EMPLOYEE WELFARE

A STUDY ON ³EMPLOYEE WELFARE´ IN GALLA FOODS LIMITED., @ CHITTOOR
A Project Report

Sub mitted in Partial fulfillment for the award of the Degree of ³MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION´ S.V. UNIVERSITY, TIRUPATI.
Submitted by

Mr. A.RAJAGANAPATHY
Regd.No. 181098035 Under the Valuable guidance of Smt. N. MYTHILI, MHRM

Faculty department of Management Studies

SALN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT
(AFFLIATED TO S.V. UNIVERSITY, APPROVED BY AICTE) PALLURU, CHITTOOR DIST. A.P-517132 2009 ± 2011

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DECLARATION

I hereby declare that the project titled ³EMPLOYEE WELFARE´ done at GALLA FOODS LIMITED, PUTTALAPAT, submitted by me as part of partial fulfillment for the award of the ³Master of Business Administration´ at. SALN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT, CHITTOOR. Affiliated to SRI VENKATESWARA University is a record of bonafied work done by me.

PLACE: DATE:

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
I cordially thank S.V University for giving me the opportunity to undergo my project work. I thank the principal Mr. KRISHANAMACHARYULU, for their full fledged support for having given me the opportunity to study in this Institution. I thank Mr. S.A. SARAVANA KUMAR, Head of the Department of Management Studies for his inspiration and providing me all the facilities to do my project work. I would also like to thank our faculty guide Mrs. N. Mythili, who guided me throughout the project. Sincere thanks are also to all the staff members of MBA department for their valuable guidance and support. I would also like to thank Mr. SANTHARAM.C, HR Manager, and Personnel Department for permitting me to pursue the project in their esteemed concern and Mr. SAMPAD KUMAR BISWAL, Assistant Hr, Personnel Department for sparing his valuable time to guide me during the project work and also to all the employees of GALLA.

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CONTENTS 

INTRODUCTION  INDUSTRY PROFILE  COMPANY PROFILE  PRODUCT PROFILE  RESEARCH AND METHODOLOGY  REVIEW AND LITERATURE  DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION  CHI SQUARE TESTS  OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY  SCOPE OF THE STUDY  LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY  FINDINGS  SUGGESTIONS  CONCLUSIONS  BIBILIOGRAPHY  GLOSARY  QUESTIONNARIES

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Thereafter starts the main topic of the study. Employee Welfare is the topic. It provides information about the concept of labour welfare. After the conceptual study of the topic all the study is apply to Galla Plant and trying to find real application of aspect to the plant. The concept of Employee welfare is very wide. It describe that what is the actually welfare of labour. It covers that what is labour welfare? What are main constituents of labour welfare in the Galla? Which are main major agencies of Employee welfare in the plant? What are main principles of labour welfare? In the research methodology along with the sources of data collection, the limitations and the constraints which I had to face during my training are also given. At the end analysis is done of the whole project. Which highlights that what are the actual application various aspects of labour welfare in the plant. In the end conclusion is done in which application of labour welfare is judged after taking various factor in consideration. Some observations and suggestions are also described.

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INTRODUCTION

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

INTRODUCTION
Employee Welfare is an important facet of industrial relations, the extra dimension, giving satisfaction to the worker in a way which evens a good wage cannot. With the growth of industrialization and mechanization, it has acquired added importance. The workers in industry cannot cope with the pace of modern life with minimum sustenance amenities. He needs an added stimulus to keep body and soul together. Employers have also realized the importance of their role in providing these extra amenities. And yet, they are not always able to fulfill workers demands however reasonable they might be. They are primarily concerned with the viability of the enterprise. Employee welfare, though it has been proved to contribute to efficiency in production, is expensive. Each employer depending on his priorities gives varying degrees of importance to labour welfare. It is because the government is not sure that all employers are progressive minded and will provide basic welfare measures that it introduces statutory legislation from time to time to bring about some measures of uniformity in the basic amenities available to industrial workers. After employees have been hired, trained and remunerated, they need to be retained and maintained to serve the organization better. Welfare facilities are designed to take care of the wellbeing of the employees, they do not generally result in any monetary benefit to the employees. No rare these facilities provided by employers alone. Governmental and nongovernmental agencies and trade unions too, contribute towards employee welfare. Employee welfare is a comprehensive term including various services, benefits and facilities offered to employees by the employer. Through such generous fringe benefits the employer makes the life worth living for employees. The welfare amenities are extended in addition to normal wages and other economic rewards available to employees as per the legal provisions. Welfare measures may also be provided by the government, trade unions and nongovernment agencies in addition to the employer. The basic purpose of employee welfare is to enrich the life of the employees and keep them happy and contended.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE Employee welfare today has become a very controversial topic. It covers a very broad field. To being with, let us briefly discuss the main concepts or, rather, the general, meaning full ideas which have been evolved about it so far. The term welfare suggest many ideas, meanings and connotations, such as the state of well-belling, health, happiness, prosperity and the development of human resources. The concept of welfare can be approached from various angles. Welfare has been described as a total concept. It is a desirable state of existence involving for certain components of welfare, such a health, food, clothing, and housing, medical assistance, insurance, education, recreation. Job security, and so on. The word employee means any productivity activity. In a broader sense, therefore, the phrase employee welfare means the adoption of measures to promote the physical, social, psychological and general well being of the working population. Welfare work in any industry aims, or should aim, at improving the working and living conditions of workers and their families. The concept of employee welfare originates in the desire for a humanitarian approach to the sufferings of the working class. Later, it becomes a utilitarian philosophy which worked as a motivating force for labor and for those who were interested in it. Employee welfare has been defined in various ways, though unfortunately no single definition has found universal acceptance.

