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USABLE WITH THE MYTHIC GAME MASTER EMULATOR OR ANY RPG

CREATE ADVENTURE LOCATIONS FOR ANY


ROLE-PLAYING GAME, IN ADVANCE OR ON THE SPOT
BY TANA PIGEON
Create adventure locations for
any role-playing game, in advance
or on the spot

Writing & Typesetting


Tana Pigeon

Artwork
Jorge Muñoz
theyorko@yahoo.com

Word Mill
5055 Canyon Crest Dr. • Riverside, CA 92507
www.wordmillgames.com

The Location Crafter © Copyright 2014 by Tana Pigeon and Word Mill. The Location Crafter is published by Word Mill. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this work by any means
without written permission from the publisher, except short excerpts for the purpose of reviews or pages clearly marked for personal use, is expressly prohibited. The mention of
or reference to any company or product in these pages is not a challenge to the trademark or copyright concerned.
REGIONS

“Not all those who wander are lost.”


J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

You’ve Got Places To Be


Pushing open a pair of impressive carved doors, Nathan and Lady • ELEMENTS: These are the specific details that populate your Region.
Montgomery stepped into a cobweb strewn chamber of prodigious size. Books Elements are usually simple words and phrases, like “orc” or “hallway.”
lined the walls, moldy in their leather bindings, the shelves that bore them Elements are combined to give each location its own flavor.
sagging with time and rot. • SCENE: Each discrete location within a Region is generated
“This is different,” Lady Montgomery said, her British accent higher than separately, and each occurrence of these locations is called a Scene.
usual, her excitement at the find barely containable. Characters will play out whatever they must in each Scene, depending
Nathan was less enthusiastic, his fingers tensing around the grip of the pistol on what they find in that location, before moving on to the next Scene.
he held. The mansion was deserted and crumbling, and yet here there were Breaking the adventure down into Scenes is a way to compartmentalize the
books. Tons of books. He felt as though the volumes themselves were regarding events in the Region to give the Gamemaster a chance to conceptualize each
the pair of investigators even as they stared back, and Nathan sensed that the one and keep the adventure moving forward smoothly.
attention was not friendly. Those who know the Mythic game system will find many of the
“Just ... be on guard. This place has an ill reputation,” he said as his partner concepts in The Location Crafter familiar. In particular, all of the pieces
moved swiftly toward the shelves, eager to peruse the mysterious tomes. above ... Regions, Categories, Elements, and Scenes ... are interpreted by
“You worry overmuch, my American friend,” she said, plucking a volume at you, the player, as you go. Crafter gives you the raw components for an
random from a shelf. She blew at it, watching dust puff away in wispy tendrils, adventure, you put them together and decide what it all means. We’ll talk
then she opened it. more about this later.
A sigh seemed to pass through the house, like a wind that could not be felt.
The hair on the back of Nathan’s neck prickled, and even Lady Montgomery

Regions
looked up from her find, a note of alarm in her eyes.
Before Nathan could utter a worried curse, the doors they had passed
through slammed shut of their own accord. He knew, by dread instinct, that
they were about to meet the Lord of the manor.
Regions are the places your characters are exploring, and it can be
any discreet locale of any size. For instance, your Region could be a hotel
No matter what genre of role-playing game you’re playing in, regardless room where a murder took place, or it could be an entire planet that your
of what world the characters find themselves fighting for their lives, there exploratory starship has run across.
is one thing common to every story: places to explore. Whether it’s a dank The size of the Region doesn’t matter, the process is the same. Regions
and cavernous dungeon or the shining and lofty spires of a futuristic citadel, are broken into their component parts in the three Category lists,
stories from horror to science fiction to fantasy are filled with places for Locations, Encounters, and Objects. If the Region is a planet, the Location
characters to experience. list may consist of continents and notable planetary features. For the hotel
The Location Crafter is a role-playing aid to help you construct these room, the Location list may be very short, just a few rooms, but it could
places randomly, as you play, with a minimum of fuss. It accomplishes this even include smaller items within the room, like dresser drawers or cabinets.
by having you build lists of elements that will be found in the region you By changing the scale, you can use The Location Crafter to flesh out
explore, which The Location Crafter will use as the raw material to fuse areas into greater and greater detail. You may have Category lists for an
together and create your explorable space. entire planet Region. After exploring that, your characters may focus on one
A few terms to get out of the way before we proceed: particular continent, which becomes its own Region. There, they discover
• REGION: The total area that is being explored. This is the dungeon, an alien citadel, which forms another Region with its own lists. There is no
the island, the villain’s lair, the haunted mansion ... wherever it is that the end to the number of Regions you can generate, and eventually you could
characters have found themselves. have details on many interconnected Regions, which helps flesh out your
• CATEGORIES: Regions are broken down into three Categories, campaign.
which are Locations, Encounters, and Objects. Each Category is a list of
Elements.

2
CATEGORIES

Categories
Before exploration begins, you must set up the building blocks of
your Region using Categories and Elements. Categories are the broad
classifications of a setting, and include Locations, Encounters, and
Objects. Elements are the specific listings within those Categories, the
actual components of your Region such as furniture, monsters that may be
lurking, treasures, etc.
To keep things simple and running quickly, Elements should be one
or two word descriptions to spur the imagination. When combined with
Elements from the other Categories, along with what has already occurred
in the adventure and your own expectations, you will find the Region
taking on a life of its own as the characters explore.

Locations
These are the areas within your larger, explorable Region. For instance, Objects
the chambers and halls of a dungeon, or the rooms and breezeways of an
apartment building. These are the specific places your characters will find Objects are things that characters can run across that should be of
themselves in as they explore the Region. interest to them. These are important items and not just set dressing (that
Location Elements might include: hallway, bedroom, swimming pool, kind of thing is implied by the Location and events, to be discussed more
command center, elevator, meadow, laboratory, cave, street. later).
Object Elements might include: gun, sword, chest, treasure, key, orb,
chain saw, shotgun.
Encounters
Encounters usually mean people or creatures that the characters can ASSEMBLING CATEGORIES
interact with, and which will interact back. This can also include non living Categories are lists that will be put together before and during play to
things too, such as traps or devices. The key here is that Encounters are create the environment about which the characters will explore. Populate
people, creatures, or objects within a Location that the characters will have each Category with the Elements you think would occur in this Region,
to deal with and will likely form the most active portions of each Location. starting with the most likely. You start with what you already know about a
Encounter Elements might include: enemy agent, orc, robot, super Region, or expect.
villain, henchman, pit trap, innocent bystander, intruder, ghost. Generally, the first six Elements in each list should be common, the
kinds of things you’d expect to find early in exploration. More exotic and
unique Elements should follow further down the list. There is no limit to
how long your Category lists can grow, but it’s advisable to try and keep the
Elements to the most interesting and pertinent to building the story.

