,
pf. Mams,
fut. brlam
1. to be
proud of,
to
glory in,
to boast
of,
with
terrain.,
bder
rldm-pa
to boast of
one's
good fortune,
ycig-par
QY
ycig-tu
rlom-
pa
to be
proud
of the
identity
with . . . Tar.
-
2. to
love,
to adhere
to,
to be attached to
W.,
to strive
after, fzdn-gyi
nor-la. 3. to
be
possessed,
of
demons,
ydon-gyis
brldms-
pa
Lt. II. sbst.
pride, bsags kyan
rldm-
pas /cyer
if
perhaps (any merit)
has been
gathered,
it is taken
away again by pride
Mil. Deriv.
rlom-po
a
boaster,
an arro-
gant person
6s.;
rlom-sems
pride, arrogance.
?
6's.)
brla
(-bo?}
the
thigh,
brla nd-
ba a
pain
in the
thigh Do.,
brla
yyas
."138
8JC,: rluil

three humours of tile body (v. Tlytls-pa) sup-
posed to e:r.ist in nearly all the paris lind
organs of the body, circulating in veins of
its own, producillg the arbitrary nnd the ill-
voluntarymotions, and causing variousother
physiological phenomena. When deranged,
it is the cause of many diseases, esp. of
such complaints the origin and seat of which
is not known, us rheumatism, nen"ous nffee-
tions etc. This rill;/ or humour is divirled
into five species, viz: slVJf!-odzln canse of
breathing, !Jyen-1'f!!lll faculty of spcaking,
fya!J...lftjkJ cause of muscular motion, me-
mnydm of digestion and Ilssimilation, (w··
sel of excretion; rbl/i-iall "gy!lr-pa yin (the
diS<"nse)ariscs from rluitGlr. ;rMh-gis b:;,ui_
ste_rlwi_ndd_J..yis blab·sIe. - These notions
concerning 1'lwiareoneof the wenkestpoints
of Tibetan physiolog)' and pathology. -
4. in mysticism rlwi o(lzin-pa seems to he-
dbugs and to denote the drnwing
in and holding one's breath during the pro-
cedure called rlum-mo (q. v.), whieb is as
much as to prepare one's self for contem-
plation, or enter into a state of eo::stasy Mil.;
rlwi 3lms-la dba,i (Ob-pa Mil., frq., is said
to imply tbnthigh degrceofmysticaleCi'tasy,
when rlwi and senn have been joined into
one; he who has attained to the mgyogs-
rHoi is able to performextraordinnry things,
e.g. with a heavy lmrden on his back lIe
is uble to run with the greatest speed, and
the like. -
Compo rUln.-rta Ihe airy horse, n. oflittle
flags, frequently to be seen wuving in the
wiud on Tibetll.D houses, on heaps of stones,
bridges etc. The figure of a horse which to-
gether with various prayers is printed on
these flags signifies (nee. to &hl. 253) the
deity rta-m'Cog. Hue also mentions super-
stitious practices that Dlay be called rlun-
rIa. - Sell. air-gun. - riUll-nd,l
disease caused by rlun, v. above. - rlUli-
dmdr, rlUli TlI/g-"fO prop. dust-storm, l\ stann
whirling up douds of Just; fllfther: storm,
tempest in generlll, also n gale af sea Gir.
and elsewh. - rlll,,-6Uh whirlwind, snow-
slorm ,Mil. - rlUii-1!hn3 \'. 'QVe,rlUli 4;;.-:-

rlllll..m·, rbui-bsRr-bll, rlwi bsir-l.m, u violent
wind C3.
rlubs 1 in C.: corner, hole, place for
hiding a thing; Lu.: Eu,i-blti dubs.
- 2. Sel,.: dilch, pil, pool, abyss, met 1'[1I6s
fireppool.
af1"J" rl6g_pu, pf. bl'lags, fut.I.)I'lag, imp.
r.: d()[J(s), brlag, vb. 1\. to ldd9-PU, J.
to overthrow, to destroy; (dl·bal' or nldl-dlt
rldg_pa to reduce to powder, to destroy
entirely TA9!J' and elsewb.; 'tBa-ba-lIaB, or
rndnl-par, to annihilnte, e.g. all the infidels
Ptk, to break, to smash e.g. a vessel C.;
to lose C., ·'d-ma la9-80f'· 1 ha\'e lost my
mother G., -lug Cig lag 30/i- one sheep Ims
rerishe;) C. - 2. fig. to pervert, 10 infatuale,
ny/s-p«i dd-maBJp.liiHlf bl'ldg&-te quite cor-
mplcd by the filth of sin Dzl.; C'lili·mar
od::in-pai bsdrn-rlafP-(80 those infaluaterl by
thougilts of marriuge GI.I,,; brldy./KJ foolish,
stupid, of u little child TII[JY.
e;'C: dOl, sometimes erron. for Ho/l or Lori.
rldn-l,a I. 1. adj. ((;6. 'moist') W. wei,
r.: (sali-rltin quite wet, wet through;
hence of meat, vegetnbles and tlle like, fresh,
green, raw IJ. aad col. - 2. vb., pf. and fut.
brian, 10 make wet, to moisten, GUS, Gal'pfIaIJ
Dzl.
n. &h.: to answer, with lan, also 9Mn-pa,
{don-pa, blti.n-pa,
r'.::r'f rldh-pl" pf. hrlah3, fut. briah, imp.
I:J rbJbs, v. 6yin.
.. :::r rMm-pa I. vb., pf. brlmll8, fut. brfam
r.l 1. to be proud of, to glory in, to boasl
of, with termin., !xk" rldm-pa to boast of
one's good fortune, rNg-par or rCfg-lu rldm-
pa to be proud of the identit)' with ... 1ar.
- 2. 10 love, to adhere to, to be attached to
w., to strive after, ,.zdn-yyi nlJr-ia. - 3. to
be possessed, of demons, rddn-yyi3 brldffl$_
pa 1.1. II. sbst. pride, bsags k!lail ,.lOm-
peu JllJer if perhU!IS (any lnerit) has been
gathered, it is taken away agailLby pride
Mil. - Deriv. "lOrn-po a boaster, an arro-
gant person (.3.; rlOm-3em.! pride, arrogance.
(3.) &rIa (-bo!) the thigh, bda nd_
r: ftu- a. pain in the b"la rylU
689
tin-
right thigh
(Hi-., brlu-rkdii t'euioral b<ni<-
($<//.:
hip-bone?).
*biia-Kun*
groin
W.
;
lirln-lxtr .sV//.:
junction
of the
legs, genitals;
/irln-1-iix tV'inoral
bone;
brl<i-*u muscular
part
of the
thigh;
l>rl<t-xttl
<
'.s.: 'side of the
thigh'.
brldg-pa
v.
rl6g-pa.
[><>
l.c.i-. and sv//. abusive
word, invective,
abusive
language
(/Sc/t.
also: 'rude
fellow,
brute
1
?),
rtsub-
/>rlih'i-ba nut
1/in-f.ia refraining
from abusive
language Thgy.\ brldn-po-
warns
byed-pa
to make use of such
language Stg. ;
brlan-
*/>i/od byed-pa
to be
coarse,
churlish Sch.
la
'CJ"
brldn-pa
v.
Kf
brldb-pa
v.
/-lob-pa.
brldm-pa
v.
rloni-pa.
tni'm-in,
<
'.
firm, secure,
safe
quick?), lii-liii-fio id.,
both of men
and
things, *////->////// jl--ln
kur* C.
carry
it
safely, carefully! brlii<-l<'i<j
Sc/t.:
confused,
disorderly,
not to be trusted.
luiuy-pa
Sch. : mdzd-bo
friend,
assistant, helper;
one Lex.
explains
bid-brluy by yroys.
v.
QJ / 1. the letter 1. 2. numeral: 26.
QT
^a I. sbst. mountain
pass,
road or
passage
over a
mountain,
laigyenihe up-hill
road
or ascent of a
mountain,
led fur the down-
hill road or descent Cs.
;
la
rydl-ba B.,
C.
( W.:*yijdb-ce*}
to cross a mountain
pass;
Id-la
Oyro-ba
Cs. id.
Comp.
la-rked or sked the
declivity
or
slope
of a mountain
pass.
la-Ud the
high-
est
point
of the
pass, la-myo
the
head,
or
top,
of a mountain
pass.
la
-
sgo,
Sch. :
'turnpike
of a
pass'.
la-ycdn-pa
a collec-
tor of duties on a
ghat
or
pass
Cs. la-cun
a small
pass
Glr.
la-mjuy
=
la-rfsa.
la-stoii v.
stdn-pa. Ia-f6y
=
la-rtse. la-
rfsd
(
W.
*lar-sa*)
foot of a mountain
pass
/d-rtse
(W. *lar-se*) top
of it. la-sdn
Sch.:
=
la-rked.
I 1.
sbst.,
also
Id-ba, wax-light, wax-candle,
taper,
from the Chinese Idh
wax,
C.
III. In
compounds
for
la-pug
and la-l-u .
IV.
postpos.
c. ace. 1.
denoting
local
relations in
quite
a
general sense,
in answer
to the
questions
where and whither: sd-la
^yre-ba
to roll
(one's body)
on the
ground,
sd-la
^nl-ba
to fall down on the
ground,
ndm-mka-la
Opdy-pa
to rise to
heaven,
ndm-
mka-la
Opur-ba
to
fly
in the
air,
me-la
at,
on, in, to,
the
fire,
ri-la
on, to,
the moun-
tain,
cu-la
in, into, to, on,
the
water,
sdr-lu
to,
towards the
east,
eastward
(e.g.
to
look),
bod-la
iu, to, Tibet;
also where we should
say: from,
as:
yndm-la
Kd-ba
O
bab snow
falls from
heaven,
rtd-la
O
bab he
alights
from his
horse,
brdy-la
mcons he
leaps
down
from the rock
DzL,
lus-la
Krag Obyin-pa
to
draw blood from the
body by scratching.
This latter use of la occurs so
frequently,
that it cannot
always
be looked
upon
as a
misspelling
for
las, though
this would be
the more exact word. 2. with reference
to time:
zag ysum-pa-la
on the third
day,
lo
nyi-su-pa-la
in the twentieth or
during
the twentieth
year,
zld-ba
ysum-la (finish it)
within three mouths
(?/;.,
pyug ddn-po-la
at, during,
the first obeisance Glr. 3. in
other
bearings
: d-la rten-nas
(prop, relying
the I'ight l.higll Glr., brla-rkd,i femo",1 bUill'
(&1,,: hill_ bone ?). -bda-I..'l11;'- groin 11'.;
b"III_oor &11.: junction of the legs, genitals;
brlll-,./j3 femornl 1J0oe; br/a-jd lUuscular
l'''l'l of the t11igh; bda-lUl Ca.: 'side of die
lhigb'.
brMg-ptl v. rldg-pa.
brlUu - po Lu. nud Sd,. abusive
:.l word, invective, abusive language
(&1,. also: 'rude fellow, IJrute'?), I'tsub-
brldli·ba lila yill.p<t refrniuing from 3busi\'e
'1'I'g/;.; bdd,i-,xJ-Nla"u byid-pa
lo mnke use of such lAuguage Stg.; bri,Hi-
Uy..V.[.pll lo be conrse, churlish &1,.
la I. the letter I. - 2. numeral: 2G.
Il.l' la I. slJst. mountain pass, roud or passage
o"er n mountain, lai [!!If1ltbe ul,-hill rond
or IlScent of n U1ountnin, fai fl/I' the down-
Ili1l rand or descent (il,; la J'gal-ba lJ., G
( -!l!Jdb-U') to cros.s a mountain pns.s;
M-la ofIrd-ba ClI. id.
Compo fa-rJ.·;J or skbl the declivity or
!>lo(le of n mountain pass. _. la-I'd the high-
est POillt of the pass, It:MII,'JO the head, or
top, of a lUounlnill I'\1.SI>, - la· 8fJo, Sel,.:
'turnllike of n pass'. - la-ycdll-pa n collec-
tor of duties on a ghat or pass Ga. - la·culi
a smnll pll.SS Ofr. - la-mjliy =
fa-atO,i v. stoJi-l'a. - la-fdg _ la·rld. -Ia-
I'lsd (W. -lar-sa-) foot of a mountain pll8S
la-rid (w. -lar-3i-) lop of it. - la-idll
&h.: == iarrkM.
1r. sbst., also ld..IJa, wax·light, wax"candle,
taper, from lhe Chinese ldh wax, C.
III. In eompouuds for ia-fu9 and la-c/I.
IV. postpos. C. ace. I. denoliug local
relntious in quite n genual in tlDs'!.er
'39
la
bdall-lla V. rMlI-pa.
brldb--l'a \., rltJb-pu.
bddlll-IJa V. ,.idm-I)fI.
=:J£'C::=:J' bdi,j-Ua ('. firm, secure, safe (Selt.:
I:.l quick?), br/ili-po id., both of men
lind things, -lfii-gl.yi jM-la llur- C. carry
safely, carefully! bdili-ldg Sell,: coufu:.etl,
disorderly, Dot to he trusled.
==!':'Q]'.:.j" brlug-pa Sel•. : _ mJ.::d.w friend,
:\ssist:lJlt, helpel'; oneLe.(.cxplnius
bl6-brlug by YI'()(,P.
brlulM v. 'I'llibe.

to the questions where and whither: sd-la
offl'e-bu to roll (OIlC'S 1J0dy) on the ground,
sd-la offl"il-ba to fall dowu on the ground,
to ri."c to heaven, ndlll-
JIlka-la op·/Ir·ba to fly in the air, JIll-la at,
on, in, to, the fire, "i-la on, to, the mouu-
tuin, eli-la in, into, to, on, the wnter,
to, towards the enstwnrd (e.g. to look),
U&.l-la iu, to, Tibet; nlso where we should
say: from, ns: rudlll.la fd-IJ", obah
falls from helweu, I'M-fa obab he alights
from his horse, bl'dg-ia 11lCtliis he leap;; do.....n
frOID the rOCK D::l., 1"3-1a ""rag obyill'lH1 10
drnw blood fl'om the body by bCfll.lching.
This use of la occurs so frequently,
tbat it eaunot nlwlI-Ys be looked upon liS II-
mis'>pelling for lUI, tllOugh this would lJe
lhe more exa.ct word. - with reference
to time: zag fSlim-PJ-la on the tbird day,
lo lI!Ji.iJu-pa-la in the twenlieth or during
tbe tllclllielh }'eHr, ::ld-ba ysulII-la (finish it)
within three mouths Gir., hlog
at, during, the ur"t obeisauce Gu,. - 3. in
othFl1 bearings: dJ-la ,'tell-nat (prop. rel}'ing
540
(2T
la
'
Id-pug
on, keeping
to)
relative
to,
with
respect
to,
in
consequence
of;
also
de-la,
without rten-
nas id.
;
with verbs
expressing
feelings
of
the inind :
at, off, concerning etc.,
de-la
dgd-
sfeglad
of, rejoicing
at it
; sdig-pa-la dzem-pa
to be afraid of sin
;
ma
byun-ba Odi-laydams-
ndg ysol-to
he asked advice with
respect
to this
not
having
been done
Mil.;
in
introducing
a new
subject: rgydl-sa
me-nydg-la
sor-bai
lo-rgyus-la
now,
as to the fact of the
suprem-
acy having
been transferred
to
Tan-gud,
it ... Glr.
;
in
headings
of
chapters
etc., e.g.
glin
bzii min-la names of the four
parts
of
the
globe Trig. ; ce-cun-gi
fsad-la with re-
spect
to size
Glr.;
bre-srdn-la
yyo
mi
byed-
pa
not to cheat
by
measure and
weight
Glr.;
for the Latin
erga
and
contra,
as:
dgra-la
rgol-bato struggle against
or with an
enemy;
bu-la
snyin-brtse-nas
from love to her
son;
nad-stobs-kyi
ce-cun-la
dpdg-pa
to
pro-
portion (the medicines)
to the
degree
of
the illness
Lt.;
sndr-gyi rgyun-la
in com-
parison
with the former time
Tar.;
rgydl-poi
fiigs-rje-la by,
or
according
to the
king's
favour;
nai
lugs-la by my way
of
proceed-
ing, according
to
my system
Mil.;
zdbs^pyi-
la
(to go
with a
person)
as a
companion.
4. most
frq.
la is used as
sign
of the dat.
case,
col. also of the accus.
following
a vb. a.
5. in all the relations mentioned
above,
la is added to the
inf.,
partic.
and root of
a
vb.,
wherever the verb will at all admit
of
it,
and besides it is used as
gerundial
particle
in a similar sense as te: a. after the
inf.
(only
in
B.')
: Iha^rten
zig yod-pa-la
as
there was in that
place
an idol-shrine Dzl.
;
often also to be translated
by although,
b.
added to the root
(B.
and
col.):
mfon-la ma
btags (though) having
seen
it,
yet
he did
not fasten it
Dzl.;
col.
esp.
when the root is
doubled,
for
while,
whilst: *he sa tub-tub-la
fcyod
sin Kur* fetch thou
wood,
whilst I am
cutting
the meat into
pieces
W.
;
in C. and
B.
=
cw,
also added to
adjectives,
lus mi-
sdug-cit'i
fun-la
dbyans snydn-pa ugly
as to
his
body (and)
of small
stature, (but)
hav-
ing
a fine voice
Dzl.;
in
sentences contain-
ing
an
imp.
it is added to the root of it:
sog-la
Itos
sig
come and look!
Qi-rn-^f
la-Kyi-mo
W. the mountain-weasel
;
W =
sre-mon?
ITrFf
Ia
-
r
9yd
&cn-'-
government,
adminis-
x#
tration
(?).
p..,-.
fo-cfa
sealing-wax, Wdh.; *la-kyir*
W.
balls of
sealing-wax,
with a hole for
stringing them,
used like our sticks of seal-
ing-wax; la-fig drops
of
sealing-wax; la-fig
rgydg-pa
to
drop
melted
sealing-wax upon
(a person),
as a torture.
flj-^r*
la-nyun Glr.,
either a sort of
turnip,
<o
or
(more prob.)
for
Id-pug
daii
nyun-
ma radish and
turnip.
^r*^*
la-nye
Sch. : 'a mark'
(?).
prr*
la-td Hind.
xpJ?
an
imported
material
'
like flax or a sort of
linen-cloth,
not
in
general use;
hence in
many parts
of the
country
unknown.
QTC"
PJ'CT dj*^'
la~tu
> la-fa? la-du, prop.
>4>'
NS'
NO
^ra~.
a sort of
pastry
of In-
dia, composed
of
suet,
coarse
me'al, sugar
and
spices;
the word
may
also be used for
our
gingerbread.
Cs
f^'Spl"
la-fig
v. la-ca.
'
la-tod turban Glr.
la-dwdgs,
also
mdr-yul,
Ladag.
La-
ddk, province
in the
valley
of the
Indus between mha-ris and
Balti,
inhabited
by
Tibetans and
formerly belonging
to Ti-
bet,
afterwards an
independent
kingdom,
but
recently conquered by
Gulab
Singh
of
Kashmere and hindooized as much as
pos-
sible
by
his son and
successor; capital
Le.
la-pa-sa
or
la-pa-sag
Cs. a kind of
upper
gar-
ment without a
girdle.
Id-po
buttermilk, boiled,
but not
yet
dried into vermicelli
(Jiur-ba).
Id-pug
radish,
bod
la-pug
the com-
mon black
radish,
ni f.
; rgya Id-pug
a red
species,
of an acidulous taste. The
carrot
(Daucus carota)
is in 6'. also col.
called
la-pug ser-po.
la-bddr, gen.
*lab-
540
la
on, keeping to) relative to, with. respect to,
ill consequence of; nlso de-ta, wlt1l0ut rtin-
IWl! id.; with rerbs expressing foolings of
tbe mind: at, off, concerning etc., dM«
steglMl of, rejoicing it; sdlg-pu.-laodzem-pa
to be afraid of sin; rna !Jyuri.ha odi-laydams-
1jlig ysdl-to be askedadvice withrespect to this
Dot having been done Afi!.; in introducing
4 new subject: rgyal-sa 11lt-nyd[Tla Mr-bai
w-rgyus.la Dow,nS to the fact of thesuprem-
ncy having been traDsferrcd. to TUli.gud,
it ... Glr.; in headings of cbapters etc., e.g.
glin bzii min-fa names of the four parts of
the globe Trig.; ce-t-uli-gi lsad-la re-
SElect to size Glr.; brNrdJi-la 1YO 1IIi byM-
pa DOt to cbeat by measure Dnd weight Glr.;
for the J,atin ergo. Ilnd CQ1lt,.a, as: dgra-la
ryol-ba to struggle against orwith an enemy;
bu-la myiti-brl3e-nas from love to her SOD;
1lad-stObs-l.y; u-luIi-la dpdg-pa to pro-
portion (the medicines) to the degree of
the illness !..t.; s,io.r-gyi rgyun-Ia in com-
parison with the former time Tar.; ryyo.l-poi
b.)', or according to the king's
favour; riai lUgs-la by my way of proceed-
ing, according to my systcm Nil.;
10 (to go with n person) as n companion.
- 4. most frq. la is used as sign of the dut.
case, col. also of the aceus. following a vb. a.
- 5. in all the relations mentiollcd aho\-e,
la is added to the inL, partic. and root of
a vh., wherever the \'erh will at all admit
of it, aDd besides it is used as gerundial
pnrticle in a similar sense as tt: a. after thc
info (only in 11.): ll,a-rtin zig ydd-pa-Ia
there wus in that place an idol-shrine Dzl.;
often also to be Iranslnted by allhough. b.
lldded to the rool (11. and col.): mtdn-Ia ma
btags (though) hl\yillg seen it, yet he did
nol fasten it Dzl.; col. esp. when the root is
doubled, for while, whilst: "tir ila tuh-tub-la
kyod Aill /lur" fetell thou wood, whilst I lUll
cutting the meat into pieces W:; in C. and
B. = cbi, also added to adjectives, Ius mi-
w'ug-ci" E/hi-fa dbya,is snydn-pa ugly to
his body (and) of small stature, (but) brn'-
iog fI fine voice Dzl.; in senwnces contain-
iug un imp. it is added to the root of it:
sOfj-la ltos ilig come and look!
. Ia-I.i/i-·/lw tv. the mountain-weasel;
IJ = srt-moM
la-1'fI!Ia Sch.: government,
tmtion (?).
r:flfl' la-cO. sealing-wax, Wdli.; ·la-kyir" Iv.
balls of sealing-wax, with a hole for
stringing them, used like our sticks of "eal-
ing-wax; la-fig drops of sealing-wax; w.-fi!!
rfI!Jag-pa wdrop melted sealing-wax upou
(a person), as a torture.
la-nyu,j Glr., either a sort of turnip,
...., or (more prob.) for la-Pug dall nylii...
ma radish and turnip.
'.
r:f,? la-lIyl Sell.: 'a mark' (?),
Ill'?' la-M llind. an imported materinl
like flax or a sort. of linen-cloth, not
in general usc; hence in many parts of tile
country unknown.
1ll',Sr Il.l.... la-tu, la-{u, la-du, prop.
-<.' ....,' :J
din, composed of suet, coarse menl, sugar
and spices; the word may also be used for
our gingerhread.
Of£Fr la-ffg \". la- ca.
la-too turban GI,..
la-dlCeigs, a!solllor-yu{, Ladag, La·
dik, prv\·ince in tbe \'lliley of thr
Indus lietween mtia-ris and Bl'llti, inhabited
by TibetaDs aDd formerly beloD.';iug to Ti-
bet, afterwards an independent kingdom,
but rccently conquered by Gulab Singh of
Kashmere and bindooized as much as pos-
sible by his son and Sllccessor; capitnlLe.
ld-pa-Sa or lci-pa-il"!}
, 'II Cs.akindofuppergar-
lI1eot without a girdle.
r-.jif lei-po buttennilk, boiled, hut not yet
dried iuto vermicelli (iftil'-ha).
r-.j'e-l:I'f ld-jlu!l radish, bod ld-jmg the OODl-
man black mdish, ni f. i lyYa !d-Jluff
II red species, of an acidulous tl1ste. Tile
Cllrfot (DaUC'1t8 carola) is in G: also col.
called la-pug sir-po. - la-bdlil', gen. "«W-
I
</<//*,
a contrivance for
grating
radi>ln->,
cither made of
wood,
or
consisting
of a
i|uait/.-Mtuir
with a
crystallized, rough
sur-
face.
q'q*
Id-ba v. la II.
Will. :
k
a woolen blanket or
cloth
;
a sort of
deer';
skrai Iwd-ba
Sty. frq.
a kind of woolen cloth. The seat of Buddha
is often a slab
resembling
a Iwd-ba Do.
|*
la-ma Sch. : a certain herb.
la-ma-sro
raspberry
Kun.
la-Jjir Cs.,
also
la-gor Sch., quick,
swift,
speedy, Kyod
ma
Odug
ma
Odug
la-jir
denMil. make
haste, go
without
stop-
ping (on
the
road).
la-yogs retribution,
punishments
overtaking
a sinner
during
this
life
(cf.
Ian-
cogs) C., W.',
*
la-yog
fob
yin*
that will come home to
you!
Sch. has la-
yogs-pa
to
return,
to come back
(?).
!;?
la-re W. a sort of
long-legged
and
swift
-moving centiped, frequent
in
houses.
C.,
B.
(is
said to be
pronounced
la-la in
Sp.,
but
Thgy.
sometimes ac-
centuates Id-
la, according
to the
metre)
some,
a few
;
when
put
twice :
partly partly,
what
what;
la-la
ziy
also as a
singular:
some
body,
some one Dzl.
W-,
1 .
fjrfjraC' Id-la-pud
a medicinal
herb;
in LA.
'
a
Bupleurum.
fcj'^f
la-so Sch. list
(of cloth), selvage.
I*
la-siH/s
v.
soys.
Qicn*
la
9->
a^so
dbon-lay, dyon-lay,
Sch.'.
little,
'
not much.
ldg(-pa)
1.
resp. pyay,
hand, arm.
*ldy-pa
tdn-ce*W. to shake
hands,
also to offer one's
hand,
as a
pledge
of faith
(for
C. v.
mdzug-gti); lay pa-nas gju-ba
to
take,
to seize
by
the hand Dzl.
;
lay-pai
ryyab
or bol the back of the
hand;
Idy-pai
mdun the
palm
of the hand Cs.
;
Idg-tu
Un-
pa
to take in hand, to exercise, to
practise,
QJ'flT
541
sgom-pa
meditation
Mil.,
Mg-d6n
to
study
and
prartiM!
the
import
of a
word,
to live
accordingly Mil., metaj)h.: mfn-ldf/
arm of
the
sea, gulf, bay, m&o-laff-Jbrti
narrow
sea,
straits; /////J-A///, i/ul-ldg tongue
of
land, ////<-
lay-Q
brtl
isthmus,
neck of land
C.;
fig.
for
power,
authority,
mil
Idg-tu
c
yro-ba
to
get
into a
person's power,
to be at his
mercy
Thyy., Idy-nas Oproy-pa
to snatch out of a
person's hand,
to deliver from another's
power
Glr. 2.
fore-paw;
also
paw
or foot
in
gen., e.g.
foot of a cock Glr. 3.
symb.
num.: 2.
Comp. lay-kod
bundle, bunch,
armful,
sheaf of corn Ld.
(?). lay-skor
Ld. : hand-
mill.
lay-Kug pouch, hand-bag
Schr.
lay-
myo \.lay-mgo
tsam like a fist
(?//.,
or ace. to
others : both hands
put together
in the
shape
of a
globe
or ball. 2. a
glove
with
only
a
thumb,
a mitten C.
lag -gram leaning
one's head on the hand W.
lay-rgyugs
railing. lag-rgyun
accustomed
manner,
use,
habit Cs
lag-ndr
the fore-arm Wdn.
-
ldg-ca utensils, tools, implements; object
car-
ried in the
hands,
e.g. royal insignia
at a
festival
procession
Glr.' also in a more
gen.
sense,
like
cd-lay, Kor-yyoy ldg-ca
dan
beds-pa
ton
zig supply
servants and
things
(wanted
for the
journey")
! Glr.
lay-cdg
a broken
hand,
a lame hand
Cs.,
Schr.
-
"lag
-cad" W. solemn
promise by shaking
or
joining
hands.
lag-ijes
1.
impression,
mark,
of the
hand,
of the
fingers.
2. a work
which immortalizes a
person's
name,
lag-
/;}(*
ojoy-pa
to leave such a w
r
ork behind
Glr.
lag-nyd,
one Le.r. has:
lay-nyds
=
sf&r-mtfan-med-par Im-pa
to take what is
not
given,
hence
lag-nya prob.
a sbst. : a
grasp,
a snatch.
*lay-nydr*
W. for
lay-
/Kir.
lag -tig (or dig?) travelling-bag,
pouch
Ld.
lag-rtags
1.
resp. pyay-rtdys
q.v., sign
or mark made with the
hand,
as
a seal of
verification,
impressed
on a
legal
document,
but often
only
with the
finger
dipped
in ink. 2.
any
small
object, e.g.
a
needle,
which the deliverer of a letter has
to hand over
together
with the
letter;
pre-
sent in
general? lag-stdbs
Sch.
lag-
llU,..., fI, contrivtUlce for gNl.tillg rAdishes,
either made of wood, or consisting of :\
with II crystRllizl·d, rough SUI'·
fncc.
l«-ba ,.. fa n.
aJ'.:::r crrw /lcd-ba, [wd-wII, &1.:. 'lPifl!I',
<I ' <l:1 Will.: 'll. woolen IJlnnket or
cloth; a S()rt of deer'; d'/,ui {,C'd-ba Stg. frq.
u kind of woolCD clotl!. Tile seat of BuddllR
is often /I. 811\b resembling", lrt'dAm Do.
cr"!' [a.."lu ScI,.: " cert:liu herb.
raspberry K'It1I.
r..n:;%\ til., ulso la-g6r Sell., quick,
swift, speedy, Ityrxl fila "dug fila "dU{}
la- odeli/l/il. make bnslc,go without stoll-
pillg (on the road).
fa- !/0g3 retribution, punishments
o\'ertaking l\ sinner during this
life (cf. lan-cugs) C., IV.; "lu-!JOy fob yin"
that ..... ill come borne to you! Sell. has la-
Y'J!Js-pa to return, to come oo.ck (?).
la-re W. a sort of long-legged and
swift· moving centilled, frequent in
houses.
Q,j'Q,j' lA-la C., B. (is said to bo pronounced
in Sp., but '1'I'[I!I. sometimes nc-
centuates /d.la, according to the melre)
some, a few; when put twioo: parUy- partly,
what - what; zig also liS a singultu':
sOlDe body, some one D:1. VIJ, 1.
ld-la·ftud l\ medicinal berb; in LI,.
a Buplcurum.
llJA{) Sel,. list (of cloth), sel'lage.
la-$Qy$ v. I#')(jf.
r..t:n0 lag, lliso dgol/.1ay,&ll.: little,
"1 not ruuch.
ldg(.pa) 1. resll·llyag, hand, arm,
·ldg.pa ta,i· U·W. to shake hnnds,
aho to offcr one's 11I1lId, ns 1\ pledgc of fuith
(for C. v. 1I1tb'g-gu); lag }HNla3 .,jit·QU to
tllke, to seize by tbe lmnd D::l.; lag.pai
l"!Jyub or 60l tho back of the Ilnnd; lug-pai
nulun the palm of the hand Or.; Un-
pa to take in hand, to exercM, 10 praetise,
!iii
3961/1.pa meditation Mil., (,fg-Mlj to study
nnd tho import of l\ .....ord, to live
nccordiugly Mil., motllph.: mf'l).ldfj arm 01
the sea, gulf, bay, narrow sell,
straits; gli,j-ldg,!jUl.ldg tongue of laud,
lag·obl-il isthmus, neck of land C; lig. for
power, authority, "Iii tdg·tu c!f'"6..va to gct
ioto II. person's power, to be lit bis mercy
Tl'!I!h ld[l.mu Jfroo-pa to suateh out of n
person's hand, to deliver from another's
power GIl'. - 2. fore-paw; also paw or 1001
in gen., e.g. foot of a cock Gil'. - 3. symu.
nuUl.: 2.
Compo lag ·1.:00 bundle, bunch, armful,
of corn 1.4.,(?). Lei.: hand-
mill. -lag-Ifuy pOUCh,
m,q6 1.lag-111f1O t8am like II fistGlr., or ace, to
otlJerS: both hands put togfther in theshnpll
of a or baR '2. /l. glove with only a
thumu, 0. mitten C. - leaning
one's head on the hnnd 1Y. - lag.''f/!J"gs
railing. - lag.rfl!Jun l\Ccuslomed mMner,
use, habit (8 - lag.ildl· the fore-arm Wdri.-
lriy.;:a utensils, tools, implements; object
ned in the hands, e.g. royal insignin. I\t a
festi\'Il1 procession Glr.; I\lso in a more gen.
sense, like cd-lag, i ..'ol·.ygQg lrig.ca dati
Qc!b-pa (o,j zig sUPI,ly sen'ants nod things
(wanted for the journey)! Gil.. - lag.'fdg
n broken ha.nd, flo lalUe Imnd (.a., &hl'. -
"lag. cad" W. solemn l'ronlise by shnkioR:
or joining hands. - lafJ-Jjh 1. impression,
mark, of the lmnd, of the fingers. 2. n work.
which immol't:alil:es u perSQn's uame, lag.
rjes J&rrPfl to lelwe such work bellind
GIl'. -lag-Il!Ju, one Lu. hilS: lag·lIyUs_
stlr-mA'all.",ed.par lill-pa to take what is
not given, hence lag.n!!(/, pl'ob. a shst.: Il
grasp, a snateh. - "lag·ngdr" W. for lag.
,ial'. - lay - tig (or dig1) lravelling.b.'g,
I,ouch Ld. - lag.rtags I.
q. v., l>ign or mark ronde wilh the hlWd, I\<>
Il seal of "crification, impressed on IL legal
uocument, Lut often only with the finger
dipped iu ink. 2. any small object, e. g. "
needle, which the deli"crer of a letter hiS
to hllDd over "ith the leuer; pre·
in geuer,,}? - lafJ-Itdbs Sell. - lag-
542
"j'
ldgs-pa
'q'
ldn-ba
fen,
lag-mfil
the
palm
of the hand.
-
lag-dam
Mil., lag-ddm-po
C. close-fisted,
stingy, niggardly. lag-dar
Lex., prob.
the same as Idb-ddr
(
PP.
col.)
grater. lag-
ydub
bracelet.
lag-bde Mil., C.,
the
per-
son that
pours
out the tea at a tea-carousal.
-
lag-
don Cs. a vassal or
subject paying
his landlord in
money
or
kind,
opp.
to rkan-
^ro
who
performs
his services as an er-
rand-goer
or a
porter. lag
-
rdum Mil.
having
a mutilated or
crippled
hand.
lag-
Iddn
having
a hand or a
trunk,
hence
=
elephant,
Cs.
lag-brdd sign
or
signal
made
by
the
hand, beckoning. lag-na-rdo-rje,
lag-rdor
v.
rdo-rje. lag-na-yzon-fogs
Cs.
'holding
a basin in his
hand',
n. of a
deity.
lag-snod lag-tig. lag-dpon
work-
master, overseer,
esp.
builder
Dzl.,
Glr.
lag-pijis
a
piece
of cloth for
wiping
the
hands,
towel, napkin. lag-bubs
v.
Jbub-pa. lag-
ber
walking-staff.
lag-mi bail, surety.
-
lag-dmdr
C.
hangman.
--
lag-btsug shoot,
scion.
lag-fsigs joint
of the
hand, wrist;
elbow-joint. lag-yzuns,
W.
*lag-zum*,
ba-
lustrade,
banister,
railing. Idg-yyog-pa
companion, assistant,
associate.
lag-ris
the lines in the
palm
of the hand Sch.
-
lag-Un, resp. pyag-len,
Sch. also
lag-stabs,
practice, practical knowledge, dexterity,
Cs.:
cos
-
kyi lag
-
Un the
practice
of
religion,
Krims-kyi
of the
law,
rtsis-kyi
of mathe-
matics.
lag-subs glove.
ldgs-pa,
re
sp-
and
eleg.
for
yin-pa
and
Ogyur-ba,
to
be; Idgs-so
like
yin,
as answer to a
question
: so it is !
yes
to be sure!
very
well! at
your
service! When
a Lama asks a
shepherd
:
Kyed-kyi
min ci
yin
what is
your
name? the latter answers:
N.N.
byd-ba lags my name,
if
you please,
is
N.N.,
and asks on his
part
: bld-ma
Kyed
ci skad
bi/d-ba lags
what
may
be the name
of
your
Reverence ? Mil. de
Kycd Idgs-
sam is it
you,
Sir? Pth.
;
dge-slon
de su
lags
who is this reverend
gentleman? Dzl.;
ci
Itar
lags-pa (for gyur-pa] ysol-pa
he re-
ported (to Buddha)
what had
happened,
Dzl.;
bld-ma-la
bzugs-grogs med-pa lags-
sam Mil. has
your
Reverence no attendant?
ltd-ba ma
laqs-kui
that does not mean : to
e/ i/
behold,
but . . . Dzl.
; ^on-ba
ci
lags
'what
is it that this comes here?' i.e. how does
this
happen
to come here?
Glr.;
rje
ci
lags
what is
that,
Sir?
(when
one is
surprised
at
any thing strange
or
unaccountable,
at
an unreasonable demand
etc.,
also when we
should
say:
God
forbid!) Glr.;
yin lags,
yda lags, yod lags
there
is,
it is Glr.
;
zal-
zds
ysol Idgs-nas
when we shall have done
dining
Dzl.
;
a Lama asks : btsal-le
(==
btsal-
lam}
have
you
looked for it? and the dis-
ciple
answers: btsal
lags yes,
I have!
Mil.;
in
addressing
a
person
: bld-ma
lags (prop
:
you
that are a
Lama)
for the mere voca-
tive
case,
c5
ISQSV, Mil., frq.
In W.
lags
is not in use now
(cf.
however le
3),
but in
C. it is of
frq. occurrence, e.g.
in Lhasa:
*la,
la-so,
Id
yo\
la
yin*
for:
yes,
Sir!
very
well,
Sir! *laf la-am? la-sam?*
please?
what did
you say?
J"
ldgs-mo
W.
clean,
for
legs-pa.
lan-ka
Ceylon,
lan-ka-pu-ri city
of
the Rakshasain
Ceylon,
which island
is the abode of these
beings, according
to
the belief of
many people
in Tibet and
northern India even at the
present day;
lan-kar
ysegs-pai
mdo the Sutra Lankdva-
tdra in the
Kangyui:
^ &K-wa)-fow(-w0)
weak,
y i v
e.g.
irom
hunger,
disease
Ld.
Ian-fan
Scopolia praealta
Don.,
a
common weed with
pale yellowish
flowers
Med.;
mLh. a
species
of
Hyoscyamus,
of
frq.
occurrence,
seems to be understood
by
the same name.
ldn-ba
(provinc. lou-bd), pf. lans,
imp. lon(s),
~
Idan-ba,
I. to rise, to
get up,
da Ions
get up
now ! also with
yar
(pleon.);
lans-te
sdod-pa
to
stand,
Lt. and
col.;
to
arise, e.g.
of a contest
W., C.;
to
go away,
to
depart, esp. fig.,
of the
night:
nam Idns-te at
daybreak
;
to come
forward,
to
Step forth,
from
among
the crowd Do.
;
pyir
ldn-ba to
recover,
to be
restored,
to
grow well,
to COme to one's
self,
after a faint-
-
Un. - lag -lIlfil tile palm of the IUlod.-
lag-ddm Mil" lug-dam- fHJ C. close·fisted,
stingr. niglfltrdly. - lay-dar I,u., prob.
tile sa-mc as lab-dd,' (IV. col.) grater.-l'lg-
}'dilb bracelet. - lag-Me Mil., C, the pe....
SOil that pours out tlie Ie:' :\t II. ten-curollSal.
_ lag-cddn (s. n vassal Of subject paying
his landlord in mone)' OJ' kind, opp. to l'J.:aii-
.sr6 who performs ilis services as no er-
rand-goer or a porter. - lag -NiUm Mil.
having lllllUtilawd or crippled Imnd.-lag-
lddll baving n hand or a trunk, hence_
elephant, [8. - lag-brda sign or signallllndc
by the band, beckoning. - lay-na-l'dJ-tje,
lw,;-rdar v. 1'dJ..lje. - (,8.
'holding II basin in his hund', n. of n dlity.
- 14g-3nQd -lag-li9' - lag-dpdn work-
master, overseer, esp. builder Dzl., Gll'. -
lap-p!Jfs 1\ piece of cloth forwiping the hands,
towel, napkin. - lag-Min v. /n'b-pa. lag-
ber walking-staff. - lag-JIll bail, surety. -
lag-dmdr C. hangman. - lag-btsug shoot,
scion. - lag-fsigs joint of the hand, wrist;
elbow·joint -lag-yziun, II'. "lag-::tml", ba·
lustrade, banister, roiling. - tag-yyog-pa
companion, assistant, associate. - lag- ri3
the lines in the palm of the Imod &h. -
lag-lin, resp. ,;yog-Un, Belt. also lag-stab&,
practice, practical knowledge, dexterity, (,'s. .-
Cds - klJi lU[J - Un the practice of religion,
of the law, rtm-kyi of !Datbe-
matics. - lag-sum glove.
lJgs-pa, resp. and cleg. {or yin-pa
and 09yUJ'-ua, to be; lUgs-so like
yill, as lUIswer 10 a question: so it is! )'es
to be sure! very well ! otyour service! When
lL Lama asks II she!llierd: 1l1JM-kyi mili
!lfn your name? the latter answers:
N. N 0Jd-ba laf13 my name, if you please,
is N.N., and asks on his part: bfd-Illa J..!yed
N skad b!Jd-ua lags whnt may be the name
of your Reverence? Nil. - de /tyed !dgB-
aam is it )'QU, Sir? Pth.; dgC-8wn de su lUfP
who is this re\'erend gentleman? DzL; Ci
ltal" lllfP-pa (for .qgul·-pa) ysol-pa he re-
ported (to BuddlJa) whllt hdd happened,
Dd.; bld.-ma-la [,;;ug3-grog' tMd-pa IUfP-
aam Mil. bns your l:l:evcl'enee no
i!l e
l:.ll:.·,::r lWi-ba
Itd-bu ma Id[J3-kyi thot does not mean: (()
behold, but ... D::L; <o,i-ba Ci lUffl 'what
is it that tbis COlues bere?' i.e. how docs
this happell (() come hcre? Oir.; '''je Ci lufP
what is that, Sir? (when one is surprised
nt lilly thing or uuaceoulllnble, llt
an demand etc., !l1i<Q when we
$lIoul(1 say: God forbid!) Glr.; yill lay!,
fda lagt, yIX! lug! there is, it is GI,..; iul-
ZIU ywl Mgt-lieU! when we shall havc done
dining lJzl.; II Lama asks: btsal-le (= utsal-
lam) hMe you looked for nud the dis-
ciple answers: 013allags yes, I ha"e! Mil.;
in addressing 1I person: bld-11Ia lag8 (prop:
you that are a Lama) for the mere voca-
tive case, r1J le(leii, Mil., frq, - In IV. laffl
is not in use now (cf. however Ie 3), but in
C. it is offrq, occurrence, e.g, in Lhasa: ·M,
la-so, la yg', ld !lin" for: yes, Sir! vcrywell,
Sir! "ltl"! &'-am' la-sum? please'? what did
),ou say? '
ldgs-1/W W. clean, for ligt·pa.
e.t1:.''TJ' lan-ka Ceylon, city of
theRnksbnsainCeylon, which island
is tile abode of these beings, accordiug to
tile belief of many people iii Tibet and
uortheru India even at Ihe prescnt Jay;
Imi-kur md<> the Sul,'u LaiJ.:riru-
tlira in the KUllfJ!JW'.
lali(-lia)-loli(-ne) .weak,
e.g. from hunger, d,seo:,e
lAo
hili-fa,; Scopolia pl'aealiu D(!1l., a
common weed with pale ye1lowislJ
flowcrs Med.; inLJI. aspeciesofHyoscyamus,
of frq. occurrence, seeJll'> to be understood
by the same name.
I::!I'"'."" bili-ua (pl'o\'inc. IIM-ba), pf. lairs,