³Efforts to make life worth living for worker´

³The oxford dictionary´

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Concept of Employee welfare
The concept of labour welfare is flexible and elastic and differs widely with time, region, industry, social values and customs, degree of industrialization, the general socioeconomic development of the people and the political ideologies prevailing at a particular time . It is also molded according to the age-groups, socio-cultural background, marital and economic status and educational level of the workers in various industries In its broad connotation, the term welfare refers to a state of living of an individual or group in a desirable relationship with total environment ± ecological, economic, and social. Conceptually as well as operationally, labour welfare is a part of social welfare which, in turn, is closely linked to the concept and the role of the State which is applicable in the plant. The concept of social welfare, in its narrow contours, has been equated with economic welfare. As these goals are not always be realized by individuals through their efforts alone, the government came into the picture and gradually began to take over the responsibility for the free and full development of human personality of its population. Labour welfare is an extension of the term Welfare and its application to labour. During the industrialization process, the stress on labour productivity increased; and brought about changes in the thinking on labour welfare. In its broad connotation, the term welfare refers to a state of living of an individual or group in desirable relationship with total environment ± ecological, economic, and social. Concept dually as well as operationally, labour welfare is a part of social welfare which, in turn, is closely linked to the concept and the role of the State. The concept of social welfare, in its narrow contours, has been equated with economic welfare. Pigou defined it as ³that part of general welfare which can be brought directly or indirectly into relations with the measuring rod of money´ (Pigou, 1962). According to Willensky and Labeaux, social welfare alludes to ³those formally organized and socially sponsored institutions, agencies and programmes which function to maintain or improve the economic conditions, health or interpersonal competence of some parts or all of a population´ (Willensky and Labeaux, 1918). As these goals may not always be realized by individuals through their efforts alone, the government came into the picture and gradually began to take over the responsibility for the free and full development of human
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EMPLOYEE WELFARE personality of its population. Labour welfare is an extension of the term Welfare and its application to labour. During the industrialization process, the stress on labour productivity increased; and brought about changes in the thinking on labour welfare. An early study under the UN observed as follows ³in our opinion most underdeveloped countries are in the situation that investment in people is likely to prove as productive, in the purely material sense, as any investment in material resources and in many cases, investment in people would lead to a greater increase of the flow of goods and services than would follow upon any comparable investment in material capital´. The theory that welfare expenditure, especially expenditure on health and education, is productive investment has led to the view that workers could work more productively if they were given a fair deal both at the work place and in the community. The concept of labour welfare has received inspiration from the concepts of democracy and welfare state. Democracy does not simply denote a form of government; it is rather a way of life based on certain values such as equal rights and privileges for all. The operation of welfare services, in actual practice, brings to bear on it different reflections representing the broad cultural and social conditions. In short, labour welfare is the voluntary efforts of the employers to establish, within the existing industrial system, working and sometimes living and cultural conditions of the employees beyond what is required by law, the custom of the industry and the conditions of the market The constituents of labour welfare included working hours, working conditions, safety, industrial health insurance, workmen¶s compensation, provident funds, gratuity, pensions, protection against indebtedness, industrial housing, restrooms, canteens, crèches, wash places, toilet facilities, lunches, cinemas, theatres, music, reading rooms, holiday rooms, workers¶ education, co-operative stores, excursions, playgrounds, and scholarships and other help for education of employees¶ children.

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INDUSTRY PROFILE

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AMARA RAJA GROUPS Amara Raja Group
Amara Raja Group founded by Mr. Ramachandra N Galla, with a vision to offer Quality products/solutions to the Power Sector by installing manufacturing facilities in Rural India.

Amara Raja Batteries Ltd
Amara Raja batteries Ltd (ARBL) is the flagship company of the group and has a Joint Venture with Johnson Controls Inc (USA), UAS 35 billion Fortune 500 Organization. ARBL is a dominant player in the Indian Ocean Rim market under the renowned ³Amaron´ Brand, also offering products in the Industrial segment.

Amara Raja Electronic Ltd
Amara Raja Electronics Ltd (AREL) is located at Diguvamagham near Chittoor, in Andhra Pradesh. India. AREL manufactures Battery Chargers, Digital Inverters and Trickle charges and also provides solutions to the parent company by offering its services for assembly and testing.

Amara Raja Power Systems Ltd
Amara Raja Power Systems (ARPSL), first company to be established in the group offers the following. 
 

Design and development of Power Electronic products Power electronics Systems Integration and testing Magnetic Manufacturing

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Mangal Precision Products Ltd
Mangal Precision Products (MPPL) is situated at Petamitta in Chittoor district in Andhra Pradesh. India. MPPL manufactures the following products: Fabrication of advanced sheet metal products and fasteners, plastic component and compounds with Technological support - Nedschroef, Belgium MISSION AND HISTORY Mission, mantra, way of thinking, philosophy, what we live for« call it what you want, you¶ll find it below. Introduce yourself to the way we think. "To transform our spheres of influence and to improve the quality of life by building institutions that provide better access to better opportunities, goods and services to more people«all the time." Introduce latest generation technologies Adapt these technologies to suit the operating environment Develop and manufacture globally competitive, customer-focused products of world-class quality Responsibly introduce these products into relevant markets

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Achievements and credentials
Best Telecom equipment Manufacturer Award 2009 by BSNL Quality Excellence Award for the year 2009 by INDUS Towers Amaron® is the preferred supplier to Daimler Chrysler, Ford and General Motors Automotive Product of the year 2000 by Overdrive Excellence in Environmental Management in 2002 by AP Pollution Control Board Creative Advertiser of the year '02 by ABBY Ford "World Excellence Award" Ford Q1 Award ISO-9001 in 1997«RWTUV QS 9000 in 1999«RWTUV ISO/TS 16949 in 2004«RWTUV Quality benchmarks Best Business Practices as per JCI ISO 14001 in 2002«RWTUV Part of the world's largest battery manufacturing alliance - Johnson Controls Inc., USA Largest manufacturer of standby VRLA batteries in South Asia Pioneered the widely used VRLA batteries for industrial application in India Largest & dominant market leader of standby batteries in Railways, Telecom, Power Generating stations in India One of the largest (designed for producing 3.64million batteries p.a.) and most modern automotive battery plants in Asia

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE Highly automated (oxide preparation to finishing; all processes and operations are automated) Part of Amara Raja's highly integrated battery complex (most components are built in-house) Industrial Economist Business Excellence Award - 1991 by the Industrial Economist, Chennai. Best Entrepreneur of the year 1998 - by Hyderabad Management Association. Excellence award by institution of Economic Studies(ES), New Delhi. Udyog Rattan -1999 by Institution of Economic Studies (ES), New Delhi. Q1 Vendor Status by Ford India Limited - 2003. World Excellence Silver Award by Ford USA The spirit of Excellence by Academy of fine arts, Tirupati