Sample Region Category Lists: Christoff Manor


Our region is a crumbling old
mansion that is reputed to be LOCATIONS ENCOUNTERS OBJECTS
haunted by a dead wizard. The • Dining Room • Broken floorboards • Painting
setting is the United States, • Breezy Hallway • Runaway youth • Crime scene evidence
1920s. The adventure is one • Moldy Bedroom • Rats • Books
of horror, and our characters • Empty Room • Homeless man • Blood crusted knife
are exploring this location while • Kitchen • Eerie sounds • Discarded shotgun
investigating a gruesome murder. • Library • Moving furniture • Spent bullet casings
Clues have led them to Christoff • Attic • Christoff’s ghost • Christoff’s mummified body
Manor. The Gamemaster puts • Torture Chamber
together the following Category
lists based on what she expects
from the Region.

3
ELEMENTS

Elements Summary Of Category Elements


The Elements themselves are entirely up to you. You should broadly CUSTOM SPECIAL
think of them in two categories: common and uncommon. As stated before,
the earlier Elements in a Category list should be the most common, with
less common following further down the list. This will make it more likely
EXPECTED RANDOM
that those less common Elements will be discovered later in the exploration,
instead of right off the bat ... unless you want to allow that to happen. NONE COMPLETE
When you are thinking of the Elements you want to place in each
Category, think of the Region to be explored and what characters might
expect to find there. In a fantasy setting, Location Elements might include: Custom
hallway, great chamber, and tomb. Encounters might be: pit trap, animated
skeleton, giant spider, and group of orcs. Objects might be: debris, statue, These are the Elements you devise based on prior expectations to
sword, and closed chest. It all depends on your particular game, the populate your Categories, as described above. This will be the most
campaign world, what’s happened in the adventure so far, and what you common type of Element as they derive from your ongoing story.
already know about the Region.
Most of the Elements listed above are fairly generic, but you could
also slip in some specific Elements, ones that are important to the story Expected
the characters are involved in. For instance, if the characters are exploring An Element listing under a Category can simply say “Expected.” Not
a dungeon in search of a vampire they are hunting, one of the Encounter every Location, Encounter and Object will be unique or of Earth-shattering
Elements might be: Vlad the Vampire. Encountering Vlad might be the importance; this Category Element represents the mundane in your Region.
whole purpose of the exploration. This can be true for Locations and As your characters enter a Region and explore, you will have expectations of
Objects as well. The further characters delve into an adventure, the more what you will find: dark hallways in a dungeon, tangles of vines in a forest,
Regions they explore, the more imaginative material you have to draw on to enemy henchman patrolling a villain’s lair. A Category result of “Expected”
populate new Region Category lists, propelling the story forward. produces just that, what you most expect for that Category.
Keep in mind that, although you may know some of the Elements You can tailor how active a Region is by using the Expected Element.
of your Region ahead of time, you won’t know exactly how the known For instance, if you want a Region to only have a few key points of
Elements will mix with the other Elements, or when in the exploration they interest, you may make the first five Elements in your Location Category
will come up. Also, in the course of exploring, new Elements may be added “Expected.” This would require characters to delve into the Region for a
along the way, changing the flavor of the Region unexpectedly. while before coming across the more story-pertinent Locations. You could
Although the Elements making up your Category lists are entirely up to also do this with Encounters and Objects, to help tone down or increase the
you, their are some special Elements to consider: chances of Elements that propel the adventure forward.

Christoff Manor Updated With New Category Elements


The Gamemaster has decided
Christoff Manor is too loaded LOCATIONS ENCOUNTERS OBJECTS
with Custom Elements; she • Expected • None • None
wants to mix it up with some of • Expected • None • None
the more specialized Elements. • Empty Room • None • Expected
Going through the lists, she • Dining Room • None • Expected
adds to it. The lists have gotten • Moldy Bedroom • None • Painting
longer, but she doesn’t intend • Kitchen (U) • Broken floorboards • Crime scene evidence
for the house to be that huge, • Library (U) • Runaway youth (U) • Books
so she places the Complete • Special • Rats • Blood crusted knife (U)
Location Element in the 9th • Complete • Homeless man (U) • Discarded shotgun (U)
position, three short of the top of • Attic (U) • Eerie sounds • Spent bullet shell casings
the list, increasing the chances • Random • Special • Special
that the house can be fully • Torture Chamber (U) • Moving furniture • A murdered corpse
explored without necessarily • Christoff’s ghost (U) • Christoff’s mummified body (U)
exhausting all the lists. • Random • Random

4
ELEMENTS

None Special
A Category Element of None means there is no Element for that The Special Element is an opportunity to shake things up. A Special
Category in the scene. This would come into use with the Encounters Element can be placed in any Category list, and probably should be
and Objects Categories, since you can’t have a None Location. As with somewhere at least once in every Category, most likely in uncommon
the Expected Element, the None Element can be used to tailor the territory (after the first six items). If generated, this necessitates a roll on the
chance of finding points of interest in the Region ... the more None Special Element Table (see below), which will provide instructions on what
results you have, the more deserted the Location. to do. This can result in alterations to the Category list, special scene events,
and other unexpected twists.

Special Elements Table


When a Special Element is generated in a Category, roll 1d100 on the table below and apply it to that Category as the Element for the current
Scene. If the table requires you to make additional rolls in a Category list, do not count that toward the Progress Points for that Category: only one
mark, the original, is registered.