imp. WI'(S), = ldmi-bu, T. to rise, to
get up, da loli. get up now! 11180 with !Jur
(picon.); IUJi8-fe sdod-pa to stand, LI. nod
col; to arise, e.g. of a contest W:, C.; to
go away, to deport, esp. lig.,.-.{lf tile night:
nalll !d48-te at daybreak.; to come IOlWard,
to step forth, f,"Qm among the crowd Do.;
Fyi/' 1Illl-ba to recover, to be restored, to
srg ,'fell, to come to one'. SI", after a faint-
Inn-kan
ing
lit />./.:
//,///-/'<//
nn-ro
laiix-pa
/////
the
dying
embers of
religion
were blown into
a Hum.-
again
Glr.: to
appear,
to break
out,
iif a
disease,
m/<7-A//;.s-</Vs when n disease
i< in its lirst
beginnings
IA. II. lait-ba
ami loit-lnt.
pf.
foristo come
up to,
to arrive
at. to be
equal,
to
reach, O
di Ion son with
this it is made
up,
that will do
6'.; O
dn'n-
<////*
HHI lit/i
lit.: the
serving up (of many
dishes)
would not
do,
i.e. there would be
no end of
serving up
Mil.',
gr&At-kyi
Id/'t-
ba to be numerable
Mil.,
cf. also cu
(init.)
and
r)<H/-j>(t ('xtr.).
l<<ii-fxo
youth, youthful age,
dei Idn-
fso-lama
cdgs-pas
not
falling
in love
with,
not
being
enticed or led
away by
their
youthful appearance Glr.,
lan-fso
rgyds-pas
grown up
to
adolescence;
lan-fsoi
dpal
the
charms of
youth
J'f//.; Idn-fto&in-moi
ydon
the face of the
youthful
Srinmo
Glr.;
lan-
fso-can Cs.
adolescent,
young;
lan-fso-ma
girl,
maiden Sb.
ldn-lin-ba Sch. to be in a con-
fused
whirling
motion
(v.
Ion-
Ion};
laii-ma-lin Mil. seems to be a word
descriptive
of the
rising
of a
cloud,
of the
soaring
of a bird of
prey, sprin-dkdr
lan-
ma-liii.
"
laii-loft v. lan-na-loh-itc.
htH-xdr ( K.
stubbornness,
obstinacy.
adj. lan-sor-can;
sometimes lii-
sor
(without can)
seems to be also used ad-
jectively, e.g.: O
dre
fynl-jiti*
liiii-xor
bdg-
cac/s
yin
Mil. evil
passion
is more obstinate
(i.e.
more difficult to be
got
rid
of)
than
ye
hobgoblins.
Idd-pa
Cs.
weak, faint,
exhausted,
of
men and
animals;
blunt,
dull,
of
knives;
Sch. also
rotten,
decayed.
Ojr-^r
Idd-mo
imitation.
I(id- mo
bytd-p<i
/>' .
C., *co-ce*,
gyab-ce* W.,
to imitate,
to
mimic,
to
say
after, xi<'>n-lam
O
di-xk<nl
Ixluij-iii
/ti,/~ f/ tn
t/i//s
>ay
after me the follow-
ing prayer Thyr.', /^W-Xyy/
l<'nl-nio /,
r
//r</-/;///.s
titi
f
nii
Mil.
you
cannot imitate me.
Ian
(orig. perh.
:
'turn', hence)
: 1 . time,
times,
lan-ycig
\.
once,
onetime. 2. also
dus-lan-ycig
Glr.
once,
one
day,
both as to
tin-
past
and the future. 3. once for
all,
de-
cidedly
Glr. \. for this
time, first,
first of
all,
before
all,
*lan
i-ig
l{-ka
Q
dt co* this
work must be done first of
all;
da-Ian
id.;
Ian
ynyis
twice,
lan-bcu ten times etc.
;
Ian
Ixlnn
(nam) ysum
seven times or three
times,
li<|
in rules about
ceremonies; b&gor-ba
Ian
ni ('n't -du
byds-te circumambulating
round it
many
times Mil.
;
Ian
gram dpag-tu-med-
pa
innumerable times
Thgy.;
W.: *zi Ian
nyi
la fsam
j>el*
how
many
are 2 times 4?
bzi Ian
ynyis-la brgyad
x"//
~>
times 4 are 8.
-
2.
return, retribution, retaliation,
Ian
bytd-
pa (
W.
*c6-ce*},
Ian
jdl-ba
to
return,
re-
taliate,
repay; pdn-lan ynod-pas
or
legs-pai
Ian
nyes-pas jdl-ba B., *pem-p<j
l?n-la
no-
pa jhe'-pa* 6'., *pdn-pe
Idn-la
nod-pa
co-
ce* W. to return evil for
good;
*lan-zo co-
ce W. to show
gratefulness,
to be
grateful;
punishment,
. . .
bHtg-^as
Ian
dwj
that is the
punishment
for
having
allowed... Glr.
;
Ian
Un-pa,
W.: *lan
kor-ce, tdii-ce, dug-Ian
Idon-
ce*,to
take
vengeance,
to
revenge
one's
self;
miff-la miff-Ian
so-la so-lan
srog-la srog-lan
eye
for
eye,
tooth for
tooth,
life for
life;
dei Idn-la in return for
that; Ian-grans
a
number of retributions
Ttyy.;
drin-lan re-
compense
for benefits
received, requital
of
a
good
action,
bzan-ldn
id.,
dei bzdn-lan-
du as an
acknowledgment
for it Glr.
;
hence
nan-Ian
signifies: taking revenge
for an in-
jury
received, returning
evil for
evil,
not
as Cs.
gives
: bzan-lan
gratefulness,
nan-Ian
ungratefulness (?)
3. answer,
reply, fyod-
kyi )'suii-ba
dei Idn-du as answer to
your
majesty's question
Glr.\
Ian
Od^bs-pa frq.,
also
Ottbs-pa, klon-pa, Idon-paDzl.,
W. *zcr-
ce* to
answer; lanysol-ba,
zu-ba id. in an-
swering
to the
questions
of a
person superior
by
rank, age
or
office, lanmdzdd-pa
if
he,
the
superior,
answers;
ytdm-lan gl>t-yi$ jal
I answer to the
speech by
a
song
Mil. :
drin-
lan an answer to a
question.
/
rin- Ian a
reply
to a
dispatch
received,
/7,W-Am Cs.
a defendant's
reply (in law), yig-lan
answer
to a letter.
"-*''''-
/'"'-//'"' railing,
fence, enclosure NA/. :
/
ing fit D:l.; fI,c-ro ldtil-p" yill tile
dying emhers of l'eligioll were blown int(l
II nlilue l\gain Gk; to appear, to break out,
of II. nad-la,jl·tlll' when II ,1iliClI.SC
i'l in its bl.'ginnings U. - II. la,j-ba
lt/ld loli-Qll, pf. 10li, to come up 10, to nrrive
:1\, to be equal, to reach, 0(/1 loti ro,i with
this it is lIIadc up, that will do C.; oJrbl-
!JY" nUl lwi lit.: tllC serving up (of nHlny
dislilS) would not do, i.e. there would be
no cod of serving Ull Nil.; M,i-
b" to he lIumemble Mil., ef. nlso "la (init.)
llild ,jdd-l'a (extr.).
r...,lt:::::t iIi,i-flJl) youth, youtllful np;e, dl'i.M,j-
fsa.la ma "Efi!Js.pm not fulling in love
wit II, nut being i!nticed or leu llwny by their
youthfuluppe:mlnce Glr., M,i-fro rg!JUs1H1.s
grown up to lIodolescence; la,i-froi tlpal the
charms of youth l-'tl,.; M,l-fro ,,.in_moi )"tlo,;
tlll:- fuce oCtbe )'outhful Srintno Glr.; la,i-
{3(j.Can £.,. young; l'lIi-fso-ma
girl, IlIllidell Sb.
Mli-lili-I.m Sci,. to be in a coo-
fused whirling motion (v. loti-
lo,i); w,i-ma·l/,i Mil. seems to be n word
,lcscriptive of the rising of n. cloud, of the
sollring of n bird of prey, tprin-tlkd,. lali-
ma-li,i.

lail-ldli \'. Iwi-III,_lo,j_,;e.
stubbornness..obstinacy,
ndJ. lall-sdr-?U1lj sometuues Imi-
';0" (witllout ('un) te be nlso used IId-
jecti\'e1r, e.g.: "dl't lJiI·';Qr /.xig-
cays yin .Mil. c\'i1llnssion is more ob",tillnte
(i.e. more difficult to be got rid of) tlll\n ye
hobgoblins.
ldd..pa (:8, weak, laint, exhausted, of
meo :met I\niml\ls; blunt, dull, of
knives; &11. 1\1,;0 rollen, decayed.
Idd.-n1(J imitation, lJd-1IIo b!JIIl-pa n,
c., oro-ceo, !JYuIJ..U· liZ, to imitate,
to mimic, to say afler, 'lJlo'l-lU1'l .di-skad
!xlii!J-!J; lthl-mo g!JilJ SU)' :dter me thc follow-
ing Ilnlyel' '1'1'9"'; .iM-kg; ltid-1IIQ J:.lJI'd-J.:IJ'"s
lIli Nil. rou cnnoot imitllte me.
lall (orig. perh.: 'turn', hence): J. time,
times, fmt-}'N!J l.once, ou,time. 2.l\lso
dus-w.t-rUg GIl', once, one dny, both as to
tlle past lind the future. 3. once for nil, tic-
cidedly Gil'. I. for this tilll<:O, ljn;t, first of
1111, b<:ofore all, °lan ti!J f;·ka .(Ii Ctt° tltis
.... ork must be done first of I'll; da·[rin id.;
fan f1i9'"s !wice, lm,..bi':u wn limes etc.; Ian
Ixltm ('lam) )'SuII/seven timesor three timCB,
fr'l' in rules nbouteeremonies; I(m
,mlJi-Ju byas-te eircumumbulntiug round it
Uluny times Mil.; Ian !Jl'uiI, dpag-tu-1Ilid-
J'u innumerllble tiu.les 'l'/l9Y'; W: on Ian
n.!Ji la [smillie/" how rollny nre t times 4?
bZi Ian f1/yis-Ia b"Vyud 8/)1; 2 times 4 are 8,
- 2. return, retribution, retaliation, lall byld-
1'" (W °i..-o-ceO), Ian .,jdl-ba to return, re-
taliate, repaYi lilin-lan rOOd-pas or Ugs-]J(li
lUll n!Jh-pas Jlil-ba 11., 0#m-pr l.:n.-Ia 1I(i'-
pa jM-pao U" °l'dn-pr llin-la nOd-pa (-0-
ceo W: to return evil for good; °lan-zd i..00-
ce Ii'. to show grntefulness, to be gl1lterul;
punishment, ' .. bi:lig1xu Ian dllg lhnt is the
Jlunishment for having allowed•.. Gbo.; Lan
Ihi-pa, Jv.: °lan J,-or-i:e, tthi-cr, dUfj-Iafl {.lon-
ceO,to take YengelUlee, to re\'enge one's self;
mlg-Ia mig-Ian 16-la !frog-la ir6y-lall
eye for eye, tooth for tooth, life for life;
dei lUn-la in return for that; lo.n-gnifi' 1\
number of retributions TI49Y.; drin-lall re-
compense for benefits received, requital of
II. good action, bzan-ldn id., cki b.:d';-ltm-
dft liS nn ncknowlcdgment for it Glr.; !Jcllce
.. an-Ian signifies: tllking revenge for lin in-
jUI'y reoei\'ed, returning evil for evil, not
IlS (8. giles: Jl"rntefulness, ,io......lan
ungrlltefulnes«(?) - 3. answer, reply, ("dd-
kyi )'SNli-lta dei ldJl,du lIS anSwer to )'OUr
majesty's qnestioll Glr.; {all ol/lN?1 frIJ.,
1\lso /U,8-pa, kldll-pU, ldon-]J(l /).:1., W: °zer_
ceo to answer; /all rW/./m, zu-bo. id. in 1111-
s.....eriDl:l" to the questions of a [ICr""O <1uperior
by rtlllk, age or ofGcc,-ltmllldzlid-l'a if he,
the sUllerior, IInSWers; )"lIim-/lm gIH-!Ji, JaL
Innswe!' to the speech hy l/. :;.ong Mil.; (/,';s-
lall lin nnswer to 1\ /irill-lml II
reply to n dispatch ...e.l, d,M-lan Cr.
a defendllllL's rcply (in In"'). yl!J-I<ll1 answer
to a letter.
MII-g(w railing:.
fence, enclosure Sf9.; I..u.:
-1iU- ill.
544
lan-skydr
lam
lan-skydr
W.
prob.
=
Ian,
retribu-
tion, return,
*de
lan-kydr yin*
that
is all he has
gained by
it!
lan-gyog Thgy., prob.
=
lan-cags;
or
perh.
the
original
form of la-
yogs
f
lan-cdgs
misfortune, adversity,
ca-
lamity,
as a
supposed punishment
for what has been done in a former
life;
every unlucky accident,
that
happens
to a
person
without his own
fault, being
looked
upon
as a retribution for former crimes.
Thus
lan-cags
denotes about whatNon-Bud-
dhists would call
destiny, fate,
disaster.
p...-.
ldn-bu
braid, plait,
tress of hair
(Cs.
^ ^
curl,
lock of hair? Sch.
pigtail?)
ldn-
bu sle-ba or Ihe-ba to make
plaits,
to
plait
the
hair;
lan-fsdr
ornaments,
worn in the
hair Mil.
m*'j(*
Idn-fsa,
more
accurately
lahfsa
(ace.
to
Hodgson corrupted
from
f^fl)
n-
of a
style
of
writing
in use
among Nepalese
Buddhists. It is a kind ofornamental
writing,
used
by caligraphists
for
inscriptions
and
titles of books.
OJ5\*rf("
^an~^swa sa
't> prob.
=
fswa,
Idn-fswa
'
**
cu-la
tim-pa
salt which dissolves in
water
Thgy.;
Idn-fswa Ka-zds
kun-gyi
bro-
ba
skyed
salt
gives
a relish to
every
dish
S.g. ;
Idn-tswai cu salt-water
Lex.;
Idn-fsica-
ba
saline, briny
Med.
"
lab-bddr v. la-bddr in
la-pug.
lab-pa
to
speak, talk, tell,
mi-la ma
lab do not tell
anybody
Mil.;
rdzun-
ytam lab-pa
Bhot. to
lie,
to utter a false-
hood
;
lab fsol-ba Sch. : 'to
speak
unseemly,
to
brawl(?)'.
lab
tsdm-pa
Sch.: to
speak
while
dreaming,
to be delirious, lab
yton-
ba Cs
,
*lab
gydb-ce*
W. to
talk,
to
chat;
*Kd-
lab-cen*
eloquent,
fluent of words
6'., W.\
rgya-ldb
a
great
deal of
talk, rgya-ldb-can
talkative
C.,
W.
Comp. ldb-ga Cs.,
*ldb-ca*
C.,
W. talk.
lab-grogs
Mil.
companion,
intimate friend
Mil.
lab-rdol
talking
unbecomingly
Sch.
*ldb-ra*
(prop. Idb-sgra}
'noise of
tattling',
tattle, talk,
*ldb-ra
tdh-ce* W. to
chat,
babble.
-
*
lab-lob or
lab-lo*,
with
*g>jdb-ce*
to
speak indistinctly,
to
mumble;
to
speak
in
one's
sleep;
*lab-Ub-te (lul* he walks
speak-
ing
in his
sleep,
he is a somnambulist W.
Idb-tse a
heap
of stones in which a
pole
with little
flags
is
fastened,
esp.
on mountain
passes
Schl. 198.
lam 1.
way, road, lam-cdn, rgyd-lam,
ston-lam Cs.
,
*md
-
lam* W.
highway,
main
road, high-road; gyen-lam
an
up-hill
road,
an
ascent,
fur-lam a dowu-hill
road,
pred-lam,
rtsibs-lam a horizontal or a
sloping
road,
that leads
alongside
a
hill, lam-prdn
a narrow
footpath,
lam
dog-mo
a strait
path,
lam
ydnspa
a broad
one;
*lam de-mo* a
good, easy
road,
*lam
s6g-po*
a
difficult,
dangerous,
road
W.;
lam far the road is
open, may
be
passed,
is not obstructed
by
snow etc. Glr.
;
lam
byed-pa
Sch.,
*lam co-
ce,
sdl-ce* W. to clear a
path,
to construct
a
road;
rgya-gdr-gyi
lam or
rgya-gar-du
Ogro-bai
lam, the
way
to India Pth.
;
gri-lam
the
way
of the
knife,
i.e. a
cut, slit, slash;
*'z-
ne
dud-pe
lam* here is the
way
for the
smoke,
here the smoke
escapes
W. 2.
way,
space
or distance travelled
over, journey,
Idm-du on the
road,
on the
journey;
bal-
bod-kyi
lam the
journey
from
Nepal
to Ti-
bet Glr.
}
Idm-du
)ug-pa
to set
out,
to
travel,
also: to continue one's
journey, lam-pyed
tsdm-du
pyin-pa
dan as we had done about
half the
way
Dzl
.,
Idm-nas
ldog-pa
to return
home from a
journey,
Krus-la
O gro-bai
Idm-
du when he went to bathe Dzl. 3.
7nf?T,
fig. way
or manner of
acting,
in order to
obtain a certain end
;
t'dr(-pai)
lam the
way
of
deliverance,
viz. for Buddhists: from the
cycle
of
transmigrations,
for Christians : from
sin and its
consequences;
hence the
way
to
happiness,
to eternal bliss. The six
(some-
times
only five)
classes of
beings (v. O gro-
bd)
are sometimes called the six
ways
of
re-birth within the orb of
transmigration.
In
mystical writings
lam Ina are
spoken
of
as the
ways leading
to the sa bcu
(q. v.)
Thgy.; lam(-gyi) rim(-pa)
Cs.: 'a
degree
of
advance;
the several
steps
towards
perfec-
tion'
;
also the title of
sundry mystical
writ-
544
lan-d'!Jdl' IV. prob. -- lall, relribu-
-1:.:J lion, N!tum, ·ae lan./cydl· yin* tl13t
is all he has gained by it!
lan-gyOg TI,yy., prob. - lail-lJays;
or perh, the original form of la·
ydys1
lan-cags mIsfortune, adversity, ca-
lamity, as R supposed punishment
for wl111t bllS been done in a former life;
c\'ery unlucky accident, that happens to a
without his own fault, being looked
upon as u. retribution for former crimes.
'nuswn-lagsdenotcs about whatNon-Bud-
dhists would caU destiny, fale, disaster.
hin--bu braid, tress of hair ((4.
'" curl, lock of ba.ir? Self. pigtail?) M.n-
bu slt-ba or lM-W to make plaits, to plait
the hair; lan-tsdl' ornaments, worn in the
hnir Mil.
ldn-{sa, more a.ccurnt.ely lahfsa (ace.
to Hodgson corrupted from WT) n.
of a style of wriling in use among Nepalese
Buddhists. Itisakindofornamental writing,
used by caligl'llphisls for inscriptions and
titles of books.
z.: Mn-(sICa (Irob. = (SICa, ldn-(slta
c,i-la tim-pa salt which dissolves in
water Thgy.; ldn-(.w:G fla-zrls kUn-gyi br6-
ba J.:yed salt gives l\ relish to el'ery dish
S.g.; !dn-tSlrul Cu salt-water La.; lJn·uII'a·
ba saline, briny Aled.
lab-lxld.1' v. la-bdtil' in la-pv{j.
r..l=f'=f ldb-pa 10 speak, talk, ten, ml-la ma
lab do not teU anybody Mil.; rdzun-
flam lUb-pa fllwt. to lie, to utter a fal,;e.-
1100d; lab fs61.fJa &11.: 'to sp<'ak ullseemly,
to brawl(?)'. -lab t;,dm-pa Self.: to speak
while dreaming, to he delirious. lab ft<Jij·
ba (', *lab !/ydb-U' IV. to talk, 10 chat; */Cd-
lab·ecn- eloquent, fluent of words C., 11'.;
r[Jya,.lr1b l\ great denl of talk, rY.'1a-ldh..cUl<
talkative C., 1V.
Compo ldh-.'1Q LB., -!db-ca* C., lV. talk.
Mil. companion, intimate frielld
Mil. - lab-rdiJltalking unbecomingly &h.
- -ltib-l·u- (prop. hib-sYl'a) 'noise of
tattle, talk, -l.ib-I'a Mn-cf* W. to chal, babble.
i