Managements
RAMACHANDRA N GALLA Chairman Amara Raja Batteries Ltd. Dr. Dr. Ramachandra N. Galla is the Patriarch of an illustrious business family of Andhra Pradesh, Gallas, who have established a name for themselves by successfully setting up Amara Raja Batteries. Born in 1938, Dr. Ramachandra Galla is an Electrical Engineer from S.V. University, Tirupati and has to his credit Masters degrees in Applied Electronics, Roorkee, India and Systems Sciences, Michigan State University, USA. Dr. Galla started his career as an Electrical Engineer in US Steel Corporation, USA moved on to Sargent & Lundy, USA as a Consulting Engineer for the Designing of Nuclear & Coal Fired Power Plant. He initiated various projects in these corporations & mastered the ropes of this competitive business in a very short time. However, he soon discovered that his natural inclination was serving his country and as a logical sequel he gravitated towards Chittoor his native place in India. Dr. Galla laid the foundation of Amara Raja batteries in 1985 in Chittoor.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE In his capacity as the Chairman, Dr. Ramachandra Galla has promoted and established the following companies from the conceptual stage which are now well established and profit making: Amara Raja Batteries Ltd Amara Raja Power System Ltd Mangal Precisions Products Ltd Amara Raja Electronics Ltd Galla Foods Ltd Amara Raja Infra (P) Ltd Amaron Batteries (P) Ltd Amara Raja Industrial Services (P) Ltd Dr Galla¶s fines hour as a business man came in 1998 when he was presented ³BEST ENTERPRENEUR OF THE YEAR 1998´ ± by Hyderabad Management Association, Hyderabad. He has been bestowed with honorary doctorate degrees from Jawaharlal Nehru Technical University in 2008 at Hyderabad & Sri Venkateswara University in 2007 at Tirupati. He has also been conferred with ³THE SPIRIT OF EXCELLENCE´ award by Academy of Fine Arts, Tirupati, and various other prestigious awards. He is passionate about a corporate¶s responsibility to society as well as championing ecofriendly business practices. Dr. Galla has established various charitable trusts like Krishna Devaraya Educational & Cultural Association (KECA), Rajanna Trust, Mangamma & Gangul Naidu Memorial Trust. He is dedicated to rural development and improving the economic conditions of the farmers in Chittoor District, Andhra Pradesh, India. KECA which was established in 1975 provides scholarship to the poor and needy students to pursue their higher education. While Rajanna Trust that was established in 1999 to construct check dams and deepening the tanks to improve the ground water levels. MANGAL TRUST was established in 2003 to provide drinking water facilities, constructing check dams & providing infrastructure facilities to Pentameter and surrounding areas.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE A committed family man with wife, two children & grand children, he loves spending time with his family and participating in society development project.

JAYADEVGALLA
ManagingDirector AmaraRajaBatteriesLtd. Jayadev Galla (Jay) is the Managing Director of Amara Raja Batteries Limited (ARBL), a leading manufacturer of Advanced Lead Acid batteries for Industrial and Automotive applications. ARBL is a joint venture between Amara Raja group and US based Johnson Controls Inc. (JCI). JCI is a USD 35 billion conglomerate and the global leader in building efficiency, automotive interior experience and automotive power solutions. The company owns the brand name ³Amaron´ which is the second largest selling automotive battery brand in India today. ARBL is a widely held public limited company listed on the National Stock Exchange of India Limited and the Bombay Stock Exchange Limited. The gross revenue for the year ending 31 March 2009 is more than USD 300 mn.

Achievements
y y y

Spearheading ARBL¶s automotive batteries (Amaron) venture Striking a partnership with JCI, U.S.A. for the automotive battery business Winning the prestigious Ford World Excellence Award in 2004 achieved by meeting global delivery standards. ARBL is the 3rd supplier from India to be given this award.

Posts and Responsibilities
y

Confederation of Indian Industry
o o o

Young Indians National Branding Chair Young Indian¶s National Immediate Past Chairman Young Indians Immediate Past Chairman - District Chapter Initiatives

y

Amara Raja Group of Companies

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o o o o o o o y

Managing Director, Galla Foods Limited. Director, Amara Raja Power Systems Ltd. Director, Amara Raja Electronics Ltd. Director, Mangal Precision Products Ltd. Director, Amara Infra (P) Ltd. Director, Amaron Batteries (P) Ltd. Director, Amara Raja Industrial Services (P) Ltd. The Trust was established in 1999 and is dedicated to rural development and to improve the economic conditions of the farmers in Chittoor District, Andhra Pradesh. Among other things, Rajanna Trust has executed micro irrigation projects valued to a tune of 1 million US dollars which has benefited over 2000 agricultural families

Permanent Trustee of the Rajanna Trust
o

y

Advisory Member
o

Wockhardt Foundation

Jay holds a bachelors¶ degree in Political Science and Economics from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, USA. As an avid sports lover, he has played chess and tennis at a competitive level. He also enjoys golf, motor sports, diving, travel and pop culture in general. Married with two children; in his leisure time he loves spending time with his family and participating in community development initiatives.

Corporate social responsibility A company is known by the society it keeps. We believe in taking responsibility for whatever we do; within and without the company. It¶s what responsible leaders are expected to do. Our vision is to create communities that are economically and socially vibrant enough to stimulate growth and self-reliance; within and without the company

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE In keeping with this commitment, we¶ve committed ourselves to social activities in the following four areas: >Education >Infrastructure >Village Development >Environment

Education
To ensure our people have a better quality of life we provide primary schooling facilities for the children of our employees. We also provide our employees with facilities in the form of free memberships to education enhancement trusts and organizations like the library for employees on site, the Rajanna Trust for intellectual enhancement, the Krishna Deva Raya Trust and Cultural Association, Vinayashramam, Thapovanam and the Rashtriya Seva Samithi.

Infrastructure
Some of the infrastructure requirements for daily living that we take responsibility for include a bank for employees and the public, residential complexes for employees, medical and other facilities like a post office, subsidized transportation and recreational clubs for everyone who works with us.

Village Development
India lives in her villages. It¶s why we focus a great deal on developing the same by helping in the building of roads, street lighting, rainwater storage plants and check dams. Under the banner of µGrameena Vikasam¶ we¶re proud to have invested time and resources on all ongoing and long-term initiatives.

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Environment
Respect for environment is a core business value that is reflected in all the comprehensive, proactive environment programmes like the development of green belts, energy conservation and water harvesting, to name a few.

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COMPANY PROFILE

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COMPANY PROFILE GALLA FOODS
Galla Foods is part of the USD207 million Amara Raja Group, makers of internationally acclaimed Amaron Batteries. Situated at Chittoor in Andhra Pradesh, the mango belt in India, Galla Foods (GFPL), is a 100% Export Oriented Unit (EOU) processing Tropical Fruit Purees, Concentrates and fresh fruits. Galla Foods was started keeping in mind the local farming community wealth. The farming community is an integral part and forms the backbone of the organization. In its effort to be a forerunner in the chosen areas of business in terms of best practices in quality and technology, GFPL plans to benefit farmers, the industry and the nation in a phased manner. Galla Foods believes in empowering farmers by providing technical assistance from research institutes in the food industry to support the farmers in achieving better quality and higher yields by developing the gardening and harvesting techniques. Further to educating farmers with latest horticultural techniques, Galla Foods is encouraging farmers to mobilize the fruits directly to the factory, thereby minimizing the fruit handling damages and high value realizations. The first phase has been completed, by setting up of state-of-the-art fruit processing plant to produce natural tropical fruit puree and concentrates.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE CHAIRMAN: Dr. Ramachandra N. Galla is the Patriarch of an illustrious business family of Andhra Pradesh, Gallas, who have established a name for themselves by successfully setting up Amara Raja Batteries. Born in 1938, Dr. Ramachandra Galla is an Electrical Engineer from S.V. University, Tirupati and has to his credit Masters degrees in Applied Electronics, Roorkee, India and system sciences, Michigan State University, USA. Dr. Galla started his career as an Electrical Engineer in US Steel Corporation, USA moved on to Sargent & Lundy, USA as a Consulting Engineer for the Designing of Nuclear & Coal Fired Power Plant. He initiated various projects in these corporations & mastered the ropes of this competitive business in a very short time. However, he soon discovered that his natural inclination was serving his country and as a logical sequel he gravitated towards Chittoor his native place in India. Dr. Galla laid the foundation of Amara Raja batteries in 1985 in Chittoor. With his intense zeal and highly focused approach, he propelled Amara Raja Batteries in the top league of battery companies in India. In his capacity as the Chairman, Dr. Ramachandra Galla has promoted and established the following companies from the conceptual stage which are now well established and profit making:
y y y y y y y y