1-5 • SUPERSIZE: Roll in the Category again (if you get Special again, treat it as Expected). Whatever Element is generated, make it biggie size,
more than what is expected. Take the Element up to the next level, or as grand as you can, while still making sense within the Scene. For instance, if
the Category is Locations, and the Element generated is “pool,” where you originally may have envisioned this as a pond you now treat it as a lake.
6-10 • BARELY THERE: Roll in the Category again (if you get Special again, treat it as Expected). Whatever Element is generated, minimize it
as much as possible. Whatever you would have described to represent this Element, take it down a notch or two. If it’s an Encounter, such as an
enemy, maybe it is wounded or of a lesser nature than usual. If it’s a Location, maybe it is badly in need of repair or is unusually small.
11-15 • REMOVE ELEMENT: Roll in the Category again (if you get Special again, treat it as Expected), and cross that Element out and remove it
from the Category list. You will still use it for this Scene, but the Category list has now been altered for future rolls. If the Element is Unique, then this
result has no effect (as Unique Elements are crossed off anyway).
16-25 • ADD ELEMENT: Add a new Element to this Category, tacking it on to the end of the list. Generate the new Element by treating it like a
Random Element and rolling for a description of it on the Complex Question Description Tables. The new Element is then added to the Category
list and is treated as though it was rolled for this scene. This is identical to a Random Element Special result (see below), except that the Element
generated is added to the Category list to possibly be encountered again later.
26-30 • THIS IS BAD: Roll in the Category again (if you get Special again, treat it as Expected). Whatever you get, it is bad for the characters.
For instance, if it’s an Encounter, it is probably something that is harmful to the characters. If it’s a Location, maybe the place is very dark and
treacherous. If it’s an Object, maybe it’s unstable and about to explode. Not everything is dangerous, it could just be finding an otherwise useful
Object that is broken. Go with whatever modification to the Element seems most obvious to you. If you’re not sure how to make the Element bad,
then roll on a Complex Question Table for inspiration.
31-35 • THIS IS GOOD: Roll in the Category again (if you get Special again, treat it as Expected). Whatever you get, it is something good for
the characters. Whether it’s a Location, Encounter, or Object, it is an Element that will be helpful or useful to the characters. Go with whatever
modification to the Element seems most obvious to you. If you’re not sure how to make the Element good, then roll on a Complex Question Table
for inspiration.
36-50 • MULTI-ELEMENT: Roll twice on this Category list (if you get Special Element again, treat it as an Expected Element), and allow both of
them into the scene together. If the Category is Location, and the Elements are “pool” and “stony chamber,” maybe this is a chamber with an ornate
fountain in it.
51-60 • EXIT HERE: This Location, in addition to whatever else it contains, also holds an exit from the Region, if this is possible. Maybe it’s a back
door out of the mansion, or another exit from the cave. If this result makes no sense, ignore it and treat this as an Expected Element.
61-70 • RETURN: Whatever else this Location contains, it also has access to another, previously encountered Location. This is only possible if that
other location had a way to reach this one ... in other words, it had other doors or access that the characters had not yet explored. If more than one
Location Element matches, then determine which one it is randomly. If this result makes no sense, ignore it and treat this as an Expected Element.
71-75 • GOING DEEPER: Instead of adding one Progress Point for this Category, add three instead. Otherwise, treat this result as an Expected
Element.
76-80 • COMMON GROUND: Eliminate three Progress Points for this Category (don’t record this occurrence and eliminate two more).
Otherwise, treat this result as an Expected Element.
81-100 • RANDOM ELEMENT: Treat this Special Element like a normal Random Element. As needed, ask the Complex Questions, “What does it
look like?” and/or “What does it do?” and roll on the Description and Action tables, interpreting your results.

5
ELEMENTS

Random UNIQUES
Some Elements listed under a Category may be of a special, unique
Even though the Region is generated randomly as you go, most of the
nature, like Vlad the Vampire. If one of the Encounter Category’s Element’s
Elements placed under each Category list have been of your invention
is “the Big Bad,” and there is only one of them and you destroy him on the
based on expectations. The Elements combine to give surprising results, but
first meeting, how are you going to encounter this twice? For Elements that
to throw more surprises into a Category, insert Random Elements. When
are unique, once they have been discovered by the characters and cannot be
a roll on a Category list generates a Random Element, ask a Complex
discovered again, cross them off the Category list.
Question (see page 8) to figure out what it is. Most likely, you will ask the
You can decide at the outset whether an Element is Unique. To
Descriptive Question of “What does it look like?” If you need more detail
differentiate it from other Elements (and perhaps remind yourself), put a
on what the Element is doing, you can ask a Complex Action Question.
“U” next to it on your list. Once that Element has been generated, you may
These questions are answered using the Complex Question tables. Use
have to make a judgement call as to whether or not you should strike it off
the Description tables to answer “What does it look like?” and the Action
the list. For instance, if the Unique Element is a Location, the characters
tables to answer “What does it do?” You may not need to roll on both. For
will only encounter it once (unless they go back to it later intentionally),
instance, if you are generating a Location, you may only need to know what
so off it goes. However, if it’s Vlad, and he escapes the encounter with the
it looks like. If you’re generating an encounter, you need to know what it
characters, you may decide that since he is still on the loose he may be
looks like so you know what it is, and you may also need to know what it is
encountered yet again later.
doing, such as what kind of trap it is.
For more information on how to use the Complex Question tables, see
page 8.
As with most of the mechanics of The Location Crafter, the
answers you receive on the tables are interpreted based on what Here is a sample of a filled out Region Sheet at the start of an adventure for a post-apocolyptic
you already know of the Region, what has already happened, setting. You can find blank Region Sheets at the back of this book for printing and copying.
what you expect, and what springs to mind. We’ll talk more about
interpretations later.
As with the Special Element, you may want to have at least
one Random Element in each Category to spice it up.

Complete
The Complete Element can only be placed in the Location
Category, and should be somewhere past the 6th item. When
generated, this indicates that the Region has been fully explored;
there is no place else to go, at least that the characters are aware
of. If this is rolled, treat it as an Expected for this Scene, but there
are no further Locations to explore beyond this one; the Region
is done. Any access points described in earlier Scenes that the
characters had not gone through, like doors or corridors, will lead
to already existing Scenes. You can choose those connections by
what makes the most sense, or randomly, at you discretion.
The larger your Region, the further down the Location
Category the Complete Element should appear. If your characters
are exploring a small apartment, this may be the 7th Element. If
they are exploring an entire jungle island, this might be the 15th
or 16th Element.

REPEATS
Not every Element in a Category needs to be listed as a single
entry. Having the same Element repeat is a good idea if that result
is expected and should be common for the Region. For instance,
if a dungeon is crawling with undead skeletons, the Encounters
Category may be loaded with skeletons, and then perhaps a few
vampires and ghosts further down the list. Elements in a list can
be rolled more than once (unless they are Unique; see below), so
it isn’t strictly necessary to repeat a recurring Element, only if you
think it would likely appear with greater frequency.

6
MAKING IT HAPPEN

Making It Happen
It’s time to put all of these lists into action. Exploring a Region
is a process of generating one Location, and its contents, at a time.
Characters enter a Scene, you use the Category lists to randomly
determine the characteristics of the Scene, then the characters move on
to the next one.
To generate a new Scene in the Region to explore (including the first
one), take each Category (Locations, Encounters, Objects), roll 1d6 for
each, and count down the Category list by the number you rolled, and
that is the Element you run with.
This will give you one Element for each of the three Categories to
construct your Scene with. Combine these Elements together, use the
magic of interpretation, and voila! You have a Location to explore.
For instance, let’s say our investigators have entered Christoff Manor.
For our first Location, we roll 1, 4, and 6. Looking at our Category lists
on page 4, we get: Location - Expected; Encounter - None; Objects -
Crime scene evidence.
The Gamemaster interprets these results with the following
description: “You enter the foyer of Christoff Manor [the foyer being
what the GM expected to be the first Location in a mansion]. The place
is dank and cobwebby, a chandelier that hasn’t been cleaned in decades,
it seems, dangles from the ceiling. The waning sunlight glimmers on an
object on the floor, an earring on closer inspection. You recognize this as
the twin earring belonging to the one worn by the woman who had been
murdered in Rivercrest last week [our piece of crime scene evidence].”
The GM is given a good deal of creative license to run with any
description that matches the Category Elements she was dealt. You
should remain true to the results rolled, but to embellish as much detail
as makes sense given what you already know. The most important
Element of this particular Scene is the crime scene evidence, which gives
our investigators the tip off that they are on the right track by exploring
the manor.