- -lab-lAb or lalrw., witl. *g!Jab-;:e- to
spollk indistinctly, to mumble; to speak in
one's sloe[); he walks speak.
ing in his sleep, he is a somnambulist IV.
bW-tu a heap of stones in which a
.... pole with little flags is IllStened, esp.
on mountain passes&ld. 198.
lam 1. way, road, 1'9!ld-lam,
sMri-lam (,3., *ma -lam- W. highway,
main road, high-road; yyt!n-laln nn u[I.hill
road, an ascent, fur-lam a dowu.hill road,
ired-lam, 1't;,lw-lama horizontal or It sloping
road, that lends alongside a hill, lam-jJrdll
a nalTow footpath, lam diJg-lIlo a strait path,
lam ya,ispa a broad one; -lam (/i-'me* a
good, easy rond, -lam siJ{j-po* n difficult,
dangerous, road IV.; lam (d,. the rond is
open, may be passed, is not obsW'ucted by
suow etc. Gll'.; lam b!JU-pa Sc/i., -lam M-
ee, sdl-i:e' W: to clear a pll.llJ, to construct
rond; 1'!I!J/l-gal'1/!Ji lam or r.'1ya.{ju,...du
c{jrd-bai lam tl,e way to India Pth.; {lI'Mam
tbe way olthe kuifc, i.e. a cut, slash; $'1·
nr dUd-pr lam$ here is the way for the
smoke, hcrethesmoke escapes lV.- 2. way,
space or distance travelled over, joumey,
lam-au on the road, on the jonrney; bal-
Md-J..'!ji lam lhe journey from Nepal to Ti-
bet Gll'., ldm-du Jitg-pa to set out, to trlJ,\'el,
also: to continue one's journey, lam-P)Jk/.
t;,am-du ziyill-pa Jwj AJ> we had done about
half the way Dzl., ldm-naB ldiJg·pa to retllrn
home from a journey, Rrus-la oU'yj..bai lam-
du when he went to bathe Dd. - 3, mflr,
fig. way 01' manner of acting, in order to
obtain a certain end; (dl\-pai) lam the way
of deli\'erance, \·iz. for Buddhists: from the
cycle oftrfmsmigrations, for Christians: from
sin and its consequences; hence the way
10 hnllpiness, toetemal bliss. The six (some-
times only five) classes of beings (". 091'6-
ba) arc sometimes calied the six ways of
re-birth within the orb of transmigration.
In mystical writings lam bia lU'e of
as the ways lending to sabi:u (q v.)
Thgy.; lum(.gyi) rim(-pa) 0.: 'a degree of
advance; the se\'ernl steps perfec·
tion'; also the title of sundr'.: mystical writ.-
lar
ings;
Z'lb-liiin the
profound
method or
way,
tdiis-ltun
methodofthe
(proper)
ipeAaa ("it'.)
.I///.:
liln-nii'd-rdn-rjt'i
l<un,
col.
m'tdgx-kyi
In in denotes the Uma-doctrine or
mysticism,
v. <ll>i'i-tn<i-
s/,-y,'n-/m
ct'tH-/Hii,
J>i-ii't-jiui\
and
'>;'//-/><>/'
lain three
ways:
tbut of a natural
(sinful) man,
that of the more advanced
lieliever
(but
not: 'the
happy
mean'
6s.)
and
that of the
saint,
or the walk and conver-
sation of the
righteous,
so also in draii-sroit-
<ji
lam the saint's or hermit's course of
life;
tli/i'-ba bcui
Ids-kyi
lam
spyod-pa
to walk
the
way
of
practising
the ten virtues DzL
Comp.
and deriv. ldm-ka
prob.
=
lam,
Idm-ka-na
(another reading ldm-Kar\ by
the road-side DzL lam-mtfan one well
acquainted
with the
road,
a
guide l*th.,
also
fig. lam-gol by-way,
secret
path
Sch.
-
-
In
nt-grogs
fellow-traveller, travelling
com-
panion. lam-rgyud
=
lam 3?
lam-ryyitd
Ina DzL
?xS3> 18,
the five classes of
beings,
cf.
^gro-baYL. lam-rayus-pa
Idm-mJcan.
lam-ccn Schr.
=
rgya-ldm. lam-rtdgs
the
signs
of the
way being nearly
accom-
plished
i.e. the
acquirements
and
perfections
of a saint Mil. lam-ltar-snan
something
looking
like a
road,
but a
spurious, wrong
way
Sch.
lam-stegs
seat,
resting-place by
the
way- side;
also
fig.
Gl>: lam-mdo v.
mdo lam-
dren-pa, lam-snd-pa guide.
-
Idnt-pa,
\.
police-officer
stationed on
high-
roads for
seizing
thieves or
fugitives;
toll-
gatherer.
2.
traveller, wayfarer
Cs. 3. bell-
wether W.
Idm-po
=
lam, lam-po-cc.
1.
highway
Sb.;
also as a
place
for
practising
magic,
nif. 2.
way
to
heaven,
=
*
far-lam*
W.(?) Idm-yig
v.
yi-ge
extr.
lam-log
erroneous Mil. lam-sran
lane,
street.
lar 1.
but, yet, still,
however
Mil.,
Thgy.,
Gli'.' ldr-ni and Idr-na
id.;
occurs
.-carcely any
more in col.
language.
2.*lar*
(or
*
la-re*')
me C. none at
all(?).
las I.
sbst.,
col.
las-ka,
resp. pyag-ld*
W. *tin-le*. 1.
action, act, deed, work,
byl-dor-gyi
las the act of
sweeping
Lex.
;
las-
/>:(ii/, !<tx-</kd>' a
good work,
virtuous
action,
las-nan,
las-
nag
a
bad,
a wicked
action,
frq.;
lus dan
nag
dan
yid-kyi
las
actions,
word-,
thoughts DzL; A/'.s-/y/
riuiin-sium re-
tribution,
reward or
punishment
for human
actions,
iV<|. (cf. A/.s-/y///w-
///v/
below);
Ids-
l.i/i
iin'-lofi mirror of
fate,
mirror foreshad-
owing
future events
Glr.; Ids-kyi /Jtn/i-/>a
a certain vessel used in
religious
ceremonies
Schl.
248;
las
mazdd-pas
because the measure
of his deeds was not
yet
full,
his
destiny
was not
yet
fulfilled Dzl.
;
also destination
in a
general
sense Was.
(282); Ids-kyi Ihdtj-
ma
lus-pa
des in
consequence
of the
yet
remaining
rest of
(unrequited)
works
Sty.;
s/ton-las former
action;
las dban-bc6s-su-
mcd-pa
l*th. an accident which cannot be
prevented;
performance,
transaction,
busi-
ness,
las fams-cad
nus-pa
one who can do
or
perform every thing
Do.;
also the func-
tions of some
organ
of the
body
Lt.; work;
labour,
manual
labour,
*le-ka
fdb-pa*
to
get
work;
las
bijcd-j)a
B., 6\,
*lc-ka
co-ce,
td/'t-
cc* W. to do or
perform
a
work,
to
work,
also of
things:
to
operate,
to
produce
effects
Wdh
; mKar-las-byed-mi
workmen
employed
in
building
Mil.',
dur-las
byed-pa
to attend
to the
graves,
i.e. to
perform
the
sepulchral
rites and
ceremonies;
zan-zin-las
byed-pa
to
carry
on
business,
to
trade,
to traffic Mil. :
Ids-su
as a
task, according
to one's occu-
pation,
trade,
or
business, by
virtue of one's
office,
ex Officio
(nif.)
Mil.;
Ids-su run-bar
duly, rightly, perfectly,
commc
ilfaut
Mil. :
Ids-su
byd-ba
v. below
(extr.).
2. some-
times: secular
business,
*l?-ke
ndn-na* in
business-affairs,
in
practical
life. 3. effect
of
actions,
and in a
special
sense:
merit,
las
zdd-pa
the merits
being over, having
an end
Thgy. (cf. 1, above).
4. the doctrine of
works and their
consequences,
of retribu-
tion,
las mi bden that doctrine is not true
Thgy.
Comp.
and deriv. Ids
-
ka l . col.
work,
labour,
v. above. 2. Sch. and Wts. :
dignity,
rank,
title.
-~
A/.s-.s^// retributive
fate,
=
las-pro.
Ids-ntKan workman
( 's.
las-iyyu-
Jbrds
either for : las dan
rgyu-Jbras
works
and their fruits
(which
in
Thgy.
are divided
into
bsod-nams-ma-yin-pai las-rgyu-Jbrds
sinful
deeds, bsod-nams-kyi las-rgyu-
bras
35
lar
inl(s; .:lib-lam the IlrofouDd method or way,
(dl!&·la1lJ mellus (ui f.)
Mil.; bla-J/I((/.,·(l6-lj,i lam, col. !,;df/l- J.:yi
{filii denotes the Ullin-doctrine or mysticism,
\'. dM-lIlfl; ni,i.OOi, obrili.poi, nud
lam Ihree ways: tbnt of II. nalural
(sinful) 1U:\Il, thnt of the 1U0ro advanced
lJeliover (uut not: 'the huppy meaD' C8.) aDd
thllt of Ihe saint, or the walk ami con,'er-
slltion of the righteous, 50 also ill (1I'(I.1' ...11'(1,i·
yi l(wi tlte saint's or ltermit's course of life;
bi.1li 1d8-kyi lam 8pyod-pa to willI.:
the WilY of practising the ten virtues D::l.
Comp, and deriv. Idm·J.:a prou, _ lam,
Id/ll-J.:a·na (another reading Idlll-far), uy
the road-t::ide D::l, - la7ll4n!fa11 olle well
acquainted with tbo road, a guide Pill" also
fig. -lam'got by·wny, secret path &Ii, -
- lam-!fI'Orfl fellow.traveller, h'lwdling com·
pl\flion, - lanH'fJ!Jild - l«llt 3? lam",!!!}lid
Ilia ));;1. ?S<, 18, the nve I'lnsses of ueing>:!,
cf. = ldm-mfal/.
- laJII-CI71 &lir. _ t'f}ya.ldm. - lam-du[J8
thc signs of the wny being Ilearly accom·
plislJcd i.e. theacl!uirements and perfections
of a !l3int. Mil. -lam-ltal"8I/aJt sometlJing
lookiug like A road, but a spurious, wrong
way &11. -la1lHtCrJ8 seat, resting-place by
the '\'IIy.«ide; also fig. GIl'. - lalJl-mdrJ v.
1/1(10 - tam·od,-ffi-pa, lam.sna-pa gUide, -
M,II1m I. police.officer stationed on higb-
roads for seiziug thicl'cS or fugitiYCs; loll·
gatherer. 2. lraveller, wayfarer IA. 3. bell·
wether w: - IamfO - lam, lalll--po.re. I.
highway Sb.; also as II place for prnctisiug
magic, ni£. 2. way to heaven, - -(ar-lam-
w.(?) -1a1ll.yifJ v. yi-ge extr, - lalll.Jdg
erroneous Mil. - la//WI'ati lane, street.
C-l.::.' 1(//' Lbut, yet, slill, however Mil., l'IIy!J.,
Glt,j 1d1'-71i nud Id'··,la id.j OCCUI'll
sollredy any morc in ool.lllDguagc.- 2,-ia"-
(or -la-r(-)?luI C. uone at all(?).
1a8 T. sbst., col. Ids-ka, rcsp'l;yau-lda
"'i'" 1. action, aet, deed, work,
b!Ji.J6''"Y!Ji las the act of sweeping1.cJ:.; la8-
b:d,i, las-tlkd,' n good work, virtuous action,
la8-i,till, la$-I/dy a bad, n wicked adion,
frq.; Ius dOli ,iag dOli yid-l;/Ji las nctions,
.:>, C
words, t110ughts J):;i.; IU8-k!!i l"IIam-v'Ji'. TO·
triuutioll, rClI'aro or punishment for iluman
actions, frq. (d. la8-"V!JU'"obras below); iti.·
lyi 111i-ion milTor of fllle, mirror foreslHw-
owing future events Glr,; llb.J.:!!i bilm-l'"
II eert.u.io vessel used ill religious ceremonies
ScM. 248jla8lIlazdd-pa.lH:.lcausc theillellsure
of his deeJs was not yet full, !lis destiny
was not yet fulfilleJ 1J::l. j also destination
in n geuero.l seose !Vas. (282); lds-l-yi Uw.g-
1/1" lia.pa det io of }'ct
remnilliog rest of (unrequited) works Sty.;
8lion·laa fonller actioo; IWl dbati·bc&&-su·
lIlM1J« Ptk an occident. wllieli cannot bc
I,re\'cntedj performance, transaction, busi-
ness, las (ams-cad JitU-pa one who ean do
or pcrfol'm every tlJing J)Q,; also tile func·
tions of somo organ of tILe body M.; work;
labour, manual labour, -Ii-I.:" (db-pa-.to gct
work; lasin/ed-pa B., C., ·If-ka Cd-ct, trilt-
iv! to do or perform l\ work, 10 work,
nlso of thilll¥: to operate, to produce effects
H'd,; ; m/;'al'_Ias-bytd-mlworL:menCllilllo}'ed
in uuildiug .Mil.; d/h'-lta bgid-pa tQ attend
to the grtwes, i.c. to perform lhe scpulchral
rites Md ceremonics; zwi·:;bi-las byCd1)U
to curry on business, to trndc, to traffic Mil.;
la8_su t\5 n tnsk, accordiug to ooe's occu·
patioll, trnlle, or busincss, by virtue of one'!;
officc, ex officio (oif.) Nil.; Ids'8Il l'iui.bar
duly, lightly. pcrfectly, il jalle Mil.;
lall-8u b1/f1.oo ", below (cxtr,). - 2. some-
times: secular business, -li-kr flali-uu- in
business-affairs, in pn,cticallife. - a.effect
of /Ictions, aud in II special sense: merit,
zdd-pa the merits being o,'er, luwing!tll cud
'l'I,yy_ (cf. 1, ahove). - 4. the doctrine of
works nud lheir consequencC-'!, of retriLu·
lion, ita 1/1i Well thl\t doctrinc is not true
'l'/'9Y'
Compo and deriv. Ui$· ka I. col. work,
labour, v. nbo\·e. 2. &-1,. lIod lru.: dignity,
rank, title. - las·d·al rctribtlti,'c fllte,-
-l,d-)III.'OIl workmanC8.-II/l.rg!Ju.
obl'd8 for: ta8 da,j rflYU·obl'lUI works
lmd their fruits (whidl in 17IY!J. nrc divided
into NOd_nallll-ma.!!ill_plli las-rgYU-obl'ds
»nful deeds
l
b8dd-liallu-l:yi las.rgyu-.b'·«8
:J:>
546
las
li
virtuous actions, mi-yyo-bai las-rgyu-Jbrds
ascetic
or
mystical
works W
7
.),
or for Ids-
kyi rgyu-
brds: fruits of
works,
retribution
and the doctrine of it.
Ids-sgo
trading-
place,
emporium
Glr. Ids-can \ .
laborious,
industrious Cs. 2.
(v.
above las
3) having
acquired
merit, worthy
Mil. las-ce in C.
used for
expressing probability,
as in W.
O gro
with the
gerund
is
used,
v.
O gro-ba
I,
5
;
mtoit las-ce he will
probably
have seen
it
Mil.nt.;
nas
O
di
Jbor
las-ce as
possibly
I
may put
this
yet aside; Kyod
mi-la-ni
min
las-ce
you
are not
Mila,
are
you?
Mil.
-
las
fog-pa
Sch. : a
person employed,
an
official,
a
functionary. las-rtdgs
Sch.
dignity, rank,
title incident to the office held. las-ddn-
po-pa
v.
dan-po.
las-ddr Sch. :
'parade,
ceremonial'(?) Ids-pa
l.
workman,
labourer
Cs. 2.
Sp.: vice-magistrate
of a
village.
Ids-dpon
overseer of workmen.
las-spyod
works, actions,
way
of
life, byah-cub-kyi
las-spyod skyed-pa
to lead a
holy
life Pth.
-
las
-
Opro
'continuation
,
prosecution
of
works', blessings following
meritorious
deeds,
fcyed
dan na
yah snon-gyi
las-
pro-yod-pa
yin
a bond of connection is formed between
you
and me
by
the merits we
acquired
in
former
periods
of life Pth.
;
- -
happiness,
prosperity
in
consequence
of
good works,
good
luck,
fortunate
event,
opp.
to
lan-cags.
las- brel Glr.
prob.
id.
- -
Ids-mi work-
man. las-mdd
idle, lazy,
inactive. las-
fsdn 1 .
office, post, service,
las-fsdn-du
jug-
pa
to
put
into
office,
to
appoint,
las-fsdn-
nas
Odon-pa
to
put
out of
office,
to dismiss
Cs. 2.
official,
functionary *yul-gyi
le-fsen*
elders of a
village-community C.,
las-fsdn-
paid.
*le-lam-/can*
diligent, industrious,
*le-
mi-ldm-Kan*
idle, lazy
W. las-su
byd-ba
the second case of Tibetan
grammar,
the
dative case.
II.
only
in B. and C. :
postp.
c. accus.
mostly
corresponding
in its
application
to
the
English prepos. from,
used also for ex-
pressing
the
ablative case
(having nearly
the same sense as
nas'):
1.
from, e,g.
deliver-
ing from,
coming from,
often
=
through, e.g.
shining
into a room
through
the window
DzL;
to
hear, get,
borrow a
thing
from a
person
etc.
;
to
call,
to denominate a
thing
from or
after, according
to;
fsdd-las
dpdg-
pa
to define
by
or
according
to measure
S.g. ;
in
quotations: O
dul-ba-las out of
the,
from
the
Dulva,
sometimes also for: in
theDulva;
for
denoting
the material of which a
thing
is made: of
earth,
of
clay etc.;
partitively:
Jbras
de-las sas
fcig
a
part
of this
rice,
slob-
ma-las
ycig
one of the
disciples
DzL;
nai
yul-mi-lasbu-moyod-pa-rnamsthQ girls
that
are found
among my subjects DzL.,
kun-las
Opdgs-pa distinguished amongst all,
more ex-
cellent than all the others
DzL',
hence 2.
than after the
comparative degree
: nd-nih-
las bzan more beautiful than last
year
Mil.
;
with a
negative:
lo bcu-
drug
-las ma lon-
te not older than sixteen
years
DzL;
zld-
ba Ind-las mi sdod I shall not
stay longer
than five months Glr.
; ras-yiig ycig-las
mi
bdog-ste possessing nothing
but one sheet of
cotton cloth
DzL;
nd-las med there is none
besides
myself
Glr.;
brnyas Kyer-ba-las
mi
yon
in the end
you
will
probably
do
nothing
else but
despise
me
Mil.;
in a brief mode
of
speaking
:
ysa-ycig-las rje-btsun
ma mfoii
we saw
nothing
but the
leopard, your
Re-
verence we did not see
Mil.;
mi
pdn-zin
ynod-pa-las
med it is
good
for
nothing,
it
only
does harm Mil. 3. added to the inf.
of verbs it
signifies
not so much from as
after,
from
doing,
i.e. after
doing, nydl-ba-
las lan-ba to rise from
lying,
to rise after hav-
ing
been
lying
down
; during, frq.,
the verbal
root
being repeated,
son-son-ba-las
during my
going
or
travelling
on DzL
;
ndn-du
O gro-
bar
bsdm-pa-las
when
(I)
intended to walk
in,
when
(I)
was on the
point
of
walking
in DzL
Ids-pa
Cs. for
lus-pa,
in
rdg-las-pa
and a few other
expressions
occur-
ring
also in B.
gr
li I.
bell-metal, li-sku, li-fdl, li-fur,
li-
snod an
idol,
a
plate, spoon,
vessel made
of that
metal;
li-ma in
gen.:
utensil,
instru-
ment that is cast of li Glr.
II.
apple,
=
sli C.
III.
li-yul Glr.,
ace. to Was.
(74)
Bud-
546
"irlllOliS nctions, mi-Y!jQ-bai
llscetic or mystiral lV.), or for ld&-
kyi rg!l'l-obl'o!: frtlits of works, retribution
lind tlle doctrinc of it. - IdHyo trading-
place, emporiumGl,.. -ld8-can 1. laborious,
iadustrious (4. 2. (.... aoo\'e la! 3) ha...ing
IlCquired merit, worthy Mil. - lWl-re in C.
used for expressing probability, as in W:
oyro \'I·ith the gerund is used, v. oYro-ba I,
a; mtoJi la8-lfJ be willlJrobably hll\'C seen
it Mil.nt.; fiaa odi jN}' l!n-ee as possibl)' 1
may put this yet aside; fyod m(-la-ni min
IWl-ce yon are not :Milll, are you? Mil. -
la3 (09-1)«&11.: a personemployed,an official,
a functionary. - lWl-rtd[J3 &1,. dignity, rank,
fitle incident to the office held. - lWl-ddli-
po-pa v. dan-po. - l!n-ddl' &11.: 'plU'ade,
eeremonial'(?) I. workman, labourer
Gil. 2. Sp.: vice-magistrllte of a villaA:e. -
lds-dprln overseer of workmen. - l!n-I1J)y6<1
works, actions, way of life, bYali-cub-kyi
las-6py&l sl'!Jed-pa to lead 1\ holy life PUt.
- las - ol}ro 'continuation, prosecutiou of
works', lJIessingsfollowing meritoriousdeeds,
fyed dan ,;a yan !lidn-g!Ji la&-o1jrd-ydd-pa
yin a bond of connection is formed between
)'ou tmd me by the merits we acquired in
former periods of life 1"111.; - happiness,
llrosperity in consequence of good 1I'0rks,
good luck, fortuoalc event, 0Pl" to lan-lags.
- la&-/m}l GIl'. prob. id. - Ms-mi work·
man. - l!n med idle, lazy, inactive. - laa-
1. office, post, service, fcu-(8dn-du Jug-
pa to put into office, to oPI,oint, las-(aan-
tl!n odd'llfa to l'ut out of office, to dismiss
['8. 2, official, functionary "yul-gyi lHsin"
elden of l\ \'ilIuge-communilY C., l!n-fsan-
va id.-"lr-Iam-,ran" diligent, industrious, "lr-
lIIHdm-liaTl" idle, lazy W - l!n-8u b!Ja-ba
tho second ease of Tibetan grammar, the
dative case.
H. only in JJ. and C.: postp. c. aecllS.
mostly correspondiog in it.'1 application to
the English prepos. from, used also for ex-
I,rossing the ablative case (huving nearly
the same SClise lIS n!n): I. from, e.g. deliver-
ing from, coming from, often = through, e.g.
shining into a room through the window
D::l.; to hear, get, borrow n thing from l\
person etc.; to call, to denominate u. t1Jiug
from or alter, according to; (sdd-las dpdy-
fXl to define by or according to measure 8.g.;
in quotations: odUl-ba-las out of the, from
the Duh'a, sometimes also for: ia the Dulnl.;
for denoting the material of which a thing
is made: of earth, of clay etc.; partitively:
/mu dMas sas rUg a pa.rt of this rice, !fW-
ma-laa yag one of the disciples D=l.; nai
yUl-mi_lasbU_mo!Jdd-pa_rrn1.1118 the girls that
are fouod among my subjects D::l" kun-las
o1,ags-pa distinguished amongst all, moreex-
cellent than all the others Dzl.; hence 2.
than nfter the comparative degree: nd-ni;,-
las b::a;, more beautiful Ilmn lost year Mil.;
with a negative: wb?:u-dritg-l!n ma 16n-
ie not older tillm si;deen years Dd.; ::fd-
ba bid-laa 1ni &dod I shill not stay longer
fhan fi ...e months Gll'.; ras-y,ig rNg-las mi
bdOfJ-3u Ilossessing nothing but one shcet of
cotton cloth D::l.; iid-IWl wwd there is nODe
besides myself Gll'.; brn}jas J.yer·oo..l!n 1IIi
yoil in the end yOll will probably do nothing
else but despise me Mil.; in a brief Ulodtl
of speaking: ysa-yi:ig-148 I')e-bfrun ma m(oii
we sow notlJing but the leopard, your Re-
verence we did not see illil.; mi pdn-zi,i
ynM-pa-las mal it is good for nothing, it
only does hnrm Mil. - 3. added to the inC.
of verbs it signifies not so much from ns
alter, from doing, i,e. after doing, nyal-ba-
laaldli-ba to rise from lying, to rise aSter hav-
ing been lying down; during, frq., the vCl'bal
root being repeated, Si,,,i-sQli-ba-laa during my
going or travelling on Dzl.;· ndJi-du ogrd-
bar fAam-pa-la3 when (1) inteoded t() walk
in, when (1) was on the point of wa.lking
in D::l.
lds-po. for lus-pa; in.l'dy-lJ.u-pa
lind a few other c:J;pressl.ons OCCUl"-
ring also in B.
15.l' Ii 1 bell-metal, li-8lrn, li-(al, li-fu/', Ii-
sndd an idol, a plate, spoon, vcsscl made
of that IDelal; Ii-ma in gen.: utensil, instru-
ment thnt is cast of li Gil'.
II. apple, _ C.
lll. U-lJul Glr., ace. to lP.'lU. (74) Bud-
-
547
dhist fountrii'sin northern Tilid.
t-^..
Kln>-
tfii: ace. to others in northern India or
Nepal.
It-L-u-i'd or li-Ka-ra Cs. a sort of
sugar.
jsjrra'
//-/// C/'/r. and
dsewh.,
an
orange-
J
coloured
powder,
ace. to Y,/.s.
red
lead,
minium.
H-fdn Cs.\ '&. of a
province
of Tibet
near the Chinese
frontier', li~f<i//-/>
inhaliitant of that
province.
li-ba
squinting, squint-eyed Sch.,
li-ba
miy squinting eyes
Sclt.
'
ii-tsa-byi
n. of a noble
family
of an-
cient
India,
often mentioned in the
history
of Buddha
DzL, Gyatch.
li-yul
v. li m.
lt-lam
f
Hind.
^rTT,
acc- to Shak-
speare
from the
Portuguese leilam,
auction, public
sale.
q-^n-
li-s-i 1. Ssk.
^f^jf
cloves
Med,
C.
-
2. Hind. ^ cardamom W.
'
fy-bu-migSg.,Sch.:
'malachite'.
tifl
-y
a Ssk- 1-
sign,
mark.
--
2. the
image
of an
enemy
which is burnt in
the
sbyin-sreg
in order thus to kill him
by
witchcraft Lt. 3. membrum virile Pth.
lin-gol-ma
a
large
hornet Sik.
^~'"
;
dangling, waving, floating,
in the
wind
Mil.;
sprin ziy
lift,
byuh-bas
a
floating
cloud?
Mil.;
*liit-lin cd-ce* W. to
dangle,
to
hang dangling, e.g.
on the
gallows,
*lih-liit se-cc* W. to
swing,
to
see-saw; rkait-ldy
pro,
lih-iie
Oduy-pa
an infant
struggling
with
hands and feet Pth.
''-%
r tin-
tog
a film or
pellicle
on the
eye
Med.
l* tl~ba
C">
also
lin-po
or lin
alone,
a
whole
piece,
lin
ycly
of one
piece,
lift.
b$i four
pieces
or
parts,
=
rndm-pa\ ystr-
yt/i
liit-lxt Ts. : a
piece
of
unwrought gold;
dar-liii ('x. a
piece
of
silk;
////-///.s
o
dril-ba
in
park up
into a
parcel,
to roll
up
into one
packet
Sch.
> Un-fse
gratings,
lattice Cs.
Itii-liit v. Hit- in'.
lii<*
a
hunting
or chase in which a
number of
people
are
engaged; dmdy-
l/'/'tx id.
(cf. /cyi-ra); byd-lH'*
<
'*.
falconry,
hawking;
Hits-la
^ro-ba
to
go
a
shooting,
a
hunting;
Hits
Odi'bx-pa
Sch. to
hunt,
to ar-
range
a
hunting party;
Hits
ytoit-ba
to
get
by hunting,
to hunt
down,
Hits btdii-ba what
has been
got by hunting, game
shot or
caught; liiis-pa hunter, huntsman,
Hits-pa-
mo huntress
('*.;
Hitx-kyl hound,
liits-Kra
hunting
falcon or hawk.
\*
liiix-xkor hand-mill W.
(?)
Hits-pa
Sch.:
quite
round or
glo-
bular; dkdr-i>or
lins-te Pth. :
prob.
:
being quite white,
cf. *ldiiis-se* Ld.
quite.
lib, all,
Ld.: *lib du-cc* to
sweep
all to-
gether
with the
hands;
6'.: *Kd-wc lib
kab soil* all
being
covered with snow.
QJ-
lu 1.
knag,
knot,
snag,
=
Odzcr-pa;
*lu-
5
big*
knot-hole Ts. 2 num. for 86.
PJ'TIC"
fa'kuii
(perh.
a
misspelling
for
luys-
koii
?)
crucible for
gold
and silver Sc/i.
CU'cn* njzn'cn"
lu-gu, luy-yu,
diminutive of
-\3
'
N5
luy,
lamb,
frq. ; lu-yu-ryyud
1 .
rope
to which the lambs are
fastened,
or
strung;
hence 2. small
chain, e.g.
watch-
chain,
chain or row of stitches on
knitting-
needles; lace-trimming
and the like.
lu-ba 1. vb. to
COUgh,
to throw
up
phlegm,
to clear the throat. 2. sbst.
the
cough
<
k.
Qt-^r
lu-ma Sb.
pool containing
a
spring,
ground
full of
springs,
lu-ma-can rich
in
springs.
lu-lu the fruit of some
thorny shrubs,
sib-xi-lu-lu
hip,
fruit of the wild rose-
tree,
fser-stdr-lu-lu
berry
of
HippOp&aS.
O^cn-
luy Sheep, *dd-lmj, *i~lug, bsdd-lug*
W.
^
'
sheep
for
slaughter. litg-Kyu
flock
of
sheep. luy-yu
v.
lu-gu. lug-sgdl
sheep's
load
luy-iidl-ba
and
lug-cun-ba
names of medicinal herbs (
X., \\'<lri.
lug-
snyid
Sch. wether.
lug
-f
fig
ram B
., 6'.;
luy-fiig-gi
rtra
dbyibs
like a ram's horn
\\'tl/'i.;
>-<jya-ni-luy-(uy
a
Saiga
ram
S.y.
35*
,Jilin countrin in nortbtem Tibel, eliI"
lten; fu:e. to otbt:n ill norlhtern Indi. or
NI'I,·I.
Ii-J:a-ro or li·l!a-ra U. • 50rl of
sugar.
li·frl Gir. and te6ell'b_. IU\ orange-.
colollred powdter, ace. to Lu.
red lc!nd, minium.
';"(die CL 'D. of Apro\ illu of
near the Chinese (routier', /i.(u.rpt.
inh.llitll.nt of that province..
..q' 1i-6a squinting, squint-eyed &1•., 1i-6«
Ylllg squ.iDtiog eyes &/1.
Ii-/Ia-byl n. of:l. noble fl\.mily of 11.11-
dent India, often mentioned in tbe
history of lllludhn D:I., G!Jatcll.
{i-!JId v. Ii HI.
li.la1ll, Hilld. oce. to Slink·
spenre from tile Portuguese kilalll,
auction, public sale.
c:r-1 li-.ii 1. &sol cloves .lied, C. -
2. lJind. c.nrdamom 11':
·litj..w-migS9-,&h.: 'malnchile'.
lii••ga &J;. 1. sign, mark. - 2. the
imAge of an eDemy .. hich is bunlt in
lbe JJyin4ri-g in order thus to kill him by
,.,.itebl;raU lA. - 3. membrum lirile I1J..
-
li"-!lfJl-m4 a large hornet a.
li>i·,;e dangling, waying, lIoaling, in the
wind AIiL; 'P"'n liir byuir-bm.
Boating donuT ".Iii.; ·/iii-li':' W: to
dangle, to bnng dlUlgling,e.g.on the
·'i;'·Ii" W-Ct-lY. to S¥l1ng, tosee-saw;rl:a".'Jy
Pr4 liie·tij .dufI1HJ an infaot struggling wilh
bl\nd;1 and feet HI..
lili·tdtJ or lili.fdy a film or pellicle
on the eye
It.i-ba G., !\Iso li,j.po or tili alone, a
whole piece, lill reiy of olle piece, liie
b:::i four pieces or parls, _ mdtll.p"j til,...
!JlIi li,:,../)ul.•. : 1\ Iliece of uowrought gold;
dar-I;,j o. 1\ of silk j lili-giA eddl-IM
to pock ul' iotA>" parcel, to roll up into one
flAcket &h.
. -
Iiit·(1t gratings, lattice C,.
M7
!iii, a hunting or chait in whicb "
nuulherof I"'Opleare eugllged;dllUJrr
lin' ill. lya.ra); by(i.liil, CI. r..Ieoory,
h.wking; lbtHU .!Jrd-ba to go • t.booLing,
• bunLing; liu &4. to hunL, to u-
nUlge" buoting puty; Ii,¥, ,,..bu to get
by Iiunliug, to hunt down, lin' 6ta,,;.lJa what
lIaS beeu b<{)t b)' hunting, game shot or
CDught; Uit..-pa hunter, !luou;lulu,/iia-pel_
mo huntress (k.; li"C"!Ji bouod, Iin.·l!ra
buoting falcon or hawk.
!i>iNl:Jr haud·miU 1V. (?)
li,j'-pa &1..: quite round or glo--
bular; dl·u"-}IOI" W,,·t, PII•. : proll.:
being quite white, cf. e,di,;,_,tf 1.,<1. quile.
lib, all, Ld.: elib du-;,- to sweep .11 to·
getber with thc IllllJds; C: elf
u
-1C! fib
J..ah SOlie all being covered \\·;th soow.
Ef lu 1. knag, knol, snag, - _ckir-ptJ; e/u•
big
e
1•. - 2 nUIP. (or 86.
EftTF· /N.-J.·uiI (peril. IL miSl>pelling ftor lli!Is-
10. 1)Cl"Ilcible for gold aDdsi'''er h.
1,,!/"flU, diwnutiye of
- ..... ' ..... ..... Illg, lamb. frq.; l.-gu.-rvyWd
I. rope to ll·hie!1 liIe lambs ILre Uask'Ded, or
:.trung: hence 2. small chain, es. lTateh·
chain, chain or row of .Ute!le15 on knitting.
needles; J2ee.trimmi0R' IlDd the
r..r:;r U;. ba 1. \·b. to cough, t.o tbrow up
..... phlegm, to ckar the tbroaL - 2. sbst..
the cough C..
[..lila SO. pool containing. spring,
ground full of lillriogg, liJ-wlfH..'an rich
in springs.
lil-I" the fruit of .0IU(I thorny shrubs,
iib--ii_lu_Iu hip, fruit of tlte wild rose.
Iree, (I¢r·3Wr·llt-!u berry of lIippophuc.
E:I:f].lug sheep, -I/d--lllg, iJi.lug, blJd-lffff lV.
s.heep for ..laughter. - lifg·l.lyu flock
of sheep. - fity-g" \". lil.gtl. - 1U1J·Ilfld./.
loud - lUfJ"'ilJI« .Ild
DAmes of meclicinallit:rLi GI., Jrdir. -lug-
IP,yi/1 &1.. wether. - IIJfI·(;'g ram 11, Cj
't41/-(itg.!Ji IYQ. db!filc like a ram' hom
U;dri.; rll ·/cuj-filg a Saiga raID S.g. -
".
548
"r
lug-pa
lun
lug
-ton Sch. wether.
lug -pa
1. sbst.
shepherd,
keeper
of
sheep
Ma. 2. to stick
the heads
together
like timid
sheep,
to be
sheepish
in behaviour Ma.
lug-mig
n. of
a flower Med.
lug-mur
and
lug-rtsi
me-
dicinal herbs.
lug-tsdgs
a
sheep-skin
with
little wool on it Ld.
lug-rd sheep-fold,
pen, sheep-cot. lug-ru
ram's
horn;
D. of
several
species
of Pedicularis.
*lug-log*
sheep-skin
Ld.
_._..
lug-pa
I. sbst. and
vb.,
v. sub
lug.
-
II.
vb.,
to
give way,
to fall
down,
of.
rlug-pa
Ts.
Ojm&r
lu
y
s ^ tne
casting, founding,
of
metal,
lugs-su blug-pa
Glr., *lug-la lug-pa*
col.
(7.,
to
found,
to
cast; lugs-ma
a
cast,
rgya-gdr lugs-
ma an
image (statue, idol)
cast in India Glr. 2.
way, manner, fashion,
mode, method, bod-kyi lugs
su
gyis sig
Glr.
make it
according
to the fashion of
Tibet;
nai
lugs-kyis
bon
byed dgos you
must live
according
to
our,
i.e. the Bon-fashion
Mil.;
bsam-ftdn-la yod-pai lugs-su byas
he
feigned
meditation Glr.
;
diyin-pai lugs-su byed they
speak,
act,
make it
appear,
as if it
really
were so Tar.
184, 21;
na-rdn-gi lugs-kyi
mKdr-las
my way
of
building,
what I call
my style
of
building Mil; opinion, view,
judgment, way
of
proceeding, Kyed-rdn-gi Ugs-
la
according
to
you,
if we followed
your
advice Mil.-
cos-lugs religion,
i.e. a certain
system
of faith and
worship, pyinanynyis
cos-lugs gan
bzan which of the two
religions,
the Brahman or the Buddhist be the better
one
Glr.;
established
manner, custom, usage,
rite, cd-lugs
mode of
dress,
fashion,
cos-lugs
religious rites,
rgyd-lugs
Chinese
(or Indian)
manners,
bod-
lugs
Tibetan manners
etc.;
rdn-lugs
one's own
way, yzdn-lugs
other
people's way
or
manners;
rdn-lugs-la ynds-
pa (=
ran-sa
Odzin-pd) Glr.;
seems to be
only
another
expression
for that Buddhist
virtue of
absolute indifference to all
objects
of the outer
world;
lugs
is also
use,d
con-
cretely, meaning
the
adherents of a custom
or
religion,
hence
=
sect,
school, religious
party,
denomination,
mdo-lugs
follower of the
Sutras,
the Sutra
sect,
snags-lugs
a follower
of the
Tantras,
the Tantra
sect;
in a
spe-
cial sense :
lugs ynyis
the two
principal
clas-
ses with
regard
to
religious life, Ojig-rten-
gyi lugs
the laical or
profane class,
laymen,
cos-kyi lugs
the clerical or sacred
class,
priests
Cs.; lugs-kyi
that which relates to
manners or
morals,
ethical Cs.
(v.
As. Res.
XX, 583).
3. in
conjunction
with a verbal
root or with the
genit.
of the inf. it often
corresponds
to the
English
termination
ing
as:
Iddn-lugs
the
rising, getting up, ^gro-
lugs
the
going, sdod-lugs
the
sitting Mil.,
<
~
r
ffydl y
n
~
1U
9
S S0
9
S sol
-
O
debs
-
kyi
zu-
ba the
(possibility of) getting
into difficul-
ties and other reasons for
inducing
him to
postpone (his setting out) Mil.;
bsam-yds
bzens-lugs
bris he described the
building
of
Sam-ye
Glr.;
med-lugs
the
(circumstance
of)
not
having Mil.;
yin-lugs
the
condition,
State
Mil.;
dd-lta
nd-lugs
ci-ltar na as to
your present
illness,
in what does it con-
sist?
Mil.;
fsogs-nas skydn-bai litgs-su yod-
pa they joined
in
educating them,
they
edu-
cated them
together
Mil.;
it is also added
to
adjectives: ce-lugs greatness
Mil.
"?]"
lugs-ma
v.
lugs
1.
lun 1. 1. a
strap, slung
over the shoulder
or round the
waist,
for
carrying things;
handle,
ear
(curved),
of
vessels,
baskets etc
,
different from
yu-ba
a
straight
handle,
hilt.
2. 'foot-stalk of fruits'
6s.; It/n-fag
Cs.:
a
rosary, string
of
beads, suspended by
the
girdle.
II. Ssk.
^mffi,
=
bka,
used of words
spoken by
secular
persons
commanding
re-
spect: pas yndn-bai
lun fob-nas
obtaining
(his)
father's word of
permission
Dzl
,
lun
Jbyutl
an order is issued
(by
the
king) Glr.,
tu-ru-lka-la lu>'i len
dgos-pa being obliged
to
accept
orders from, the Turuskas
Tar.;
more
frq.
:
spiritual exhortation, admonition,
instruction,
lun
yndh-ba
to
give
it
(some-
times
only:
to
pronounce
forms of
prayer
etc. before
devotees);
lun
ytoh-ba id.,
*luii
tan-Ken*
instructor, teacher,
admonisher
C.;
lun
ston-pa,
also lun-du
ston-pa
to
instruct,
to
give spiritual precepts^
also with
regard
'"
luy-foli &!J. wether. - MfJ-pa I. sbgt.
sllcl'hcrd, keeper of sheep Ma. 2. to stick
the bends together like timid sheep, to be
sheepish in behaviour Ma. - [uY-'I1l(f/ n. of
a flower Med. - [ug-mltl' and lug-rtsi me-
ilicin31 herbs. -[ug-t8uf/8 a sh(lcp-skin with
little wool on it Ld. - lw,rra sheep-fold,
pen, sheep-cot. - lug-loU rlllll's horn; D. of
several species of - ·lug-ldft
sheep-skin Ld.
iI'flopa I. sLat. lIui! vb., \.. suL luy.
..... - n. vo., to give way, to fall down,
cr. 1'bi!J-pll
lugs ,I. llie casting, fOllnding, of metal,
lUgwu bilig.pa GIr., -litg-la blfl-Pu·
col. C., to found, to cast; lUfj8-mu a cast,
1'!J!JU-!JI/I' lUys-ma an image (statue, idol)
cast in Iodin Glr. - 2. way, manner, fashion,
mode, method, b6d-kgi lllfP 814. Y!lU i>ig Gl,..
mnke it according to tile fashion of Tibet;
Tiui bifJa-kyis lxm bytd ago, you must lil'c
according to our, i.e. the Bon-fasllion .Mil.;
usum-rtdn-la y&l-pai LUgs-$U U!lw. lie feigned
meditntion Gb.. j di fJin-pai lligs-3U b!Jed they
speak, act, makc it nppettr, as if it really
were so Tar. 184, 21; iW-rlili-!Ji lUfJ'-kfJi
my way of building, what I call
my style of building Mil.; opinion, view,
way 01 proceeding,..l'yrd-rdlj-gi 1I'gs-
la according to you, if W6 followed your
advice .Alil.; religion, i e. a certain
system of fllith and worship, liyi naljl'n!lu
cds-lugs galj uzalj whiell of the two religions,
the Bruhlllnn or Buddhist be the better
one Glr.; established manner, custom, lISage,
rile, cd-lug, mode of dress, fashion, cd3.1ufJ8
religious rites, 1'fJ!ld-lugs Chinese{or Indian)
manners, OOd-lufJ8 Tibetan manners etc.;
one's own way, other
Ileople's way or IDllIlncrs; rdil-IUfls-la rnds-
pa (= cdzin-pa) Glr.; seems w be
only another expression for that Buddhist
virtll6 of absolute indifference wall objects
of the outer world; is abo us'\d con-
cretely, meaning the adherents of a custom
or religion, hence = sect, sehool,
party, denomination, mdo.lugs follower of the
Sutras, the Sut!a sect, a followcr
""'. { .
"d.... Ult •
of the TantrllS, the Tnutm sect j in a sl'e-
cial sense: IU!J3 myis the two principal clas-
ses with regard wreligions life, Jig-rUn-
g!li the laical or profunc class, laymen,
c63-kyi lugs tho clerical or sacred class,
priests Cs.; lugs-J.:yi tliat which relat.es to
mannol'S or momls, ethical (v. As. Hes.
XX, 583). - 3. in conjunction with l\ verbal
root or with the gCllit.. of the in£. it often
corresponds to the English termination ing
liS: ldd,i-lu!J3 the rising, !;Otting up, <111'6-
the going, the sitting Mil.,
- 1'[Jydl IlOfjt i6l- cdebs - kyi M-
ba the (possibility of) getting inw difficul-
ties nnd other reasons for indncing Jlim to
postpone (his sctting out) Mil.; lnam.yd3
b:in3-lllgs urn he described the buildiug of
Sam-ye Gb·.; mM.-lugs the (circumsfance
of) not Mil.; yin-lugs the condition,
state Mil.; du-lta (:i-ita,. na as to
yonr present illness, in what does it con-
sist? .Mil.; lug3-8u ydd-
pa thcy joined in edncating them, thc)' euu-
cat.ed them wgethcr lJil.; it is also added
to adjectives: greatness Mit.
lUg3--ma v. lugs 1.
btli 1.1. a strap, slnng O\'cr the shoulder
or round the waist, for carrying things;
handle, ear (curved), of vessels, baskets etc.,
different from yu../)a a straight handle, hilt.
- 2. 'foot·stalk of fruits' ClI.; li"j.(ag 01.:
(). rosary, string of beads, suspended by the
girdle.
11 Ssk. = Ma, u.sed of words
spoken by secular persons commanding re-
Sllect: )'1l/in-bai lilli (dlJ-nm obtaining
(bis) fatber's word of permission Dzl, l/lli
cbflU" an order is issued (by the king) Gll'.,
tle-ru,-a:a-Ia lUll len d[loo-pa being obliged
to accept orders from the Turuskas Tar.;
marc frq.: spiritual exhortation, admonition,
instruction, lUlt )'nuli-ba W givc it (some-
times only: to pronounce forms of prayer
etc. before devotees); luri }'wiJ-ba id., -lwi
tali-l4n- instructor, teacher, admonisher C.;
lwi 3t6n-pa, also lU,t-du to'instruet,
to give spiritual precepts, also with regard
Iltn-f.i;/
to
supernatural
voices etc. Mil.
;
esp.
to
pro-
phesy, predict,
to reveal
secrets,
with termin. :
iln-ii<i-xt-l<t
i/i'ii-jutr
Init l>*t<tn it is
prophe-
sied tli:ii it is
Danasila,
the
prediction
re-
lates to
D., sans-rgyds-su
liin-bstan-to he
has received a
prediction
concerning (his
obtaining)
the
Buddhaship
Dzl.;mdaii
mL-a-
]'n'os lun-bstan-pai skyes-bu
de the man
foreshown
yesterday by
the Dukini
Mil.,
hence
litn-ma-bstan-pa
unheard
of,
unpre-
cedented Mil. nt.
(Cs.
also: to
demonstrate,
litii-du brtdn-du
yod-pa demonstrable?);
Itiii
^gdd-pa
Cs. to
make,
to
establish, pre-
cepts;
luit
Odren-pa
Cs. to
cite,
to
quote,
an
authority
Tar.
210, 2; lun-gi rjes-Jbrdn
Was.
(274)
those who stick to the letter
(opp.
to
-rigs-Kyi rjes-brdn
to the real
quality,
viz. the
spirit);
luh-bstdn
exhortation, pre-
cept, commandment,
lhai luh-bstdn
bsdd-pa
to communicate the
precept
of the
god Tar.,
. . . zes
byd-bai
lun-bstdn
byun
there came a
divine order or
prophecy
of this
purport,
to this
effect;
hence
lun-ston-pa prophet
Chr. Prot.
lun-fdg
v. above lun I.
lun-pa
1.
valley,
ri-luh mountain and
valley;
lun- cm a
large valley,
lun-
cuh or
luh-prdn
a little
valley ; lun-Kog
Sch. :
'the
cavity
of the
valley';
lun-sto/i a
desolate,
a
solitary valley,
as a fit abode for
hermits,
frq.
2.
furrow, hollow, groove, e.g.
on the
surface of a stick
Mil.,
of the liver Med.
lud
manure, dung, lug-lud sheep's dung;
lud
^grem -pa
to
spread
manure
(on
fields)
6s.,
lud
Odren-pa
to
carry
manure
(to
the
fields) 6s.,
*gydb-ce,
tdb-ce,
tdn-ce*
W. to manure the
ground;
lud-Ku
dung-
water;
lud-ddn
dung-hole; lud-puh dung-
hill; litd-Jbu grubs
etc. in a
dung-hill.
lud-pa
1. sbst.
phlegm, mucus, mag-
l<i'<'J-gi
lud
-pas
bkan-stc full of
phlegm,
matter and blood
Glr.;
esp.
in the
organs
of
respiration: lud-pa cig bskyiii'-bas
throwing up
some
phlegm
Glr.;
liid-pa
lu-
ba to throw
up by coughing Dzl., sbnd-pa
by sneezing S.g.; litd-por spittoon, spitting-
box 6'. 2.
vb.,
to boil over cu
lud-pas
549
the water
boiling
over
Dzl.;
m(*o
lud-pa
the
running
over of
lakes,
inundation Mu. :
cu liid-nas lud-nas bkdn-ba
yin
it
filled,
by
the water
rising higher
and
higher.
^ums a ^a^ usec^ ^ a me^'ca^
cure;
fomentation.
l"m
~
bi
>
lum
-M~,
- of a
queen
,
and of a
grove
called after
her,
situated in the north of
India,
where Buddha is said to have been
born.
ZMS,
also
lus-po, body,
lus sd-la brddb-
pa
to
prostrate
one's
self,
frq.,
lus
ston-pa
to show one's
self,
to
appear,
to
make one's self
visible,
as
gods Dzl.,
and
in a similar manner lus is often used for ex-
pressing
our reflective
verbs,
when relat-
ing
to
physical processes,
cf.
sems;
lus-kyi
dbdn-po
the sense of
feeling,
in as far as it
resides in the skin and the whole
body
of
man
Med.;
rgydl-poiydun-brgyud (or rgyal-
bu)
lus -la
yod
I bear a
prince
under
my
bosom Glr.
;
lus
smdd-pa
to
violate,
to rav-
ish
Pth.;
lus
^grub-pai fog
-ma the
begin-
ning
of the
development
of a
body
as em-
bryo
Wdn.;
grub-pa
lus v.
grub-pa;
lus-la
cdgs
-
sin from love of life Dzl.
;
lus dan
srdg-la
sdo-ba to risk or stake one's life
Dzl.
;
mi-lus
fob-pa
or bldn-ba to be born
as a human
being,
lus-ndn
(to
be
born)
as
an
animal,
or also as a woman
Mil.;
often for the whole
person
of a man : brdn-
gyi
lus
kyan dpon-du <gyur
even a servant
may
become a master
S.g.; lus^kyis
mi
bzdd
-
par nya-ndn-gyis yduns-te
is used
(Dzl. 9&9, 3)
of an
exclusively
mental suf-
fering
or
infirmity.
Jn
mysticism
and
speculative
science several
expressions
are
employed which, however,
donotdifferrnuch
in their
import: sgyu-lus, ^d-lus, bde-^gro
mfo-ris-kyi lus;
rig-pa Odzm-pai
lus
(Tar.
56, 20), yid-kyi
lus
(frq.),
faf
nO<
the
immaterial
body
which is enclosed in the
grosser
material
frame, accompanying
the
soul in all its
transmigrations
and not de-
stroyed by
death
(Kopp.
I., 66), yid-kyi
lus
might
be rendered
by 'spiritual body'
;
an-
other
explanation given by
Lamas is: the
lllli-(ug
to sUltenlnturll.l voices ele. Mil.; up. to pro-
phesy, predict, to reveal secrets, witli lermin.:
yin-pat' luli wt«lt it is prophe-
sied that it is Danl\sI1a, the prediction re-
latCi to D., 8a,i.-IT!ylU-3U INn-lIttan-to he
Ims received a prediction eoneCJ1ling (his
obtRining) the BuddbftSl.ip D::l.; nulmi mkJ_
oJiroc .kyi.-bu de the mao
foreshown yesterday by tho Dokini Nil.,
hence Mn-ma-wtall-pa unbel\NI of, uflpre-
ecdented Mil. m. 1\180: to demonstrate,
1Il1j-du lwtdn-du yOd-pa demonstmble?);
Iuti o!IJd-lla Q. to make, to eSlnblish, pre-
cepts; llUj odrin-pa G. to cite, to quote,
no l\utlJority Tar. 210, 2; lIi1i-gi
lI'a•. (274) those wbo stick to the letter
(opp. to rrg.-flyi r)er-brli.'j. to the real quality,
,·ir.. the spirit); lUlj..o,tdtt exhortation, lire-
ccpt, commandment, thai b«Jd-pa
lo communicate the precept of the god 'lar.,
... Zef b!ld-bo.i Iwj-b8tdn uyu,i there came n
diviae order or Prollbcey of tbis purport,
to this elTect; hence lUI1-Bwn-JJa prophet
(''hr. Prot.
lU'l-M!! v, above lu,i I.
r.:'t:::r valley, ,.i-1I,,' mount;,in nnd
valley; lw,-&n" Io.rgc volley, lUli-
(u,l n little \'a1ley; luh-I.'dfJ &h.:
'the cavity of the volley'; lUli-3to,i adesolnle,
n solitary \'"l1e)', as /l. fit a.bode for bermits,
frq. - 2. furrow, hollow, groove, e.g. on the
surfuce of a stick Mil., of the li\'er Met/.
e=)' lud manure, dung, lug-IUd sheep's dung;
Iud dJdm - pa to sprend lDanure (011
fields) C•. , Iud odrbl-pa to carry mllllure
(lo the fields) (,I" "!l!Jdb-fe, Uib-ce, td,j·re"
11': to mnuure the gronnd; Iud-l.'u dung-
water; lud-do,j dung-hole; b«J.ftitn duug-
hill; lNd-obu grubs etc. in a dung-bill.
..q' llld.pa ]. sb:>l. phlegm, mucus, mag"
J..'rug - fJi IUd - paf bkali - Bte full of
phlegm, matter and blood Gb·. ; esp. in the
organs of respimtion: ltidopa i:ig bsJ.1/ur-!JM
throwing uil some phlegm Gir.; [u(l-pa iIi-
ba to throw UII by coughing D::l" sbrid-pa
by sneer.ing S.y.; iUd-jor spittoon, sllitting-
box C. - 2. vb., to boil over Cu U:1bf
the water hoiliag over D:l,; m40 lrid-I'a
tile runniog oyer of lake., inundation Mo..;
en Uul-naf litd-1lU3 bkli.,j-ba it filled, by
the WAter rising higher and higher.
IU'"B a bath used llolI a mediul cure;
fomentation.
MIII·bi, lIim-bi.tli, o. of II.
queen, and of 1\ ,:;rove
cfliled after her, sHunted in the north of
India, where nuddba is said to h;l\'e
born.