Amara Raja Batteries Ltd. Amara Raja Power System Ltd Mangal Precisions Products Ltd Amara Raja Electronics Ltd Galla Foods Ltd Amara Raja Infra Pvt. Ltd. Amaron Batteries Pvt. Ltd. Amara Raja Industrial Services Pvt. Ltd.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE Dr Galla¶s finest hour as a businessman came in 1998 when he was presented BEST ENTERPRENEUR OF THE YEAR 1998 ³ ± by Hyderabad Management Association, Hyderabad. He has been best owed with honorary doctorate degrees from Jawaharlal Nehru Technical University in 2008 at Hyderabad & Sri Venkateswara University in 2007 at Tirupati. He has also been conferred with ³THE SPIRIT OF EXCELLENCE´ award by Academy of Fine Arts, Tirupati, and various other prestigious awards. He is passionate about a corporate¶s responsibility to society as well as championing ecofriendly business practices. Dr. Galla has established various charitable trusts like Krishna Devaraya Educational & Cultural Association (KECA), Rajanna Trust, Mangamma & Gangul Naidu Memorial Trust. He is dedicated to rural development and improving the economic conditions of the farmers in Chittoor District, Andhra Pradesh, India. KECA which was established in 1975 provides scholarship to the poor and needy students to pursue their higher education. While Rajanna Trust that was established in 1999 to construct check dams and deepening the tanks to improve the ground water levels. MANGAL TRUST was established in 2003 to provide drinking water facilities, constructing check dams & providing infrastructure facilities to Pentameter and surrounding villages. A committed family man with wife, two children & grand children, he loves spending time with his family and participating in society development project.

MANAGING DIRECTOR
Jayadev Galla (Jay) is the Managing Director of Amara Raja Batteries Limited (ARBL), a leading manufacturer of Advanced Lead Acid batteries for Industrial and Automotive applications. ARBL is a joint venture between Amara Raja group and US based Johnson Controls Inc. (JCI). JCI is a USD 35 billion conglomerate and the global leader in building efficiency, automotive interior experience and automotive power solutions. The company owns the brand name ³Amaron´ which is the second largest selling automotive battery brand in India today. ARBL is a widely held public limited company listed on the National Stock Exchange of

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE India Limited and the Bombay Stock Exchange Limited. The gross revenue for the year ending 31 March 2009 is more than USD 300 mn.

Achievements:
Spearheading ARBL¶s automotive batteries (Amaron) venture Striking a partnership with JCI, U.S.A. for the automotive battery business Winning the prestigious Ford World Excellence Award in 2004 achieved by meeting global delivery standards. ARBL is the 3rd supplier from India to be given this award.

Posts and Responsibilities
Confederation of Indian Industry
y y y

Young Indians National Branding Chair Young Indian¶s National Immediate Past Chairman Young Indians Immediate Past Chairman - District Chapter Initiatives

Amara Raja Group of Companies
y y y y y y y

Managing Director, Galla Foods Limited, Director, Amara Raja Power Systems Ltd. Director, Amara Raja Electronics Ltd. Director, Mangal Precision Products Ltd. Director, Amara Infra Pvt. Ltd. Director, Amaron Batteries Pvt. Ltd. Director, Amara Raja Industrial Services Pvt. Ltd.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

Permanent Trustee of the Rajanna Trust
y

The Trust was established in 1999 and is dedicated to rural development and to improve the economic conditions of the farmers in Chittoor District, Andhra Pradesh. Among other things, Rajanna Trust has executed micro irrigation projects valued to a tune of 1 million US dollars which has benefited over 2000 agricultural families

Advisory Member:
y

Wockhardt Foundation

Jay holds a bachelors¶ degree in Political Science and Economics from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, USA. As an avid sports lover, he has played chess and tennis at a competitive level. He also enjoys golf, motor sports, diving, travel and pop culture in general. Married with two children; in his leisure time he loves spending time with his family and participating in community development initiatives.

FACILITY Galla Foods processing facility is located in Chittoor, spread over an area of 150 acres. This place has been earmarked to host a Integrated Food Complex of International standards. The facility currently has a tropical fruit Puree / Concentrate processing plant and the pack house for preparing the Fresh Fruits & Vegetables

CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY Galla Foods plant is equipped with state-of-the-art fruit puree processing aseptic filling line of SIG- Manzini, Italy to produce natural fruit pulps & concentrates. The plant has one of the India's single largest fruit processing line -10 TPH ripen fruit processing with Aseptic Packaging.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE Galla Foods' technology initiatives span the following disciplines
y

PLC operated equipments for better control over monitoring and operations with supervisory units. Two stage washing of fruits to ensure HACCP quality requirement. Two-stage sterilization to retain the natural flavor and aroma. High speed advanced Mono block aseptic filling machine supplied by SIG Manzini. Integrated Enterprise Resources Planning system is in place to automate business processes and provide data for analysis and reporting, allowing a closer control on quality and operations.

y y y y

Efficient Plant Layout
y y y y

Minimal drop in power and steam transfer. Straight-line process flow design to maintain the hygiene‡ and control in respective areas. Special food grade self-leveling epoxy flooring to maintain optimum hygienic conditions. Curved corners and food grade epoxy painted walls to avoid dust accumulation and to facilitate easy washing. Advanced high raise insulated roofing with double layer GI Sheeting with air extractors to maintain temperature inside the plant. Utility lines are routed outside the plant to keep the interiors free from dust accumulation

y

y

Valuable Industrial Expertise
Galla Foods is backed with strong support and service from its team of highly qualified technical personnel and domain experts with perceptive knowledge and skill. Powered by priceless hands-on experience these professionals are upgrading themselves continuously to identify and introduce improved and innovative product offerings that would delight customers worldwide and comply with the leading global quality standards.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

Puree & Concentrate Facility
The fruit processing aseptic line is from SIG-Manzini of Italy. The line has a capacity to process 10 metric ton per hour ripened fruits. the processing line is fully integrated and controlled by PLC.