THE FIRST SCENE


The first Scene characters enter for a Region should be considered
its start point and contains an exit to the outside world. There are no
rules for generating what the entrance/exit is, use what makes the most
sense. In the case of our mansion, the GM knows they entered through
the front door. Until further exploration reveals additional exits from
a Region, it is assumed that the starting Location is the only known
entrance/exit.
Category (for instance, you have 8 elements in your list, but your roll
plus Progress Points is 10), then the result is considered Expected. Also,
DELVING DEEPER reduce that Category Lists’ Progress Points by 5 points.
Continue to generate Scenes one at a time like this until the
As characters dig deeper into a Region, you need to get past the
Complete Location Element is rolled, until the GM decides the Region
first six items in a Category list to delve further than the most common
has been fully explored, or until the characters decide they are done and
Elements. To do this, a modifier is applied to your d6 rolls each time a
leave.
list is rolled. Every time you roll on a Category list (usually after entering
The complexion of your Category lists may change over the course of
each new Scene, unless also directed to do so by a Special Element),
an exploration. Unique Elements may get removed, and Special Elements
write down a hash mark on a piece of paper for that Category list to
may add new Category Elements. It’s easiest if your Category lists have
indicate the amount of Progress Points (which begin at zero). Each time
been scrawled out on a piece of paper so you can easily scratch out and
a Category is rolled, roll 1d6, plus the number of Progress Points for the
add Elements, and add/remove hash marks from Progress Points. There
list, to get your final result.
is a blank Region Sheet at the back of this book for printing and copying
If your roll takes you beyond the current list of Elements in the
for personal use.

7
MAKING IT HAPPEN

KNOWN ELEMENTS most likely answer is “yes,” then a result of 4-10 is a Yes. If the odds are
50/50, or you really aren’t sure, then a result of 6-10 is a Yes. If it seems less
The Location Crafter assumes you’re searching a Region that is wholly likely to you that the answer is “yes,” then a result of 8-10 gives you a Yes.
unknown to you. As such, characters are wandering, learning about the If you are using The Location Crafter with the Mythic Game Master
Region as they go. What if, however, they do know about the Region, or Emulator System, feel free to replace the simple yes/no system here with the
learn about Locations within the Region as they investigate but before they Fate Chart system of Mythic.
actually encounter them and wish to proceed directly to those Locations?
This could occur in a number of ways, and is particularly easy if the
Region is a geographic area, like a town. You explore a town, discover a Complex Questions
hotel, talk with employees there in your search for the local graveyard, and
they give you directions to it. If you have no idea what the characters will find in that chest, instead
Should the characters roll random Locations until they find the one of asking a yes/no question, you can ask a Complex Question, which is a
they seek, or should they go directly to it? This can also apply to the other common language question, such as, “What’s in the chest?”
Categories, such as Encounters (is the Sheriff at the Sheriff’s Office?) and To answer this, consult the Complex Question Tables (pages 14-15).
Objects (are their guns in the armory?). The GM will have to make a There are two sets of tables: Description Questions and Action Questions. If
judgement call on this, whether to allow some items to be chosen from a the Complex Question is one of description, such as, “What’s in this box?”,
Category list instead of rolled. If she feels there is an overwhelming chance consult the Description Questions Tables, which provides two lists of single,
that the Element is present then she should feel free to choose it instead of descriptive words. Roll 1d100 on both tables, put the words together, and
rolling for the next Scene. Otherwise, ask a Simple Question (see below): “Is this is your answer of what the thing in question looks like. Interpret this
this Element present?” result in the way that makes the most sense to you.
If the answer to the question is “no”, then, if the Element in question If the Complex Question is about an action or activity, such as, “What
is a Location, the characters may have been heading to their chosen does the trap do?” then consult the Action Question Tables. Roll on both,
destination but encounter another Location instead or along the way. In and put the words together.
the case of Encounters and Objects, the people or items simply are not at The Complex Question Tables will give you very simple results, but
the Location. this should be enough to spur your imagination and generate a meaningful
The Location Crafter is designed to give broad outlines of a Region to outcome when interpreted in combination with the other Elements of the
lessen the amount of work required by a GM in creating a locality, to spur Scene and what has happened so far in the Adventure.
creativity, and to allow for exploration surprises. Determining the contents For instance, for our question of “What’s in the chest?”, we roll on the
of a Location will also depend on the adventure itself, what the GM decides, Description Tables and get: rudely tranquil (by rolling a 91 and 93). The
and the mechanics and campaign of the RPG you are playing. You don’t GM thinks for a moment, and goes with this interpretation: “The chest is
have to use the Simple Question system here for deciding on the presence empty, except for a mildew smell that really stinks badly.”
of Scene Elements that players ask for when it makes more sense for these What if the chest on the Objects Category list had said “Trapped chest”?
Elements to come to light in the normal course of role-play. If an Element The GM, not knowing exactly what the trap is, decides to make it an
for a Location is determined without rolling on a Category list, however, do Action Complex Question. She rolls on the Action Question Tables, getting
not increase its Progress Points for that Scene. 83 and 69, resulting in: assist wounds. The GM decides this means that the
trapped chest assists in causing wounds, and when opened poisoned darts
fire out of it.
FURTHER INVESTIGATION The results of the Question Tables are general and vague, but they
So, you know the Location the characters are exploring, you know are designed to be non-specific enough to allow your creativity to find an
what they are Encountering and what significant Object is here. Now interpretation that should fit into nearly any situation. Don’t try to be too
what? Role-play out the Scene using the RPG you are playing with. The literal about your interpretation, go with whatever springs to mind first and
Elements generated give you a good place to start, mixed and interpreted makes sense. (When nothing that makes logical sense springs to mind, see
by you into something that’s meaningful. If you need to add more detail to the I Dunno rule later).
a Location beyond what the Category Elements have given you, and you
need a simple system for determining answers to Region questions, you
can use the following Questions system:
Expanding Category Lists
Your initial Category Lists may have been sparse in detail. After all, you
Simple Questions probably don’t know much about the Region beforehand and maybe your
expectations are few. As characters explore a Region and learn about it, feel
The characters are in the coffin chamber of the master vampire where free to add new Elements to the bottom of your Category lists.
they have found an ancient chest. They open the chest and find ... what? So These additions should take place at the end of a Scene, when moving
far, The Location Crafter has given you enough details to set the Scene, but from one Scene to the next. Additions should be limited to adventure
what happens when you dig deeper at a particular location and need more Elements that have actually been encountered or have been referenced in the
detail? A Simple Question may be the way to go. course of play (brand new Elements can be created from the Special Element
If you have a some idea of what the characters will find, but you are not result of Add Element.)
certain, you can pose it as a yes/no Simple Question. For instance, “Does For instance, your characters are old west gunslingers on the hunt for an
the chest contain tons of gold and jewels?” Roll a d10. If you think the outlaw they wish to capture and return to collect a bounty. They believe him