.t6n-pa to show one's sclf, to APIlenr, to
make one's self visible, as gods D:l., I\nd
in a similar manner 1m is often used for eJ;-
pressing our reOeeti\"c verbs, whcn relat-
ing to phrsicnl processes, cr. MIllS; lit.-X'!!;
dbd>i-po tile sense of feeling, in ns fnr as it
resides in the skin and the whole body of
man Med.; royul-pqi rdu,i-brg!Jud (or ruyaI-
bu) Un-la yod 1 beo.r a prince under my
bosom Gir.; lru amad-pa to viOlate, to rav-
ish lU$ o!IrUb-po.i (og-71la the
Ding of tile de\'elopment of II. body ns em-
bryo Wdn.; grtib-pa lU8 v. Ul"lib-pa; bi.-la
'tdfJB Mn from love of life D:l.; lU8 dan
srog-la fdd-ba to risk or stllke one's life
D::l.; mj-lU$ (db-pa or bld,i-ba to be born
as a human being, lUf-nd'l (to be born) liS
lion lUIimnl, or also ns a wOlDnn _
often for tIle whole person of a IDJ\ll:
gyi /In k!lml dp6l1-du o!I'Jur e\'en a serVl\nt
roilY becolDe n mnster S,g.; lUI - J.'!!i. JIli
b::Jd - par 7Iya-nli.n-f/lJi! rdu1i.- te is used
(Dd. ?::;:;?, ,of IUl exclusinly ment.'11 suf-
fering or infirmity. - In mysticism lind
speculative science sc\'cml expressions nre
employed which, however, donot differ much
in their import: 'f/lJli-llU, ";(i-lIn, lxle-dJ''O
m(Q..rl,-X'!!i lu.; '''gopa od::in-pai llU (Tal'.
56,20), yid-X,!!i lu.J (frq.), fli!l"1J<)(, the
immaterial body whiclt is enclosed in the
gf06scr material frnlUe, nccomplmying the
soul in lIli its lrnnsmigmtions and not de-
stroyed by den.th (Kvpp, I., 66), yid-Jqflill'
migbt be fClIdered by 'spiritu:u body';
other e,;pIRnAt.ion gi\'en by Lamas is: the
O.
550
tegs-pa
body
which exists
only
in our
imagination
(yid);
in that case it would be identical with
sgyu-lus.
Comp. lus^gydgs
a fat
body
Cs.,
lus-rid
a
mean, thin,
lean
body,
lus- shorn a thick
stout
figure,
lus-ri/i
a
long
tall
body,
lus-
futi a short
body
6s.
:
lus-can
having
a
body,
hence as sbst.
=
sems-can
creature,
being,
lus-can
kun-gyi yid-du ^oii
a favourite
of
every
creature
Stg.
--
lus-stod
upper
part
of the
body,
lus-smdd lower
part
of the
body.
lus-boits the bulk of a
body.
-
lus-bydd
form of the
body.
lus-med hav-
ing
no
body, incorporeal, ghostlike, ghostly,
lus-med-pai
skad a
ghostly
voice Mil.
lus-smdd v. lus-stod. lus-zuhs v. sub
yzuns.
QTxr^r
lus
-pa,
C. also Ids
-pa,
to remain
behind or at
home,
bod-du zld-ba
ynyis
to remain in Tibet for two months
Glr.;
to be
remaining
or left
DzL;
to be for-
gotten, omitted,
left behind
; yyen-du lus-pa
to remain
uppermost, floating
to remain
standing, sitting, lying, e.g.
*Ka lus-sa mi
dug*
W. the snow does not
remain,
will soon
melt
away;
lus-
par byed-pa Pth.,
lus-su
Ojug-pa,
*lus
cug-ce*
Ld. to leave
behind,
to leave a
remainder; ma-lus-par entirely,
wholly,
without
remainder,
without
excep-
tion, Ogro-ba
ma- lus or mi-lus
Mng.,
all
creatures without
exception;
md- lus
-par
prob.
also:
surely, undoubtedly,
at
any rate,
in
any case,
ni f.
lus-ma, rjes-lus, pyir-
lus, Ihdg-lus
Cs.
remainder, balance,
residue.
QT
le 1. a small not cultivated
river-island
C.,
=
glin-ka
and zal. 2. v. leu.
3. W. a word
expressive
of
civility
and re-
spect,
and added to other words or sen-
tences,
like Sir! and Madam! in
English,
*zu-U*
good
day,
Sir! it is also added to the
word sa-heb
gentleman,
and then
sa-heb-le
is about
equivalent
to: honoured
Sir,
dear
Sir. 4. num.: 16.
h-brffan, leb-rgdn
l.Med.
frq.,
Lex.
=
^ saffron,
whereas Cs. has:
'poppy, le-brgan-rtsi
the
juice
of
poppies, opium,
le-brgdn-ghi
me-
tog
the
poppy flower,
le-brgdn-ghi Jbrds-bu
poppy-seed',
and Sch. adds:
le-brgan-mdog
OJq
w
A5*
1
poppy-coloured,
light-red,
and he translates
also
le-brgdn
Dzl.
\SV
V
, 1, by 'poppy-colour-
ed', although
it is mentioned there
amongst
various
species
of Lotus. But in W.
poppy
and
opium
are
usually
called
by
the Hindi
name
^r,
pirn',
neither in W. nor in Sik.
did I meet with
any body,
who knew the
significations given by
Cs. and
Sch.,
but
only:
2.
diapered design
of woven
fabrics;
thus also Mil. :
le-brgdn dmdr-poi )'dan
a
flowered
carpet, le-brgdn ^ol-ber
Pth. a
flowered dress with a train.
Qrx'
le'-na the soft
downy
wool of
goats
'
(esp.
those of
Jangthang)
below the
long hair,
the shawl wool
;
fine woolen-cloth.
!*
le-ma v. leu.
~% appendix, supplement,
addition
PTPH*
le-lun Cs.:
consequence;
Sch. : re-
buke, reprimand, reproof,
and le-
Idn-pa,
le-ldn bdd-ba to
blame, rebuke,
re-
prove;
le-ldn-can Cs.
consequential,
im-
portant (?).
s
"
le-ldm-niKan \.las-ldm-mfcan.
Oj'Sf
le-lo,
le-lo-nyid indolence, laziness,
tardiness,
le'-lo ma
byed cig
don't be
lazy! Glr.;
ycig
le-lo
byds-nas
as one
(of
them)
had been
lazy
Dzl.
;
le-los
Jlyer
he
is overcome
by
laziness
Mil.;
le-loi
rjes-su
Ogro-ba
to be
given
to laziness
Ld.-Glr.\
le-lo-ca/i
lazy, indolent,
slothful. *le-sol*
W.
=
le-lo.
legs-pa B~>
legs-po
and -mo C.
(cf.
also no.
3)
1.
good, serving
the
purpose,
with
regard
to
things;
adv.
legs-
par well, duly, properly, legs-par O
fsol-ba
to
search,
to
investigate accurately Glr.;
bsu-ba
legs-po gyis
do care for a
proper
re-
ception! Glr.; legs-par gyur cig (Schr.
adds
Ihjed-la) may you prosper! Sch., legs -par
^.o/ts-so
you
are welcome
Sch.; happy,
com-
fortable, bdag legs-na
when I am well off
(opp.
to
nyes-na) Do.; legs nyes ston-pai
me-lon mirror of
fate,
of the future Glr.
;
/o(-fog)
legs(-pa) B.,
*lo
lag-mo* W.,
a
rich,
healthy, happy year;
ci Itar
byds-na legs
which is the best
way
of
doing
it?
Glr.,
550
lJady which exists only in our imagination
(!jid); in tLnt cnse itwoulu be identical wit"
!{lyu-lua.
Compo ltu-'JY1/agt n fat body C,., flU-rid
a meM, Ibin, lCllIl body, llt8·,bQm n thick
stout figure, [w;.-riil II. long tall body, lU6-
(un n 811011 body Os. - IUB-can ho.viog n
body, hence as sbst. - ,blls-i'an creature,
being, lUs·can t1m-flY; yM-du ..QJi n favourite
of c\'cry creature Stf!. - lUi! - sled upper
part of the body, lm-amdd lower part of llie
Lody. - {u,-/x)", the bulk of a l>ody. -
luJ-byJd form of tbe body. - lla·med hav_
ing no body, incorporeal, ghostlike, ghostly,
lwrmld-JKli skad n gllOstJy voice Mil. -
lru-amtid \'.lU,Htdd.-[us-zlin$ v.sub )';;1(1;'.
lUa-pa, C.I\I5O flh-pa, to remain
behiPll or at home, bOd-du ::M-ba
ynlJis to remain in Tibet for two months
GIl'. j to be remaining or left D::l.; to be for·
gotten, omitted, left bellind; }'gbi-du ll'18-pa
to remain uppermost, to remnin
standing, sitling, lying, e.g. ·fa lus-sa mi
du!f W. the snow docs not remain, will soon
melt awny; lUs-1Jar ligtd-pa Ptk, lUs·su
.,)ug-pa, ·lus hig-Ce" Ld. to lenve hehind,
to leave n remainder; entirely,
wholly, without remainder, witl.out excel'·
tion, o!Jl"fi-ha 1IIa-1I's or mi-ius .A/,ig., nil
crentures without exception; ma-ilU-par
prob. also: surely, undoubtedly, nt nny ratc,
in any case, ni f. - bls-ma, 1);S-lus, Jig/t-
iWl, llt.ilg-lus Cs. remainder, balance, ruidue.
a:r It I. '" gmnll not culti\-uted river·island
G.; '= gl"'.1.:a and zal: - 2. v. leu. -
;3. IV. n word Cl:pressive of civility Dnd re-
spect, and added to other word:{ or sen-
tl'nces, like Sir! nnd Mndam! in English,
·zu-M" good day, Sir! it is also lidded l.O the
word sa-11th gentleman, and then sa-/,eb-ie
is nboot equivalent to: honoured Sir, denr
Sir. - 4. num.: 16.
le-brfllln, 1. Mtd.
frq., IA::!:. = lfl( sll.lTron,
wherens Cs. hns: 'poppy, le-brgall_rtsi the
juice of poppies, opium, le-brfJu1l-gld mi-
WfJ the poppy flower, le-brydn·fJhi obrds-J,u
('oppy-seed', IUld &h. ndds: le-br!!an.mdlJfj
poppy-coloured, light-red, and he trlUlslntes
also It-J,rgun D::l. -.5\", 1, by'popp)·-colour.
ed', ulthough it is meotioned t!lere nmoogst
species of Lotus. But in IV. poppy
uod opium are usuall)" called by the Hindi
name r-d' l>'im; neither in nor in Sik.
did I meet with IIny bod)·, wbo knew the
siguificll.tions giveu b"y Cs. and &/1., uut
only: 2. diapered design of wo,'en fubries;
thus Il.lso )Jil.: ie-brgdn dmr1r-poi rdan Il.
flowered cnrret, le.brgan Jo/,.bir a
flowered dress with Il. trnin.
le-na the soft dowDy wool of gonts
(esp. those of Jangthti.ng) l..elow the
long II/Iir, the shawl wool; fine woolen·cloth.
Le-ma v. leu.
Ie-lUg appendilC, supplement, addilion
L'.
atl':.l.?j" u-Mn 01.: consequence; Sdl.: rc-
buklJ, reprimand, reproof, nnd lt-
Mn.pa, Ie-It,n bdu-ba to blume, rebuke, rc-
pro\"e; le-ldn·tan C3. consequentinl, im-
portnnt (P).
le-ldm·mllan v.la3-lam-mllan.
fl-lo, U.lo-nlJul indolence, laziness,
lardiness, {i·lo 1IIa byed Ny don't be
lllZY! GlI·.; rdg M·kJ byo.s.nas AS one (of
them) had been lazy D::l.; Le-lo8
o
l.!!JCI" I.e
is ovcrcome uy Itl.?iness MI1.; U-loi 1)CS-3U
o!Jrd.ba to bo given to br.iness Ld.• Glr.;
le..lo-ca,j lazy, indolenl, slolhful. -
fV. _ lc-Io.
ff!J8-pa B.,ltys-po Il.Dd .mo. C. (d.
ulso no. 3) 1. good, servlDg the
purpose, with regard to things; (ldv. li'l3-
ptW well, duJ)", llroperly, fe[!3-par ofsdl-lJa
to senrc.lJ, to investigate ll.Ccurntely Gil'.;
b3u-ba U!JS-PO gyis do care for n proper re-
ceptionl Gfr.; IPgs.par gyul' f:ig (&k.l.llids
fyM.la) mn)" you prosper! &h., llfP-par
",Q';3·30 )"ou nrc welcome Sth.; happy. com·
fortable, bdag iPgs-1la when I am well off
(01'1" W 1IyCs-na) Do.; 1"!lS u!JC'stOn-pai
me-lo" mirror of fate, of the future Gil'.;
lo(-fog) 14Js(-pa) IJ., ·/0 lag.mo· n rich,
Ilealthy, happy yell.f; i:i liar bgas-1lu lCfls
which is way. of q.ojng it? Gir.,
sf
/o
'/'<//.;
sems-can mis
byds-na ttys-pa yan yin
wliich of tlie actions of human
beings
are
good (in
this connection it is
nearly
the same
as
bz<i>'i-j>i>. morally good); leys
is also used
in
politely hinting
or
requesting,
like the
English
'you
had better':
1,'yod pyin
-
pa
leys(-so)
Glr.,
and still more
polite: yseys-
par leys your Highness
had
perhaps
better
go
etc. l*th
;
nus-na sin-tu
leys-
so if
you
can do
it,
very
well! DzL
;
also
leys-so alone,
very
well! well done!
leys-so leys-so
ex-
cellent!
capital!
2.
neat, elegant, grace-
ful,
beautiful 6'. 3.
*ldy-mo*
W.
good, due,
and adv.
well, duly, properly,
like
leys-par
(v. above), ,e.g.
*me
lay-mo O
bar
Oduy*
the
fire burns
well,
*U-ka
lag-mo
cos*
you
have
worked
well;
but most
frq.:
clean, pure,
clear,
*cu
lay-mo* pure
or clear water
(opp.
to
rtsoy-pa); fine,
of
powder,
=
zib-mo;
*ldy-mo
co-ce* to
clean, clear, wash,
wipe,
sweep
etc.;
to reduce to fine
powder,
to
pulverize.
Comp. leys-can Sch., leys-lddn
Cs. vir-
tuous
(?). leys-byds, resp. leys-mdzdd good
deed,
good
work Cs.
leys-sbydr, jjJMifl,
well
constructed, skilfully arranged, high-
wrought,
hence: the Sanskrit
language.
-
leys-smon patron, protector, well-wisher,
con-
gratulator
Cs.
leys
-
bsad a remarkable
saying,
a sententious remark
Mil.,
two
works,
called after their authors
yon-dkdr
and sa-
skya-leys-bsdd,
are recommended to students
of the
language. leys-ysol resp.
thanks,
acknowledgment, gratitude
C.
QMTCJ"
l^n-pa (rarely Idn-ba,
Ion
-pa), pf.
bloiis
(rarely Ions),
fut.
blan,
imp.
Ion
Cs., /o/i(s) Dzl., Mil.,
blans
Cs.,
W. :
*len-ce,
nen-ce,
bldn-ce* to
take,
i. e. 1 . to
receive,
get, obtain, ynas-ndn
an inferior
place
viz.
for
being
re-born
Thyy.
2. to
accept,
what
is offered or
given, opp.
to
O
dor-ba
;
also to
bear,
to suffer
patiently,
to
put up
with. 3.
to
seize, catch, lay
hold
of, grasp, e.g.
one
that is about to
leap
into the water Dzl.
;
to catch
up;
to
catch,
to take
prisoner,
a cul-
prit I)zl.\
to
carry off, e.g.
the arms of
killed
enemies;
ma
byin-par
to take what
is not
given,
to
steal,
to
rob'; len-pa-
dra it
is as if it had been stolen from me 67/ .
;
cui't-ma
len-pa
to
get
or take a
wife, frq.,
also to
procure
one for another
person; srog
/,'/i-j>a
=
O pr6y-pa
to
deprive
of
life,
to kill
I/"//.;
to
fetch,
t<
:
n-du( W.*len-na-1a*)soii go
and fetch it! to take
possession of,
to oc-
cupy (by
force of
arms)
Glr.
ttb-mo
(Cs.
also
Itb-po) flat,
mon-
srdn leb-mo Indian
pease
are
flat,
lenticular; leb-can,
leb-leb id.
col.,
*leb-Ub-
la bor*
lay
it down flat!
leb-ma, leb-fdys
lace, bandage,
ribbon
Cs., <//-//</-///*
Icb-
fdys
lace of silk thread
;
bliay-leb
a flat loaf
of bread
6'.; sin-Ub,
leb-sin
board,
plank,
rdo-leb a
slab,
cf.
yleb-pa.
leu
division,
section of a
speech,
of a
treatise,
of a
book, chapter,
of
very
different
length;
leu-can
Cs.,
leur
byds-pa
Zam.
having
sections or
chapters, being
di-
vided into
chapters;
abbreviated
Ic,
bsays-
le dan ser-le
cad-pa yin
the
chapters (treat-
ing)
of the confession of sins and of wis-
dom are
wanting Tar.',
le-ma
Cs.,
le-fsdn
Sch. id.
gr
lo 1.
year (resp. dyun-lo,
v.
dgut't),
lo
Ina-bcu-pa
Ma.
usually
lo liia-bcu Ion-
pa (W.
*
Ion-Kan*} fifty years old,
of
fifty
years;
bu-mo
lo-ynyis-ma
a
girl
two
years
old
Ma.;
lo dans
lo, lo-re(-re)-bzin,
16-ltar
(Sch.
also
bstdr!) annually, yearly;
16-nas 16-
ru from
year
to
year; snd-lo, Q
dds-lo last
year; Odi-lo, usually *dd-lo*,
this
ye&T', pyi-
lo,
C. sdn-lo next
year;
lo
Q
K'6r-te after one
year
had
passed, srds-kyis
lo Kor-te when
the
prince
was one
year
old Glr.
;
the names
of the twelve
years
of the small
cycle (v.
below)
are those of the
following
twelve
animals :
byi mouse, ylan ox, stay tiger, yos
hare, Ob)*uy dragon,
sbrul
serpent,
rta
horse,
lug sheep, spre ape, bya
hen, kyi dog, pay
hog;
thus the first
year
is called
byi-lo
the
mouse-year,
and
byi-lo-pa
is a
person
born
in that
year
etc. 2. for lo
-
toy,
v. the
compounds;
for id-ma
leaf,
for Id-tsa-ba.
3.
prob.
:
talk, report, rumour, saying,
added
(like skad)
to the word or sentence to which
it
belongs, ce-ye-mo
si lo zer-ba fos tsd-na
when a rumour is
heard,
that N.N. has died
Ol,yq' In'.pa
Tar.; tIIU bym-7la 9cui yill
wllich of the \\Cliolls of buman beings Arc
good(in tllis connection it is IlcArl}' the snme
as b::lin-l"o, morally good); legs is also used
in polilely hinting or requesting, like the
Euglisll 'you had better': (yod hJfll·
Gf/'., nDd still more polite: rillgs-
par ("!I' yOllr Highness had perhaps better
go etc. 1'1.1/ ; flUs-lIU iill.tu Ilgs-so if yOll
C:1O do it, very well! Dzl.; nlso IIgNO Alone,
vcry well! well done! ex-
cellent! cnpital! - 2. neat, elegant, grace-
ful, beautiful C. - 3. "fUg.71u)" IV. good, due,
I\.Ild ad\'. well, duly, properly, like {Ifp-par
(v. Above), _c.g. "me !do-mo "bar oduy· the
firc burns well, "1I-ka Idg.7Ilo Co$"YOll ha.ve
worked well; but most frq.: clean, pUrt,
clear, "i!i, fag-lIIo" pure or clear water (opp.
to r1Js6g - pa); fine, of powder, _ zib -1IKl;
-fO.g_11IQ i:6-U' to clean, clear, wash, wipe,
sweep etc.; to reduce to fine powder, to
pulverize.
Compo Sch., ll'g'-Iddn C•. vir-
tuous(?). - Il'fI'-bydB, «,sI1. fCg8-'1I1J::dd good
deed, good work (4. - ltgB-Bbydr,
well constructed, skilfully nrrnnged, hlgh-
wrought, hence: the Sn.nskrit lnngullg'e. -
ItyNmo,t patron, protector, well-wisher, can-
grntulator u. - leg. - Uad u. rcmnrknble
saying, a. sententious remark Atii., two works,
cnlled nfler their authors goli..([kdr and .a-
8lya-Ie[!8-Mdd, are recommended to students
of the language. _ Icg.-r$O/. relip. thanks,
acknowledgment, grntitude C.
..q' Ibl-pa (rarely 16n-ba, 16n-pa), pf.
blo,i. (mrely 10IiB), fut. Mail, imp. lOll
c.., foli(.) D::l., Atil.,lHMia lA., lV.; -Int-c/"
1Im-ce, bldli-w- to take, i.e. 1. to receive,
get, obtain, r1tas-,idn an inferior 11lace viz.
for being rc-born Tilgy. - 2. to accept, what
is offered or gh'ell, opp. to odJr-ba; also to
bear, to suffer patiently, to Pl/t up with. - 3.
to seize, catch, lny IlOld of, grasp, e.g. one
t1mt is obout w lellp inw the w,nter D::I.;
to catch up; to catch, to take prisoner, Il. cul-
prit D:;I.; to carry off, e. g. the nrms of
killed enemies; flta byi'''''par to tnke what
is Dot to steal, to rob;; Ihlo-pa-odro it
551
Of I,
is M if it lll\d been .stolen from me Glr.;
Ibt'lm to get or t.nke a. wife, frq.,
to proCUfC one for nnotber penon; '''Of!
Un-pil _ olil'OfJ-f'a to deprive of life, to kill
M,ig.; to fetch, Ibl·du( W. -U'I-lw.la-)lOli go
an(l fetch it! to take !)()S;;ession of, to oc-
cupy (by forw of Ilrlns) Glr.
Ub-mo (01. l\lso leb-po) flat, mon-
""i arlin IIb-IIIO Indian pCMC lire f1nt,
leutieulnr; leb-?an, leb-lib id. col.
l
-Itb-Jeb·
10 11Q,J' lay it down f1nl! lib-ma, I,.{,- (ug.
lace, bandage, ribbon C•., (Iar-akitd.Jq/i
(tl!Js !nee of silk thrend; U,ag-leb n f1:\l loof
of bread C.; liJi-Ia, leb-Jilj bonnl, pInok,
rtkrl& n slab, cr. glib-po.
c:n.. leu division, section of n speech, of a
'" trentisc, of :10 boole:, chapter, of very
different length; leu-ca't c.., lcul' bYfl.-pa
Zalll. having sections or c111\pters, being di-
vided into ehnpters; abbreviated Ie, biagB-
Ie doit ier-Ie Cad-po y;'1 the clJapters (tteat-
ing) of the confession of sins and of wis-
dom are wanting 1'01'.; 'e.-7IItl C,., 1e-(sQlI
&h. id.
ar 10 1. year (resp. dgMI-lo, v. dyllli), 1o
[,ia-bcu-pa Mu. usunlly 10 llia-bm lon-
pa (1V. -/M-J,.'U7t-) fifty years old, of fifty
yenrs; bu-'1IlO lQ-fnyia-mo a. girl two yenrs
old Ma.; 1o dUli. 10, lo-,./(-rc)-b::in, lo-Itar
(&It. a.lso bardl'!) annl/ally, yearly; 16-nll$ 16-
ro from yenr to }'enr; alid-Io, oddl-Io last
ycnr; "di-Io, usuolly -M-M-, this yerl.t; ftyi-
1o, C. I/bi-/() next year; 10 nfler olle
year ha.d passed, ardl-J.yi4 '0 /!m·-te when
the Ilrince was one year oldGlr.; the names
of the tweh·e years of the small cycle (v.
below) are those of the following twelve
animals: byi mouse, g/on ox, .tag tiger,!JO'
bnre, _bl"Ug dmgon, wl'ul serpent, rta borse,
lUff sheep, apr/! ape, bya bCD, k!J; dog, flUff
)10g; thus the first year is CAlled the
mouse-}'ear, and by(.IQ-pG is a persan born
in tbnt yur etc. - 2. for /()-tdg, v.the
compouods; for /6-mtl leaf, for
3. prob.: talk, rumour, saying, added
(like akad) wille word or senWnce to wllieh
it belongs, It-!JMIIO Ii 10 ::b·lm (01 tld-lIa
when l\ rwnour is heord, that N.N. has died
552
r
io '^T
log-pa
Thgy.',W.:*da
lam far
/o*they say
the road
is
open
now;
also with a definitive
subject:
*'
a-ce'-ku-lig
ton lo* the mistress asks for the
key ;
*Ko kdm-se
rag
h* he
says
he is
thirsty
(yet
also in these cases a
speaking
on hear-
say may
be meant:
somebody
tells me that
Mrs. N.N. asks for
etc.);
*fsor-lo*
report,
rumour
W.,
also *f6h-lo* and *16b
(?)-Z0*
are
said to have a similar
signification;
*se-lo*
and
*rig-lo*
W. are
expressions
of which I
cannot
give
a
satisfactory explanation;
bsdd-
lo
byas kyan krdm-payin M7.,prob.: though
he
may get
a name
(in
the
world) by
his
learned
discussions,
he is after all a liar.
lo 3
prob.
occurs
only
in col.
language
and
more recent
pop.
literature;
Dzl.
WV,
17 lo
is a
corrupt reading
for
ysol.
4.num.: 146.
Comp.
Jo-skor
(Cs.
also
lo-L'or) cycle
of
years,
a
period
of twelve
years;
it is the
usual manner of
determining
the exact time
of an
event,
which also
tolerably
well suf-
fices for the short
space
of a man's life. If
for instance a
person
in a
dog-year (e. g.
1874) says
that he is a
byi-h-pa,
it
may
be
guessed by
his
appearance,
whether he is
10 or
22, 34,
46 etc.
years old,
and thus
also in other cases accidental
circumstances
must
help
to determine the
precise
date of
an event.
Occasionally, however,
the
cycles
are
counted, e.g.
lo-skor
brgyad
96
years
Glr. Besides this
cycle
of 12
years
there
exists another of 60
years
which is formed
(in
imitation of Chinese
chronology) by
combining
those 12 names of animals with
the names of the
(so called)
five
elements,
sin
wood,
me
fire,
sa
earth,
Icags iron,
cu
water. Each of these elements is named
twice, followed,
the first time
by po,
and
the second
by
mo;
which
signs
of
gender
may
also be omitted without
altering any
thing
in the matter. Thus
sin(-po)-Kyi-lo,
sin(-mo)-pag-lo ,
me(-po)-byi-lo, me(-md)-
glan-lo
are our
years 1834, 35, 36, 37,
and
1894, 95, 96,
97 etc. lo-Krfms
(v. lo-fdg-
gi Icrims) ceremonies,
at the
beginning
of
harvest.
lo-grdns prop,
date
(of
the
year),
Sch. also :
lo-grdns
fsdn-ma
being
of
(full)
age. lo-mgd
Cs. the
beginning
of a
year,
new-year's day. lo-rgyus
v.
rgyus.
lo-
nan a bad
year,
a
poor
harvest.
lo-cdg
Cs.
'every
second
year'.
lo-cun or
nyuil
C.
young, lo-nyun-nyun very young.
lo-
nyes
=
lo-ndn.
lo-snym
Sch.
'year, pe-
riod or
stage
of life'
(?). lo-tog
or
-fog
the
produce
of the
year, harvest, crop,
lo-
tog
rnd-ba to
reap it,
to
gather
it in. lo-
fd almanac. lo- dod Mil.
earthly-minded,
sinner?
lo-dpyd
annual tribute.
--
*lo-
pu,'*
=
srus-pud,
C.
lo-pydg (Ld.
*lob-
cag*) embassy
sent
every year
to the
king
to renew the oath of
allegiance. lo-pyed
half a
year.
lo-fsdn annual
produce,
har-
vest,
lo-fsan ce-ba a
rich,
abundant harvest
Glr.
lo-Ugs
v.
legs-pa.
lo-bsdd
=
lo-
fo Cs. lo
-
yseb
Sch. a
stack,
a
heap
of
corn
(?).
farm'
ld-ka Ssk.
world,
lo-ke-swa-ra
=
'
lo-fog,
or
lo-tog,
v.
lo,
compounds.
lo- ddb v. Id-ma.
Id-ma,
W.
*ldb-ma*, leaf,
Id-ma
Ihun,
brul
B., (7.,
*lob-ma dil or dul son* W.
the leaves have
fallen;
*ldb-ma id-mo* an
acerose or
pine-leaf;
lo- ddb
=
Id-ma.
grV'
5f($f*
l-tsa,
lo-tsd
(v.
Ssk.
itifYTi
to
^
speak ?)
the
(art of) translating,
sgra
dan Id-tsa slob
-pa
to learn the lan-
guage
and the
(art of) translating Glr.;
also
Id-tsa
sgyur-ba
to translate
Pth.\
Id-tsa-ba
translator
(of
Buddhist
works)
lo-cen
great
translator,
seems to be a certain
title;
lo-
pdn
for ld-tsa~ba dan
pdndi-ta.
ld-li-ma Ld.
(Urd.
^S)
prostitute,
harlot.
log-ge-ba
seems to be
nearly
the
same as
log-pa adj ,
fe-fsom
Idg-
ge-bai
nan-la
prob.
:
entertaining
irrational
doubts or
scruples;
baft- rim
Idg-ge-ba
an
inverted ban-rim
q.
v.
; Idg-ge-ba-la Kyer
he
took it back
again
Mil.
log-pa
I.
vb., pf.
and
secondary
form
of
Iddg-pa, q.
v.,
1. to
return,
to
go
back, yiil-du Glr.;
*nam
log-te
ca
dug* W.,
*nam
Idg-ne do-gyu yin*
C. when will
you
552
1'/I!!'1.; lV,: ·da lam tar 10" they say tue rood
is open now; also with a definitive subject:
'"'a-lJ'kit-lig fo,,' 10'" the mistress asks forthe
key; '"Ito A:6m-u rag 10" lie says he is thirsty
(yet also in these cases a speaking on hear-
stly may be mcant: somebody tells me t1l11t
Mrs. N.N. asks for etc.); ·66r-lo· report,
rumour W:, also "tIM-lo'" nnd '"lOb (?)-lo'" are
said to have a similar sigaification;
ond '"rig-lo'" lV. are upressions of which I
cannot give a satisfactoryuplanotion; UJd-
lo byas ,,-"Yali krJm-payin Mii.,prob.: thougll
he may get a 11I\11I0 (in the world) by his
lenrned discussions, he is ofter all a liar. -
io 3 prob. occurs only in col. 1t'llIguage and
more recent pop. liternlure; Dzl. :.rt'V, 17 10
is a corrupt rendiog for rVJI. - 4. nuUl.: 14G.
Compo lo-d>(>r «(,3. also lo-fol') cycle of
years, n period of twelve )"e:lrs; it is the
usual manner of determining the exact time
of o.n event, which also tolernbly well suf-
fices for tbe short space of a man's life. If
for iost."mce 1\ pcrson in a dog-ycM (c. g.
1814) says that be is aby(-lo-pa, it mny be
guessed by his appearlUlce, wliCther he is
10 or 22, 34,46 etc. years old, lind thus
l\lso in other cases accidental circumstances
must help to determine the precise dale of
aD e\"ent. Occ.'lSionally,llowever, the cycles
"lite counted, e.g. lo-sh.ll' br9.!Jad DO years
GIl'. Besides this cycle of 12 ycurs there
exists anotller of GO years which is formed
(iu imitation of Chinese chronology) by
combining tbose 12 nnmcs of animnls witll
tho nllme!< of the (so culled) fil'e elements,
M,j wood, mil fire, sa ellrth, iron, ;:1.1
water. ElICh of these elements is named
twice, followed, the first time h
y
po, on(l
the second by 1110; wllich signs of gender
mllY also Le omitted witllOut IIny
thing in the matter. Thus Sili(-po)-lIyi-lo,
Ai" (-'TIIO)-jJog-lo, me(-po 1110'1(-mo)-
glati-lo are. our yenrs 1834, 35, 36, 37, and
18!)4, 95, 96, 97 etc. - lo-ltrims (v. lo-tdg-
gi lfrilll$) ceremonies, at the beginning of
hnrvest.-lo-grtlJis prop. dnte (of tho year),
Sek also: lo-g'Yi"s tsuJi-1IIa being of (full)
age. - lo-mgo es. tile beginning of a year,
t:
new:year's day. - lo-rgiJus v. rgyus. - lo-
nJn a bad yellr, II poor blLTvest. .:.... lo-cug
lAo 'every second year'. - lo-cuJi or flyuJi
C. young, lo-nywi-nyuJi very youug. - 10-
fl!Jt3 - lo-Men. - lo,sllgh, Seh. ')'cllr, pe-
riod or stage of life' (?). - lo-tO!J or -(t.lg
the produce of the year, harvest, crop, 10-
tQg r"u-ba to reap it, to gather it in. - lo-
td almanac. - lo-odod Mil. eortbly-minded,
sinner? - lo-Jp!Ju annual tribute. - '"to-
PY/'" - 8rtu-ftUd, C. - lo-pyug (lA. '"lob-
'tat!) cmbassy scnt every yeM to the king
to rcnew the oath of allegiance. - lo-p,yM
bnlf a yellr. - lo-hun annual produce, ha,'"
vest, 10-61111 Ci-lJa a rich, IIbundant
Glr. - lo-li[Js v.INJ8-Pa. - lo-bAad -10-
to CB. lo - rsi:b Belt. a stnck, a heap of
corn (?).
ilf"1· l6-J.·a &k. world, = 'IIIlf-
.nfm,.

':l-£ffI- lo-(Og, or lo-fOg, v. lo, comjJoun&".
lo-odab \'. 16-ma.
16-11111, W. '"lOb--ma", leaf, l&-ma lIm/i,
brulE., C., -lOb-ma (lil or t/ul SOli'"
tllO leaves have folleo; '"lOb-ma lin
IIcel'ose or pine-leaf; lo-odab -l&-ma.
ari- ar\S. lo-tsa, lo-uti (v. Ssk. to
, r:.. speak?) the (artof)translating,
sgra da,i M-tsa s16b-pa to learn the lan-
guage and the (art of) trnnslating GlI·.; also
16-f$a lY!Jul·-ba to U"o.aswtc Pili.; M-Isa-ba
translator (of works) lo-'Nn great
trnnsl"tor, Seenl!; W Le 1\ eertnin titlc; lo-
pdQ for M-tsa-ba dali pdQJ£-ta.
!.d-li...7IIa IA. (Urd. J."J) prostitute,
harlot
109-ge-lJa seems to be nearl), the
sllmc IlS It.lg-pa adj, (e-fMJ-m lOU-
ge-bai lid,,-la proL.: entertaining irmlional
doubts or scruples; bail-rim ldg1le-ba lin
im"crtcd ba,i-r(m q. v.; 16g-!Je-ba-la Mger he
\ook it back Again Mil.
ar=l']"tf lou-pa 1. vb., pf. nnd secooollry form
of IdOg-pa, q. v., J. to return, to go
back, yill-du GlI·.; '"lIam 109-ft (Ja dl/g'"
"flWII !Jill- C when will )"ou
Jogs
return?
I6g-pa O
tad
Glr.,
I6g-la O
d6d-do Glr.
let us turn
back,
jfyto Itypai
lam the
way
back. 2. to come
back,
to come
again.
-
'''. to turn round, to be turned
upside down,
to
tumble down
H'.,
e.g.
of a
pile
of wood
etc.;
im I
<'></-
pa
or
Id6g-pa
to turn
away
one's
face, always
used
fig.
for to turn one's back
on,
to
apostatize
K6r-bai
yul tid-ldoq-na
if
you
mean to turn
your
back to the land of
the
cycle
of
existences,
more
frq.
:
I6g-pa
biji'd-pa
to
revolt,
to
rebel,
log-pa rtsom-pa
to
plot,
to stir
up,
an insurrection
Glr., log-
pa-mKan
a rebel
Glr.;
*
log-pa-can*
rebel-
lious,
seditious W.
II.
adj. reversed, inverted;
irrational,
wrong,
log-pai
lam,
lam
log-pa
Mil. a
wrong way ;
I6g-pa-la zugs-pa^to
rush into
error,
to turn
to what is
wrong?'),
also
euphemism
for to
fornicate
Sty.; lta-(ba)-
log^-pa)
v.
ltd-ba;
cos-log
a
wrong faith,
false
doctrine, heresy;
grwa-l6gt jo-log
col. an
apostate
monk or
nun;
log -par
and
(col.) log
adv.
wrong,
amiss,
erroneously, log-par sem-pa
to think
evil,
to have
suspicions (about
a
thing),
often
-
Ita-log skyed-pa
to
sin;
frq.: *log Q
dren-
pa*
to
mislead,
seduce
B.;
*log ydn-ce*
W.
to come
back,
to
return,
*si-log yoii-cc*
to
recover
life,
to revive
(after having
been
nearly lifeless),
to rise from the
dead, prob.
also: to
appear
as a
ghost W.;
*nad
log-
gydb
tail* W. the disease has become worse
again,
there has been a
relapse; *la-log
(bla-
log} pd-ce*
W. to
turn, e.g.
the
roast;
*cud
log
tan-ce* v.
ycud.
Comp. log-cos
Ma.
=
cos-log. locj-rtogs
wrong judgment,
false
knowledge. log-
Ita
=
Ita-log,
v. ltd-ba
log-spyod,
Lt. :
log-
spyod nan-pa perverse conduct,
a sinful life.
ioff-
fso with
sgrub-pa
to live in a sinful
manner,
as much as : to live
by
crime, by
vice Mil.
l (
J
s 1 S
'd6>
rtsig-logs
the side of a
wall,
mdun-logs
fore-side, front-side,
rgydb-logs back,
back
part
of a
thing; logs-
re 1.
side-post
of a door
(opp.
to
yd-
and
tnd-re}.
2. each side
(v.
re
3); logs-bzdit
the
right
or
upper
side, lot/s-Stdn
the left or lower
side
(of
a
cloth)
C's.
; surface,
sal of the earth
;
side,
direction,
region,
tin-
pint
of the
feet, up
i'mm the feet
(e.g.
a
|>;iin
in the
body proceeding up
from the
feet) Sch.; yyas-logs
the
right side,
yy6n-
logs
the left
side,
frq.; fm^-loya
this
side,
on this
side,
pd^-log
the other
side,
on
the other
side; 16gs-w, log*-la aside,
apart,
*zdc/-pa*
C. to
lay by,
to
put aside,
to
put
out of the
way,
to clear
away, I6gs-m dgur-
ba,
bkdr-ba means about the
same; logs-su
bkdl-ba to
hang aside,
to
hang up
in another
place; logs-nayod-pa
to be
distinct,
separate,
to live
by
one's
self,
solitarily Schf.,
Tar.
45, 18; I6gs-pa other, additional,
by-, co-,
spare-, rgyags Jogs-pa spare-provision,
so
also
logs ycig: fdg-pai
sne-mo
logs ycig
the
other end of a
rope.
2.
wall,
*log-zdf
W.
id.; logs-bris
mural or fresco
painting
Tar.
-
Ion 1.
leisure, spare-time,
vacant
time,
time,
loii
yod-du
re-la, ndm-zla
O
das
whilst
you
are
always hoping
to have
(still)
time(enough), you
allow the favourable mo-
ment to
pass away Mil.;
similarly:
Ion
yod
snyam-la
mi-fse zad
Mil.]
sdod-pai
Ion med-
par
without
delay, immediately, directly
Glr.;
*/ta
yon-Ion
med*
6'.,
W. I have not
time to come
; *peb-lon yod-na*
if
your
honour
have time to come
6', W.;
rdeg-lon ydit-bas
as there will be
yet plenty
of time to beat
(me, you
had better hear me
now)
Mil. ;
loit-ytam
Sch. : 'cheerful
talk,
animated con-
versation'. 2.
imp.
of laii-ba and
len-pa.
jfc*T!*
Sfc'pT
Sfc'OT
loit-ka, loii-K-a,
lon-
1
ga
Med.
intestines,
entrails, guts; strictly
taken itis said to denote
only
the blind
gut(?); yur-'oii,
indr-t'oii. ('*.:
the
upper gut,
the lower
gut
or thin
guts,
thick
guts;
lo/'t-ndd a disease of the
guts.
lon-ba 1.
pf.
and
secondary
form of
Idon-ba,
as vb. : to be
blind,
and
fig.:
to be
infatuated;
as
adj.:
blind,
blinded
etc.,
as sbst. : blind m&nDzl.
/o//-/V/</(or
A
r
ytlrf-
pa)
the
guide
of a blind man Lc.r. ;
loii-po,
lon-ba-po
a blind man
(
x. :
*tii/<'-lu/i*
W. an
empty
ear of
corn,
a tare. 2. also IOHS-
pa,
=
len-pa
Glr. or laii-ba \
,
2 Glr.
Idti-bu
Stg
,
lo/'t-nin Mil.
ankle-bone,
N:>
astragal.
553
Mri-bu
return? ldg-pa .tad Gir., Idg.la .,Ihkl-do Glr.
let us turu bAck, J>'yir MYfili 1m/I the way
back. - 2. to come back, to come again. -
:l. to turn round, to be turned upside down, to
tumble down IV., e g. of II pile of wood etc.;
';0 ldfJ-JII'I Of 1d6[l-pa to tum n\1'lly one's
fAce, nhmY8 used fig. for to tunl one's back
on, kJ n[lostatir.e ol.fOt·-bai yul M-lJ6q-lIa if
),ou mcan to tUI'n )'OUf back to the hU1l1 of
the c)'de of CXiSWllCes, more frq.: MfJ1la
byM.pa to revolt, to rebel, ldg.-pa
to lllot, to stir up, All insurrection Glr., Mg.
pu-lIIl.'an n rebel Glr.; °ldg_ptJ-can" rebel-
lious, 8pditioliS TV,
lI.:ulj. reversed,inverted; irrational, wrong,
l&j-pai lalli, lam Idg.pa Mil. a wrong wn)';
IdfJ-pa-w::uy$-l'a('10 rush into error, to turn
to wllllt is wrong?'), ntso eUI,hemism for to
fornicate Stg.; lta-(ba}- log(-pa) v.lM-ba;
Awrong fnith, fnlse doctrine, heresy;
!/J"I('{I.ldq, )o-Mg col. nil Allostnte monk or
nUll; IJrJ - par nnd (col.) log ndv. wrong,
llmiss, erroneousl)" MY-/HII'sMlI-pa to think
evil, to luwesuspicions (aboutatlling), often
_It".l&j skyM..pa to sin; frq.: "log odrl'1l-
1m" to mislead, seduce H; "loy yQ,j-f:e" iV.
to col11e back, to return, "ili-l&j yOii-c? to
recover life, to rcvivc (after having been
nelnly lifeless), to rise from the deud, prob.
nlso: to appenr as A ghost lv'; "?lad lofJ-
!/yab {wi" IV. the disense hns become worse
llgnin, there hns been a relapse; "la-lJrJ (bla-
ld<;) IV. lo turn, e.g. the roast; "Cud
l()y tali-ct:" v. rrod.
Camp. log-Cos Ma. - Co8-1Ofj. - 10g-rt&fJs
wrong judgment, false knowleugl'. - lOfj-
lla -lta-Id<;, \·.ltd..fJa -lorrspl/(){I, U.: lOfj-
sl'!Jod liUII1Ja pen'erst conduct, a sillfullife.
- IOg-,/so with IlfJI'tib"]Ja lO liyc in a sinful
ml\nner, M much ll.S: to liye by crime, liy
vicc Mil.
I()(JS 1. side, J'!sIy-logs the side of a
wnll, mdim-IOfIS fore-sidt>, fl·ont.-sidll,
rY!Jdb.IOfJs baCK, bn.ck part of n thinK; fdgs-
J'e I. side.post of a door (opp. to yti. and
Jlld·re). 2. en.ch side (Y. I"c3); 1()(jS-lmili tlie
right or nplICl'sitle, the lenor lower
sitle (of n cloth) Cs.; surface, 8/1i of the enrth;
'i
side, direction, region, rldti1Jui-IOtfl-7Ia, from
tile pnrt of the feet, up from the feet (e.g.
n pnill in the body proceeding up frout the
fcet) Srll.; )'!Ja.-logs the l-ight side, r1J4'I-
llXfl the left side, frq.; ($u(f')-logtl tillS side,
on this litle, Jid(r)-I()(.I' the olher side, on
tile otller M'JS-IU, f&.I'_1a aside, apart,
"ztifJ-pa" C. to lily by, to put aside, to put
out of the wu)', to clear Qway, 10,.I'-su dydr-
ba, bkdl"-M means about the sume;
bkdl-/)a to hang ll.side, to llaug up in ll.hother
pln.ce; 100s-na!J(}d.pa to bedistinct, sepArate,
to liyc by one's self, solitnrily &ltf., Tal'.
45, 18; Mris-pa other, nddilional, by., CO-,
spAre-, rgyags logs·pa spare-pro\'ision, so
nlso logs rhy: (tf9-lJai IIlC"M lO!Js rf:iu the
other enu rope. - 2. wall, "log-ztil* W,
id.; 100Jl-bl"i$ mUflll or fresco painting Tal".
r.rt:,. 101' 1. leisure, ya.cnnt time,
time, loli yOd-du 1-t-lu ndm-da otlas
whilst you lire nhl"afs hoping to hlL\'e (slil!)
time(enough), you allow tlle fa\'ourable OlD-
ment to pass awny Mil.; similarly: IOIi'lJ()(l
snyam-la 1Ili-fS(' zad Mil.; adJd..pai loti lIlrn-
])G!' \I·ithout delay, immediately, directly
Glr.; ",i" !I,M-!o,j ?lied' G" W: I IJll\'e 1l0t
timetocome; "fJib-fOlj!JOd-na" ifJour honour
IJave; time to come G, IV.; nitTI-lou !JO,j-bas
as tberc will be )'ct plenty of time to lJCat
(me, you had better !lenr me now) Mil.;
IOli-rlam &h.: 'cheerful talk, aniJunled oon-
versation'. - 2. imp. of la,i-ba nud lt1l-pa.
arr-
0
"1' al:-1::I' a!r-°:rr 101i-ka, 10n-I.'Il, loli-
.... -- , ""'--,., ""'-- -I " I t
ga-.I tJ(. in estioes,
entrails, guts; strictly taken itissnid todenote
ool}' tile blind gut (?); !Jar-'Ol', lIull'-lo,j (,8. :
the upper gut, the lower gut or thin guts,
tllick Ruts; lo,j·mid a disease of the guts.
alr-o_.,. lo,j-ba I. II£. and scC<Jndary form of