Pack House
Galla Foods has a set up a Fresh fruit and Vegetable processing facility from Greefa, Spain. Fresh fruits including mangoes, bananas are processed along with tropical vegetables like Okra, Egg plant, Lemon, Bitter gourd etc. The facility also holds ripening chambers, pre cooling chambers and cold storage to handle fresh fruits and vegetables

Vapour Heat Treatment (VHT)
To enable Fresh Mango exports to countries like Japan and Korea, Galla Foods has commissioned the VHT facility. This ensures irradiation of the fruit flies in the fresh fruit. Galla foods are the first private organization to set up this facility in the country.

Certifications

INTERNATIONAL QUALITY STANDARDS
GFPL's quality and business objectives are designed to challenge the organization through continual improvement and a zeal for results. At GFPL quality determines not only the end product but processes and operations at all levels. The company's laboratory is equipped with the latest testing facilities to perform all necessary tests. Frequent & stringent quality checks are carried out for Physical, Chemical, Organoleptic & Microbial parameters and immediate corrective measures are carried out on

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE detection of variance in parameters, assuring a high quality end product. As a mandatory procedure, all finished products are analyzed with extreme care before clearance by GFPL's quality assurance staff.

Our certifications include
1. HACCP (Food Safety Certification) by TUV, Germany 2. ISO 9001:2000 (Quality Management System) by TUV, Germany 3. KOSHER by Star-K, USA 4. Sure Global Fair (SGF) 5. Halal Certification

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

PRODUCT PROFILE

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PRODUCT PROFILE Puree / Pulp
Galla Foods offers finest tropical fruit purees including Mango puree, Guava puree, Papaya puree, Tomato puree etc. Fruits are carefully graded, sorted and are directly sourced from the farmers to a large percentage. We ensure direct interaction with the farmers and share knowledge on pre & post harvesting practices, resulting in better quality, better yield and highest satisfaction.

Mango Puree Alphonso Mango Totapuri Mango

Guava Puree White Guava | Pink Guava

Papaya Puree Yellow Papaya | Red Papaya

Tomato Puree Tomato

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE Banana Puree Acidified Banana Pure

CONCENTRATES
Galla Foods offers finest tropical fruit concentrates including Mango concentrates, Guava concentrates, Papaya concentrates etc. Fruits are carefully graded, sorted and are directly sourced from the farmers to a large percentage. We ensure direct interaction with the farmers and share knowledge on pre & post harvesting practices, resulting in better quality, better yield and highest satisfaction.

Mango Concentrates Totapuri Mango | Neelam Mango

Guava Concentrates White Guava | Pink Guava

Papaya Concentrates Yellow Papaya | Red Papaya

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BEVERAGES FRUIT DRINKS

Classical Mango and Apple-Litchi Galla Foods has entered the popular fruit drinks segment with the launch of Galla Fruit Drinks in two flavors ± Classical Mango and an exotic blend of Apple-Litchi..

Fruit Nectars
Galla Thick Mango Galla Thick Mango - the thickest, juiciest mangoes, bottled just for you! Made from the fattest and juiciest mangoes; Galla Thick Mango is a delicious treat for your ... Galla Thick Mango Cocktail Pure, true and unmatched « Galla thick mango cocktail is a sumptuous blend of exotic fruits with the quintessential king of fruits...

Galla Thick Mango Magic Experience true magic rush in your mouth with the inimitable blend of Galla thick mango with apple or orange. Add to this the multiple benefits of these exotic fruits...

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Fresh Fruits

Tropical Fresh Fruits processing Integrated Pack House Facility

at

Galla Foods has a set up a Fresh fruit and Vegetable processing Pack House in addition to the state of the art Fruit Puree & Concentrate processing.

Fresh fruits including Mangoes, Bananas are processed along with tropical vegetables like Okra, Egg plant, Lemon, Bitter gourd etc. The facility also holds ripening chambers, pre cooling chambers and cold storage to handle fresh fruits and vegetables.

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Fresh Fruits
Mangoes: Located in Mango belt of India, Galla Foods has access to variety of fresh Mangoes like Alphonso, Banganapalli, Neelam, Rumani etc. The fresh mangoes are handpicked, processed in the pack house as per international standards for Domestic and Global markets. Bananas: The pack house handles variety of bananas which undergo Controlled Artificial Ripening resulting in uniform ripening with fine texture. Others: The facility also can process fresh fruits like Papaya, Pineapple, Guava, Pomegranates etc based on the need and availability.

Fresh Vegetables

Tropical Fresh Vegetables processing at Integrated Pack House Facility Galla Foods has a set up a Fresh fruit and Vegetable processing Pack House in addition to the state of the art Fruit Puree & Concentrate processing.

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FRESHVEGETABLES
Farms around the facility grow tropical vegetables like Okra, Egg plant, Cluster beans, Ridge Gourd, Bitter Gourd and leafy vegetables. Galla Foods has entered into contract farming with the farmers to ensure quality produce. Galla Foods also enriches the farming community by sharing with farmers Pre & Post Harvesting techniques.

ENVIRONMENT WATER MANAGEMENT Water is an essential & precious natural resource. It is a nature¶s gift. Without water there is no life on the earth. It is as important to the fruit processing industry as to the living being. But, water is becoming scarce year by year due to increase n its consumption in industries & agriculture sectors & indiscriminate use /wastage by human beings, therefore, it needs a integrated& scientific approach for its management to use it so that undesirable wastage is avoided which helps us to save water for right utilization . Keeping the importance of water in mind, we take care at every stage of use of water to the best effect in our factory. Our main source of water is bore wells. The water is potable. Water from all bore wells is collected in a sump. From there it is pumped to over head tank to supply to various locations of use. To manage appropriately & conserve the water, we are taking following steps at various locations of its use:

Fruit washing: the water is re-circulated after filtration up to it becomes dirty. This water is
chl0rinated to control the contamination by continuous dosing of chlorine in the washing tub.

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Steam generation
Water for boiler feeding is treated in water softener to reduce the hardness. The steam condensate of evaporator is recycled to boiler to save water & energy as condensate will have high temperature. 1. Steam condensate from other heating equipments & Vapour condensate from pulp concentration is collected in a tank to use in crate & floor cleaning. 2. Floor & equipments are cleaned by compressed water jet to conserve the water. 3. Treated effluent is used for civil construction & gardening. 4. Flow meters are installed at location of major use to have control over water utilization. 5. UV sterilizer is installed on main line of water, which feed to processing to sanitize the water. 6. The water to be used for blending in product is treated in r o plant. 7. Drinking water is passed through zero-b filter. WASTE MANAGEMENT Effluent treatment Our factory is equipped with aerobic effluent treatment plant of 250 kl capacity. Effluent from all locations of water use is collected through inter connected drains in ET plant. It is aerated here & transferred to settlement tank for sedimentation of solid particles. The treated effluent is sent to oxidation pond. From pond, water is used for gardening & civil construction. The sludge is transferred to drying bed. The dried sludge is used as manure in our garden. The main feature of our company is that no effluent treated or untreated is released in public drains & therefore, does not pose any danger to surrounding environment & public.