8
MAKING IT HAPPEN

to be hiding out in the town of Bleakstone, which is now the Region they are to the next, it’s assumed that the Locations have a connector of some kind
exploring. While questioning people in the town saloon, the characters learn (doorways, hallways, a road to travel, etc.)
that the outlaw has a brother who lives in town. At the end of the Scene, the You can keep track of a growing Region by either writing down each
GM decides to add the brother to the Encounters Category list. Location (with it’s Encounters and Objects) and keeping them in a list, or
The characters’ search turns strange when they discover that the outlaw roughing out a map as you go. This will help you if the characters decide to
is a member of a bizarre blood cult. The cult has a sigil that members often backtrack and visit a previously encountered Location, or when trying to
burn into their property. The GM adds the sigil as an Element on the determine if one Location connects to another.
Objects Category list. When in a Location, it is presumed, as long as the Region has not been
completely explored, that there is access to the next Location. It is up to you
how to describe the exits in a Location since The Location Crafter abstracts
MAPPING IT ALL OUT the construction of Regions. Go with whatever makes the most sense. As
As characters proceed through a Region, it’s going to become important the Region unfolds through exploration, you may decide that some of these
to keep track of the Locations they travel through and what they contain areas interconnect logically. If there is some question whether one Location
and how they connect to other Locations. There is no rule for how connects to another, and you choose not to determine that yourself, you can
Locations connect; when characters move consecutively from one Location pose it as a Simple Question, “Do these Locations connect?”

Using the Enemy Marauder Town Region Sheet from page 6, I ran it through the paces and generated the Region for it. Below is a rough, flowchart map of the
final Region. It ended up with 6 Locations, including the entrance street, a street being guarded by marauders, a shack with some guards in it, a watchtower, hills
with cave dwellings used as living space by the marauders, and an old house where a prisoner was being kept (the goal of the adventure is to rescue the prisoner).
I decided each location was loosely connected by dusty roads. It’s not a pretty map, but it does the job!

9
INTERPRETATION

Interpretation
The Location Crafter is designed to kick back simple concepts
and adventure snippets which, once put together in your
imagination, build the bigger scene. The Elements you generate
are the essential components of the Scenes, and everything else is
interpreted and inferred. If something makes sense, then run with
it. If you are in doubt, then ask a Simple or Complex Question
to check on it.
Although the system provides the details, your imagination
ties it all together. That’s were interpretation comes in, the key
to making this work. For instance, let’s say you’re running a spy
game, the Region the characters are exploring is an abandoned
warehouse that the characters think the villain may have used as a
previous headquarters, and you generate the following Elements:
Location: auto garage
Encounter: guard dog
Objects: documents
Based on these results, and what is already known of the
Region so far, the GM may describe the scene like this: “You
enter a larger area of the warehouse where you see several cars up
on blocks and workbenches stained with motor oil. It looks like
an auto garage. There are several file cabinets, drawers partially
open, loose sheets of paper sticking out of them as though
someone had rifled through them in a hurry. Before you can
explore any further, you hear a growling sound. Slinking out
from underneath a car is a black, mangy Rottweiler who does not
look pleased at all to see you.”
The Scene described above uses all of the details generated
from the lists, and ties them together into a coherent whole. All
of the other details of the scene ... the cars up on blocks, the file
cabinets, etc. ... were logically inferred from the details that had
to be in the Scene. Allow yourself to let the scene take shape
in your head based on the Elements provided and try not to
worry about the extra details too much; focus on what is most
interesting to keep the exploration moving smoothly.
In the previous section on Mapping It All Out, how to handle
connections from one Location to another is discussed. This is
also a matter of interpretation and going with what makes the
most sense. For instance, after the characters finish with the
garage in the example above, the next Location they find might
be an office. We decide the office is connected to the garage
by a door. You could also decide that the characters encounter
the office down a short hallway. This is for you to interpret, go
with whatever seems most appropriate. If the decision matters
(perhaps the players are hoping for a hall to give them some place
to hide), then consider framing this as a Simple Question. you more than a few seconds to justify a new Element or outcome with
the existing Scene, or no interpretation that makes sense springs to
mind, then forget about it. Treat the Element as an Expected result and
WHEN IN DOUBT, USE THE move on. This applies to Special Elements as well that just do not fit the
Scene. This is especially important if you are using The Location Crafter
“I DUNNO” RULE as you play, generating the Region on the go. Don’t bog down the game
Random systems like The Location Crafter give random results, and on a particularly tough interpretation. The flow of the adventure is more
sometimes all the interpretive powers in the world will not help you important, and a forced or stretched interpretation is often unsatisfying.
make sense of something that just makes no sense to you. If it’s taking Just move on.