/./o,j-bu, liS \'l".: to be blind, and fig.:
to be infatuated; as adj.: blind, blilldcd etc.,
ns sbst.: Mind mAll lJ:l.-Ioii-I..'rill(or)!I;<1-
pa) the guide of n blind mllu Lu.; /0';-]'0,
IOli-bu-po a blind lIlun c,.; ""yt-ll/lj" W. an
empty ellr of corn, 1\ titre. - Z. nlso 10l;s-
ptl, .. Ibl-pa Gfr. or la,j-lm I, Z Gi,'.
a[1:;,',::r ldH-bu Sty, loti'"1lKJ Mil. ankle.bone,
"" astragal,
554
"
Ion-Ion
sa
Ion-Ion
being
in
pieces,
in
frag-
ments
C.,
cf. bun-Ion.
2. in
conjunction
with
spyod-pa:
to
use,
to make use
of,
to have the use or benefit
of,
to
enjoy, e.g.
bde-ba dan
skyid-pa-la
happiness
and
prosperity;
Ion
-
spy
od-
par
byd-bai rgyu
the
object
of
enjoyment,
the
thing enjoyed Stg.; lons-spyod(Ssk.
jffar)
1.
enjoyment, fruition, use,
esp.
with
regard
to
eating
and
drinking, lons-spyod
sd-fa
byed
they
fed on
meat, lons-spyod
sin de-las
byed
they
lived on
(the
fruits
of)
this tree Pth.
2.
plenty,
abundance, bza-btun-gi lons-spyod
dpag-tu-med-pa
bsag
Glr.
they produced
or
procured
an enormous
quantity
of food and
drink;
esp.:
riches, lons-spyod
ce-ba
great
riches; wealth, property, lons-spyod-kyi bddg-
por gyur
he became owner of the
property
Dzl.',
m
cod-pa byd-bai lons-spyod
med he
was not rich
enough
to
bring
an
oifering
(to Buddha)
Dzl.
f^'^f
ttd-pa, Ud-po,
v.
Ihod-pa.
lod-po
Sch. : 'half
through, through
the
middle,
one half
(?)'.
Ion
notice, tidings, message,
hn-bzdn
good
news
, sprin
-
ba to
give notice,
send
word,
send a
message ;
Ion
kyur
or Ion zei*
has also the
special
sense: send in
my
name!
6'.;
Ion
zig kyer-la sog
let me
know,
send me word Pth.
Ion-pa
=
le'n-pa
1. to
take,
to receive
etc.
Glr., Pth.,
cu lon-nam have
you
fetched the water? i. e. are
you bringing
the water?
Pth.]
nor-bu mi Ion I shall not
receive the
jewel!
Pth. 2. more
frq.
the
word is used with reference to time: to
elapse,
to
pass,
a. in a
general sense,
lo
mdn-po zig
Ion-pa
dan after
many years
had
elapsed
Dzl.,
rin-zig
lon-te after a
long time,
rin-
por
ma
Ion-par
after a short time. b. with
regard
to the
age
of a
person:
lo ci tsam
Ion how old are
you? bcu-drug-lon
I am six-
teen Mil.
^ ^- sometimes for lo
year,
and lob-
ma for 16-ma leaf.
lob-pa, p, imp.
lobs,
to
learn, rarely
for
slob-pa] lobs-pa
the act of
learning
Dzl.
(5JTJ-
los,
in
truth, indeed, mgon-skyabs
ran
los
yin
he is indeed the
helper (from
a
hymn
in
praise
of
Buddha).
HI 1. the letter
sa,
the
English sh,
but
pa-
'
latal;
in C. it is
distinguished
from
(^
(za)
only by
the
following
vowel
being
sounded
in the
high
tone. 2. num. : 27.
n' sa I. 1.
flesh, meat, yydg-sa yak's flesh,
1
lug-sa mutton;
sa
O
f
sod-pa (
W.
*tso-ce*)
to boil
meat;
sa
rhod-pa (W. *no-ce, srdg-
ce*or*ldm-ce*')
to roast
meat;
c
pyi-sa
out-
ward
flesh,
ndti-sa or ndn-ca inward
flesh,
or the entrails'
Cs.(?)
;
sd-nas
cdd-pai
bu Glr.
the child of
my
own flesh and
blood;
sa
Krig-pa
sexual
instinct; *'d-pesa,
'd-me sa*
in W. a
vulgar
form of attestation
;
surface
Of the
body,
sai ri-mo
spots, stripes
etc. on
the skin
(of
an
animal)
Tar. 2.
muscle,
nu-sa thoracic muscle
Mng.
2. for
sa-K6g
v.
compounds.
II. v. sd-ba and sa-mo.
Comp.
sa-bkra n. of a cutaneous disease
Med. sa-skdm meat dried in the sun.
-
sa-Kdn
larder;
butcher's stall. sa-Ku broth.
sa-K6g
the
body
of a
slaughtered
animal,
i;1t:,'afc:.' lon-loti being in pieces, in frag-
ments C., ce. bull-ton.
{o,is., 1. pC. lind imp. of ldn-l!a. -
2. in conjunction with to
list!, to make use of, to IllWC tJleuseor "enefit
of, to enjoy, e.g. bdUa dan 8kyid-po, - fa
happiness I\Ild prosperity; ItM-spyod-JX1I'
b!Ju-bai 'rU!lu the object of cnjopnenl, the
thing enjoyed Stg.; lotis-spydd (&1.:. mtr)
1. enjoyment, fruition, use, esp. with regurd
to eating and drinking, ]QriHp!Jdd &u-la b!Jed
they fed on menl, lon8-spyOd 8iti dl--las b,'1ed
they lived on (the fruits of) tbis tree )Jell.
2. plenty, abundance, b:a-btilli-gi ldliNp!JOd
(IJWU-tu-mid-pa beag Glr., tbey produced or
procured nn enormous quantity of food lIud
drink; esp.; riches, !O/iNP!fOd ci-ba gnut
riches; wealth, property,lrhis-apyod-kyi Mag-
por !J!IU" be became owner of the property
Dd.; mCtki-pa byu-bai 'nu:d he
W:lS not rieh enough to bring an olTering
(00 Buddha) D:J.
IM-pa, Idd-po, v. IllMfa.
IM-po Sell.: '11Itlf through, through
, 1 the middle, one hll.lf(?)'.
Ion notice, tidings, message, lon- b::JJi
"1" 'a
good news, spr{,j.ba to give notice, send
word, send u message; ion kyur or ion ::er
has abo the special sense: send in my
name! G.; lon zig A'yer-fa iJog let me know,
send me word 1'tll.
hilv-pa - lin-pa 1. 10 take, 10 receive
etc. G{I'., 1'111., eu ldn-nam have you
fetched the wnter? i. e. nre you bringing
the water? 1"111.; rWr-bu 'IIli Ion I shaH Dot
reooi,'c the jewel! 1'111. - 2. more frq. the
word is used with refereilCe wtime: to elapse,
10 pass, /I. in a general sense, 10 mdli-ZX' zi[/
(dnfa da/i nfler many years had elapsed
Dd., rhi-Zig 1O""te nfter II long time, riJi-
por rna Mn-par After:\ short time. b. wit.h
regard 10 the nge of u. person: 1o C:i tsam
Ion how old are )'on? lK'.u-drilg-lon I am six-
teen Mil.
af.:r lob IV. somctimes for {Q year, and /db-
rna for {o-rna leal.
ai".:::r.q lQb-pa, pf., imp. lob$, 10 learn, rarely
""\ forslQb-pa; IObs-pathcaetoflearlliog
Dd.
ioa, in truth, indeed, rng6n-skyabs rali
""\ los yin lIe is indeed the hellIer (from
a hymn in praise of Buddha).
"'9 1. tlm letter sa, the English sh, pa-
laml; in C. it is distinguished from (bz)
only by the following \'owel being sounded
in the high tone. - 2. DUm.; 27.
"'1 ga I. I. flesh, meat, yak's fles!l,
1-ug-iJa mutton; sa (lV. -tsd-U')
to boil ment; aa rnod-pa ( -,io..ce, iJr&[/-
U or to roast meat; pyi-8a out--
ward flesh, nu/i....a or ndli-la inwnrd flesh,
or theentrnils' GB.(?); iJ&-nat crld-jJ(li bu Gfr.
the child of my own flesh and blood; iJa
.l!dg-pa sexual instinct; - 'd-p! iJa, iJa-
in IV. a vulgar form of attestation; surface
of the body. gai l'i·11lQ spots, stripes ele. 00
the skin (of an animal) Tar. - 2. muscle,
tlJ.oJ'tlcic muscle 111';[1. - 2. for
v. compounds.
II. v. iJu-ba and
Camp. iJa-bkra n. of a cutaneous diflCllSe
Mea. - ,ya-dei-In ment dried in the sun. -
larder; butcher's stnll.- iJa-l!u broth.
- the body of n slaughtered animal,
wiihout the
skin,
head,
and
entrails,
ce-&a
of ;i
large
cun-ya of a small animal
-
*<!-/.
/<;</
11. -sh and
blood,
meton. 1. for
body,
x(i-lcr<i<j j-sul-ba
a sound
body
Mil. '2. for:
child ivn horn of the same
parents
Cs.
-
sd-rgifutjs
fat meat.
*sa-cug* (jia bcu(f)
meat cut into
strips
and
hung up
to
dry
in the sun
W.,
C.
(Hook.
II, 183). m-ij&n
raw meat.
sa-nyogSch.: 'soup
with
greens
in it'. su-rn
if
Iii old meat.
sa-mdog
colour
of the
skin,
complexion
Dzl. and elsewh.
sa-mdog-log-pa
Cs.:
erysipelas,
St.
Anthony's
fire?
sa-ntig
the lean of meat Cs. sa-
ndd a certain disease Lt. *sd-na*
(lit.-swa)
W.
ardour,
zeal?
sd-spu
feathers,
downs.
-
*sa-spin*
meat boiled down to
jelly
W.
sa-
prog
Mil. ?
--
*sd-bhag
-
leb* a sort
of
pie
baked in oil 6'. sa-bo
sheep,
cattle
or other animals destined for
slaughter
Mil.
nt. sd-
Q
bu a
maggot.
*sa-bur* W.
boil,
abscess,
ulcer;
Sch.: mark left
by
a
lash,
weal.
*sa-dti* rice boiled with small
pieces
of
meat 6'. sa-sbmii
flesh-fly, blue-bottle-fly.
sct-iinm
fleshy
excrescence,
a little
lump
in the muscular flesh. sa
-
btsus boiled
meat. sa-fsd 1. hot meat. 2. friend
Pth.,
S.y.,
sa-fsa-can
amicable,
attached W.
sa-fsdn
dmdr-po
Sch.: 'a tumour
resembling
a weal or a wart'. sa-tsil the fat of ilesh.
-
M-fson-pa butcher,
dealer in meat.
-
sa- dzin 1. a hook for
taking
meat out of
a kettle
6'.,
W. 2. the fork of
Europeans.
sa- dzcr wart.
tia-zd,
sa-zdn 1.
prop.:
flesh-eater,
carnivorous animal. 2.
gen.:
a
class of
demons,
described as fierce and
malignant,
Ssk.
fq^rf^.
--
m-zug, sa-yzug
=
zug
2.
sa-rug
dried
apricots,
with little
pulp,
and almost as hard as stone. sa-
i~id lean flesh. siwil \. little
meat-pies.
2. Y. sa-ba.
sa-rug sauce,
gravy
C. sa-
rfil
putrid
moat. sa-rd a disease \\\lii.,
is said to be an induration of the
skin, callus,
or
perh.
scirrhus. sa-rlon fresh
meat,
raw
meat,
sa-ysdr
flesh of an animal that has
just
been killed.
/ swa 1. Dzl.
W
,
1. Sch.:
high
water,
J
flood,
inundation. "2. Lt: a certain
hereditary
disease or
infirmity?
555
.s-/- some kind of
game (V)
H'//>.
,
Ka-ce sti-l.-<i-iint saffron -.... Kd
'
tta-kar Cs. a kind of
sugar.
a-kon,
or .sa-
/Jo'n, Wdn.', S'cA.:grudge,
resentment,
hatred.
ld-kya
Ssk.,
ji6d-pa
Tib.,
the
mighty,
o
the
powerful,
the
bold,
n. of the
family
of
Buddha,
the founder of the Buddhist
religion,
and hence often n. of Buddha him-
self,
also
sd-kya-fub-pa (Mil.
rather
boldly
abbreviates it into
sak-fub), su-ktja-mu-ni,
su-kya-seh-ge.
./T^rps"
m-dkdr v.
ysa-dkar.
/-i'5jr'
xa-skdd the
cawing
or
croaking
of
'
ravens W.
rrs sa-sky6 Mng.? perh. dough
mixed with
meat.
-.__.-... _.__.-.
M-Ka-ma,
sd-Ka-ra
=
5a-
ka-ma and sa-ka-ra.
sa-Kug
Sch. a small
bag
or
purse.
R"
sa-Kyi
Sch. a
shaggy dog,
a
poodle.
"
sa-fi'6n v. sa-kon.
m-gos,
col. for
sam-gos.
a-&n LU
sa-nydm(s) Lex.,
as
explanation
otdbal?
tsa-sta,
klu Wilit.
1. also
sa-d<if/
mere,
merely,
Only, l>ycu sd-dag
btsds-te
only
sons
being
born
Dzl.;
mi dbul-
pohs-pa >ni-s1ug-
ste as
they
are all of them
poor people
Dzl.;
bdm-pa-mfoi'i-ba
*<i-st<t</-tn
gyur-to they
all
come to the
knowledge
of the truth Tar.
2. Ld. for
(>'tai}xdin(-la}-bta(js(-pa)
a
pack,
a
bundle,
fastened to the saddle be-
hind the
rider, *sd-stag-la
Kol or r?l ton*
tie it
up,
fasten it behind!
S,"
*d-di
Ld.,
Pur.
ape, monkey.
hemp.
(
k: flax,
.^i-
jT3T
*a
~
na ' s
'
nai ras
<S/^r.,
Sch.: ^fine
linen',
sd-nai
without the skin, Ile.d, I'JIII enll1lil" l4!-Ja
of II, large - CN';';11 of. smn.1I nninml -
ifl-frug flesh 1111\1 blood, mclon. l. for body,
ia-I.'rOo ,.aI-btl ft lIOund body Mii. 2. for:
c.biMreo born of thc sam.e I,nrents w -
Jt••rgyd!l' fat meat. - ';_"!I (ill bnr,)
meat cut illto strips IlIId hung up to dry
in the sun C (1/001:. II, 183). - ia-rjm
11l'" ml"at,.- ia-'H!l6y&h.: 'lIOul' with greens
in il'.-;a-".gili old Inc"t.-M-wwUtJ c.olour
oCthe complexion D::/. nlld elsewh. -
(a.: ".,.;ptlm,St.Anlhony'll
fireT - io..,.o!J the 1e.1n of me.t W. - Ja-
"eid. ct'rtAin disuse Lt. - ·;a..7U.·(lit....."a)
11'. ...dour, ua!? - Jd-fptr fC&lhen, down.\!.
- l!Iet1.t lIoiled do.·n to jell)" lI'.
- JD-.lw6g Mii.! - ·io-lJlay-W,· a sort
or pie in oil C. - ia-bo sheep, (aulc
Or otbu llQ.ilIl1\ls de.tined for lIaughkr Alii.
JilL - iti-i'" a maggol- ·JD-bw"- 11'.
abscess, uletti &h : mllrk left U)' allUill, "·eal.
- ·Ja-4"" rice boiled" ilb Im:'llillie«s of
mealC - kI-Wru" flesh-fly, blue-boule-OJ.
- ia-"""" ne"by exeretlCenct', aliltle IUPlI'
in the muscular f1e;;h. - ia·laUs ooiled
meat. - I. hOL meat. 2. frieod Ptil ..
S{}., ia-faa-«m nttached iV: -
ill·f.kin d",ti,...po &11_: 'It tllPlour resemlJling
" weal or a wut'. - ia_f,it tile fat of ftcsh.
- iti.flOif-pa butcher, dealer io meaL -
ia-.d::in t." hook for lAking mellot out of
" kettle <.-: 1 11'. 2. the fork. of Ellropeaos.
- ia-od:;" wnrt. - ia-:u, ;a_zan 1. prop.:
Dcsll--eat.er, Cllrn;'·OI'OU8 lI.Qimftl. 2. gen.: n
e11l58 of demons, dl!llCribed 1\11 fierce and
malign:'lllt,Sak. - ia-zw9, ia-y::u9
= zII9:.!' - Ja-rfiy dried apriCOls, with little
pulp, ftnd nlmO!>l IU hllord as stone. la-
rid lean flesl.. - 'iH·il I. liule meILl-l,ies.
1. \". 'a-ba. - ia.'';y snu<:e, grnYJ C, - ia·
rill IlIllrid meat. - Ja-I'd a disease mM.,
is suit! 10 be nn indurntionofthukio, cnllus,
or I.e.-h. scirrhul. - .lu_ridll frcsh menl, rnw
mCllot, M-yldr flesh of an IUlimnl thnt has
just been killed.
+r itta I. D::l. ?,':l, I. &11.: high w:'Iter,
... flood, inundation. _ :/. Lt.: II. cer!llin
beredit.nry disease or infirmit)·?
,a-ta some kind of gnme ('I) Wilif.
ta-lt ;a..{-I.-/l1(1 uflron
-4fTF' M-tar w. It kintl of suglLr.
,a-kOlI,or ,a- n·d,i.j&J..:grudge,
. I resentment, hatred,
i&-t!la SK., liM-1M Tib., the mighty,
r:.. the powttful, the bold, n. of the family
of Bllddha, the founder ef the Buddhist
religion, and lIenee ofU'n D. of Buddbll. him-
!elf, also Jd-l:9"-f.b-pa (Mil. rather boldly
"bbre\"iatc;l it ioto WJ:-f..b), id-tga-,mi-"i,

+f-rrF 'a-dhir 'f. j'ifN.iJ:ar.
M.,kUd the a..,..ing or croaking of
- I",'" flWCDS W:
.!TH" ia.-dyO J1!iog_' l1t"rh. dough mixed 'Kith
. I meat.
-r:::rer, 1:1".::;;' M-1.'a-lIu" .ti-ra-ra - in·
, . , . ,h._rna :md in·!.,.ra.
ia_lirg &h.. tL small bag or

+fl3' Ja-1.'yi &lr. n dog, .. poodle.
in·olfrin '-. ia-l.w..
ia-gds, col. for iam-ge..
'"-'in Lt.'
.. Ja-Hyd",(.) Lu., u ex"llI.nl'tiop
'I F' of i/bai'
- A.-lu U'd,i.
,ti-.tao 1. also ia-lWo mere, mere",
., only, (yeu 'd-dag buti..tt onl,. sons
being \,om D::l.; 1111' dh''l-01kni.-ptl Jti"'I'Y-
Ite as the,. nrc IIll ofthclll poor people D::l.;
hdhl-pa-m(o,i..!Ja .M-.tao-tu fIIJllr-to thc)" "ll
come to lile kDowledge of tile truth 7'ar.
_ :/. lAo for (,·tai)ililll(-lll)-h/Cl[lf(-pa) I'
p:\Ck, I' bUlld]e, fl\Steneu to the SIlddle be-
hind the rider, -.d-.lllg-la tul or rn loti·
tie iL up, fnsten iL behind!
••ti..Ji Lil., l"\4r. ape, monkey.
..cr.' 'a-na l. &1'.1[llJ hemp, u.: flax. iU·
1lai ,'m Sto., &11.: 'fine linen', i,,-J!4i
556
sa-pos
sdn-Ka
gos
a
garment
made of fine linen. 2. v.
sd-sna,
sub sa.
*/TJ$4*
sd-pos
a thick blanket Ld.
-._.
/rq-
sd-ba,
swa-ba Cs.
W., C.,
B. a
<
hart,
a
stag,
col.
usually
*sa-
wa-ra-cu
or
ru-cu*', sd-po
the male
animal,
sd-mo the
hind,
roe,
sa-prug
a
young
deer,
fawn;
cf. k'a-swa.
/Tr
sa-ma 1.
after-birth, placenta.
--
2.
~
an
ordinary
coat made of cloth which
has not been
napped
W.
*
sa-mi-lig parsley
Ld
f^
sd-mo
C.,
B.
(W. *mog-sa*)
mush-
room
;
the various
species
of
fungus
receive their
appellations
from their colour
(dkar-sd, nag-sa, smug-sa, ser-sa)
or from
the
place
where
they grow (kluns-sa,
cu-
sa, lud-sa,
sin-
so)',
the
damp
climate of
Sikkim
produces
moreover
*so-ke,
Kd-wa
and de-mo
(sgre-mo) -sa-mo*,
etc. Cs. has
also
sa-mah,
a thick kind of mushroom.
*jT^VT^' sa-ra so-re
(cf. yser-pa)
W. moist.
rrr'rrc
sd-ri-ka Ssk. n. of a
bird,
Gracula
M^^ T
o;
'
reutgiom;
a
species
01
jay.
su-rii-bu,
^jTfT*T%
n- of one of the
two
principal disciples
of Buddha.
JTX*
*'^-?
'
M 1- hartshorn Mcd. 2. n. of a
'
vein Med.
sn*fi|cn"
-% warped, oblique,
aslant W.
/jryy'c*
sdk-ti Ssk.:
spear, lance, pike, sword,
' '
Cs. also
trident;
Dzl.
nm-
sag,
in
sag-ter-gds
it
broke,
it burst
'
asunder ScJt.
sdg-ma
1 . C. small stones or
peb-
bles, gravel, sdg-ma-can gravelly,
sag-fan
a
plain abounding
with
gravel.
2. W!
pebble, sag-rdd rocky ground,
covered
with a thin
layer
of mould which
only by
dint of
much
irrigation
will
yield
a
scanty
produce;
sag-rug gravel, sdg-sa
earth mixed
up
with
pebbles,
stony,
sterile
ground.
sags
1.
joke, jest, fun, sags
ce-ba
byed-
pa
to
rally
maliciously,
to turn into
ridicule with sarcasms
Glr.;
nan-sags
Mil.
a bad
joke; Ka-sdgs
v. Ka. 2. cause of a
contention,
object
of a
dispute
or a
quarrel,
matter in
dispute
Mil.
;
quarrel, dispute,
con-
tention,
in
gen., *sag gijdg-pa*
C. to
fight,
to
quarrel,
to
dispute.
"
san v.
t C
rig
v.
ycan-po; *san-ldg*
a kind of
fur, perh.
for
sbyah-sldg
fur-coat of wolfs skin Lh.
san-ldn
sabre,
sword Pth.
san-sdii a fabulous creature with
wings
and bird's
feet,
but other-
wise like a human
being;
san-san-feu Cs :
pheasant
or
partridge
(gftcrgfta).
nrsr sans,
resp.
for
sna,
the
nose,
sans-
rgyud Pth.,
sans-sna
id.;
sans-l\un
nostril,
sans-rtse
tip
of the nose.
.qr*
sad 1. the mark of
punctuation
:
],
also
rkyah-sdd
or
cig-sdd;
it is a diacritical
sign
of about the value of our comma or
semicolon; nyis-sdd
the double
shad,
||,
dividing sentences, or,
in metrical
compo-
sitions, verses;
bzi-sdd the fourfold
shad,
'||,
at the end of sections and
chapters;
fseg-sdd
the dotted shad
(i
Y an ornamental
form of the
ordinary shad, always
made use
of,
w
r
heu a shad is to be
put
after the first
syllable
of a
line;
sad
byed-pa
Lex., Ofen-pa
Sch.,
to make a shad. 2. v. the
following
article.
pa,ysod-pa
Cs.
1 . to
comb,
to
curry, (a
horse),
also sad
rgydg-
pa.
2. to
brush,
to
stroke,
to rub
gently
with the hand
W.;
sdd-ma Sch.
curry-comb,
horse-comb;
'^sin-se* a wooden
rake, *cdg-
se'* an iron rake C.
nx'
san 1 . iron
hoop
of a barrel Cs. 2.
'
small
boat, *sem-pa* ferry-man
C.
-
3.
snow-leopard
W.
(cf. ysa).
4.
difference,
distinction,
san
Jbyed-pa
to
distinguish,
de-
cide,
determine Mil. and elsewh
, yzan-gyis
san mi
byed-pas
as
nobody
else is able to
decide it Glr.
; skad-ynyis-san-sbyor
is said
to be the title of a certain
dictionary.
-A3TK*
sdn-Ica 1 .
oblique W.,
*sdn-Jfa-la de-
ce* to cut off
obliquely;
san-fer
id.,
556
[JOIl a garment made of fine linen. - 2. v.
wU-81la, sub
wd-poo a thick blanket Ld.
+r=r dd-ba, IIwa-l>a U. lV., C., Jl. a
, I '., hart, a stag, col. usually "wa-
'I·a·f'u-cu or ru-Cu"; !ld-Po the male animal,
!ll,-mo the hind, roe, sa-frog a young deer,
fawn; cf. fwwa.
sa-ma 1. after-birth, placenta. - 2.
an ordinary coat made of dotll wllich
IIIIS not been nnpped lV.
ia-mi-Ug parsley IA.
o'5f !ld-mo C., JJ. (lV. "m6g-sa") mush-
"" 1 room; tho \"Il.Iious species of fungus
receive their nppelbtions from their colour
sIUUg-da, w...sa) or from
the plnce wl.tere they grow (klu,is-sa, i'!u-
ita, bid-ita, Gi,j-ia); tho damp climato of
Sikkim producos moroovor "sO-kf, I..(I'-wa
and tji-ww (sgrt-mo) -ia-mo", ete. es. has
also ita-mllli, a t!Lick killd of mushroom.
!la-ra so--re (cf jU,...pa) lV. moisl
SM. n. of a bird, Gl'acula
r; 1'flifJiO&l; a species of jny.
itl1-rii-bu,llTf\lA, n. ofoue of tlle
f:! '""-: '" two prillcipnl disciplos of Buddha.
oO':S; "ti-ru 1. hartshorn Med. - 2. n. of A
, 1 "ein AfOO.
""9'aF!r iJa-10g warped, oblique, aslant TV.
.t1"l,. Ss.{": spear, lance, pike, sword,
CII. abo tndent; D::l.
.a:n' sag, in ilag-lel'"fIo.s it. broke, it bul'$t.
, 1'1 llSunder &1,.
iJo.g-ma I. C. small stones or peb-
bles, gravel, 3o.g-1l1IHan gravelly,
iJag_(o.,; a plain nbounding with grnvcJ. -
2. Iv. pebble, JaY-I·tid rocky ground, covered
with a thin Inyer of mould which only b}'
dint of much irrigation will yield a scant.y
producc; wag-Mig gl11vcl, Ao.g-sa earth mixed
np witb stony, sterile ground.
ila/fll. joke, jest, fun, Hags 'ft-ba b1JM.
pa to rally maliciously,.to turn into
ridicule with snrtnsms Glr.; ,iau-Mys Mil.
o bad joke; Ra.JJo.f/8 v. Ma. - 2. cause of a
contention, object. of a dispute or a quarrel,
matter in dispute Mil.; quarrel, dispute, con-
tention, in gcn., "!lag gyo.g-pa" C. to fight,
to quarrel, to dispute.
""9t::.. AOI' v. TAa,j.
+1t:;.'f. fO' :sa:,
'" . l:ul-a",lIull-
rig v. yca,,-po; +Jan-lti.g* a kind offur, peril.
for sbya,i-sldfJ fur-coat of wolfs skin /.,/,.
sa,j-lti,i sabre, sword I'tlI.
""9t:;'41i:.' iJan..M" a fabulous crcnture with
wings nnd bird's feet, but other-
wise like II IluIDnn being; G3 :
pbonsnnl. or Ill\rtridgc
SOli', resp. for ma, the nose, Salis-
'Y/1JUd Pt!t., sa,i, .. ,na id.;
nostril, san,-rtU tip of the nOse.
""9:::;' sad 1. IJle IIInrK (If punctllation' 1, 1l.1Sil
or cig-!lrid; it is n diacriticnl
sign of about the \'alue of our comma or
semicolon; tlyu - Still tbe double shad, '1.
di\'iding sentences, or, in metrical compo-
sit.ions, "orsos; b::i-iJo.d the fourfold shad,
1111, nt the end of sections llfId chaptel'$;
{1leg-iJtid the dotted shad (1), an ornnment:l.1
form of tho ordillnry shnll, nlways made use
of, wllt.'11 a shad is to ho put after the first.
syllable of a line; iJad bgM-pa "fbl1Hl
Sch., to make a shad. - 2. \'. the following
llrticle.
.0--'1' 01.0-"1' ",">fr-,I' M<1-pa, r"d-
'(1 ' '\'11 .
1. to comb, to curry,(n IJOrse),n)so gad 1'gyo.g-
pa. - 2. to brush, to stroke, to rub gcntly
with the hund lV.; sdd·ma &It. curry-comb,
Ilol'SC-eomb; *iJbi--8i· a wooden mke, "co.y-
iJi" an iron rake C.
.a- 3/ln I. iron hoop of a barrel c,. - 2.
. 1"\ small boat, "";m-pa" ferry-maD C. -
3. snow-lcoparillV. (r£ [sa). - 4. difference,
distinction, san obyM,.]Ja to distinguish, de-
cide. uetennille Afil. and c1sewb , yzan-g!Ji&
san fui byld-pas as nobody else is' able to
decidc it Glr.; skad-ynyis-wml-ib1J6r is said
to be the title of a certain dictionnry.
sd11.l!a I. oblique lV., "stin-/.'a-la (li-
ce" to cut off obliquely; iJan-a.,. id.,
557
sdn-pa
*lam san-(c)--l(t ca
dug*
the road has ; m
oblique
direction. 2. 6'.:
place
of
passing
(>\.T a river.
.;/-/
bxan-pa, slaughterer,
butcher
6V/*.,
sometimes also
hang-
man;
*dn
-
l<<tit
slaughter-house,
butcher's
shop,
sdn-t/ri,
butcher's
knife, san-yrib pol-
lution
by
the sin of
slaughtering
an animal.
-
2. master or rower of a
boat,
boatman.
.nqv/iq'
Sab-sub 1. W.
whispering,
*sab-sub
NJ
tdii-ce,
zc-r-ce* to
whisper.
--2.
also sab-sob
lie, falsehood,
sab-sob
hiji'd-pa
to
lie,
to
cheat;
sab-st^b-can
deceitful,
frau-
dulent, crafty.
n^r crm^r
^am
i
ysam
the lower
part
of
a
thing, e.g.
of a
country,
x<un-pa
a lowlander
(opp.
to
yzun-pa
and
xW-pa); ysdm-du
adv. and
postp.
below,
at
foot,
rdh-leui sdm-du
O
cad
they
will be
incited of in their
respective chapters
Lt;
ili'i si'iin-du under
it,
underneath
(e g.
to
write); sam-gos, sam-fdbs,
resp.
sku-sdm a
garment
like a
petticoat,
worn
by
Tibetan
priests
and monks.
*^"
sdm-bu
flounces, fringes, trimmings.
n
-
sdm-bha-la Ssk.
.
in
pure
Tibetan
bde-
by&n,
n. ofa fabulous
country
in the north west of
Tibet,
fancied to be a
kind of
paradise;
sdm-bha-lai
Idrn-yig (not
passport, but:) 'guide
for the
journey
to
Shambhala'.
sar
(from sdr-ba)
1.
east, sar-pydgs
id.;
xdr-pa
inhabitant of an eastern
country;
Mtr-lid south-east. 2. termin. of
*-a,
into
the flesh.
sM'-pa
1
young
men,
grown-up youth
(collective
noun) W.;
peril,
also: a
young
man. 2. v. the
preceding
article.
sA^'^f
y(
ii'-po
1' W.
adulterer,
**>dr-po
co-ce
or fcur-ce* to commit
adultery, (on
the
part
of the
husband.)
2.
=
sar-pa
1.
*<i''-i>o
a
young man, sdr-po yzon-nu
ysum
three
young
men Mil.
sdr-ba
pf.
and
secondary
form of
J'dr-ba.
n^-
xtir-ma 1. Sell.: a
strip
>'</,/.
ryydb-pa
to sew in
long
Mitdics,
to
baste
(6V/f.
: rw/i*
yil-ib-pa).
-
-
IK,
6'.
grown-up girls (collective noun); afemale(V)
*
J*
sdr-mo
adulteress,
cf.
idr-po.
sar-xdr
straightway, directly,
*/-*/
Oyr6-ba
( N.
Hur-HHi- Ld.
furrowed, having
small
N elevations and hollows.
J*
a,
in rna-sdl
ear-lap, tip
of the ear.
sdl-ba 1. >Sc7t.
stone-pavement.
2.
a
h&rrOY/, sdl-sal-baSch.^sril-
la dud-
ce* Ld. to harrow.
xdl-ma 6s.: a
flint, sharp-edged stone;
W^. :
stony ground;
mountain side
consisting
of
detritus;
sdl-ma-can full of
sharp
stones 6's.
V
sdl-nia-li Ssk. the seven-leaved
silk-cotton
tree,
Bombay
hi>j>t<i-
phyllum Sty.
rr*r
sas 1.
part,
ca-sas
id.;
^/v/s de-las sas
ycig part
of this rice Dzl.
;
sas-sds-su
bgo-ba
to
distribute,
. . . la
among
Dzl.
;
sos-
ce-ba a
good deal, much,
the
greater part
of,
zla-mfsdn sas-ce-bai
Ku-lh'dg generative
fluid in which uterine blood
predominates
(cf. Ku-tfrdg
in
Ku-ba)
Wd/'t.
yti-mug
sas-
ce-bar
^yur-ba
excess of dullness or stu-
pidity Thgr.; sas-cei; sas-ci's,
sas-cen in an
eminent
degree,
in an
exceeding
measure.
-
2.
some,
a
few, zag-sds
some
days
Mil.;
^a-sas some,
a few Mil. 3. instr. of sa.
A* si num.: 57.
^-
si-ba
pf.
and
secondary
form of
O
ci-ba.
^n-n-
s-
1. vb. to
die,
to
expire,
to
go
out
(as
light, tire);
si-bar
ai/xr-pa-lds
-when she
was in a
dying
state
Pth., si-zin-pai <dg-tu
after her
death;
*st-tc
I6y(-yo/t)-cc*
W. to
rise
again
from the
dead,
*ldJi-ce*
(lit.
stan-
ces)
to raise from the dead. 2. sbst. the
state of
dying, expiring,
si-ba-laji sos awa-
kened from a
dying
state
frq.;
cf. also
comp.
3.
partic.
and
adj.
si-ba sos-
par bijcd-
par ytfur
one
already dying
still recovers
Do.;
si-bat lus the
body
of the deceased Do.
-lmll jllll·(b··lu. la dNyo tho fOltll 1m!! nn
olJliquo direction. - 2. C.: plnce of pussiug
OH'r rivCT.
"'9"1.:f' iall-I'll I. nlso Ulall-pa, slRughwrcr,
butcher Gb'" somelinJcs alw hang.
man; jUl. - flJ.lj slaughter-house, butdlcr'l:I
shop, ;dlJ-9''; blllcher's knife, fall-flrio pol.
lution by tbe sin of slaughteriu):; an nnimn1.
- 2. master or rower of l\ bont, boatman.
+j.::r.,q.:r j(lh-.8l1.b 1. JIl. whispering,
.J ta,i-ct, ::tr-i:e- to w!lisju:r. - 2.
:'Lbo JalNdb lie, falsehood, ?Jab-JOb b!JM-pa
to lie, to cheAL; deceitful, frau-
dulcllt, Cfllrt)'.
.tj;.r', JUIII,. rJum the lower I'nl"l of
:\ tlllllg, e.g. of l\ country,
.tdm-pa " lowbndcr (opp. to r!:,j,j·pu lind
MOd-Jla); yJdlll-d,J nd\'. u.nd po,;tp. below,
I\t foot, I'/.M-lcui '01/1-<1" Jad they will be
trented of in their respective c1ll1pters Lf.;
dri .iulII-du under it, undernenth (e g, to
write); ?sam-yOa, ?sam-(,ih8, resp. M'U.;utl< 1\
like a petticoat, worn by TilJetllll
l'riests aut! monks.
sam-btl flounces, fringes, trimmings.
isum-Ma-la ... in pure Tibetan
l() odc-ob!Jlui,n.ofa
in the north west of TiLet, fancied to be II
kind of (lara.disc; isdm-MfI-lai lam-yiy (not
IHlssllort, but:) 'guide for the jouriley to
Shllmbhllill'.
--9:;0 Jar (from .idr-ba) 1. east, id,;
id"-]HJ inhnbituntof :\11 eAstern eOlmlr}';
isal..lIuJ south-cast. - 2. termin. of sa, into
the fleslJ.
"'9:;'=,f ;u"-1'a I, youug men,grown-ul) youth
(coll(!Ctil"e noun) perh. also: 1\
}'ouug WlIn. - 2. v. the preceding nrticle.
"9:::.:'f iaJ'-JIO 1. W: adulterer, -1IU,.-1'o i:&-ce
or I':-u,·-Cc" to commit lldultcr}', (on
the pllrt of the - t. _ .il.lr-pa J.
1I,j,../VJ I' young mall, lid!""]\<) y;;Qlrll"
rs/tlli three young mcn Mil.
"9':;".:::r pf. nnd seoondlHY form of
oC'I.I"OI.l.
557
Ji-bu
"9-'5.l' Jd"-Ma 1. &1,.: a strip &hr. ;l.Ir
..... 1'9!Jdb1Ja to sew in long lilildlell, to
bU6t.e (Sc/'.: :ltIi. rtltib-]JI.I). - 2. w., C
grown-up girls (COIlCCli\'e nouu); a lemale("{)
+j-=\3f Aur-lIlo adulteress, cf. J(}I'1HJ,
"9:;'""9:;' Aar.Jdr straightway, direc!ly,Jar.Jlir
o!JTYl-ha (,3.
.,a.:;'.,q-=\ isar·islwLd. furruwcd, having smnll
'1 . -J elevations lind hollows.
--9"'f isal, in 1'Iw-Aul ear-lap, lip of the ellr.
..Qc.r:::r Ml-ba 1. &1,. stone-pavement. - i.
. I a harrow,sIU-isal-baSdl., -6fil·la (lUd-
i:e" IA. to hnrrow.
?slil-llia (,il.: a lIint, sharp-edged stone;
IV.: stony grounu; mountain side
consisting of detritus; Adl- IIIa-Clln full of
sllllrp ston('S O.
Aul-lIIa-li &1.:, the seven-leaved
silk-COlton tree, lJcmbl.£X Iltl'/a-
Sly.
Aaa 1. part, ra';l1.'1 iu,; ima dc·IWl «aa
tHy part of this rice Dzl.; «aa-AuHU
o[lo-ha to distribute, .•. la (1Inong Dd. j Aus-
l.t-ba good de:ll, much, the grellter (lurt
of, zla-1II(sun !..tu,,.I..',.ug genemtive
fluid in which uterine blood predominntes
(cf. 1.11-!..t,.ug in Ilu-ba) IVd,i.; rti-mll!J .iaa·
rt-har o!J!lU/'-h'l excess of tlullness or stu-
pidity Tllfll',; Aua-ell', 6as-Ch, Aaa·cen in "n
eminent degree, in lion exceeding meftSUl"e.
- t. some, a few, =«[1-"ua somo allYs Alii.;
o!Ja-Aas some, l\ few Mil. - 3. iDslI'. of 1Ia.