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Solid waste management
The solid waste consists of followings
y y y y

Seeds of fruits Stem ends & skin/peel of fruits & vegetables Pomace-consists of fibers & embedded pulp. Spoiled fruits & vegetables

The seeds & peels of good fruits are passed second time through a pulper to remove the remaining pulpy portion. The pulp extracted so & Pomace are mixed & given an enzymatic treatment & centrifuge to remove the extraneous materials so that pulp can be used for making concentrate. This helps in improving the recovery out of fruits. Then, seeds & peels are dried in sun to be used as cattle feeds and fuel in small-scale industries. Spoiled fruits & damaged portion of peels are used for manuring by vermiculture & composting in pits. The manure is used for gardening & helps to maintain good environment in & around our working area. To maintain good environment, we are planting lot of trees in our premises, which are nourished by in-house made manure & treated effluent. Fruit washing: the water is re-circulated after filtrations up to it becomes

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GROUP COMPANIES
A group is known by the companies it keeps

Galla Foods:

Inaugurated on 4th May, 2005 at Chittoor, in AP Investment of US$ 4.6 million 100% Export Oriented Unit

Amara Raja Electronics Ltd:

PCB Assembly (Through hole and SMT) Located at Diguvamagham near Chittoor, in AP Electronic products Assembly and Testing Currently manufacturing Battery chargers, Digital inverters and trickle chargers

Amara Raja Power Systems Limited:
Design and development of Power Electronic products Power electronics Systems Integration and testing Magnetics Manufacturing

Mangal Precision Products Limited:
Situated at Petamitta in Chittoor district in AP Fabrication of advanced sheet metal products and fasteners, plastic component and compounds Technological support - Nedschroef, Belgium

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DEPARTMENT PROFILE
The Department in Galla Foods Limited and the employees in all departments have been classified under three categories which comes as three grades
1. Management Grade 2. Staff Grade 3. Workmen Grade

MANAGEMENT GRADE
The Management grade employee¶s hierarch starts with the executive engineers designation. The company has ranked the employees accordingly who are in their respective position as given. The Management grade employees are experts who hold qualification like PG in Management, B-tech and Msc. M9 M8 M7 M6 M5 M4 M3 M2 M1 Engineer/ Executive Senior Engineer/ Senior Executive Assistant Manager Manager Senior Manager DGM (Deputy General Manager) GM (General Manager) Managing Director/Vice President Chairman

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STAFF GRADE
The Staff Grade employees are those who work in the department under management grade employees. These Staff Grade employees who are qualified as from Bsc, B.com & diploma engineer who are specialized in technical field. Assistant 1 Technician Assistant 2 Supervisor Junior Officer

S5 S4 S3 S2 S1

WORKMEN GRADE
These employees from working employees in production and management aspect in the company. The hierarchy of these Workmen Grade employees is as follows GW1 GW2 GW3 GW4 GW5 Workmen Grade 1 Workmen Grade 2 Workmen Grade 3 Workmen Grade 4 Workmen Grade 5

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RESEARCH AND METHODOLOGY

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RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Research is to see what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought´ Albert Szent ± Gyorgyi

This is a systematic way to solve the research problem and it is an important component for the study without which researcher may not be able to obtain the facts and figures from the employees.

The methodology adopted for the study is as follows:

STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEMS

y y y y

To the study the extent to which the respondents need to have training programmes. To study the reaction of respondents to the existing work environment. To find out the factors affecting training programme. To suggest the ways for the improvement of training programmes

SOURCE OF DATA
Data was collected based on two sources:  Primary data  Secondary data

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PRIMARY DATA:
The primary data is collected with the help of questionnaires. The questionnaires are chosen because of its simplicity and reliability researchers can expect a straight answer, which is directly related to the questions.

SECONDARY DATA:
Secondary data is collected through the document provided by the HR department such as policy decisions, reports regarding suggestion scheme etc. Books from various authors of HRD, magazines, journals and annual reports of the company, feedback reports file of training department, brochures and company personal manual.

SAMPLING UNIT:
Sampling unit for the study is Executives, senior executives, and Graduates, of GFL.

SAMPLING SIZE:
The sample size consists of 100 respondents.

RESEARCH DESIGN:
³Research´ as the ³Systematic investigation into and the study of materials and sources in order to establish facts and reach new conclusion´  A research design involves the completes process of planning and operation of the research.  A research design is an instrument. Which helps in achieving scientific accuracy of the study under consideration?  How many observations should be made one of each unit in the study?  The researcher has covered all the levels of the employees.

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SAMPLING TECHNIQUE:
Sampling can be broadly classified into probability sampling and non probability sampling. But the study is conducted by non-random convenient sampling techniques for the purpose of assuring the sample size.

CONVENIENCE SAMPLING:
The type of sampling depends upon the convenience of the researcher.

RANDOM SAMPLING:
This type of sampling can be choosing on the basis of random.

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS:
The data is collected through questionnaire regarding the purpose of approval and positive and negative aspects of existing system were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively and inferences were summarized.

STATISTICAL TOOL USED:
Sampling percentage method: Percentage method is used in making comparison between two or more series of data. This method used to describe relationship. No. Of respondents = No. of respondents X 100 Total respondents The data is specified in tabulation form. It is very useful to understanding the clear information.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE Chi-square Test: The chi-square test is one of the simplest and most widely used non-parametric tests in statistical work. The
2

are the Greet letter chi the chi-square ( 2) test was first used by Karl

Pearson in the year 1990. The quantity chi-square describes the magnitude of the discrepancy between theory and observation. It is defined as: Chi-Square = (O-E)2 / E Where O = Observed frequency E = Expected frequency To determine the value of chi-square, the steps required are: 1. Calculated the expected frequencies Total no. of Respondents E = --------------------------------------Different types of respondents 2. take the difference between observed and expected frequencies and obtain the squares of these differences i.e., (O-E) 2 3. Divide the values of (O-E)2 with respective expected frequency and obtain the total i.e., (O-E) 2 / E Degree of Freedom is (n-1).

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REVIEW OF LITERATURE
Definition of Employee Welfare
Labor welfare has been defined in various ways, though unfortunately no single definition has found universal acceptance.