10
PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER

Putting It All Together


Let’s get busy and make the magic happen! Following is an example of “The area widens suddenly and in the middle of the floor is a gaping
putting a Region together and running it in play. The campaign is for a hole. Crumbled scaffolding hangs above it, old ropes moldy with age
weird west setting in the American Southwest of old times plus magic and dangling above what appears to be a hole down into nowhere. The mine
monsters. The adventurers are a mixed group of town folk and gunslingers continues beyond the hole, but the rim around it is very tight, only a foot
searching for the Hand of Luke, the dismembered hand of a dead outlaw wide. A cool draft emanates up from the hole.”
whose ghost has returned from beyond to terrorize the town. Only finding We role play out this Scene, the characters trying to figure out a way to
and burning the Hand will banish him. safely skirt their way around the hole without falling in. I make additional
Through investigations during the adventure, the characters determined rolls as the Scene plays out, which results in the characters hearing sounds
that the hand is in an abandoned gold mine. The wizard (who was already from deep within the hole, faint scratching and scrabbling noises. After
dispatched by the characters) who summoned up old Luke had a lair in the a few near falls narrowly averted, and one character dropping his lantern
caverns, and it’s believed the Hand is still there. down the shaft (which disappears into the dark, taking a few seconds before
I start with a Region Sheet (see page 18) and fill out the Category lists. I impact is heard, and then all the other noises suddenly cease).
do this quickly as the players discuss how they want to approach the mine, I cross “Bottomless shaft” off my Locations list, since it was a Unique
since I’ll be generating the Region as we play. I fill the common area (the Element, and generate the next Scene as the Characters continue. I roll:
first six lines) of the Locations list with a bunch of Expecteds and a few Locations - Ceremony Room; Encounters - Luke; Objects - Dead body.
Random Elements, since I expect them to see mostly general mine shaft This should be interesting. I say the following: “As you proceed along the
areas. I add in a Special Element, and decide for the fun of it to throw in a cavern, a hewn area is to your right. It appears to be a square room carved
“Bottomless shaft”, since that seems like something one might find in an out of the earth. Inside you see a stained wooden table, shelves with various
old mine. I mark it with a “U” to make it a Unique Element. I also add in a bottles and strange objects, and weird symbols painted on the walls. The
“Ceremony room” where the wizard would perform his magic, also Unique. smell of incense is very strong here, and as you watch a sudden chill fills
I round it off with one more Random Element and the Complete Element. the area, the air shimmers before your lantern light, and a spectral figure
For the Encounters list, I put a few None Elements in the common area, composed of what appears to be blueish mist appears.”
plus bats and rats since that seems likely. I add in a Random Element and The characters have an encounter with Luke the Ghost, who attempts
a Special, a Unique Element in “Luke” the ghost, and a couple of “zombie” to drain their life essences away with his ghostly touch. The characters had
Custom Elements (the adventure has already established Luke has some already prepared for their undead foe, and counter with blessed weapons
ability to raise the dead as zombies). and holy water. The combat is short as they drive Luke away, taking
For the Objects List, I fill the common area mostly with None some damage in the process. Luke is listed as a Unique Element on the
Elements, “Old mining gear”, a Random Element, “Dead body,” a Special Encounters list, but since they did not destroy him I don’t remove it from
Element, and “Hand of Luke,” a Unique Element and the goal of the the list. The characters do a quick search of the room and continue.
characters’ search. I glance over my lists to see if anything else occurs to me, For the next Scene, I generate: Locations - Special. Rolling on the
nothing does, so on we go. Special Element Table, I get “This Is Good.” I roll on the Locations list
For the first Scene, I roll the following Elements: Locations - Expected; again and get Special again, so I treat it as Expected; Encounters - Rats;
Encounters - None; Objects - None. I say the following to my players: “You Objects - I roll 10, and the list only has 9 items, so I went over. I treat the
enter the mine, rotting timbers overhead bolstering the sagging rock ceiling. result as Expected and remove 5 points from the Objects Progress Points.
The ground is dusty, a pair of iron cart tracks trail along the floor and off Since there were only 5 points there, the Progress Points are back to zero.
into the darkness.” I think about it for a moment; what would constitute a “good” location in
It’s an unremarkable entrance to the mines, which is pretty much what an abandoned mine, and I say the following: “The mine continues, gently
I wanted to get the exploration started. The characters light their lanterns, twisting as you go. You feel a cool breeze and see moonlight, spotting a
ready their revolvers, and proceed into the mine. I roll up the second Scene, small hole in the ceiling. It looks like a little cave-in happened at some
rolling 5+1=6, 2+1=3, and 1+1=2 (the “+1” because each list has a Progress point creating a small rift in the ceiling, and it’s just large enough for you
Point now which adds to the 1d6 roll) and get these results: Locations - to climb up to if you needed to get out of the mine in a hurry. A few rats
Random. I roll on the Descriptor Complex Question tables to see what scurry across the floor, disturbed by your presence.”
the area looks like, and get “delightfully disagreeable”; Encounters - None; The characters make note of the possible escape route and continue. I
Objects - None. I interpret my results and say the following: “As you roll the next Scene: Locations - I roll over this list, so treat it as Expected
proceed through the mine, you smell something unusual, like incense. It’s and reduce the Progress Points by 5; Encounters - Zombie; Objects - Old
slightly sweet, but a little cloying.” mining gear.
The characters pause, wondering if they should be worried about the “The shaft continues to curve as you see an obstruction in your path:
smell. As they don’t notice any ill effects (I decided to check to see if this an old mining cart. As you edge around it, you hear shuffling inside. What
were a poison, asking it as a Simple Question, and got “no”.) They move on. you thought was a pile of old rags rises up as an animated corpse, howling
The next Scene gives me: Locations - Bottomless Shaft; Encounters - toothlessly at you and reaching out with a grasping, decayed hand.”
Special. I roll on the Special Table and get Random Element. I roll on the The characters have met a zombie, and end up in combat with it. They
Descriptor Tables and get “coolly small”; Objects - Old mining gear. Ok, dispatch it with a bullet to its brain, one of the characters taking some
now I have something interesting to work with! I make an interpretation minor scratches for their efforts.
and say the following: Moving on, the next Scene I get: Locations - Special, rolling Supersize.

11
PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER

I roll on the Locations list again and get Random. I roll on the Description Here is the final, filled in Region Sheet for the Wizard’s mine, and a map I scribbled
Tables and get “gratefully messy”; Encounters - Special, rolling Exit Here; out as the characters made their way through it.
Objects - None.
“You enter a large cavern littered with old equipment. This looks like
a place where miners once stored equipment. Much of it is in ruins, but
you can see from a glance that there may be some useful items here, such
as lanterns and rope. You feel a cool breeze and see that the cart tracks lead
to a shaft at the far end, heading up to an area where moonlight faintly
glimmers. It appears that’s another way out. There is an open shaft in
another area of the chamber as well, showing a way deeper into the mines.”
The characters use this opportunity to look for useful materials. They
end up with a new lantern for the character who dropped his down the
pit. They briefly check out the exit shaft and see that it’s clogged with
overgrown bramble, but they could cut their way through it using tools in
the room if they needed to. They proceed through the other open shaft in
their quest for the Hand of Luke.
I roll: Locations - Random, “playfully mature”; Encounters - I roll over
the list, so go with Expected and reduce the Encounters Progress Points;
Objects - Dead body. I think for a moment what “playfully mature” could
mean, I got nothing, so I take advantage of the I Dunno rule and just skip
it, treating this Location as an Expected.
“The mine continues when you hear squeaking sounds. You see some
rats on the floor nibbling on a corpse. It appears to be one of the townsfolk,
and is fairly fresh.”
The characters proceed with caution, fearing another zombie. This is
just a body, however, an unfortunate victim of Luke and the wizard. I make
note of it in case the body becomes relevant later.
The characters continue to the next Scene. Locations - Random,
“irritatingly strong”; Encounters - Zombie; Objects - Dead body. Since the
characters earlier encountered an incense smell, I decide to tie that in with
the description of “irritatingly strong,” and I make use of the dead body
and zombie rolls.
“The cavern continues and you see another body on the floor. The smell
of incense is strong again, this time so strong it makes your eyes water.”
The characters are cautious, recalling that last time they smelled the
incense strongly Luke appeared. Thinking this body is inert like the other,
they ignore it until it grasps one of their legs and tries to bite them. They
scuffle with the zombie, killing it with a pickaxe through the skull.
They continue. Locations - Complete; Encounters - Random, “healthily
rotten”; Objects - Old mining gear.
“The cavern abruptly comes to a halt as you reach a cave-in that
completely blocks the passage. It appears to be very old, and you recall
that this is likely the reason why the mine was shut down in the first place.
There is some old equipment laying about, including food stores like
crates of rotted vegetables and apples that must have once belonged to the
miners.”
This is the end of the line, and the characters have not discovered the
Hand yet. They decide they must have overlooked it and retrace their
steps, looking closer at a few areas. I make some Simple Question rolls
and determine that the inert body they had discovered was a town person
who tried to do what the characters were doing, find the Hand. He had
recovered it, only to be killed before he could escape. Since he had the
Hand on him, Luke could not use his magic to turn the corpse into a
zombie. The characters search the body and find the Hand. As they are
about to torch it, Luke shows up in a final bid to stop the adventurers.
There is a battle, but they are able to pour kerosene on the hand and burn
it, sending Luke back screeching into the netherworld where he belongs.