""9" i<l Dum.: 57.
-tt.q' Al-!Ja pf. and soeondarJ form of Ji-ba.
I, vb, to die, 10 expire, to go out (ns
lighl, lil'e); Ai-bar !I!J'II"-lJa-ll<& when sbe
\I'IIS in II Uyillg Ptk, i<i-zill-pai .;Jy-t"
after her death; ·.ii-te llxJ.-!JOIi)-U- II: to
rise lignin fl'OPl the deRd, -/Jit-i:e" (lit. IlUli-
i:ta) to misc frolll tbe delld. - 2. the
state of dying, cxIJiring, U-hfl-[a, I()IJ I\Wa-
kened frOtu n d)'ing slAtc frq.; ef. nlso comp.
- 3. parlie. nml ndj. Al-ha byld-
par !/!Ill,. ooc IIll'cndy dying still reco\'el'll
Do.; ii-bai I," tllC body of the deceased Do.
'0
558
si-rig
Comp. si-ki-ma,
ci-Ka-ma 1. sbst.
dying,
death,
st-ki-ma-ru in
dying.
2.
adj. dying,
si-ki-ma
yod (or
ci-Ka-ma
yod)
he is at the
point
of
death,
he is at death's door. *si-
Kan* col. the
deceased,
the dead. si-sno
Sch. :
'blessing
for one deceased'. si-cos
religious
ceremonies
for the dead Sch.
-
si-sa flesh of animals that have died of them-
selves,
the
only
flesh which a strict Bud-
dhist is allowed to
eat,
and which accord-
ingly
in Buddhist countries is
frequently
consumed.
"
si-rig
W.
clinking, jingling.
"
si-rog
W. a sort of
early barley.
j-
si-la Ssk. for
Krims,
fsid-Krims
custom,
manner,
moral law.
sig
1. for
cig (q.v.)
after a final s.
-
2.
louse,
mi-sig
common
louse, lug-sig
sheep-louse, tick,
Kyi-sig
flea, (lha)- dre-sig
bug; *(lag (lit.
brag)-sig-pa*
W.
mite,
wood-
louse, tick;
sig O
fu-ba
B., *ltd-ce, rug-ce*
W.
to look for
lice,
to
louse, sig
bsdl-ba to
clean from
lice;
sig-can
Sch. also
sig-po
or
sig-sig-po
infested with
lice, lousy; sig-ndd
pedicular disease;
sig-sro
lice and nits
S.g.
sig
-
ge
-
ba, sig
-
sig
1.
standing
or
lying
close
together,
close-banded Mil.
nt.,
C. cf.
ysig-pa, ysib-pa.
--2.
trembling, tottering,
wavering;
with
mig: looking
this
way
and
that, looking about, perh.
also :
rolling (the
eyes).
sigs(-se)-sigs rocking,
as
trees moved
by
the wind
Mil.;
sigs-sigs yom-yom waving, moving
to
and
fro,
shaken
etc.,
also
fig.
Pth.
^TT'
sin I.
gerundial particle
for cin after
a final s.
II. sbst. 1.
tree,
bzd-sin
fruit-tree,
rtsi-
sin v.
rtsi\ l)6n-sin
a beautiful
green leafy
tree,
skdm-sin a
dry
withered tree. 2.
wood,
sin
zig
some
wood;
Kan-sin
timber,
timber-wood,
bud-sin
firewood, fuel,
skdm-
sin
dry
wood
; yam-sin
Cs. : 'a small
quan-
tity
of wood thrown into the fire for sacri-
fice', 3. a
piece
of
wood, log, billet,
*sin
nyi
sum fob* W.
put
two or three
pieces (to
the
fire); stump,
stub of a tree
Glr.;
*tu-
pag-gi
sin* W.
gun-stock; srog-sin axle,
axle-tree.
Comp.
sin-kir-ti a
carrying-frame
Lh.
-
sin-kyu
a wooden hook. sin-rkan Schr.
a wooden
leg,
a crutch. sin-rked the
upper
part
of the trunk of a tree. sin-Kan 1.
a wooden
house, log-house.
2. shed or out-
house for wood. sin-ttu
sap, juice
of trees.
sin-Kur a load of wood. sin-ttri wooden
chair. sin-mKan worker in
wood,
car-
penter, joiner. sin-rgon
Sch. wood
pecker,
sin-rgon
Krd-bo the
spotted woodpecker,
sin-rgon mgo-ndg
black
woodpecker.
-
sin-rgydl
a tree of
extraordinary height
or
circumference,
a
giant
-tree.
--
sin-mndr
licorice
Sch.,
Wts.;
a sort of cinnamon W.
sin-cds 1. wooden
utensils,
implements.
2. tools for
working
wood Sch.
sin-tog.,
sin-fog
fruits of
trees,
fruit. sin-rfa v. that
article.
--
sih-stan
chopping-block
Ld.
-
sin-fags
wooden enclosure. sin-fun wood-
picker, gatherer
of wind -fallen wood.
-
sin-dum
log, billet,
block.
sin-dra wooden
lattice-
work;
wooden
paling
C.,
W. sin-
drun-pa
one
sitting
under a
tree,
i.e. an
ascetic,
Burn.
I,
309.
sin-ydugs
the
leafy
crown of a tree Sch. sin-sdon
trunk,
stem
of a
tree;
a
tree;
block.
sin-prdn
a small
tree,
a
shrub,
bush Sch. sin-bdl cotton
from the cotton-tree
6s.,
cf. sal-ma-li-sin.
sin-bu a small
piece
of
wood,
sin-bu sor-
bzi-pa
a
piece
of wood four inches broad or
long
Tar.
--
sin-Jbrds
fruit.
--
sin-smdn
medicine
prepared
from wood Sch. sin-
rtsd root of a tree. sin-rtsi resin Cs.
sin-rise
top
of a tree.
--
sin-fsa cinnamon
(having
a 'saltish'
taste,
as is
expressly
stated
&#.);
*sin-fse Ub-ma* W.
bay-leaf,
laurel-leaf. sin-fsdl
chip, shaving, splinter.
*sin-fsogs*
W. forest.
sin-yzon
a wooden
basin, trough,
tub.
*sin-zdg* (lit. bzogs)
chip, splint
W.;. shavings brought
off
by
the
plane
C.
-
sin-zdn
wood-rasp
Sch. *sin-
zcl* a small
chip,
a
very
small and thin
piece
of
wood,
a
splinter,
*sih-zel
zug
son* W. I
have run a
splinter
into
(my
hand or
foot).
55.
Compo iJi-ki-ma, oi!j·//a-ma I. sbst. dying,
death, isf..h,-ma-l"u in dying. - 2. adj. dying,
M_h_rlla yod (or oa-Ita-mu y()(/) he is at the
poiot of death, be is at death'!:; door. - -Moo
I.'(HI.- col. the deceased, the dead. - iswtiQ
&11.; 'blessing for onc deceased', - Ai-r'Q8
religious ceremonies for the dead &/,. -
iii-Aaliesh of animals that bave died of them-
sehes, the only flesh whidl a strict Bud-
dhist is 1I1iowed to eat, lind which accord-
ingly in Buddhist countries is frequently
consumed.

"9""'l:l']" ii-riff lV. clinking, jingling.
U-Ivly If. a sort of early barley.
-il'r..j' M-w. Ssk. for fl"illl&, custom,
munDer, morall"w,
iil9 1. for cif} (q. v.) after (I. final s. -
2. IOllse, mi..sig common louse, !lig-Big
sheep-louse, tick, Ryi-M!J Jlea, (lIwhdl"NiV
bug; -(jay (lit. brag)-Sig-pa- W: mite, wood-
"louse, tick; isig o(,i-ba B., "ltdoh, ''''g-ee- w
to look for lice, to louse, a;g bsul-ba to
clean from lice; Ug-ean Seh. also Mg-po or
Mg-Mg_po infested with lice, lousy;
pedicul:tr disease; Ug-mJ lice and nits S.g.

81
9 -!It -.ba, AiD-.Mg
1. StaJJdlDK or lymg
close together, close-banded .Mil. nt., C. cf.
tUg-pa, rUb-pa. - 2. trembling, tottering,
wavering; with miy: looking this way and
that, looking about, perh. also: rolling (the
eyes).
H!l
s
(-8C)-Jiigs rocking, as
trees lIloved by tbe wind
.Mil.; SigS-Aig8 yom-y6nl wll.\·ing, moving to
and fro, sbaken etc., also fig. 11k.
U" I. gerundilll lmrticle for ei,i lifter
a final s.
II. sbsl. 1. tree, b;;a_Ahi fruit-tree, rtsi-
Siri v. "ui; a. beautiful A;reen leafy
tree, II.him-,iiri a dry withered tree. - 2.
wood, itin zig some wood; tiwlx!r,
timber-wood, bUd-3i,j :firewood, fl1e1, shim-
Aili dry wood; ydm-itili c.,.: 'a small quan-
tity of wood tbrown into the fire for sacri-
flCe'. - 3. a piece of wood, log, billet, ·81('
n.l/; sum too" lV. put two or three pie<:ell (to
llie fire); stump, stub of a tree Glr.; "hi-
pag_gi iti,," W: gun-stock; axle,
axle-tree.
Compo Ai,,-h,"-ti a carrying-frame H,. -
iJi'i-J.:yu n wooden hook. - Jiti-rluui &711".
a wooden leg, a crutch. - iJiri-rJ.:M. the upper
part of the trunk of R tret'. - I.
a wooden house, log-house. 2. shed or out-
house for wood. - Uti-ill. sap,juice of trees.
-U,i-l.1ur a load of wood. - wooden
cbair. - Aili_mfan worker in wood, car-
penter, joiner. -)iri-''[!dn Sell. wood peeker,
Ai,j·,,!/<,n the spotted woodpecker,
iJi,i.ryQn ,n!J<'-nuy black woodpecker. -
s;'i-I'!Jylil a tree of extraordillal"y height or
cir..:umferElIlce, a giant ·tree, - Sil' - 1111idl'
licorice &h., iVf3.; a sort of cillll:lmOIl IV.
- ,iii· cas I. wooden utensils, implemeuts.
2. tools for working wood &!J. - al,i-toy,
iJfI1-(O[j fruits of trees, fruil- U,i-ria v. that
article. - iliti-3tan chopping·block JA. -
;'/li-(a!f8 woodell enclosure. - iJiti-(,in wood·
picker, gatherer of wind - fallen wood. -
iJi,i-dum log, billet, block. -Aiil-dl'a wooden
wooden paling C., W. - sili-
dl"un-pa one sitting under II. tree, i. e. an
ascetic, Burn. 1, 30D. - iJi,i-rduy8 the lenfy
crown of l\ tree &11. - Abi-Miori trunk, stem
of a tree; a tree; block. - ili'i-jll'dll a small
tree, a shrub, bush Se/•. - Aili-bdt cotton
from the eotton·tree [,., cr.
_ Ai,i-bu nsmall piece of wood, U,j·bu aQl'-
b::i-pa II piece of wood four inches broad or
10llg Tar. - ilin-obrat fruit. - 8lli-3man
medicine prepared from wood &/,.-lii,i-
rna root of a. tree. - Aili-Iui resin Cs. -
iliti-l"t8I! lop of a tree. - i!i'i-(sa cinnamon
(ha\'ing 1\ 'Sllltislt' taste, as is expressly
stated S.g.); -""i-(S( la-ma" lV. bay·leaf,
laurel-leaf. - Si,,-(sdl chip, Shaving, splinter.
lV. torest. - Ain-Y::OIi a wooden
hnsin, trough, tub. - "liili-::og" (lit. b::OfP)
chip, splint lY.;.sbaviogs broug,.bt off by the
piline C. - i!i,i·zan wood-rasp &/1. - "iJi'i-
::cl" a small chip, a \'ery sllIalland thin piece
of wood, no splinter, "lii,i-::el ::uy SOl,· W. )
have run a splinter hllnd or
xih-kun
sli,-~og
W. a
rasp.
- -
*//;-/-//
a
peg.
*///-
A
A
hoard, plan
Is
-
kin- sun the bark of
siii-*<'<l a
rasp.
.;///-/////. asa
foetida,
used as me-
>
dicine,
and
(like garlic)
as a
spice;
aUo n. of a mountain
pass
between Lahoul
and Zankar.
MH-rta
('wooden horse') waggon, cart,
carriage,
also
fig.
=
fey-pa, e.g.
.s//J-
rte
ccn-po frq.
in the
writings
of
TsotiKapa;
*in-rtd-Jc<'n--lo id.;
sin-rtai kan-bzdn the
body
of a
carriage,
siiwtai mda the
pole,
beam,
shaft of a
cart, Opd//-lo
the
wheel,
rjcs, lam, sul,
srol the
track,
rut
(of
a
cart)
Cs.',
sin-rta
rkaii-ycig
Sch.
wheelbarrow;
xift-rta-mKan Cs. maker of
carts, cartwright;
xiit-i'ta-pa
1.
carter, driver,
coachman. '2.
charioteer.
*id ! S<-'h- hazel-nut. 2. also
j.vW-
ysid-ma, ysid-ston, ysid-zdn
funeral re-
past,
of which
every body may partake
;
-s/W-
cos
religious
funeral
ceremony;
std-sa Sch.
1.
burying ground, cemetery.
2. a fruitful
field
=
ysin-sa.
Cf.
ysin.
sin-tu
very, greatly, esp.
before
adj.
and
adv.,
in 13.
frq.
i'6 v. sib.
"
s/6-pa
v.
sub-pa
to
whisper.
Bn\B*(lJ*faj*
sib-si-lu-lu or ru-ru Ld.
hip,
'
^ ^
the fruit of the
dog-rose.
st'm-sa-pa
Cs. a kind of tree or
wood.
Nq^* ^q^'^T^'
*' ?/1
5 sii'-sii',
with
O fon-pa
Cs.
to
gush out,
to stream forth
with a noise.
T^*
sil-ba W. to
drip through.
sil-li a
gauze-like
texture W.
;
sil-
sil 1 . id. 2. 6s. : 'a cant word
denoting
the noise of
any thing'.
3^1"
; ' s
9
0(^ ' uck
'
^or*un
e, bliss;
<A-
Jiiju/i-na
.N/.S if that
happens,
it will be an
auspi-
cious
sign, sis-pat
miii a name
foreboding
good Li.,
ww
sia^pai
Itas an omen
foreboding
ill
Wdn.;
bstdn-pai
sis ace. to Schl. 232
denotes the
religious plays performed
in the
559
convents. Cs.:
*tx(-pa)-jto
one
blessed,
kit-
pa yin-pa
to be
blessed,
*w-y;<//- _*////>/-////
to become
blessed,
sh-pai-
/></<'<
/-jt
to make
blessed,
to
bless;
bkra-sis v.
f-Y
su 1. ace. to
Cunningham
and other
>c
English
authorities the Tibetan word for
stag; yet
as none of the
many
Tibetans,
from different
parts
of the
country,
that were
consulted
by
us,
seemed to know this
word,
it is not
unlikely,
that in
consequence
of
indistinct
hearing
it is but a
corruption
of
sa
-
ba
(q. v.).
- -
2. *su-su
jJie'-pa*
C. to
whistle. 3. num.: 87.
JTOTI* su-ddy
n. of a
plant
Med.\
Sch.: the
x!
'
rush.
-
*&-ba I. sbst. 1 . an
abscess, ulcer,
sore
Cs.; su-ba
Q
fon an abscess
rises,
na
gives pain, pan
heals;
*su- bur*
W.,
and
prob.
also su-for Med
,
id
; *su-ndg
and bd-
su* W. a sore that has become inflamed and
rankling.
2.
scab, scurf,
scald W.
II.
vb.,
pf. (6).ws,
fut.
bm, imp. (b)m(s),
1. to take
off,
pull
off,
draw
off,
yzdn-gyi
gos
to take off a
person's
clothes, go-
ca
armour,
mfson-ca
arms, weapons
l*th.;
to
strip, strip off, e.g.
leaves, twigs, pdgs-pa
the
skin,
the
peel,
hence
(also
without
pd$rs-
pa}
to
skin,
to
pare,
to
peel W., e.g.
*'d-lu
su-ce* to
peel potatoes; gyab-siis
coat of
wool shorn from a
sheep,
fleece Ld. 2.
to
copy, dpe
a
book, resp.
zal-sus
byed-pa
Cs.;
dpe-bsiis
a
copied
book C.
su-bham
Ssk.,
sometimes at the end
of
books,
hail! all hail!
*>u-ra-se
(-na)
n. of a tract of
land in the
neighbourhood
of
Mathura,
not far from
Agra
Wdk.
su-'i-ka Tar.
63,
8,
prob.
also su-
lig
Sch.,
n. of a fabulous
country
in the north-west.
w//
1- a thrust,
push, knock, *sw/
c,'m-
po)he'-pa*
to
push
off,
to
give
a
knock,
to
elbow, differing
from
O pul-ba
to shove
(by
a more
gentle motion)
C. 2. in
comp.: KijO-siig,
v.
kyo\ sug-bzu
wife, con-
sort, spouse
Schr. 3. W. :
old,
but still fit
for use. 4.
.w/-.s//</-/a
col. for sub-bur
softly, gently, e.g. O gro-ba
to
walk,
to tread etc.
-iiH-=ix,} W.a rasp.- jj"'rztr a peg.- 8i;,-
lib uOftr(l, plMk. - .iili· the b:lrk of
trees. - Jlii4t'cl" rll!p.
;ilj - asa foctida, used M lIIe-
. r' "¥ diciDC, :Iud (like gnrlic) IlS 1\ sl,ice;
lliso n. of 1\ lIlouDI.:\in piloSIS between J.J:l.houJ
aut! ZnllkftT.
('wooden horse') waggon, cart,
1 cllTrioge, nlso fig•• flg-pa, e.g. Milo.
"ta chl-po frq. in the writings of T30';{'(Ipa;
ji,i-rta-oA:dr-lo ill.; Sili .. r(ai /lUI; - b::titi tile
body of l\ cnrril\gc, i[Ii..-rtai mila the pole,
beam, shaft of tL cart, ol'1d,;-lo the wheel,
ryes, lam, jill, tlrol the track, I"ut (of n cart)
<''3.; ,ii,l-rla rJ.:nii-ri:i{} $ch. whedbnrrowj
8I,j·rta-IIIJ.'a71 C,. lunker of carts, t.:nrtwright;
ijli-rta-pa I. curler, driver, coachman. 2.
chl\riotecr.
41-' Jid 1. &11.. hazel-nul - 2. :lISQ rJid..
1 rJiJ..ma, rUd'8Wn, rJid-::al1 fLmeral reo
of which every hody loay pnrttlkc; Aid·
roe religious funp.rul ceremony; Aid-3u &"-
I. burying grouud, cemetery. '1. l\ fruitful
field"" ,8In·3u. Cf.
Ain-tu greatly, esp. lJefore adj.
I I.J Rnd tid,'., III n. frq.

4.q· iib v. Aw.

4.q'tr .ib-t>a v. W'.pa to whisper.
.ij.q'Jj'E;!!?i' or t'I4-m IA. hip,
the fruit of the dog-rose.
isim-.3a-pa Ce. Rkiud of lree or
""1-'" . I wood.
.a.:::Jj.=:..' iiI', iir-.3il', with ofon-}'" C3.
. I ' . I to gush out, to stream fOI·tll
..... ith a. noise.

"'f-4',::r isU·ba IV. to drip tbrough.
iil-li R gnu7.e-Jilr.e te.l.ture Ail·
mI. id. 2. c..: '11. Cllot word denoting
tile noise of IIny thing'.
ii, good luck, fortune, bliss; de,h/';"·na
,if if that happens, it will be an lIllS!'i.
cious sign, ii'-pai mi,j R name foreboding
good Lt., mi HI-pui ftu3 no omen foreboding
ill \vd,..; pui Aia ncc. to &Jel.
dellOtes the religious pb.ys in tlil)
AI/g
convcuts. G•. : ii:(-pt_)iJlJ one blcssed, Ah·
1m yin'pa to bo lJlcsSCiI, ""1m,. o!lyi",-ba
to become bles>led, ii'1Jl1r byM-]1a to make
lJlessed, to Mess; bkm-8i. v. b1.:/'d..oo.
4 in 1. ncc. to Cunningham lind otller
.... £lIg1ish nuthorities the'fibetnn word for
stag; )'et as none of the many TibetAns,
from different parts of theeountry, thut were
consulted by us, seeme(! to know word,
is not unlikcly, that in consequence of
hearing it is but l'I. corruption of
sa· ba (q. v.). - 2. -iu-SU jM·pa- C. to
whistle. - 3. num.: 87.
.,q'_::q- isu-dug n. of a plant .lfed.; ScA.: the
..J \ rush.
.,q',:::r AHa 1 sbst. J. an abscess, ulcer, sore
..J C•. : iu-ba o(tm an abscess rises, na
gil'es I,nin, p'an he:\ls; ·'u.-obri/'· lV., I\nd
prob. also ht·(Qr Mrd , id ; ·slt-ndglmd bJ·
su· 11'. a sore that l111S become inflamed nnd
rankling. - 2. scab, scurf, scald W.
II. vb., pf. (b)Aua, fut. bill, imJl' (b).!u(t),
1. to take off, Ilull off, draw flIT, r::an-yyi
goa to take off a person's clothes, yr}. ea
RrmonT, 1II(aon-ca nrms, ",capons 1't1l.; to
strip, strip off, e.g. leaves, tll'ir;s, pdy!-p<J
the skin, tIle peel, hellee (also without ptigs.
pa) to skin, to pare, to peel W:, e.g. ·'a_fu
iN-ie· to peel pOIl\toes; 9yab.Ui3 cont of
wool shorn from l\ sheep, Jlcece £d. - 2.
to copy, dJM 1\ IJook, resp. tal-.31ia byid-pa
G•. ; a collicd book C.
'u-Mum Ssk., sometimes at the end
-..,; '<i of books, lJail! 1\11 hail!
.,cP:;·:W-C') .su-ra-ae(-1kI) n. of", traet of
..J land iu the neighbourhood of
M:lthunl, lIot fur from Agl'll Wd,l·.
AN-
1
i-1.:a '1'al'. 63, 8. prob. also ill_
.j fig &1,., n. of II fl\bulous country
in the north-west.
sllg 1. a thrust, push, knock, -slIfJ 'Rm-
..J I po)]UP-JUI· to push off, to gil'e n knock,
to elbow, differing from o]iitf-ba to shove
(b)' II lllore gentle motion) C. - 2. in
camp.: Ii:;o-J,ig, v. J!!JO; s,ig.JJ:a wile, (,'On·
sort, sllouse ScI,,'. - 3. U':: old, but still lit
for use. - 4. illfJ-illig-la col. for iilh·bttr
genUy!e.g'ogrQ--ba towalk, tc trend etc.
sug-gu
sul
*
sug-gu
W. for
sog-bu.
sug-pa
1. the
high, cypress-like
juniper-tree
of the
Himalaya
moun-
tains,
the
pencil
cedar
(Juniperus excelsa).
It
covers
large
mountain
tracts,
is considered
sacred,
and much used in
religious
cere-
monies;
its berries
(sug-Jbrds)
are burnt as
incense.
lug-dud
the smoke or
perfume
of
juniper. sug-fser
Med. the
young pointed
sprouts
of this tree.
sug-fsod
a sort of
mistletoe,
Viscum
Oxycedri, growing
on it
and
gradually killing
it. The leaves have
a
slightly
sour taste and are used for culi-
nary purposes
W.
rgya-sug
ace. to Cs.
=
spd-maJuniperus squamosa,
a low shrub and
similar to our
Juniperus
communis. But a
passage
of the
Stg.
shows that its fruits are
eaten like
pease
or
rice,
which cannot be
imagined
of
j uniper-berries
or
cypress
cones
;
cf.
spd-ma.
--
2. in
sug-pa Opud-pa Sch.,
v. sub
Opud-pa.
sugs
1 inherent
strength, power, energy,
c.
genit.:
ddd-pai, bydms-pai, dgd-
bai
sugs-kyis by
the
power
or ardour of
faith,
love, joy, e.g.
to shed
tears,
=
to
weep
with
joy
etc. Glr. and elsewh.
;
ycin-gyi sugs dgag
mi
by
a the
impulse
to make water must not
be
suppressed Med.\ Odi-dag siton-gyi sbyin-
sugs yin
this is the
power
of former alms
or
presents
Glr.
;
tugs-rjei sugs-kyis by
the
power
of
grace Do.;
der
sleb-pai sugs
the
power
or
ability
of
attaining
to that
place
Thgr. ;
without a
genit.
:
sugs-kyis
=
ran-
sugs-kyis spontaneously,
ofone's own
accord,
sugs-kyis yon they will,
no
doubt,
come of
their own accord
Mil.;
mgs byed-pa
to exert
one's
self(?); sugs
-
stobs
=
sugs; snd-sugs
Odren-pa
Cs. : 'the
accenting
the first
syllable'.
-
2. col. also subs and
sud,
mostly
in com-
pounds: sugs-skad Mil.,
sugs-sgra, cv\.*sug-
ra* a
whistling,
a whistle or
whiff;
sugs-glu
1. a
whistling.
2. a whistled
tune,
*sug-da
jhe'-pa*
to whistle a tune C.
; siigs-pa
a small
whistle
which,
in
sounding it,
is
put quite
into the mouth.
sugs-ndr (W. *%-%*), sugs-
fin
sigh, groan, sugs
nar
byed-pa
or
Jbyin-pa
to
sigh,
to
groan, sugs-rin
nar
ndr
Odug
he heaves a
deep sigh
Mil. nt.
sun-bet, pf.
suns,
1. to snore. 2. to
hum,
to
buzz, e.g.
of a
large
beetle.
"
sud v.
sugs
2.
sud-pa pf.
fut.
bsud,
1. to
rub, e.g.
one
thing against
another C. 2.
to
get scratched, excoriated, galled (cf.
sun-
pa').
3. sud
byed-pa (
W.
*co-ce*)
to steal
silently away,
to sneak off
unperceived.
^n
~P
a Dar
kj rind, peel, skin, sun-kog,
sun-pdgs id.,
the last
expression
is
also used of the skin of animals Lex.
-
pyi-sun
the outer rind or
skin,
nan-sun the
inner
rind;
bar -sun the middle
rind,
the
bast,
esp.
of willows Sch.:
sun-kog idns-pa
the
spontaneous chapping
or
peeling
off of
the
skin;
sun-man box-wood.
,n*rJ"
sub-pa,
also
sib-pa, pf. imp. subs,
to
NS
speak
in a low
voice,
to
whisper,
sub
byed-pa
id.
;
*Kog-sub-la
sil-ce* W. to read
in a low
voice,
to read
whispering;
sub-bu
a
whispering,
sub-bus zld-ba to recite in a
low voice
Lex.,
sub-bur smrd-ba
B.,
*sub-la
zer-ce* W. to
speak softly;
sub-bus
smod-pa
to
reprehend
in a
whisper
B.
nq^r-
subs
case, covering, sheath, paper bag
>j
etc.
frq. ; rkati-subs,
resp.
zabs-subs
stocking, sock, gri-subs
knife-case or
sheath,
mje-subs \.mje; lag-subs^ resp. pyag-subs
glove.
nrj'^r
sum-pa, pf. (b)sums,
ft.
bsum, imp.
\J
(6)swm(s),
1. to
weep,
ma sum mdzod
do not
weep
! nu-sum Mil.
weeping,
lamen-
tation.
--
2. to tremble
(?) gran
-sum
Lt.,
Schr.
gran-sum byed-pa
to tremble or shiver
with
cold,
to shudder.
sur-ba,
pf.
fut.
bsur, imp. (b)sur,
1.
to burn
slightly,
to
singe.
--
2. to
cut off.
sur-bu 1.
girdle,
belt
Lex.;
sur-bu-
preu
Zam. id.
(ace.
to
Sch.}.
2.
Cs. :
sore,
ulcer. 3. Ts. :
dumpling
of
flour,
=
Ko-lag.
sul 1- an em
Pty place,
a
place
that has
been
left,
that is no
longer occupied,
rdn-sul stons-nas
your
own
place
becoming
IV. for Mg-bu.