³Efforts to make life worth living for worker´

³The oxford dictionary´
³The voluntary effort of the employers to establish, within the existing industrial system, working and sometimes living and cultural conditions of the employees beyond what is required by law, the customs of the industry and the conditions of the market´ ³According to Encyclopedia of social sciences´ Some of the social scientists have noted that the problems of our contemporary civilization are most marked in highly industrialized societies. It influences on the humans social and psychological distress¶s to avoid the distress. Some of the framers introduced the welfare programmers and the activities must be necessary to human to make him happy. This welfare approach has become necessary because of the social problems that have emerged as a result of industrialization in capitalistic settings. After the abolition of slavery in 1833 the British colonies started importing Indian labor. Labor welfare activity was largely controlled by legislation, the earliest act being the apprentices Act of 1850, the next act was fatal accidents act of 1853, provide compensation to the workmen families who lost their lives as a result of any actionable wrong. And the merchant shipping act 1859 providing health, accommodation and protection to the employment of the seamen. To improving the working conditions of the labor they enact the workmen¶s breach of contract act, 1859 and the employers¶ and workmen¶s (disputes) act 1868.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE The first Indian factories act was set up in 1881, which mark the beginning of a series of labor laws which brought about the improvement in the working conditions of the workers who works in the Bombay textile mills. The recommendations of the international labor conference in 1890, held in Berlin, exercise a considerable influence on labor legislation in India. Under pressure from labor, the Bombay textile mill owners decided to declare Sunday a day of rest. To make development and implement the mentioned below, the government of India, on the advice of a special commission, passed the Indian factories act of 1891, which was a being advance over the act of 1891. Its main provisions were: 1) It applied to all factories employing 50 persons or more. It could he extended to factories employing 20 persons. 2) A mid ±day break of half an hour was made compulsory. 3) A weekly off ±day was prescribed. 4) Women were allowed to work for maximum of 11 hours with a break of 1 ½ hours. 5) The lower and higher age limit of children employed in factories was respectively raised to 9 and 14. They were allowed to work only in the day ±time and for not more the 7 hours a day. 6) Local governments were empowered to make rules regarding sanitation and other amenities for workers 7) Provision was made for inspection and penalties for breach of any provision of factory act. At the time first world war, in1919 International Labour Organization (ILO) was set up. In the year of 1934 the Royal Commission gave priority to the labors safety, health and ventilation.

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At the time of Second World War in 1939 the total number of workers in India in 1,75,000 members. The government actively promoted welfare activities like providing the minimum wages, crèches, ambulance rooms, canteens etc., started making their appearance on the industrial sense. After independence the factories act 1947 replaced all the provisions which are i)provisions regarding safety-guarding of machines, ii) drinking water, iii) provisions regarding health and cleanliness, iv) washing and latrine facilities, v) lunch rooms and rest rooms, vi) sitting arrangements vii) first aid and dispensary facilities in all factories employing more than 500 workmen, viii) crèches where more than 50 more women are employed, ix) welfare officer where more than 500 workmen are employed, x) provision of spittoons, xi) holidays with wages at the rate of one day for every 20 days worked, xii)weekly hours ± 48 for adults and 27 for younger persons, xiii) regulations regarding young persons, xiv) rate of payment for overtime work, xv) rest for half an hour maximum of 5 hours of work, xvi) number of hours work and xvii) weekly holidays. In our country also introduced some of the welfare amenities had been provided to the industrial labor through the Indian constitution. Concomitantly labor welfare in India has gained in importance. Employee welfare defines as ³efforts to make life worth living for workmen´. These efforts have their origin either in some statute formed by the state or in some local custom or in collective agreement or in the employer¶s own initiative.

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OBJECTIVES
y y y y y y y y y

To give expression to philanthropic and paternalistic feelings. To win over employee¶s loyalty and increase their morale. To combat trade unionism and socialist ideas. To build up stable labour force, to reduce labour turnover and absenteeism. To develop efficiency and productivity among workers. To save oneself from heavy taxes on surplus profits. To earn goodwill and enhance public image. To reduce the threat of further government intervention. To make recruitment more effective (because these benefits add to job appeal).

Employee relations. An organization's director of industrial relations forms labor policy, oversees industrial labor relations, negotiates collective bargaining agreements, and coordinates grievance procedures to handle complaints resulting from management disputes with employees. The director of industrial relations also advises and collaborates with the director of human resources, other managers, and members of their staffs, because all aspects of human resources policy²such as wages, benefits, pensions, and work practices²may be involved in drawing up a new or revised work rules that comply with a union contract. Labor relations managers and their staffs implement industrial labor relations programs. Labor relations specialists prepare information for management to use during collective bargaining agreement negotiations, a process that requires the specialist to be familiar with economic and wage data and to have extensive knowledge of labor law and collective bargaining procedures. The labor relations staff interprets and administers the contract with respect to grievances, wages and salaries, employee welfare, healthcare, pensions, union and management practices, and other contractual stipulations. In the absence of a union, industrial relations personnel may work with employees individually or with employee association representatives.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE Dispute resolution²attaining tacit or contractual agreements²has become increasingly significant as parties to a dispute attempt to avoid costly litigation, strikes, or other disruptions. Dispute resolution also has become more complex, involving employees, management, unions, other firms, and government agencies. Specialists involved in dispute resolution must be highly knowledgeable and experienced, and often report to the director of industrial relations. Mediator¶s advice and counsel labor and management to prevent and, when necessary, resolve disputes over labor agreements or other labor relations issues. Arbitrators, occasionally called umpires or referees, decide disputes that bind both labor and management to specific terms and conditions of labor contracts. Labor relations specialists who work for unions perform many of the same functions on behalf of the union and its members. Other emerging specialties in human resources include international human resources managers, who handle human resources issues related to a company's overseas operations and human resources information system specialists, who develop and apply computer programs to process human resources information, match jobseekers with job openings, and handle other human resources matters; and total compensation or total rewards specialists, who determine an appropriate mix of compensation, benefits, and incentives. Work environment. Human resources personnel usually work in clean, pleasant, and comfortable office settings. Arbitrators and mediators many of whom work independently may work out of home offices. Although most human resources, training, and labor relations managers and specialists work in the office, some travel extensively. For example, recruiters regularly attend professional meetings, participate in job fairs, and visit college campuses to interview prospective employees. Arbitrators and mediators often must travel to the site chosen for negotiations. Trainers and other specialists may travel to regional, satellite, or international offices of a company to meet with employees who work outside of the main corporate office. Many human resources, training, and labor relations managers and specialists work a standard 40-hour week. However, longer hours might be necessary for some workers²for example, labor relations managers and specialists, arbitrators, and mediators²when contract agreements or dispute resolutions are being negotiated.

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FEATURES OF EMPLOYEE WELFARE The features of employee welfare are: * Employee welfare is a comprehensive term including various services, facilities and amenities provided to employees for their betterment. * The basic purpose in to improve the lot of the working class. * Employee welfare is a dynamic concept. * Employee welfare measures are also known as fringe benefits and services. * Welfare measures may be both voluntary and statutory.