12
PRE-ASSEMBLY

Pre-Assembly
The rules up to this point assume that the only work being done before
Final Thoughts
I hope you get lots of good use out of The Location Crafter! If you enjoy
exploration begins is populating the Categories with Elements, and then it and are interested in adventure aids which are similar to it, here are a few
generating individual Scenes during the adventure, creating them as you go. resources for you:
You can also do this before play to use The Location Crafter to create a full • Mythic: Much of The Location Crafter’s ideas regarding interpretation
adventure location. of events comes from Mythic: The Game Master Emulator. Mythic is a solo, or
Assuming the person creating this Region is the Game Master for her GM-free, system for running adventures. For more information about Mythic,
players, you can take more time in crafting the area and diverge from check out the Word Mill Games website at www.wordmillgames.com.
the randomly generated results as inspiration strikes you. Maybe halfway • Word Mill Fan Site: Meet and share ideas with other users of The
through making the Region a new Location idea strikes you. Don’t feel Location Crafter at the official Word Mill Games fan site at: groups.yahoo.
constrained by The Location Crafter system, instead use it to guide your com/neo/groups/Mythic_Role_Playing/info.
imagination. Similarly, when the Region is
complete, review it and polish it until you have
it just the way you want it.
The end result will look very much like
what an on-the-fly Region looks like when
it’s done. One difference when pre-generating
a Region, however, is you should continue
fleshing it out until you’ve received a Complete
result from the Location list. The characters
may not visit every nook and cranny of your
freshly minted Region, but you should be ready
for them to. For a Region being generated
as you play, there’s no need to complete the
Region if the characters exit before that point.

Solo Or GM’d
The Location Crafter works well whether you
are a Game Master running Players through an
adventure, or a solo gamer looking to randomly
generate a Region to explore on your own.
Also, a group of players could use The Location
Crafter without a GM. In this case, the players
as a group should decide on the interpretation
of results. To keep the action moving swiftly,
keep the debate to a minimum. It’s generally
best to run with the first ideas that spring to
mind unless there is real disagreement. Or,
you can designate a single player to interpret
the results, and periodically switch that
responsibility to another player as you go. Don’t
get stuck on excessive interpretation; try to go
with the first idea that comes to you, and if
your imagination isn’t cooperating, just invoke
the I Dunno rule and move on.

13
Complex Question Tables: DESCRIPTIONS
DESCRIPTOR 1
1: Abnormally 21: Curiously 41: Fully 61: Kookily 81: Peacefully
2: Adventurously 22: Daintily 42: Generously 62: Lazily 82: Perfectly
3: Aggressively 23: Dangerously 43: Gently 63: Lightly 83: Playfully
4: Angrily 24: Defiantly 44: Gladly 64: Loosely 84: Politely
5: Anxiously 25: Deliberately 45: Gracefully 65: Loudly 85: Positively
6: Awkwardly 26: Delightfully 46: Gratefully 66: Lovingly 86: Powerfully
7: Beautifully 27: Dimly 47: Happily 67: Loyally 87: Quaintly
8: Bleakly 28: Efficiently 48: Hastily 68: Majestically 88: Quarrelsomely
9: Boldly 29: Energetically 49: Healthily 69: Meaningfully 89: Quietly
10: Bravely 30: Enormously 50: Helpfully 70: Mechanically 90: Roughly
11: Busily 31: Enthusiastically 51: Helplessly 71: Miserably 91: Rudely
12: Calmly 32: Excitedly 52: Hopelessly 72: Mockingly 92: Ruthlessly
13: Carefully 33: Fearfully 53: Innocently 73: Mysteriously 93: Slowly
14: Carelessly 34: Ferociously 54: Intensely 74: Naturally 94: Softly
15: Cautiously 35: Fiercely 55: Interestingly 75: Neatly 95: Swiftly
16: Ceaselessly 36: Foolishly 56: Irritatingly 76: Nicely 96: Threateningly
17: Cheerfully 37: Fortunately 57: Jovially 77: Oddly 97: Very
18: Combatively 38: Frantically 58: Joyfully 78: Offensively 98: Violently
19: Coolly 39: Freely 59: Judgementally 79: Officially 99: Wildly
20: Crazily 40: Frighteningly 60: Kindly 80: Partially 100: Yieldingly

DESCRIPTOR 2
1: Abandoned 21: Disagreeable 41: Graceful 61: Magnificent 81: Remarkable
2: Abnormal 22: Disgusting 42: Hard 62: Masculine 82: Rotten
3: Amusing 23: Drab 43: Harsh 63: Mature 83: Rough
4: Ancient 24: Dry 44: Healthy 64: Messy 84: Ruined
5: Aromatic 25: Dull 45: Heavy 65: Mighty 85: Rustic
6: Average 26: Empty 46: Historical 66: Military 86: Scary
7: Beautiful 27: Enormous 47: Horrible 67: Modern 87: Simple
8: Bizarre 28: Exotic 48: Important 68: Extravagant 88: Small
9: Classy 29: Faded 49: Interesting 69: Mundane 89: Smelly
10: Clean 30: Familiar 50: Juvenile 70: Mysterious 90: Smooth
11: Cold 31: Fancy 51: Lacking 71: Natural 91: Soft
12: Colorful 32: Fat 52: Lame 72: Nondescript 92: Strong
13: Creepy 33: Feeble 53: Large 73: Odd 93: Tranquil
14: Cute 34: Feminine 54: Lavish 74: Pale 94: Ugly
15: Damaged 35: Festive 55: Lean 75: Petite 95: Valuable
16: Dark 36: Flawless 56: Less 76: Poor 96: Warlike
17: Defeated 37: Fresh 57: Lethal 77: Powerful 97: Warm
18: Delicate 38: Full 58: Lonely 78: Quaint 98: Watery
19: Delightful 39: Glorious 59: Lovely 79: Rare 99: Weak
20: Dirty 40: Good 60: Macabre 80: Reassuring 100: Young