.tpf.:r 3Y!J-pa J.the high, cypress.Jike
..... juniper-tree of the IlimnJnya moun-
wins, tile peflcil cedar(Jullipcl'us ...reelsa). It
covers large mountain trncts, is considered
sacred, and much used in religious cere-
monies; its berries (i;ug-/mia) nre burnt as
incense. - Bug-dM the smoke or pcrfwne
ofjuniper.-6ug-f8b' Moo. the young pointed
sprouts of this tree. - 8Uy-(,jdJ n. sort of
mistletoe, V'l8Cum O.£.VCeJr'i, growing Oil it
and gmilual1y killing it. Tho leaves IJave
a slightly sour tasle und are used for culi-
IInry purposes Jv. - nce. to (1. _
spd-lIlaJumferlUJ squaTlW3a, n lowshrub una
similnr to our Juniperus communis. But n
passuge of tbe St9' shows that its fruits are
cawn like pease or rice, which caUDot he
imngillcdof jll nillcr-ben,ics or oypresseoncs;
cr. lIpa·ma. - 2. ill sUfI-pa "pM-pa &It.,
\', sub opUd-pa.
ilUust. inherent strength, power,energy,
c. geuit.: rMd-pai, h.ydm3-pai, dyd-
hai siuJ8-k!Ju by the power orardour of fuith,
love, joy, e.g. to shed tenrs, _ to weep ....-jth
joy etc. Glr. and elsewh,; rlin·u!Ji jugs d9a9
mi 0Ja the impulse to make water must Dot
be suppressed Med.; od,'-dag 3Mm-gyi 3b:/11-
su{Jt yin this is tlie power of former nlms
or presents Glr.; (ug3-I:)ci liu!J3-k!JM by the
jJower of grncc 1JfJ.; del" 1sUf18 the
I,ower or ability of atlaining to that plnee
TI'gr.; witllOut a genit.: sug3-k!Ji3 _ rdli-
8ufJ6-I'!Ji$ >ofoDe's own/\Ccord,
sitgs.k!Jis !loti they will, DO Ilouot, come of
their own uccord Mil.; w'fjs h!JiJ-pa \.() exert
one's self(?); _ IJuys; slid-imgs
odrm-pa u.: 'the I\ccentingthe 6.rstsyllable'.
- 2. coL also sUN and sud, mostly iii com-
pounds: Alig8-lSkad Mil., sugNgra, col. 'sug-
m' a Whistling, a whistle or whiff; sugs-glu
1. :l. whistling. 2. a whistled tUDC, 'Ulu-4a
)l"P.pa' 10 wllistle a tUDe c.; Uf[Js-pa a small
wllistle which, in sounding it, is put quite
into the mouth. ; \
" '(1
rT
.' ') ,
liUfP-nur t. wg-lJug
-J I rhi sigh, groan, !tu!J3 nUl' byMfa
t V
or ob!Jfrv-pa to sigh, to groan, sllgs-rf,i 1IU1'
IIU/' oJug he heaves a deep sigh 111fl. tit.
..qc'.q' .hili-ha, pf. su/is, 1. to snore. - 2, to
...... hum, to bun, e.g. of u. large l'eetle.
lud v.lsu9s 2.
md-pa pf. ful h.iud, 1. to rub, c.g,
-J one thing against lInotlJer C. - 2.
to get scratched, excoriated, galled (ef, .sitn-
pa). - 3, $uti hyhi.pa pv. to sleal
silently away, to sneak off unpercci\'cd.
..cJC\'f' liun-pa bark, rind, peel, skin, liu'l-kdg,
-J I iun-pdgs id., the last cxjltession is
also used of the skin of aoiumls Le.t. -
l'9i-'iun the outcr rind or skin, tui,i-,iUIl the
inner rind; hdr·.rnn the middle rind, the
bast, esp, of willows &h,: aUIl-kdg ia,is-pa
the sponlaneous chapping or pecliug on' of
tile skill; liun-mdn box-wood.
+l.::r:.r sulrpa, also Mlrpa, pf. imp. to
-J. speak in a low voice, to whisper, sub
b!JM-pa id.; 'Ilog.liub-la sil-ce· lV. to reatl
in a low \'oice, to read whispering; Utb-bu
a whispering, S!JJ-h1l8 zlU-ba to recite in a
low voice J--e.t., sitb-bul' sml'a-ba ll., 'juh-la
zh.c/1' lV. to speak softly; liulr!nu s/llcJd-pa
to reprehend in a whisper fl,
liuN case, covering, sheath, paper bag
-J - etc. frq.; d.'wi-suN, resp,
s\.()eking,l>ock, gri·jUhs knife-case or sheath,
n!ie•.iiths v. mjc; lUfJ·suhs, resp, hag-sitm
glove.
+l5r.q' .iul/t.pa, pf. (b)3ulI/s, ft. b.ium, imp.
-J (b)3I1I11(S), l.toweep,masltmmdzod
do nol weep! ,ilt-3um Mil. weeping, lamen·
tation. - 2. to tremble(?) yra,i-sum Lt.,
&111'. gl'ali-,iulII bytd.pa to tremble or shiver
with cold, to shudder.
...q:;-.q' pf. fut. UUT, imp. (b)3uI', 1.
-J to burn slightl)', to singe. - 2. to
cut off.
...q,,'[ sur-hu I. girdle, belt Lu.; jUl··bI,-
-J [n·/It Zum. id. (ace. to Sck). - 2.
C8,: sore, ulcer. - 3. dumpling of flour,
_ /Co-lag.
sui I. an empty place, a place that has
been left, that is no longer occupied,
1'uli-lu1 sid,is-nus your own place becoming
561
:-,////
,
by your
quitting
it Mil. *t'il-iln ///.s-
pai
nor all the
things
left behind in the
camp
Glr.;
ilon-tw
Iti/'ts-jxii
*///-<///. instead
of the coin which had been taken
away
(there appeared
. .
.) DzL;
Ky6d-k\ji
sul-du
in the
place
which
you occupied during your
life
Thgr.;
hence in a looser sense: btsun-
mo
med-pai
sul-du on the occasion of the
queen's
absence
Glr.;
in the same manner
'/'/.
103, 16, ID,
and also thus: dei sul-du
Glr. 51
during
her absence. 2.
track,
rut,
of a
carriage,
furrow, of a
plough
DzL, way,
road;
also in a
gen.
sense: ml
fag-rin
a
long
way
Glr.;
sul-ldm
=
ml\
ace. to Cs. also
manner,
method. 8.
any thing
left behind
by
a
person departed,
or
by
a
thing
re-
moved,
as
cu-sul, mar-mi,
pye-sul
that little
water,
butter or flour which adheres to the
vessel
emptied,
but not washed
;
me-sul the
<
\tinguished
cinders left
by
a
fire; property
left
by
a deceased
person
ml fsdn-ma
yog-
po-la
fob his servant
gets
all the
property
left
(by
his
master) W., C., pa-sul paternal
inheritance,
patrimony; pa-sul-Odzin-pa
the
heir
C.\
ml
yaii
mi
Odug nothing
at all is
left;
*sul-med-kan co* W. finish it at once!
eat it all
up! su-tsan-po
one that eats all
up,
clears his trencher
(a good
trencher-
man)
Ts.
sitl-pay bsul-pa
Cs. :
backbone, back,
posteriors;
sul-sd the
flesh,
the
muscles of the
back,
sul-rgyus
the
fibres,
the nerves of the
back;
Sch. : bsul-dri smell
of
excrements, sul-byi polecat,
fitchet.
sus 1. v. su-ba. 2. sus
Ode"bs-pa
to
whistle
S.g.
sus-ma
any thing copied,
a
copy
Cs.
N3
^n-
'
se 1. Cs.
se-stag, se-dag
=
sa-stdg mere,
only, nothing
but. 2. num.: 117.
se-na v. -na.
cj*
"
sd-pa
v.
ses-pa.
-
se-bdm Cs. :
=
to-yig
a kind of con-
tract or
bargain.
se-ma
(for r)e-ma
or
yes-ma?)
W.
noblewoman,
lady
of rank or
quality,
lady,
"se-ma
cun-nu,
setn-tiin* nobleman's
daughter, young lady,
Miss.
"
se-mon Sch.: 'divine
predestina-
tion,
divine
protection
; nature, fate,
destiny; power; origin
of
power
or autho-
rity
; strength',
force,
the latter
signification
also in
Wts.(?).
J"
se-rul Sch. :
fetid, putrid.
leg
1 .
imp.
of
yse'gs-pa, resp.
for
sog.
2. the Arabian
^v-ui,
chieftain, elder,
senior. 3. C. col. for sed I.
sed I.
strength, force,
=
sfc$s, mfu,
C.
also
s#/;
dpd-zin
sed-ce a
mighty
hero
r/j#f/.;
sed- can
strong, vigorous, powerful;
sed-mo 1 . sbst.
=
sec?? 2.
adj.
=
sed-can
Ts.,
*se"-mo
gydg-pa yin*
he is
strong
and
stout,
*<>d-med
powerless, weak, sed-med-kyi
rtd-
bas rkan-fdn
mgyogs
one travels
quicker
on
foot than on a weak
horse;
sed-cun
weak,
feeble, frail, e.g.
lus Lt.- sed
O
bri
strength
decreases, begins
to
fail, ysos
is
restored,
nyams
is
impaired;
sed
skyed-pa
to
grow
fat
Sch. : 'to
protect
;
to make haste'
;
*mi
zig-
la sed
cug-ce'*
W. to
strengthen
a
person;
*sed dan
nye-ce*
W. to rub
well,
forcibly;
*sed zdr-te
(sbyar-te)
con* run and
jump
! *sed
zdr-te
gyob* swing your
arm and throw!
W.;
*sed-kyer-ndg-po* by
force,
with
violence,
e.g.
*tan* he forced it on
(me)
W.
(cf. nan);
sed-po-ce
a
strong, powerful
man
Thgy.\
sed-
bu Lex. id.
; sed-bddg
Sch. one
having power
or
authority,
a
lord,
ruler. *sed
-
wan*
W.
force, violence,
*sed-wdn dan*
by force,
e.g.
to
take,
*sed-wdn tdn-ce* W. to
violate,
to force
(a girl).
II. the
approximate
direction, region,
quarter, nyi-mai ^og
sed-na below the
sun,
i.e. between the sun and the horizon Mil.:
W.:
*gan
sed-la* in what direction? where-
to? *de sed-la* about in that
direction;
*gan
sed ne
(lit. ynas) sig-tu*
to some
place
or
other.
A3T
sen(?)
floor of a house or room W.
"nr'*j)x* ser-puin
abbreviation for ses-rdb-
*M^
"N*^
^ '
kyi pd-rol-tu pyin-pa,
the title of a
division of the
Kan-gyur.
36
empty, by yOUf quitting it Mil. iHl·dw 1...-
Jloi nor all the tbingll leJt in lhe
('amp Gu.; d<hi'QI' lalit-poi i ..l-Ilu instead
of the coin which hilt! bf,en llIokeo Itway
(there "1'\Je",ed •.•) D:I.; l!!Jdd·kyi JWl-d1l
ill tht 1,lace which you occupied during yoor
life '1'Agr.; hence in • looser sellse: /luim.
MO "Iid-}Iai nl-dw on tbe occasion of the
queeD's absence Glr.; in tbe ..we maDDer
Tar. 103, 16, 19, lUld .Iso LbulI: cki ;;,l-du
Gir. 5t doring ber ab!ence. - 2 track. nil
of .. carriage, hlrrow, of" plough ]):1., way,
road; also in" geo. sense: Jilt (ag-ri,;" long
"'"}' Glr.; hl·ld". - ;"/j ace. to c.. 1l1!O
manner, method. - 3. an)' tbing left Ilehind
by • pft'lIOD deJ.rted. or by " thing re-
moved, as mar-;1I1, that little
..'ater, bUlter or Dour wbicb .dhcl'1!lI to the
n$..el emptied, but not ",'Shed; lJINtd the
e.ztinguisbed cinden! left by • fire; property
lelt by " de«ftSed person M (td.oi-ma!JOg-
po.la fob his sen'ant gets &Iltbe prorel'\y
len (by hi iV., c., pa-,ul pate-nul.!
inbt:rilanoe, Pl\lriIDOO)'; fa..iul-.d--in-pa tbe
beir C. j wI yaif mi .dug nothing llt all is
It:flj ·'''l-"l«f·'_ to· IV, finis.b it At ODOO!
eat it all up! ;a-fla"-po one that eats all
up, CleNS his trencht:r (a good lft:ocber-
mall) T•.
olf",,·.:.r ;j,l-po., bnl-pa Cf.: backbone, back,
..., pclsteriol"S; 'ul-id the nesh, the
of the back, lul-rg'" the fibres,
tbe nerves of the bll.dq &h.: blul-J,,; smell
of e:a:c.rements, hJ.1-byi polecat, fitchel
4"'f hu I. v. 'Ii-ba. - 2. ;lU .dib.--pa to
..J whistle S.g.
iWHlua any thinK copied, a copy C•.
Jt i. 1. til iN/ag, il-dag - la·.tdg mere,
only, nothing bu\. _ 2. num.: 117.
ll-na \'. U·11f1.
.tr=J' ii-po. v. ie--pa.
k-Ixim lA.: -. (o--yi!J M kind of con-
tl'l\ct or lmrgaln.
Uoma (for r)MnU or yU'-'OI(1) lV.
. noblewoman, Iftd)' of nwlr. or quality,
b61
lady, -ii-via km-loili- noblem.n',
daughter, young lady, Miss.
u- mQ,i &Ie.: 'divine
- I tion, divine jllotectioll; natuff, fale,
deniny; powerj origill of po,..er or autho--
rity; strcogth', force, the lauer sigtlific.t.ion
also in irtl.(?).
k-rul &4.: letid, putrid.
.iff kg 1. imp. of resp. for log.
-2. tbt: Arabia.n ..."t!Achieftain, elder,
v
senior. - 3. C. 001. for W I.
.... _. Wd I. strength. forft, _ .tNM, -..Iu, C.
Wo Jtsr; dpd-lili Wd-U a mighty hero
TIrgy.; Uti-Can stt1lAg. YigorollS. pclwtrfut;
iM-MO 1. sbsl.. - 2. adj... r,.,
•6J'--fJt() !!!JOfI"1H1 Y"",- he is strong and skHit,
i«J-.mid powerless, weak, i«l-tttid-l:yi rid-
btu rka>i-(Wj -..gyotJI one truel! quiclr.er on
foo\ than on a 'ft'eak horse; Nd-biia welk,
feeblc, frail, e.g. lw U. j W .bn lltrePg\h
begins to fail, r- is re6wred,
ftyalJJl ii impaired; W Il.yid-pc wgrow fat
&It..: 'to protect; to make basle'; .""!ig-
la W CNg-h- W. to strengthen a pelIOn;
-W d(lli nyi-rt· 11'. to I'tIb .... ell, foreiblrj
-UtI Mr-U(lbyar-tt)loN-run and jump! ·W
hir-tt gyob- s11,ing your arm and throw! IV.;
by foree, with \'lolen<:e,
e g. -la"- he foreed it on (me) Jv. (e£ 1IaJl);
W-po--"N astrong, powerful ml\.l1 Tltgy.; lid-
bu Lu. id.; &Ie. one having power
or authority, a lord, ruler. - -ltd - tedoi-
W. force, violence, -W-,e<Ui (}ali- by foree,
e.g. to take, -1td-icaJi tdn-U' lV. to violate,
to foroo (I' girl).
II. the approximate direction, region,
quarter, nyi-mai ..09 the sun,
i.e. between the sun fLOd the horizon Mil.;
lV.: -ga,; Ud-la· in whnt direction? where-
to? ·lklid-la- about in thllt direction; -gail
ltd 1If (Ii\. rnm) iig-tu- to llOme place or
otber.
im(?) floor of a house or room lV.
11:::$),1;' lu-pyin abbreviatioll for In.rab-
. I ;;1-1 kyi l'>d-rol-tu ?!Jilt-pa, the title of 1\
dh'illion of the Kan-m/llr.
562
ser-ba
T so
,
pf.
&?r,
to
compare,
to con-
front Cs.
sel
crystal, glass
Dzl and elsewh.
;
ace.
to
Stg.
the inoon also consists of such
crystal
Cs. : rdn-sel native
crystal,
bzu-sel
artificial
crystal, glass;
mdn-sel Pth.
prob.
=
sel;
spos-sel
amber;
me-sel
burning-glass,
cu-sel
x|ttf ej|frT
a fabulous
magic
stone
sup-
posed
to have the
power
of
producing
water
or even rain.
Comp.
Sel-kor or
-por
a tumbler. sel-
dkdr=selGlr. sel-Kdn
glass-works, glass-
manufactory
Schr,
sel-sgdn globe
of
glass
Mil.
sel-sgo glass-door.
sel-rdo
crys-
tal.
sel-snod,
sel-spydd
a
crystal
or
glass
vessel.
sel-preii
a
string
of
glass-beads.
sel-bum
glass-bottle. sel-mig spectacles,
spy-glass, telescope.
*n$J'
ses v. ces.
J3SJ'H ses-pa (synon. rig-pa, resp. mKyen-
pa)
I.
vb.,
1. to
know, perceive, ap-
prehend,
bzdn-bar
ses-pa
to
find,
to know
a
thing
to be
good
Glr.
;
brtdgs-na
mi ses
when
(the soul)
is searched
for,
it is not to
be
perceived
or
apprehended
Mil.
;
ses-pai
bio
ingenium sapiens
Dzl.
;
mi-ses
-pa-dag
those who do not care for
knowing (a thing)
Dzl. su ses
B., C.,
*ci se* W.
(like
the Hindi
^5|T WT%)
wno can teM? mav
be;
cian mise-
Kan a
know-nothing, ignoramus, dunce;
*fco-
rdn md se-fcan cen-mo
zig
fsor
dug*
W. he
is said to be an
extremely
clever
(learned
etc.) man;
mi-ses
dgu ses-pa knowing (even)
the unknown
things, knowing every thing
Thgy.;
can -ses
id.;
*na-rdn ton se* W. I
know it from
having
seen
it;
ses-par gyur
1 . he will know. 2. he comes to
know,
he
learns; ses-par gyis sig
1.
know! 2. let it
be known ! ses-bzin-du
knowing, knowingly,
with
(my) knowledge; no-ses-pa
=
ses-pa
}
yet
cf. sub no.
- -
2. to
understand,
=
go-
ba,
don the sense
Glr.',
nas rtsis ses I under-
stand
mathematics;
to be
able,
in a
general
sense,
also
physically: *ghan se-pa*
C. to
one's best
ability,
to the utmost of one's
power (= )i nus-kyis B.,
*ci tub-Kan*
W.);
Krdg-gi gon ^ul ses-pa
a clot of blood that
could
only quiver (though,
in
fact,
a human
being)
Glr.; esp.
with a
negative:
smra mi
ses-pa
not
being
able to
speak, dgye dgu
mi
ses
they
cannot be bent or curved Med.
3. to be
convinced,
to be of
opinion,
to
think,
su-layan
mdzd-bor ma ses do not think
any-
body
to be
your
friend!
Il.sbst.
(= rig-pa)
1. the
knowing (about
a
thing), knowledge.
2.
science, learning,
ses-pa-la zog-tu
ltd-ba to look
upon
science
as a
(sort of) cheating.
3. intellectual
power, intelligence, ses-pa
fibs the intellect
(of infants)
is still
very
weak
Lt., ysal
is
clear Pth. 4. the soul or
spirit, separate
from the
body Thgy.,
Mil.
Comp. *se-gyd*
talent
(?) 6'.,
W. *$<?-
gyrf*
Character
C., W., *se-gyu' nem-pa*
a
bad character. ses- dod desire of know-
ledge, curiosity
of mind Mil.
ses-ldan,
ses-
blo-lddn-pa
1.
knowing,
rich in wisdom. 2.
very
learned Sir!
ses-po, ses-pa-po
one
that knows or
understands,
a knower 6s.
ses-bya
1. what
may
be known or
ought
to be known,
ses-bya
kun
every thing
worth
knowing,
all the sciences. 2.
knowing,
con-
scious,
wilful ?
ses-byai sgrib-pa
contamina-
tion
by
wilful sins DoJ
ses-byed
that
which
knows,
the
understanding.
ses-bzin
consciousness
(v.
above
ses-bzin-du'),
dran-
pa
dan ses-bzin-can
yin-te Gyatch.
??,
14
(cf.
Burn.
II, 806, 5) ;
ses-bzin
may,
accord-
ingly,
be used for 'conscience' in a Christian
sense.
ses-yon
Ts.
=
ses-rgya.
ses-rdb
(TTUT)
I-
'great knowledge',
wisdom,
in-
telligence, understanding, talent,
ses-rab ce-ba
very talented, gifted (e.g.
a
boy)
Mil.
;
ses-
rdb dan
Iddn-pa id.;
ses
-
rab
-
spy
an the
(mystic) eye
of wisdom Schl.
p.
210. ses-
rab-rtswa
Taraxacum, dandelion,
also used
as food.
ses-rdb-kyi pd-rol-tu pyin-pa,
TniT
x
lTTf'nn'>
tne
having
arrived at the
other side of
wisdom,
n. of that section of
the
Kanqyur
which treats of
philosophical
matters.
so
(Cs.
:
so-mo)
I.
die, dice,
so
rgydb-pa
to
dice,
so rtse-ba to
play
at
dice,
so-
O gyed-pa (Sch. Kye-zig
as
imp.)
id.? so
rgydl-baorpdm-pato
win or lose at
playing;
562
.tj%:..q. jb-ba, pr. bier, to compare, to con·
front c,..
1io.r jel crystal, glass Dzl. and elsewh. j.ace.
. I to SlfI. the mOOD also consists of such
cl)'Stal c,.: f'a'l-$el nAtive crystal, bzu-jel
artificial crystal, glass; man-Jei PtA. prob.
_ itt; .p;n-Ul amber; me-Ail burning-glass,
lu-Jel a fabulous magic "tone sup-
posed to have the power of producing water
or even rain.
Compo jel-kOr or for II tumhler. - $el-
dkdr-selGlr. - Jet-lCd,' glass-works, gillsg...
manufactory &/11', - JeHgQ,i gloue of glass
Mil. - Jel-3[ld glass-door. - Jel-rod crys-
tal. - Jel-MUJd, iel-8pVdd a crystal or glass
vessel. - kl-prbi 8 string of glass-beads.
- jel-bUmglnu-bottle. - Jel-mfg spectacles,
spy-glass, telescope.
';es v. Cel.
ji3-pa (synOD. rig-pa, resp. mJ!Yffl-
pa) I. vb., I. to know, perceive, ap-
prehend, bzdli-bar Ut-pa to find, to know
a thing to be good Glr.; brtdgs-fla 'fill Je.
when (the soul) is searched for, it is not to
be per<:eived or apprehended Mil.;
bW i1lf!t1Iium Sf.lpiens Dzl.;
those who do not care for knowing (a thing)
Dzl.; ,uU3 B., C., ·tiile" W: (like the Hindi
<NT 'IJ!('l'it) who can tell? may be; eian miJt-
I!anaknow-nothing, ignoramus, dunce; -/..'0-
rUli ma At!-!.;an Cfn-mo zig f8Qr dug- W. he
is said to be an extremely clever (learned
etc.) man; mi-AhdguJts-pa knowing (even)
the unknown things, knowing every thing
ThtJy.; tan-Aea id.; tina-reM (0'; ilt
to
W I
know it frOID having ieeD it; Ah-pal' gyur
I. he will know. 2. he comes to know, he
learns; ia-par gyi3 ilig 1. know! 2. let it
be known! Aes-bZin-du knowing, knowingly,
with (my) knowledge; tid-Jes-pa. _ Ms-pa,
yet cf. sub no. - 2. to understand, _ gd-
bu, don the sense GIr.; riaa rmis Aes I under-
stand mathematir,s; to be able, in a general
sense, also physically: ·ghali Ji-pu
to
C. to
one's best ability, to the utmost of onc's
power (_ ji B., -n lY.);
Ilrdg-gi goii <1/ul Ah-pu a clot of blood. that
could only qui\'er (though, in fact, a human
being) Glr.; esp. with It negative: W1Ta mi
ih-pa not being able to speak, dg!Je dfJU mi
Jes they cannot be bent or curved Med. -
3. to be convinced, to be of opinion, to think,
.iv-la yan mdzd-bor ma ile' do not think any-
body to be your friendl
U.shst. (- rig-pa) I. llie knowing (auout
a thing), knowledge. - 2. science, learning,
Jia-pa-la zdg-tu lta-ba to look upon science
as a (sort of) cheating. - 3. intellectual
power, Intelligence, Us-pa (ib3 the intellect
(of infants) is still weak Lt., ysal is
clear Pth. - 4. tile soul or spirit, separate
from the body Thgy., Mil.
Compo tlili!-gyd· talent(?) C., W. - tlU..
flY!!'· cllaracter G., lV., Mm-pa· a
bad character. - ses--oddd desire of know-
ledge, curiosity of mind .Mil. Je#-ldan, Ae$-
blo-lddn-pa l. knowing, rich in wisdom. 2.
very learned Sir! - Je.-po, ih--pa'po one
thAt knows or understands, a knower QI.
- Us--b!JG I. what may be known or ought
to be known, Jb-bya l.:un every thing worth
knowing, all the sciences. 2. knowing, con-
scious, wilful? Ah-byai 'flri1J..pa contflmioll-
tion by wilful sins Do.' - Ju-byed tbat
which knows, the understnnding.- Ah-bZin
conscioltSness (v. above Je&-biin-du), dran-
pa dan yin-te Gyatch. nv-, 14
(cf. Bum. II, 806, 5); U,.f1zinmIlY, accord-
ingly, be used for 'conscience' in a christian
sense. - Ji'-y<lIi Th. = JelH"gya. - Ja..,.db
(lnJT) I. 'great knowledge', wisdom, in-
telligence, understanding, talent, ila-rab ce-ba
very talented, gifted (e.g. ll. hoy) MiL; 8eS-
rdb dan lddn"pa id.; Aa-rab-'pyan the
(mystic) eye of wisdom &hl. p. 210. - Je,-
rab-r"lM Tara.rocum, dandelion, also used
as food. - in-lYib-kyi pd-rol-tu pyin-pu,
Q1'1fn:flRn', the having arrived at the
other side of wisdom, n. of that section of
the KaW/!JUf which treats of philosophical
matters.
:tV io (Ck: id-IM) 1 die, dice, AOIWdb-pa
to dice, io rW-ba to play at dice, k-
ogyid-pa (&h. fyi-ZifJ as imp.) id.? - io
rgydl-baor po.m-pa to win or lose at playing;
">-gam
Mn-ba
('. the
money
or stake
deposited
at
dice-playing;
I'teis-doi rdeu
Mil.,
to-rdel
H
.,
uti attribute of certain
deities;
so-mig
the
points
of
dice, so-mig ysum-par (or -pa-
la) Jjdb-na
wlien three
points
arc thrown.
Tiln'tans
play
\vith three dice marked with
6 and
1,
5 and
4,
3 and 2 on
opposite
sides,
hence from 3 to 18
points may
be thrown.
II. 1. the white willow of
Spiti,
Ld. and
other
Himalayan
districts. 2. other
plants
rgya-so, lug-so?
Wdn.
III.
=
btsa-ma
blast,
blight,
sm
ut,
mildew
<
s.
IV. for
so-gam, q.
v.
V. num.: 147.
so-gum custom, duty, tax, so-gdm
Ici-
ba W. *lcin-te*
high duty, so-gam
ten-pa
to take
toll,
to
levy
a
duty; so-gdm
bzld-ba Sch. : 'to
smuggle,
to circumvent or
defraud the customs'
(?); so-gdm- gyi ynas
custom-house;
so-gdm-pa
receiver of the
customs,
toll-gatherer;
*so-tdl,
so-dti'* Ts.
tax,
duty.
"
s6-ca a kind of
steel-yard
C.
"
sn-ma,
v.
sd-mo,
mushroom Mil.
*
so-md/i a medicinal herb Med.
^ sd-ra
saltpetre, nitre,
sd-ra-can nitrous.
$o-re,
adj., damaged, spoiled, by being
partially broken,
torn
etc.,
sbst. : a de-
fect, flaw, notch, gap,
also
hare-lip;
**o-rt
son* it is
damaged,
*so-re ton son* a
notch,
chink,
crack has been
caused; *Ka-&6r,
na-
s6r*,
with a slit
lip,
a slit nose.
*
s6-lo-ka v. slo-ka.
%-^j prop,
from
fsegs-pa,
f^d/z-^a,
1.
come! let him come!
O
brds-bu
fsur-sog-gi yid-smdn
nd-la med I
do not wish that fruit should come to me
from without Mil.
;
Kur
sog, Kyer sog bskyal
sog bring hither, (with
son inst.
oisog:
take
a\vay!) sog
zer-ba to
invite,
ned-la
sog kyaii
mi zer Glr. we are not so much as
invited,
you
know. 2. with the
imp.
=
gyur-cig,
bsad-par-sog may (he,
I
etc.)
be killed ! DzL
-
II. V. 60S.
?a I.
sbst.,
also
frq. yb6g-pa,
1.
wing, ysog-vkyan-ba
to
spread
the
wings,
also to
spread
like
wings; *s6g-pa
d<?-ce, cdd-ce,
Jum-ce* W. to
clip
the
wings;
ysdg-pa-can, ysog-lddn provided
with
wings,
winged,
a bird.
--
2.
wing-feather, pinion,
Odab-y&6g, ysdg-sgro
id.;
mjuy-ysoy
tail-
feather. 3.
fin,
of fishes. 4. other
things
resembling
a
wing
or a
feather, mig-ysog,
res
p. spydn-ysng eye-lash;
ran-tdg-gi ys6g-
pa prob.: wing
or float-board of a water-
mill;
of course it
might
also be used for:
wing, sail,
of a
windmill,
though
these are
not
yet
known in Tibet.
II.
vb.,
v. sub
ysog-pa.
^arn-n* sog
-
bu,
W.
*sug
-
gu*,
1 . sheet of
'
paper,
and
paper
collectively, rgya-
sog
China
paper, bod-sog
Tibet
paper,
dar-
sog silk-paper, ras-sog
cotton-paper (also
paper
of
linen-rags), sih-sdg
bast-paper,
pags-sog leather-paper, skin-paper, parch-
ment; mfin-sog, nag-sog
dark-blue or black
paper,
for
writing
on in
gold
or silver
;
mgo-
sog, resp. dbu-sog, upper leaf,
i. e.
cover,
covering, wrapper.
2. Bal. : book.
Comp. sog
-fcdn
paper-maker's
form.
-
soy-gait
a sheet of
paper. sog-grdns
num-
ber of leaves in a book.
sog-sgril, sog-
dril,
W.
*sog-rit* paper-roll,
codex.
sog-
Ideb Sch.:
'leaf,
sheet'?
sog-fsdr scrap
of
paper. sog-siii
Sch.
palm-tree
?
sog-
hril
ycig
=
sog-gdn,
Sch.
), ^sa/i(s)
(Lex.
i
'elevated
plain,
ridge
of a
mountain')
1.
mountain-ridge
Wts.
Usual
meaning:
2.
pit, hole, cavity,
exca-
vation, valley,
cu-sdns
cavity
filled with
water DzL
;
span-sons valley
with
meadows,
low
ground overgrown
with
grass
;
snai
bya-
ysog-gi ysoits
the cavities near the
wings
of the nose
Mil.nt.\
s6h-du
valley-ward,
down hill DzL
; s6/is-can,
(j'^sOH-^sd/i
full
of
cavities, uneven,
Sch. also :
rough, rugged,
steep;
sdus-bu
furrow,
Hd/is-bu
Ofen-pa
to
make
furrows,
to furrow.
*6h-ba I. to
go in,
to have room in
or
on,
with
term.,
mi
ion,
W. also:
*s6n-ce mi
dug*
that is not to be
got in,
'63
Ao-tYJYlin (,•. the mollCY or ..take deposited
at dice-pill,ying; ru(.-loi rlleu .Mil., Jo-rdil
Wdl·., M aUrihllle of certain deities; io-mig
tile points of dice, *""ig r.u1fI-par (or-pa.
La) "bd[,.lla when three points nrc throwlI.
Tilletll.Ds play with tbroe dice miuked with
6 and 1, 51\ud 4, 3 and 2 on opposite sides,
hence from 3 to 18 l)(lints may he thrown.
II. l. tlie white willo't\· of Spiti, J.d. and
oth,·rIlimala)'ll.D districts. - 2. other plants
rwa-io, Wdti.
JII.-bua-ma blast, hlight,smut,mildew
Co.
IV. for q. \'.
V. num.: 147.
iJr"..golll custom, duty, tu, iJr"..gdmlti-
- ba W: ''It'i,He'' high dut)" iJo--gam
kn-pa to take toll, to le\')' a duty; iJo-,qam
bzld-ba &h.: 'to smuggle, to circumvent or
ul,fl'lluU the customs'{?); iJo-gd11l-gyi rna8
jo-gom-pa receiver of the
customs, toll-gatllerer; "lo-tul, iJo-d,,'" '1,.
tax, duty.
4fa;' .id-ca A. kind t)f sted-}'ard C.
4f;r ia_ma, \'. ,id-'lIlO, mushroom Mil.
io-mli,i a medicinal herb .Med.
4f=..- id-rasaltpetre, nitre, id-ra-CtJ1l nitrous.
4fi:" so--ri, adj., damaged, spoiled, by lIcing
partially broken, torn etc., sbst.: a de-
flaw, nolch, gap, also hare·lip; "so-rt
aOli" it is damnged, "ilr"..ri aoli" a Dotch,
chink, crock has been caused; "l1a-Jdr, fla-
idr", with a slit lip, (L slit Dose.
:traf"1" id-w..ka ". iw..ka,
i09 I. Ilrop. from
imp. of won.ha, 1. como! let hiw come!
"brlia-bu yid-amdn tia-la med I
do not wish thllt fruit should cowe to me
from without Mil.; 114r JofJ, iog
leg briug hither, (with inst. oHoy; take
I\way!) zil'-Qa to invite, ?ied-la iofIlyaH
mi zer Gl,'. we are not so much as invited,
you know. - 2. .,dth tho imp. _ g!lur-i:iy,
may (he,r etc.) be killed! D:l.
- n. \', iea.
:tfr"'. Jdg-pa 1. 'bsl., also frq. rJdg-pa, l.
wing, rlog-rl:yan-ba' w spread. the
wings, also to spread like wings; "Jdg-pa
dl-te, Mll-te, IV. to clip tbe wings;
r8&;-pa-can, riog-lddn llrovided with wings,
winged, n bird. - 2. wing-feather, pinion,
odah-ridg, ridg-,yro id.; m)ug-rjoy tail-
feather. - 3. fin, of fishes. - 4. other things
resembling 1\ wing or a feather, mlg-riog,
resp. ap!ldll-rlOfl eye-lllSh; ruoHug-gi rsOg-
pa prob.: wing or float.-board of a water-
mill; of COllI'ile it might also bo used for:
wing, sail, of a windmill, though these are
uot yctknown in Tibet.
n. vb., v. sub rjog-pa.
idy - bu, W: "jug- flU", 1. sheet of
paper, and paper colle<:tively, ''gyG-
sd9 Chinn paper, bod--Adg Tibet paper, dal"-
idg silk-pnper, raHdy coHon-paper (also
paper of [illen-rags), Un-idg bast-paper,
pafl3-*dtJ leather-paper, skin-paper, parch.
ment; mfin-*Og, Tlag-.idg dark-blue or black
paller, for writing Oil in gold or silver; ffl{IQ-
sOg, resp. dbu-jdg, upper leaf, i. e. covcr,
cO\'ering, wrapper. - 2. Bal,: book.
Comp, 3og-11u.,; paper-maker's form. -
SQg-yd,; a sheet of paper, - iog-1"dli, num-
ber of leaves in n. book. - iOf/--8gril, jog_
dril, W. ",iog--ril" paper-roll, codex. - Jog-
ldlb &/i.: 'lenf, sheet'? - soy-fsdl' scmp
of paper. - .iog-Ji'i &h. palm-tree? - iog_
l.ril rCifJ - ¥Off-gdli, &h.
''''('), ",.,,(.)
'ele\·nted plaiD,
ridge of n. mountain') 1, mountain.ridge lVu.
Usual meauiuA': 2. pit, hole, cavity, eltca·
vation, valley, Cu - idtis CAvity filled with
water Dzl.; .pali-*oris valley with meadows,
low ground overgrown with grass; .Tlai bya-
rJdg-gi rJo'is the cavities nelL!' the wings
of the nose Nil, nt.; ioli - du valley-ward,
down bill Dd.; .MtiS--Cll'l, (r);"'i-(r)fdli full
of cavities, uneYen, Seh. also; rough, rugged,
steep; so,i'·,* furrtlw, iOHS·bu o(m-pa to
make furrows, to furrow.
:tf::.::r idn-ba I.. to go in, room in
or on, wnh term., lOfj, IV. also:
".MI1-re ,,,I dug" is not to be got iD,
564
sod
there is no room for
it;
bre Ina son-bai bum-
pa
a can
holding
five
quarts
Dzl.
II.
pf.
bsans,
fut.
bsan,
imp. ,so/i(s),
to
empty,
remove, carry
or take
away,
W.
stones,
earth
etc.,
but
gen. (with
or without
rkydg-
pa)
to
go
to
stool,
to ease
nature,
B. and col.
sod 1. the
lower,
the inferior
part
of
a
thing,
rtse-sod
upper
and lower
part,
top
and bottom
C.;
rgya-sod
Wdn. alow
tract of
land,
with a milder
climate,
where
e.g. apricots
are
thriving, opp.
to
pu-lhdgs
elevated cold
region, scarcely
fit for the
cultivation of corn and
barley;
sod-du to
or towards the
bottom, down, downwards,
C.,
*so'-du
bob-pa*
to
descend,
come
down,
*so'-ne
Odzeg-pa*
to ascend C. 2.
imp.
of
O cdd-pa, bsdd-pa', yet
cf. also:
*^-p 5
pf. bsdd-pa,
1 . to
say,
to de-
clare C. 2. to comb Cs.
sob, ysob
a
fib, falsehood, lie,
smra-ba,
W.
*gydb-ce*,
to tell
a lie.
*
sob-sob
loose, soft,
as leaves etc.
W.
som-pa, pf. (6)&ms, bsams,
fut.
bsam,
imp.(&)som(s),
to
prepare,
make
ready,
arrange, put
in
order,
fit
out, ynas lodgings,
-ydan
a
seat,
ston-mo a
festive
entertainment,
bzon-pa
a
carriage,
i.e. to have the horses
put
to Dzl.
;
dpun-gi fsogs
an
army
Dzl.
-
som-ra 1.
preparation,
arrangement, fitting
out,
som-ra
byed-pa
=
som-pa C.,
so also
6s.;
but Sch. : 2. som-ra
state, pomp, splendour,
with
byed-pa
to show
off,
to dress
smartly,
som-can
stately, grand (?).
sor v. so-re.
*
sor-ba 1. v. cor-ba. 2. to measure
Mil.,
v.
ysor-ba.
-
sdl-ba 1.
intercalation,
insertion
6s.,
zla-sol
intercalary
month. 2. 6s :
tense of bsol-ba
q.v.
sdl-po
Sch.: 'a
species
of
willow',
v.
ysol-po.
sos I. almost
always
in
conjunction
with
fcig,
the
other,
of
two,
e.g.
bud-
ycig-sos
the other woman Dzl. 2.
,
col,
sog,
a termination
indicating
pres
the
comparative
or
superlative degree:
cun-
sos, yzon-sos
the
younger,
the
youngest,
of
two or of
several,
btsun-mo
Ina-brgydi
cun-
sos
Pth.\ *rin-sog*
W. the
tallest; yun-rih-
sos
Thgy.
the most
long-lived;
drin-ce-sos
the
principal benefactress,
cf.
drin;
nad ce-
sos
rgds-nad Ofebs-pas
because one is suffer-
ing
under the chief
disease,
viz. old
age,
Thgy.
%
sri
Ssk.,
=
dpal glory, magnificence; mag- "
nificent, splendid, grand ;
srt-ri
Ml., pr.
n.,
a naked mountain in a
sandy plain,
about
a ten
day's journey
to the west of Tashi-
Ihunpo,
covered with
monasteries,
and
perh.
on that account considered as
nyams-mfsdr-
ba.
srl-Kan<fa
v.
dpdl-gyi
dum-bu.
'
slo-ka
Ssk.,
also
so-lo-ka, strophe,
Stanza,
esp.
one
consisting
of four ca-
talectic trochaical dimeters.
sd-ma, worthy,
becoming, fitting, suitable, O
fse-ba mi
ysai
as it is
unworthy, unbecoming,
im-
proper,
to
persecute (others)
Dzl.
;
*de
Kyod-
la sa
yod*
or *sd-ce
yod*
Ld. that serves
you
right.
2.
righteous, upright, honest, good,
=
skyon-med-pa,
C.
;
bio
ysd-ma
an
upright,
true
heart,
Thgy. ;
*le sd-ma
)he'-pa*
C. to
perform
a work
faithfully,
in
good
earnest.
II.
only, merely; mere, nothing but, (=
sd-stag}
C.
cn^q'srm^' q^qcV:rnx-
fsa-dkdr,
bsa-dkdr
S.g.,
Wdn.,
C.
tin,
W.
kar-ya\ yet
cf.
za-nye.
jn
nn-xr-
ysa-rin
a
long
skirt or coat-tail
N
Sch.
XJ"
ysdg-pa
v.
ysog-pa.
med
Zam
ysags right, justice,
Lex. and
esp.
W.
; ^sa^s Jbyed-pa
Lex. to investi-
gate
the
rightfulness (of
an
action),
=
*ge
dig pe-ce* W.; *tim-sdg
tdn-ce* to admin-
ister
justice,
to sit in
judgment
*fim
-
sdg-
tan-Jcan*
judge, *sag (go-} log
tdn-ce* to
warp justice,
to
judge contrary
to
justice
and
right; *iim-sdg
zu-ce* to
go
to
law,
to
bring
an
action, *sdg-pon* superior judge,
chief-justice,
W
--
bka-ysdgs
v. bka extr.
there is no room for it; b,.e lila bUm-
pa II. can holding five quarts Dzl.
H. pf. hia;,s, fut. Mati, imp. .;oli(s), to
empty, remove, carry or take away, lV. stones,
earth etc., but gen. (with or without rkyufJ-
pa) to go to stool, to ease nllture, B. and col.
4:-' sod 1. tbe lowu, tbe inferior of
"\ n thing, rf:se.itod upper and lower pnrt,
top and bottom C.; 1'f!!Ja-sod IVdli. a low
traet of land, with u milder climate, where
e.g. apricots are thriving, opp. to rJu-1MfJs
elevated cold regioa, scarcely for the
cultivation of coru and barley; 8dd..Ju to
or towards tbe bottom, down, downwards,
C., -itg'-du bdb-pa- to descend, rome down,
-s/ "dzip-pao to ascend C. - 2. imp. of
)!dd-pa, /Mud-pa; yet d. also:
iod-pa, (If. /Mud-pa, I. to say, to de·
clare C. - 2. to comb Cs.
:If.::r W· ilob, fSOO a fib, falsehood, lie,
, smrJ.ba, W "9!JJ.b-ce", to tell
a lie.
:tf.:r:tfl' itob-ltoo loose, so«. as leaves etc.
IV.
..q' pf. (h)loms,bSams, fl!t. wam,
lmp.(b)jom(8),10 prepare, make ready,
arrange, put in oroer, fit out, rn(/$ lodgings,
fdan a seat, st&n.."ro a festi\·e entertainment,
bzdn-pa a CDI'riage, i.e. to blwe the horses
put to Dzl.; dpun-gj (soys an army Dzi. _
itom-,.a I. preparation, arrangement, fitting
XtJm-ra bgM-pa -Mm-pa C.,so alsoCs.;
lIut &h.: 2. .Mm-ra slate, pomp, splendour,
willi bgM-pa to 8how off, to dress smartly,
86m-can stately, grand (?).
:ti
r
.: itor v. 80-ri.
:q,,',::r so,:"ba_1. ."cor-ba.- 2. to measure
Mil., \. ysor-bu.
iol-ba I. intercalalion, insertion c..,
da-sol interealary month. - 2. G3 :
pres. tense of blsdl-lJa q.v.
sol-po &11.: '0. sllecies of willow', v.
riuJl-po.
1. nImost u.lwa)'8 in ronjunction
with rCi[}, the olher, of btuJ-
mM rl:i[J-s6s the otber wornnn J)zl. - 2.
Zam. i'R;, col. sag, a termination indicating
Di
the comparative or snperlati"e uegree; cun-
.ids, )'zoll-8lls the younger, the )'ollDgeilt, of
or of senmll, btsun..,,10 lita-lJr[J!ldi eu'i·
ids Ptll.; °ril<_;;og" W the talleSl; yun.n·li-
Ms Tilpy. the most long-lived;
the priucipallJcnefaetress, cf. dn'n; nad ct-
ills rgJ.s-nad "fib8-pfU be<:ause one is suffel'-
ing under the chief disease, viz. olrl age,
TIlf}y.
sri &k., = dpal glory, magnificence; mag·
I':,. nificent, splendid, grand; ;;ri-n' Mil., pro
n., a naked mountain in a sandy plain, about
I' ten day's journey to the west of 'l'ashi-
IhuDpo, cO\'er('d with monasteries, and perl..
011 that account considered as 1I!1a1lls_7II£$l1r_
ba. sn-J.!a'l}(fa v. dpdl1J!Ji dum-bu.
:cr'll' liM.-lra Ssk., nl80 so-la-ka, strophe,
stanza, esp. one consisting of four ca-
talectic trochoical dimcters.
rita 1. 1. ul80r·;a-ma, blsJ.-7IIGI, worthy,
becoming, fitling, suitable, o(si-ba mj
pai fI.5 it is unworthy, unbecoming, im-
proper, to persecute (others) D::L; "de lfyOd-
la 8a yoo- or °ild_('e yod- Ld. that serves you
right. - 2. righteous, upright, honest, good,
- Joydll_nu:d_pa, G; Uo an upright,
true hearl, 'l'IIf!!!.; Ok 3&-1IIa C to
perform a work faithfully, in good earnest.
II. only, merely; mere, nothing but, (_
sd·stag) C.

S.p., n'bl., C. tin,
W. kar-ya; yet cf. za-nyc.
ysa-rili a long skirt or cont-tail
T"l ScI..
'¥l9".f )idg-pa \'. rsog-pa.
]'ilags righi, justice, Le;r. and esp.
IV.; yAa[p "byed-pa Lu. to investi-
gate the rightfulness (of an action), = "ge
dig pt-<'e" w.; "!im-AJ.p tJ.I'-et" to admin-
ister justice, to sit in judgment"(im - Scip-
judge, "sag (go-) Mg tdli-U to
wl\rp justice, to judge cOlltraryw justice
:md right; "jim.sag ::u-U to go to law, to
bring an action, "sug-}JQ7I° superior judge,
chief-justice, W - hl.·a·rAdg8 v. bka llxlr.
ytan
_--.
/.;/;
a musical
instrument, esp.
used
by
the
Bonpo,
Glr., )*"/; Lrol-ba to
[lay
on thai inst ruim-nl .I///.
n Sch.
=
bsdit-ba.
f
sl
'"-y^'
til
rough, rugged plar.->
or tracts Cs:
ysdd-pa
1.
=
sod-/xt
to comb.
2.=
o cd<l-j><f
I l.,to
explain,
to relate.
/.sw/
1. the lower
part
of a
thing,
)
>/i-<//< a adv. down,
b.postp.
under,
below, beneath
;
also adv. farther
down,
more
towards the
end,
in the course
of;
examples
v. sub
leu,
postp.
dei
ysdm-du
under it.
2.
barren,
B. and
col.,
wo-ysdm, rgod-ysdm,
ba-ysdm
a barren
woman, mare,
cow.
'
ysar
Sch.: a certain
style
of
writing.
"$T
ysds-ma
Sch.
=
ysd-ma.
a v-
cnny-rt-
ysin-pa
1. also
ysin-po good,
fine,
;///
sin-pa
B.,
C. a fertile
field,
sa-
pyfys ysin-pa
a rich
country Sty.; ysin-par
rmd-ba to
plough
well; ysin-sa
1. fertile
field or land. 2. \.
ysin-po.
2.
=
ysim-pa.
fsin-po
one deceased, a dead
man,
ysin-mo
a dead
woman,
e.g.
*-/w-
m6)ar-z6m*
the
deceased,
the late Jorzom
;
it
may
have reference to the
body,
as well
as to the
soul,
or to both
together. j-sin-
rje
the
god
of the
dead,
of the lower re-
gions,
of
hades,
also
regarded
as the
judge
of the
dead,
Ssk.
iffi' fsin-rjei ysed
a.
id.,
Yama the
destroyer,
b. the
destroyer
of
Yama, Siwa;
Ssk.
zr7TTrT^R-
cf. also<Sc/^.93.
*<-in-ditd
f
knot,
opp.
to *tol-dud* a
bow,
a
slip-knot
W.
ysin-
dre the soul as a
ghost
or
spectre
Sch.
ysin- prds
the convulsive
motions,
the
writhings
of a
dying
creature.
-
ysin-zas
food
presented
to the Lamas
when a
person
has died
(Cs.:
food
prepared,
or
exposed
for the
dead?),
sin-sa \.
bury-
ing ground, cemetery,
2. fertile field.
i''ju<il>-i>if
C. to induce assembled
people
l>\ means of a stick to stand or sit
closer;
cf.
zal-bddy.
2.
i-nl-ijri yxih-fia
Wdn.f
r**m-pa, ytin-pa
Sch.'.
'ground,
crushed'.
qiq^t'q3C'q'
ysims-bzdn-ba
Sch. to be ir-
resolute,
unsettled in
opin-
ion;
to be
distrustful,
suspicious.
/.vts,of
ten also A.;-/.s, 1.
nature, temper,
natural
disposition, ysis-ka
col.
id.,
ra/'t-ysis yin
it is their
nature,
their natural
disposition
Mil.
ysis-kyis by
the
very
nature of the
case,
without
secondary
causes,
naturally, quite
of itself Mil.
;
ysis-hdn Mil.,
Do. was also
explained by rgyu-med-par,
prob. implying merely:
not
having
been
one's self the efficient cause. 2.
person,
body, /.sis
fams-cdd-du
Obyug-go they
anoint-
ed the whole
body
Do.
ysun-ba
Cs. to
rebuke,
reproach;
the Lexx.
explain
it
by:
sub-bur
smdd-pa
to blame in a
whisper,
i.e. behind
a
person's
back.
ysiim-pa
v.
sum-pa.
yse-ba, pf. yses,
to
abuse,
revile, with
la,
Dzl. and elsewh.
; yse yan
slar
mi
yse-ba
even when
reviled, (one should)
not revile
again (rule
for
monks)
Cs.
-^
'
yseg pa
v.
ysog-pa.
ono(t)
-
pa,
also
ysiy-pa,
1. Sch. : to
range,
to
compare;
Ld. to be
ranged,
to draw
up
iu
files;
*yral
(iP- fwg*,
Duha in
Peer Introd. etc.
p.
68;
but
sog
is
prob.
the
original
and older
form),
Bal.
*
sags-cos", resp.
to
go,
to
go away,
opp.
to
Obyon-pa
to come Glr.
;
in other
passages
to come Dzl.
;
fsegs-grdbs
mdzad he made
preparations
for
setting
out Mil.
;
ndm-mKa-
la
O pur
-
zin
ysegs
he ascended to heaven
Tar.]
slar
yw/*-pa
to return, to come back.
ysegs-pa
is col. seldom
used,
but often in
books,
and
mostly
of Buddha and
great
saints;
bde-bar
ysegs-pa
to
die,
of saints
and
kings:
sku
ysegs-pa
Glr.',
dgun-du
or
(l<jii/'i-l<i ysegs-pa
Mil
,
mKar
ysegs-pa Glr.,
id.;
b<.ti
{-bar} -yseys(-pd)
as
partic.
=
OTTrT
Buddha; de-bZin-ysegs-pa ^\ijHM
ace. to the
explanation
now
generally accepted
: he that
566
:q..qc::" tim. 1I
U}' tbe BOIIJlO, Gir., )'la,; to
play 011 tlllH iUlilrumenl Mil.
),iflll'pc< &1,. _ bid/i-ba.
)'ill,j.yid,i l:ouglJ. rugged Illllrcs
I' I T I 01' lrncl.S L,:
::n.a-'.:r ridd-pa I. - iOd-pli to comb. -
.,. ("\ 2. =' orad,pllll" to explain, to relate.
flam 1. the lower part of II. thing,
)'idm-<lu:\ ndv. down. h. postp. under,
below, beneath; also Mk farther down, more
towards tbe end, in the course of; e:u,m(l!elI
\'. sub ku; (/n.' rfUlI",du under it. -
2. barren. lJ. and col., Jlw--ridm, rgoo-yiulII,
Im-yiam n oorren woman, marc, cow.
par Sclt.: a. certain style of writing.
fida-ma &11, = tid-ma.

rUg-pa v. rUb-pa
fUll-Pit 1. alllO fi/n-po good, fine.
!ti,i iin.pa n" C. a fertile field, aa-
hlOgS riin.pa a. ),jeh couotry Sfy.; fUn-P«I'
1'111o-ba to ploulo';h wcll; fUIl-aa l. fertile
field or land. 2. \'. fMII-lXi. - 2. = f3i/fl-p«.
one deceased, a dead man,
"l fUtHl/o a (l"ll.d woman, e.l\'. *Un-
1/10 )01'-:;:011'* tILe deceased, the late Jorz6m;
muy have refereuce to the body, as well
llS to the or to both together. -
rft the god of the dead, of the lower re-
gions. of hades, also regarded as tile judj:(e
of tIl<' dead, Ssk. tl'lI; T3in-rJei fkll (I.. id.,
Yama the uClitroyer. b. the of
Yama, Si\\'a; Ssk. '!l1nlrf•. ef.also&/IUI3.
*(in-dud' knol, opp. to *tul-dlid* a bow, n
slip-knot W. - f/$in-odd the soul as n ghost
or spectre Sen. - pin-oprcn the convulsil'e
motions, the writbings of n d)'iug creature.
- fiin- zen food presented to the Lnml\S
when a person has died (LS.: fooll!lrepureu,
or eJ:IIOsed for the dead?). I. bury-
ing ground. cemetery, 2. fertile field.
"I"'t'l (,,)':t", 'l"'t'l (") ":t" t'W(')' 1"',
Wlh(8) - pa,
Illso fiig-ptJ, J. &Ii..' to rl\nge, 10 compare;
Ld. to be muged, to draw up ill files; *gral
fU9 Co to induce lI.S6Cmllled l>llol,le
Ily menns of a stick to staDtI or sit closer;
cr. z«l-bddy. - 2. rul-g" fUb-pa Wdli.'
W·.:r, f
UIII
-I'(I, fJi11-pa &1,.:
'ground,
f
3ill
&8<-b::d'i-ba &/,. t.ohe ir-
resolutc,unSt"uled in opill-
ion; to be distrustful, .
tiill,o(lcn also /,Mill, I. nalure,lemper,
l" 1 natural disposition, -I'a col. id.,
1'(.IIj-fn8 !Ii" it is dlcir nnlure, their natural
disposition MiL - - lyi4 by the very
Ilature of the case, withollt secondarycauscs,
naturally, quite of itself Mil.; Mil.,
lJiJ. was also explained by rgyU-mal-pm',
prob. implying nlcrely: not having been
one's self the efficient cause. - 2. person,
body, (ml13-Md-du
o
byufHjO they anoint--
ed the whole body Do.
=q-qt:::r fillti-ba COl. to reLuke, reproach;
..J the Lux. explain it by: ,;ub-bu,.
8mdd-pa to blaDle in a whisper, i.e. behind
a IletsOn's back.
f3litn-pa v.3um-Fa.

z::n..a',::r yU-ba, pf. f3t3, to abuse, Nlvile, with
T 1 fa, Dzl. and e1scwh.; r};e !la,; 81m'
11Ii r3i-ba el'en when reviled, (oue should)
not re\'ile again (rule for monks) G'8.
f3eq pa v.
f
M
g
8
-pa (illip. fieg', Duloo in
Pm lntrod. etc. p. 68; l.lUt 30g
is prob. the ol"iginl\1 llnd oldllr form), /Jal.
resp. 10 go, to go away. opp. to
"u!l0ll-pa to come Gf/'.; in other passnges
10 come D::L; ritgs-gl·db. 1/uJ;:ad he made
preparations for setting out MiL; ?ldm-mA'a-
la ollu/' - ziti f¥t[l8 be "scendcd 10 hensen
'Ja1'.; Jla/' r3b,P-pa to relurn, to come back.
is col. seldoDl used, but oflel) in
books, and mostly of Budrlbll and grcnt
suint.s; bdi-bar r3t,P'-pa to die, of sllint;;
and king;;; d1t fieg'-pa Glr.; dglui-da 01'
dfJlui-La pig'-pa Mil, ",1'(11' ptg..pa Gfr.,
id.; lxli(-bar)-rityJ(-pa) as partic. -
Buddha; ck-bh"l-j'it!l'-pa ace. to the
explanation now generally a«epted: he tbat
566
ysed-ma
'-Cp
yhor-ba
walks in the same
ways (as
his
predeces-
sors),
a
very frq. epithet
of the Buddhas.
ysegs
-
bskyes parting-(
beer-) cup, parting-
feast or treat Mil.
ysegs-zon
Cs. a
banquet
or
dinner,
after the death of a
great person.
ysed-ma, rarely ysed,
1. execu-
tioner, hangman Stg.
; ysed-ma
sko-
ba to
engage
a
hangman,
i.e. to
pay
a mur-
derer Glr
; fig.
:
pan
fsun
ycig-gi ysed ycig-
gis byd-ste
Wdn.
prob.
means : one
destroy-
ing
the other. 2. in a
special
sense:
gods
of
vengeance, tormenting
the condemned
in
hell,
or
fighting against
evil
spirits, drag-
ysed
Schl.
ys
en
-
ra
b(s)
Glr.
}
the founder
of the
Bon-religion,
his full
name
being
bon
y
sen- robs-
yyuh-drun
C.
prob.
identic with the Chinese
philosopher
Lao-tse
ye-ysen
Mil. id.
sgrub-ysen
the Bon-doctrine
(opp.
to dam-cos
Mil.)
yser(-ba} B.,
C.:
wet, wetness;
yser-ba,
yser-pa, yser-po adj ,
yser-bar ^gyur-ba
to
get thoroughly
wet,
to
be drenched
Dzl.,
to
get moist,
to be moist-
ened; yser-bar byed-pa C.,B., *ser-pa
co-
ce* W. to
wet,
to moisten. In C. and in B.
yser-ba
seems to be
mainly
used for
wet,
in
W. for moist.
yser-ba
I. sbst.and
adj.
v. the
pre-
ceding
article.
II. vb.. 1. to ask
for, beg for,
ser-te fob
son I
got
it
by asking
for it
(I
did not
buy
it)
W. 2. to ask
*ser-len-pa'' (lit. yser-
len-pd)
to
interrogate,
to
question,
to
try (ju-
dicially);
as
partic.
and
sbst.;
the examin-
ing
or criminal
judge
C. 3.
=
ysor-ba
to
measure C.
y^-ba,
pf. ysos,
1. to
pour out,
to
pour away C.,
prob.
the same as bso-
ba. 2
(?)
*/,
r
a sos-te
foyer*
he has alienated
him,
enticed him to
join
his own
party
Ld.
ZTpf^f
y^o-mo
lever *so-mo
gydb-pa* C., W,
*
tan- be*
W.. *so-mo
kdn-pa* W.,
*ke,mpa*
C. to
put
a lever to
(a thing).
CTj^CTj'q'
ysog-pa
I. sbst. v.
s6g-pa.
II.
vb.,
also
bsog-pa, ysdg-pa, yseg-pa,
O
cegs-pa, pf. ysags, bsays,
fut.
ysag, bsag,
imp. ysog,Pth.,
I. to
cleave,
to
split,
sin
wood,
mdm-par entirely, fsdl-pa
bzir into four
pieces
Glr
,
dum-bur into
pieces ; syo ysdg-
pa
to break
open
a door
(with
a
hatchet)
Pth.\
to break or
pierce through, <%z7through
the middle
Mil., gans bsog-pa
Mil. to break
through
the
snow,
by
means of
yaks
sent
in advance to beat a
path (v. Huc.\
lam
bsog-pa
in a
gen.
sense : to beat a
path;
lam
mi
sog
or ma
sog-par Odug
Glr. the road is
not
practicable; sog-les yseg-pa Thg.
to saw
lengthwise;
yseg-pa
is also used for: to
rend,
to
tear,
to make a rent or slit into a
dress etc.
6'.,
W. 2. to
confess, sdig-pa,
nyes-pa,
Itun-ba to confess a
sin,
and thus
to
expiate it,
which
two, according
to the
views of a
Buddhist,
are
always united,
at
least as it
regards lighter transgressions.
Hence
sdig-pa bsags frq.
means: the sin is
atoned
for,
is blotted
out,
and
yseg-pa
is
the usual word for 'to
forgive',
sdig-bsdgs
atonement, expiation,
sbrul
bsdd-pai-sdig-
bsdgs-su
as an atonement for
having
killed
a
serpent
Glr
;
mfol
-
bsags
=
sdig
-
bsags,
mfol-bsdgs-la sa-H6g Jbul-ba
to offer a killed
animal
(a sheep)
as an atonement
Mil.;
sdig-bsags-sm6n-lam
Glr.
penitential prayer.
yson(s)
v. son.
'^J'
ys6d-pa
to comb C's.
yson-pa
Cs.\
=
skyon-pa
to
put
on
(?).
"
ysob
=
sob.
"
ysom-pa Thgy.
-
som-pa.
qtjqx
y&or
Sch. a basin or reservoir of
water,
seems to be not much
known;
but
in Zam.
yur-bai ysor
is to be found.
ysor-ba
I. vb
,
C. also
yser-ba, pf.
fut.
bsar, bsor,
1. to
count, e.g.
sheep
,
by letting
them
pass
one
by
one
through
one's
hands,
the beads of a
rosary
(through
one's
fingers),
hence cos
-
brjod-
bsar-sbyan man-po byed
to read
prayers
etc.
(cf. sbyan-ba, 3).
2. to
measure,
bres
by
the
peck Lex.;
to
weigh; yser-la
rd-gan
ysdr-ba
to
weigh
out
(to
exchange)
brass
"'alb in tbe same "'ft)"S (ns his Ilredeees-
1Ol'li), a very frq. epithet of the Buddhas. -
}"UtP -W!Jh l>arUng-( br-er-) cup, JNlrting-
feutor treat MiL- A banquet
or dinner, after lhe death of. great renon.
r
W
-
fIIa
, ruely rkd, 1. execu-
tioner, hangman Stg.; ,W-ma J.'6-
IHJ to engage II. hlUlgman, i.e. to pll.y a mur-
de!'f"..r Gfr j fig.: pan tiwll pig-gi ykd ytfg_
vi- byd..", nCl.f. prob. m\'ftll;l: one destroy-
ing tbe other. - i. in II. special sense: gods
of vengeance, tonnenting lhe eoodemned
in bell, or fighting against evil spirits., drag-
l'lid &Itl.
.. yMn-rd6(.) Gfr., the founder
of the &In-religion, his full
Illlme being bon y?Jffl-ra08-rywi -d/ill' C.
l)foll. identic with the Chinese pllilogoplwr
Lao-tM - yt-rjffl Mil. id. - .grub-rib1
the Bon-doctrine (opp. to dWII-l"w Mil.)
rYr(-ba) lJ., C.: wet, wetness;
l'Ur-ba, ptr-ptt, rUr-po adj,
rilr.JJar o9!Iitr-ba to get thorollghly wet, to
be drenched D::l., to get moist, to be lLloist-
eued; yik-6ar b!jld_pa C., /J., ·Ur-pa Cd-
«- IV. 10 wet, to moisten. In C. IUld in /J.
rkr-OO ReID!! 10 be maioly used for wet, in
Iv. for moisl
W·.::r yUr.oo 1 sbst.and adj..... the pre-
ceding lI.rt.icle.
11_ vb.• I. to ask for, beg for. Ur-te (06
.,Ii I got it by uaing for it (l did not buy
it) W: - 2. to ask .jjr-fnt.po. (lit. rJk...
lert-pa) to inlef1'Ogate, 10 question, to try 00-
dieinlly); MllartiC'. llDd sbst.; the eJl:amin-
ing or criminal C. _ 3. = yiQI-...lJa 10
measure C,
r
Jd
-
ba
, pf. }'6<J8, 1. to pour out, to
pour away c., prQu. tbe same M bJo-
ha. - 2 (t) j&·tt !!!Jtr· he hll>! alienated
him, enliced him to join his own jllirly lA.
Ji6-mo lever !l!Jdb·pa·c',lI',
·tali-&-· W:. *M-mo J.:dn_pa* W.,
·l:impo,· c. to Pllt a le...er to (a thing).
rJdg-po I. sbsL '1'. jdg-po.
II. ,b...........".. _ rllg-po,
.N,.-fNl, pf. fio!/'. biafll, ful. biog,
imp. yiog,Ptll., 1. to cleave, 10 split, lili woad,
,.,uim.par entirely, Udl-pa bu'r into foor
pieces Gir, dilm..JJlU' int.o pieces j 'flO J-jdg-
po to break open 4 door (with a hatchet)
1'IA.; to break or pierce Ihrough,cU-,yilthrougb
Ihe middle '}/il, bfdg--pa .MiL to breall:
through the I;DOW, by meaDS of )..ks senl
in ad\'ance to bell, a path (T. llw:.), lam
beog.pa in a gen. seuse: to beat a pith; lam
mi Jog or ma i,og-par .d1/.9 Gir. the road is
nol praCticable; 116t.rln yJbrpa TItg. to saw
lengthwi3t!; - yieg-pa is also used for: to
rend, to tear, to wnke 4 rent or Slil into a
dress etc. C., IV. - 2. to confess, tld(g-pa,
71yi1-pa, It''il-ba to canfe:>!! a sin, aDd thus
to expiate it, which two, according to the
views 0(:\ Boddhi>!t, nre olwn)">! Wlited, at
least as it regards lighter t.rnnsgrcssions.
Hence 3dig-pa bAoflS frq. menns: the sin is
Moned for, is blotted out, nnd rJeg-pa is
tile usuol word for 'to forgive'. Mlig-&ri.f;8
atonement, expiation, wruf iJsdd-pai-tldifl·
bidg...u as an atonement (or Im... iog killed
a serpent Glr j 111(01- bidgt _ tdig - bfdg.,
mftJl..6«d.gt-Ja la-fdg .bid-ba to olfer a lI:illed
animal (II. sheep) ns In atonement MiL;
Glr. peniteftlial prayer.
yIoli(s) \'. Ioli.
yiCd-po to oomb Cs.
poR-po c..; - J.yh -pa to Ilut
00 e).
Wrioh-"".
TI>fI!I.'" id",-pa.
por &I>.a bllSin or rescrvoir ofWaler,
seems to be nOt much known; bot
in 7..am. yur-ba.i is to be found.
!?Jor-ba I....b, C. also yUr-Qa, pf.
fut. !Jior, J. to count. e.g.
Sheejl, by letting Ibem IIl\SS oue by oDe
through ooe'l; hand8, the beads of a rosary
(throllgh one's fingeN), heace Cos - br)rxJ-
biaJ'.. mali-po b!jM to reid pm}'e" etc.
(d. sb,yari-ba, 3). - 2. to lMuure, bm by
the peck u.z.; 10 weith; rsir-lo. rd_gan
rldr-ba 10 weigh oUL (to e.xchaoge) bl'Uil
t'nr
gold.
iJ. to hunt, to
chase,
=
26r-ba,
ri-dimax
gaim-
/,./.;
nya-ysdr-ba
to fish
Dzl. 4. Sch. to cut
through (?).
1 1
adj.,
also
yset'-ba, rough, bristly, shag-
gy,
.s/.'/v/ ,
*/>n
St</..
<>(>|>.
to
QJam-po (>*v-//.
rough, gruff, rude?)
ysol
plough Glr., foil,
ton
-
ysol
id.
The
plough
in India and Tibet con-
sists
only
of a crooked beam
, ysol
-
mda,
(without wheels)
with the share
(ysol-lcdgs,
ton-lcdgs)
at the lower end
; ysol-mdd O
dzin-
pa
to
plough,
lit. to take hold of the
plough-
beam.
*
ysol-po poplar-tree
C.
ysos-pa
1.
yso-ba
and bso-ba.
q,nn-
bsa 1. in
bgo-bsa portion, share,
al-
lowance,
ration
Lex., evidently
a se-
condary
form of sas. 2. Dzl.
w,
1 in-
undation, flood; swa,
the
reading
of the ma-
nuscript
of
Kyelang,
seems to be
preferable.
bsd-ba, pf.
bsas,
to
slaughter,
to kill
(animals
for
food);
in a
story
of
Glr. it follows the
slaughtering
and must
be understood to denote the
cutting
to
pie-
ces of the killed
animal;
but our Lama
pre-
ferred to read
bsus-pa
to skin.
bsd-ma v.
ysd-ma.
bsdg-pa
v.
ysog-pa.
anr'n- bsdn-ba,
Sch. also
ysan-ba,
alvine
discharges,
bsdn-ba
Jbyin-pa
to
make
open
bowels,
of
food,
medicines
Med.;
bsah-dgdg constipation Med.;
bsan-yci
ex-
crements and
urine,
bsan-ycis
sku-ba to
dirty
therewith
Dzl.; bsan-yci
bsri-ba to
retain stool and urine
Sch.;
bsan-ldm the
anus Med.
bsdns-pa leaky, leaking,
full of
crevices,
*cu-zom
nyi-ma-la
bor-
na san
dug*
W. the
water-pail
will become
leaky,
if it is left
standing
in the sun.
bsdd-pa (prob. pf.
of
O cdd-pa q.v.)
1.
to
explain, expound;
to declare,
pronounce,
cos-bsdd-pa
to
explain
religion,
to lecture on
religious subjects
to
preach;
O
ci-ba dan drar bsad he must be set down
for dead
Wdh.;
bu-mo
nki/e-bar
baud this
indicates that a
girl
\\ill !><
born
Lt.;
badd-
////,s
//// ldi,-iio it is
ineffable,
unspeakable;
to
say, Jbdb-par
bsad
they say
it flows down
Wdn.,
fd-mar bsad he is said to be on the
lowest
stage Thgy., nan-par
bsad it is said
or declared to be
bad,
smdn-du bbad it is
mentioned as a medicine
Wdit.;
to
tell,
to re-
late,
col. the usual word. 2. to comb. v.
sod-pa. bsad-grwa
school-room,
lecture-
room.
*sad-d6n* W. the
subject
of a talk.
bsad-ydm
a
public
lecture Sch.
(?).
bsad-16
byed-pa
to make
many
words Mil.
]'
bsdn-pa
v
sdn-pa.
"
bsar, supine
of bsd-ba.
bsdr-ba v
ysor-ba.
m-
bsdl-ba 1. to wash, to wash out or
off,
to clean
by washing,
to
rinse,
plates,
dishes,
etc. 2. lto-ba bsdl-ba to
purge
the
body,
hence in
gen.
bsdl-ba to
suffer from
diarrhoea,
and W. col. *sal* diar-
rhoea, looseness, flux,
*sal
rag*
1 have
d.,
*sal
dug*
he suffers from
d.,
*sal
yon*
d. be-
gins; bsal-^dm
a mild
d.,
bsal-
p'yes(?)
a
violent flux
Sch.;
bsal-ndd
indisposition
from d.
; bsal-byed B.,
bsal-smdn B. and col.
laxative,
aperient
medicine.
J'^T
bsds-pa
v. bsd-ba.
bsig-pa
v.
Odzig-pa
I.
'T
bsib-pa
v.
ysib-pa.
*
bsu-ba v. su-ba.
r^'
bsug-pa
to sell Cs.
bsud-pa
\. v.
sud-pa.
--
2. Sch.:
to
purify by fire,
bsud-me
purify-
ing
fire
(?)
bsub-pa
to
put
into the
scabbard,
to sheathe Sch.
l'q*
bsiim-pa
CJ^^'q*
bser
-
ba v.
*
sum-pa
etc.
*
bseu
(cf. bsa, swa)
inundation, flood
Mil.
for gold. - :1. to hunt, to chase, - oldl'..lm,
ri.d.rag3 gume Du.; n!Ja-y,dr-ba to fish
D;:l. - -to &J.. to Cilt through (?).
l1. adj., nl$O 'fUr-bu, rough, bristly, shag-
gy. 11.."'(1, 'I'" Stg., app. to Jam-po (&11..
ruugh, gruff, rude?)
m"f'V,.,r "ol plough GIl'" (0':', to,; - riol id.
The plough in Iudil\ lind Tibet con-
sists only of a crooked bell.m. riol- MOO,
(without whee-ls) with the share (r.roi·leuD'>
to;,-1i:dg3) at the lower end; riol-maa oddn-
]'(I to plough, lit. to take hold of the plough-
benlD.
:rpf.-rtf rWl-po poplar-tree C.
y';03-pa 1. yio-lxJ lIud b3o-ba.
.o..aQ; NO 1. in brfr-bila portion, share, al·
•. I lowanee, ration !.-ioC., c\'idently Il.
eondnry form of ';a3. - 2. Dzl. 7\'::', I in-
undation, jlood; .twa, the reading of the mn-
nuscript ofl{yelang, seems to be preferable.
lnd-bo, pc. 6303, to slaughter, to kill
(animals for food); in II story of
Gb·. it follows the slaughtering and must
bc understooll to deoote the cutting to pie-
ces of tbe killed animal; Lut our Lamn pre-
ferred to read bUa-pa t.o skin.
wa-lIla v. "fi-ma.
.:::l-lfl·:r Uag-pa v. ridg.pa_
.q-lf:.q' Uo,i-ba, Seh. nlso ,ian-ba, 1Ilvine
dischargcs, Ud,,-ba ob.'1in-pa to
makc open bo"'e\s, of food, medicines Med.;
,uan..J{ldg constipation Med.; bia"-rH ex-
crements and urine, Ual' - rCi3 ,kU-ba t.o
dirty therewith D::l.; Mati-rei lm-i_ba to
retain stool l\.Dd urine Seh.; biOli-lfim the
MUS MM.
..q' Udli3 - pa leaky, leaking, lull of
crevices, -cu-::dm nyi-ma-la Mr-
no iati dug- IV. the wate.r-pnil will Lecolllc
leaky, if it is left standing in the Ilun.
bldd-pa (proL. pc. of ocdd-pa q. v.)
I. to explain, expound; to declare,
J'ronounce, Cos-Mdd-pa to explain rcligiou,
w lecture on religious subjects, to preach;
li-ba dan odrar bAad he must be set dOIl'o
d
>61
for d(':lll IVd".; bu-me d:.'1i-1mr blOO tlLi.
indicates tlmt a girl will be born Lt.; Mad-
J!Jl' mi lJ,j-Jio it is ineffable, unspeakable;
to say, owb-par Nad they 8"y it flo",!! down
Wd,i., fMIIUl' Uad he is said to be on the
lowest stagc TI'gy., ,jon-par- !Had it is laid
or declared to be bad, ,mdn..Ju blad it is
mentioned as a. medicine IVdn.; to tell, to re-
late, col. the usual word. - 2. to comb, v.
ldd-pa. -- Uad-yl'/t'U school-room, lecture-
room, - -'ad..Jdll- IV. the suhjecl of n talk.
Uad-yula a. public Iccture &/1. (?). biad-M
b!JM-pa to mllkc many words AliI.
bidn-pa v Jtin-pa.
'f.!1'" !Mar, supine of bifi.·,f,a.
.q'ol1,,'.q bitir--ba v "d,..ba.
=!*lQ[.:r Udl-ba 1. to wash, to wash out or
off, to clean by washing, to rinse,
platC$, dishes, etc. - 2. ltd-ba bidL-ba to
purge the body, hence in gen. bitil-ba to
suffer from dinrrhocll., and IV. col. -'al" diar-
rhoea, looseness, flux, -ial "ag- 1 hnve d.,
-Jal duff he suffers from d., -,al yo,i- d. be-
gins; bioi-Jam a mild d., bial-
o
p!ft3(?) a.
violent flux &h.; bial-nod indisposition
from d.; !Hal-byM n., bJal.,mdTl- l/. and col.
laxative, aperient medicine.
bim-pa v. bid-ba.

Mig-pa \'. o(lzig-pa I.
.qJl.:P:,J' bUb-pa \'. 'Ilib-po.
.q:j'.q' Uu-ba v. Au-ba.
bii/g-pa to sell (;.
.q'!1.c;"J' blud-pa 1. \'. Iud-po. - 2. &/a.:
to Ilurif)' by fire, purify-
ing fire (?).
bI"b-pa to put illto the seabLArd,
to sheathe &/1.
!Hilm-pa - .qJl.::;:.q bltl'- ba Y•

Alim-po etc.
.q.ro.. weu ('d. Wa, ilt'a) inundation, flood
'1;..; Mil,
,
568
bses-pa
bses-pa, prop. pf.
of
ses-pa,
to know
(a person orthing),
to be
acquaint-
ed,
dan with
Dzl; ynyen-bses
a
relation,
rela-
tive, ynyen-bses-la pdn-ytogs-parsems-sot\iey
are intent on
being
of use to their relatives
Dzl.; ynyen
and bses
may
also be
separated:
tfyod
-
la
ynyen
med bses
kyan
med,
Mil.
;
bses-ynyen
on the other hand means :
friend,
dge-bai
bses-, nyen (Ssk.
efi^nwf*^)
friend
to
virtue, spiritual adviser, opp.
to
mi-dgei
bses-
nyen
seducer,
Glr.
(cf. sdig-pai grogs-
po); dge-bses
1.
dge-bai bses-ynyen.
2.
=
dge-bsnyen lay-brother.
rio-bse's v. rio-ses.
mdza-bses friend.
nlcf*n*
bso-ba, pf. bsos,
1. also
yso-ba,
to
pour
out Lex. 2. to lie
with,
to
have sexual intercourse
with,
=
Jcrig-pa
byed-pa, e.g.
: de dan
bsos-pas
bu
skyes
after
having slept
with
him,
she bore him a son
Pth.-,
to
engender,
to
generate,
to
beget (v.a.),
pdg-rdzis bsos-pai
bu the son
begotten by
the swine-herd
Pth., (bso-ba
seems not to
be considered
obscene).
^pl"CJ"
bsog-pa
v.
ysog-pa.
njq'T
bsod-pa bsdd-pa,
*so'-ri* C. ru-
' '
mour, report, *sg-ri-la
dhe-da zer
dug-te yi'
mi ce*
though
it is rumoured I
cannot believe it C.
^-A^"^"
bsor-ba v.
ysor-ba.
q^^'Sf
bsdr-po C.,
W.
liberal, munificent,
Schr.:
squanderer, spendthrift(?).
bsol-ba 1. to
put off, postpone, defer,
delay,
bod-la
Ogro-ba
the
going
to
Tibet Glr.
; absolutely:
bsol-ba bzan it is
good
to
wait;
to
prolong, eg.
mi
zig-gi
O
fso-ba the life of a
person (by
a
reprieve)
Dzl.,
also to
grant,
to allow viz. a
respite,
a
reprieve, bddg-la zag
bdun
zig
bsol-te
grant-
ing
me a
respite
of seven
days
Dzl.
;
to
stop,
detain, e.g.
the sun in his course
Thgy.,
a
traveller
wishing
to set out Pth.
;
to
omit,
to
neglect doing
Mil.
(nif.); pyi
bsol-ba to
put off, postpone, pyi-bsol byed-pai gdh-zag
a
person
that is
always
postponing
his re-
ligious
duties Mil.
;
cos-la
pyi-bsol byar
mi
run Mil. there should be no
putting off,
whenever
religion
is
concerned;
bsol
O
debs-
pa
and
Otebs-pa
=
bsol-ba
frq. ;
bsol ma febs
he could not be
detained, kept back,
diverted
from his
purpose
Pth.;
relatives are called
bdud-kyi
bsol- debs a hinderance on the
way
of the
believer,
caused
by
the devil.
bsos
resp.
for zan or
spays,
food,
vict-
uals, provisions
of the
table;
bsos-la
ysegs-pa
to
go
to
dine,
to
go
to dinner Dzl.
;
dge-
dun-la bsos
ysol-ba
to treat the
priests
to a meal
Dzl.\
now almost
exclusively ap-
plied
to food offered to the
gods,
=
Iha-bsos;
bsos-bu Mil.
offering
-morsels, e.g.
small
pieces
of butter offered to the
gods
or the
ghosts.
s-pa begotten, generated,
v. bso-ba.
M
sa 1. the letter
S,
the
sharp English
s,
in C.
distinguished
from
z, (which
is
sounded there also as
sharp s) only by
the
following
vowel
being high-toned.
2.
num.: 28.
^-
sa 1.
earth,
as
elementary substance,
sa
cu me rlun
earth, water, fire, air,
the
four
elements,
sa
nyun-zad cig
a small
quan-
tity
of
earth,
opp.
to : sa
cen-poi
sa the mass
of the whole earth Dzl.
;
rdzd-sa
clay,
ar-
gillaceous
earth,
*be-sa* W. sand and
earth,
sda-sa flint and
earth;
also for
ore,
metal
(like rcfo), yser-sa gold-ore,
dnul-sa silver-
ore
6s.; /cyim-sa sweepings, offscourings;
M8
IM8-pa, prop. pf.of ill-pa, to know
,. (' (3 pen;on ortbing), to be acquaint.
ed, Jail with Dd.; rnyen-Nla a retation, rela-
tive, ynyen-Net-lajxin-rtog3-pal' U7mI-IJOthey
are intent on being of use to their reillti"es
Dd.; myen nnd bBe3 may also be separated;
myen med bBet Iqjaii med, Mil.;
Uet·ynyen on the other hand menns: friend,
dgi-bai bAe3-, u!J(:II (&1>. 4'i1WUf") friend
to virtue, spiritual adviser, opp. to mi-dgrH.
Net- Ryin seducer, Gir. (ef. adig_pai gl'ogt-
po); dfJe-bACa l. - dge-bai Uea-yn!Jbl. 2. =
d!Je-k1lyb/ lay-brother. - no·Uta v. no.Jh.
- friend.
btd-bu, pf. bil)f, I. also rio-bu, to
pour out LeJ:. - 2. to lie with, to
ha\'e sexual in(Neollrse with, _ c/big-pa
bybi.po., e.g.: de Jan bu akyea after
ha\'ing slept witb hiro, she bore hiro ll. SOli
11k; to engender, to generate, to beget (v.a.),
pag.rd."'1't bio3-pai bu the son hegotten by
the swine-herd Pill., (bio-ba seems not to
be considered obscene).
.cUFJ..q. UdfJ-pa v. ridrrpa·
bStJd-pa - hAl/d-pa, -ig'-n" C ru-
mour, report, dhe-t,/a ::fl'
dug-u yi' mi le- though it is rumoured I
cnnnot believe it C.
.q:tfJ:,',q' bidr·ba v. por-lm,
bidr.po C., w: liberal, munificent,
Schr.: squanderer, sp('ndthrifL('?),
30, J. the letter S, the sharp English f,
in C. distinguished from z, (which is
sounded there IIlso as sharp s) only by the
follo.....ing vo..... el being high-toned. - 2.
num.: 28.
fa 1. earth, as elementllry suLstu.nce, $0,
i5u me rluii earth, ..... at.er, fire, air, the
3(J
Q8rJl,..lm 1. to put off, postpone, defer,
-.; delay, lHJd·la Qyrd.f.Ja the going to
Tibet Glr.j absolutely: bidl-ba hzai" it is
good to wuit; - to prolang, e g. mi zig-fJi
cfw-ba the life of a person (by a reprieve)
D::l., also to ta allow viz. a respite, a
reprieve, bdO.fJ-la tag bdun :iO bidi·te grant·
inp; me a respit.e of se\'en days D;;/.; to slop,
detain, e.g, the sun in his course Th!lY., 1\
traveller wishing to set out 1't/1.; to omit,
to neglect doing: Mil. (ni f.); ftyi biOl-ba to
put off, postpone, pyi.Udl u!Jed-pai yan-::uy
a person thnt is nlways postponing his re-
ligious duties ,Mil.; W3-la pyi.bi6/, b.yar mi
l"Un Mil. there should be no putting off,
..... henever religion is concerned; bioi cf.kb3-
pa nnd culn-pa = biJol-ba frq.; bWl ma febt.
he could not be detained, kellt back, di\'erted
from his purpose ptll.; rclati"es are called
bdud.kyi bsol-Qdibt 1\ hindemnce on the way
of the believer, caused by the devil.
bilQ3 reSII. for ::an or 3pQ{J3, food, viet,
uals, provisions of the table; bil)f-la
yiJegs-pa to go to dint', to go to dinner Dzl.;
dge--cdun-la bjO$ y30l-ba to the priests
1O n meal D::I.; now almost exclusi\'ely ap-
plied to food offered to the gods, - lha-bil)f;
!M(J$-bu Mil. offering-morsels, e.g, small
pieces of butter offered to the gods or the
ghosts.
..q'Q8011-pabegolten, generated, v.bio..oa.
four elements, $0, nyun-zad Cig II small quan-
tity of eartb, opp. w; 30, lin-poi to, the mass
of the whole earth Dzi.; rJzd-IJa clay, nr·
gillaceous earth, -be-to,- 1V. sand-and earth,
Adg.aa flint and earth; also for ore, metal
(like rdo), rl!il'-3a gold-ore, dnul·fa silver-
ore G&.; sweepings, offscourings;

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