14
Complex Question Tables: ACTIONS
ACTION 1
1: Attainment 21: Release 41: Expose 61: Oppress 81: Excitement
2: Starting 22: Befriend 42: Haggle 62: Inspect 82: Activity
3: Neglect 23: Judge 43: Imprison 63: Ambush 83: Assist
4: Fight 24: Desert 44: Release 64: Spy 84: Care
5: Recruit 25: Dominate 45: Celebrate 65: Attach 85: Negligence
6: Triumph 26: Procrastinate 46: Develop 66: Carry 86: Passion
7: Violate 27: Praise 47: Travel 67: Open 87: Work
8: Oppose 28: Separate 48: Block 68: Carelessness 88: Control
9: Malice 29: Take 49: Harm 69: Ruin 89: Attract
10: Communicate 30: Break 50: Debase 70: Extravagance 90: Failure
11: Persecute 31: Heal 51: Overindulge 71: Trick 91: Pursue
12: Increase 32: Delay 52: Adjourn 72: Arrive 92: Vengeance
13: Decrease 33: Stop 53: Adversity 73: Propose 93: Proceedings
14: Abandon 34: Lie 54: Kill 74: Divide 94: Dispute
15: Gratify 35: Return 55: Disrupt 75: Refuse 95: Punish
16: Inquire 36: Imitate 56: Usurp 76: Mistrust 96: Guide
17: Antagonize 37: Struggle 57: Create 77: Deceive 97: Transform
18: Move 38: Inform 58: Betray 78: Cruelty 98: Overthrow
19: Waste 39: Bestow 59: Agree 79: Intolerance 99: Oppress
20: Truce 40: Postpone 60: Abuse 80: Trust 100: Change

ACTION 2
1: Goals 21: Messages 41: Advice 61: Death 81: Victory
2: Dreams 22: Energy 42: Plot 62: Disruption 82: Dispute
3: Environment 23: Balance 43: Competition 63: Power 83: Riches
4: Outside 24: Tension 44: Prison 64: Burden 84: Normal
5: Inside 25: Friendship 45: Illness 65: Intrigues 85: Technology
6: Reality 26: Physical 46: Food 66: Fears 86: Hope
7: Allies 27: Project 47: Attention 67: Ambush 87: Magic
8: Enemies 28: Pleasures 48: Success 68: Rumor 88: Illusions
9: Evil 29: Pain 49: Failure 69: Wounds 89: Portals
10: Good 30: Possessions 50: Travel 70: Extravagance 90: Danger
11: Emotions 31: Benefits 51: Jealousy 71: Representative 91: Weapons
12: Opposition 32: Plans 52: Dispute 72: Adversities 92: Animals
13: War 33: Lies 53: Home 73: Opulence 93: Weather
14: Peace 34: Expectations 54: Investment 74: Liberty 94: Elements
15: Innocent 35: Legal 55: Suffering 75: Military 95: Nature
16: Love 36: Bureaucracy 56: Wishes 76: Mundane 96: Masses
17: Spirit 37: Business 57: Tactics 77: Trials 97: Leadership
18: Intellect 38: Path 58: Stalemate 78: Masses 98: Fame
19: Ideas 39: News 59: Randomness 79: Vehicle 99: Anger
20: Joy 40: Exterior 60: Misfortune 80: Art 100: Information

15
Summary Of Category Elements
CUSTOM EXPECTED NONE SPECIAL RANDOM COMPLETE

Special Elements Table


When a Special Element is generated in a Category, roll 1d100 on the table below and apply it to that Category as the Element for
the current Scene. If the table requires you to make additional rolls in a Category list, do not count that toward the Progress Points for
that Category: only one mark, the original, is registered.

1-5 • SUPERSIZE: Roll in the Category again (if you get Special again, treat it as Expected). Whatever Element is generated, make
it biggie size, more than what is expected. Take the Element up to the next level, or as grand as you can, while still making sense
within the Scene. For instance, if the Category is Locations, and the Element generated is “pool,” where you originally may have
envisioned this as a pond you now treat it as a lake.
6-10 • BARELY THERE: Roll in the Category again (if you get Special again, treat it as Expected). Whatever Element is generated,
minimize it as much as possible. Whatever you would have described to represent this Element, take it down a notch or two. If it’s
an Encounter, such as an enemy, maybe it is wounded or of a lesser nature than usual. If it’s a Location, maybe it is badly in need of
repair or is unusually small.
11-15 • REMOVE ELEMENT: Roll in the Category again (if you get Special again, treat it as Expected), and cross that Element out
and remove it from the Category list. You will still use it for this Scene, but the Category list has now been altered for future rolls. If the
Element is Unique, then this result has no effect (as Unique Elements are crossed off anyway).
16-25 • ADD ELEMENT: Add a new Element to this Category, tacking it on to the end of the list. Generate the new Element by
treating it like a Random Element and rolling for a description of it on the Complex Question Description Tables. The new Element is
then added to the Category list and is treated as though it was rolled for this scene. This is identical to a Random Element Special
result (see below), except that the Element generated is added to the Category list to possibly be encountered again later.
26-30 • THIS IS BAD: Roll in the Category again (if you get Special again, treat it as Expected). Whatever you get, it is bad for the
characters. For instance, if it’s an Encounter, it is probably something that is harmful to the characters. If it’s a Location, maybe the
place is very dark and treacherous. If it’s an Object, maybe it’s unstable and about to explode. Not everything is dangerous, it could
just be finding an otherwise useful Object that is broken. Go with whatever modification to the Element seems most obvious to you. If
you’re not sure how to make the Element bad, then roll on a Complex Question Table for inspiration.
31-35 • THIS IS GOOD: Roll in the Category again (if you get Special again, treat it as Expected). Whatever you get, it is something
good for the characters. Whether it’s a Location, Encounter, or Object, it is an Element that will be helpful or useful to the characters.
Go with whatever modification to the Element seems most obvious to you. If you’re not sure how to make the Element good, then roll
on a Complex Question Table for inspiration.
36-50 • MULTI-ELEMENT: Roll twice on this Category list (if you get Special Element again, treat it as an Expected Element), and
allow both of them into the scene together. If the Category is Location, and the Elements are “pool” and “stony chamber,” maybe this
is a chamber with an ornate fountain in it.
51-60 • EXIT HERE: This Location, in addition to whatever else it contains, also holds an exit from the Region, if this is possible.
Maybe it’s a back door out of the mansion, or another exit from the cave. If this result makes no sense, ignore it and treat this as an
Expected Element.
61-70 • RETURN: Whatever else this Location contains, it also has access to another, previously encountered Location. This is only
possible if that other location had a way to reach this one ... in other words, it had other doors or access that the characters had not
yet explored. If more than one Location Element matches, then determine which one it is randomly. If this result makes no sense,
ignore it and treat this as an Expected Element.
71-75 • GOING DEEPER: Instead of adding one Progress Point for this Category, add three instead. Otherwise, treat this result as
an Expected Element.
76-80 • COMMON GROUND: Eliminate three Progress Points for this Category (don’t record this occurrence and eliminate two
more). Otherwise, treat this result as an Expected Element.
81-100 • RANDOM ELEMENT: Treat this Special Element like a normal Random Element. As needed, ask the Complex Questions,
“What does it look like?” and/or “What does it do?” and roll on the Description and Action tables, interpreting your results.

16
Location Crafter Region Sheet

REGION:

LOCATIONS ENCOUNTERS OBJECTS

PROGRESS POINTS PROGRESS POINTS PROGRESS POINTS

SUMMARY OF CATEGORY ELEMENTS


CUSTOM • EXPECTED • NONE • SPECIAL • RANDOM • COMPLETE
Permission by the author is granted to reproduce this page for personal use only.

17
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SECTION

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WM005

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