Principles of Employee Welfare Service
Following are generally given as the principles to be followed in setting up a employee welfare service:
y

The service should satisfy real needs of the workers. This means that the manager must first determine what the employee¶s real needs are with the active participation of workers. The service should such as can be handled by cafeteria approach. Due to the difference in Sex, age, marital status, number of children, type of job and the income level of employees there are large differences in their choice of a particular benefit. This is known as the cafeteria approach. Such an approach individualizes the benefit system though it may be difficult to operate and administer. The employer should not assume a benevolent posture.
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y

y

EMPLOYEE WELFARE
y

The cost of the service should be calculated and its financing established on a sound basis. There should be periodical assessment or evaluation of the service and necessary timely on the basis of feedback.

y

TYPES OF WELFARE SERVICES
The types of welfare services are as follows: * Intramural: - These are provided within the organization like:

1. Canteen, 2. Rest rooms, 3. Crèches, 4. Uniform etc.

* Extramural: - These are provided outside the organization, like: 1. Housing, 2. Education, 3. Child welfare, 4. Leave travel facilities, 5. Interest free loans, 6. Workers cooperative stores, 7. Vocational guidance etc.

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EMPLOYEE PROTECTION AND WELFARE

STATUTORY WELFARE MEASURES: The preamble to our Indian Constitution promises justice - social, economic and political. It also stresses Equality of status and of opportunity. Article 23 of the Constitution prohibits traffic inhuman beings and forced labour. Article 24 prohibits employment of children in factories. The article 38 and 39 spelt under Directive Principles of State Policy are now enforceable as per the dictums laid by our Supreme Court. Constitution of India, Article 38: State to secure a social order for the promotion of welfare of the people: The State shall strive to promote the welfare of the people by securing and protecting as effectively as it may a social order in which justice, social, economic and political, shall inform all the institutions of the national life. The State shall, in particular, strive to minimize the inequalities in income, and endeavor to eliminate inequalities in status, facilities and opportunities, not only amongst individuals but also amongst groups of people residing in different areas or engaged in different vocations. Constitution of India, Article 39: Certain principles of policy to be followed by the State. - The State shall, in particular, direct its policy towards securing ±

y

That the citizens, men and women equally, have the right to an adequate means to livelihood;

y

That the ownership and control of the material resources of the community are so distributed as best to sub serve the common good;

y

That the operation of the economic system does not result in the concentration of Wealth and means of production to the common detriment ;

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE y y That there is equal pay for equal work for both men and women; That the health and strength of workers, men and women, and the tender age of Children are not abused and that citizens are not forced by economic necessity to enter avocations unsuited to their age or strength y Those children are given opportunities and facilities to develop in a healthy manner and in conditions of freedom and dignity and that childhood and youth are protected against exploitation and against moral and material abandonment.

Non Statutory Measures
Many non statutory welfare schemes may include the following schemes: 1. Personal Health Care (Regular medical check-ups): Some of the companies provide the facility for extensive health check-up 2. Flexi-time: The main objective of the flextime policy is to provide opportunity to employees to work with flexible working schedules. Flexible work schedules are initiated by employees and approved by management to meet business commitments while supporting employee personal life needs 3. Employee Assistance Programs: Various assistant programs are arranged like external counseling service so that employees or members of their immediate family can get counseling on various matters. 4. Harassment Policy: To protect an employee from harassments of any kind, guidelines are provided for proper action and also for protecting the aggrieved employee. 5. Maternity & Adoption Leave ± Employees can avail maternity or adoption leaves. Paternity leave policies have also been introduced by various companies. 6. Medi-claim Insurance Scheme: This insurance scheme provides adequate insurance coverage of employees for expenses related to hospitalization due to illness, disease or injury or pregnancy.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE Employee Referral Scheme: In several companies employee referral scheme is implemented to encourage employees to refer friends and relatives for employment in the organization. Through social security and social justice are spelt in our Constitution, they are never put into practice thanks to our Executives who only pretend to implement the programmes of the State. Some of the important Statutory Welfare measures given by the government are as follows: (i) The Factories Act of 1948 (ii) The Employees State Insurance Act 1948 (iii) The payment of Wages Act 1936 (iv) The Workmen's Compensation Act 1923 (v) The Employees' Provident Funds and Miscellaneous Provisions Act 1952. (vi) The Payment of Gratuity Act, 1962 (vii) The Maternity Benefit Act, 1961

FACTORIES ACT OF 1948
Purpose of this Act: An act to consolidate and amend the law regulating labour in factories. The Factories Act is meant to provide protection to the workers from being exploited by the greedy business employments and provides for the improvement of working conditions within the factory premises. The main function of this act is to look after the welfare of the workers, to protect the workers from exploitations and unhygienic working conditions, to provide safety measures and to ensure social justice.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE Sections 11 to 20 of the Factories Act deal about Health.

HEALTH Section 11: Cleanliness Section 12: Disposal of wastes and effluents Section 13: Providing proper ventilation and maintaining proper temperature Section 14: Removal of Dust and fume Section 15: Providing artificial humidification Section 16: No Overcrowding Section 17: Proper Lighting Section 18: Providing pure Drinking water Section 19: Providing Latrines and urinals Section 20: Providing Spittoon 1. Drinking Water: At all the working places safe hygienic drinking water should be provided. 2. Facilities for sitting: In every organization, especially factories, suitable seating arrangements are to be provided. 3. First aid appliances: First aid appliances are to be provided and should be readily assessable so that in case of any minor accident initial medication can be provided to the needed employee. 4. Toilet Facilities: A sufficient number of latrines and urinals are to be provided in the office and factory premises and are also to be maintained in a neat and clean condition. 5. Canteen facilities: Cafeteria or canteens are to be provided by the employer so as to provide hygienic and nutritious food to the employees.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE 6. Spittoons: In every work place, such as ware houses, store places, in the dock area and office premises spittoons are to be provided in convenient places and some are to be maintained in a hygienic condition. 7. Lighting: Proper and sufficient lights are to be provided for employees so that they can work safely during the night shifts. 8. Washing places: Adequate washing places such as bathrooms, wash basins with tap and tap on the stand pipe are provided in the port area in the vicinity of the work places. 9. Changing rooms: Adequate changing rooms are to be provided for workers to change their cloth in the factory area and office premises. Adequate lockers are also provided to the workers to keep their clothes and belongings. 10. Rest rooms: Adequate numbers of restrooms are provided to the workers with provisions of water supply, wash basins, toilets, bathrooms, etc. 11. Fire Extinguishers: Company should provide sufficient number of extinguishers to safe guard the employees

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SAFETY
Section 21: Section 22: Section 23: Section 24: Section 25: Section 26: Section 27: Section 28: Section 29: Section 30: Section 31: Section 32: Section 33: Section 34: Section 35: Section 36: Section 36A: Section 37: Section 38: Section 39: Section 40: Section 40A: Section 40B: Proper Fencing of machinery Precautions - Work on or near machinery in motion No Employment of young person¶s on dangerous machines Providing Striking gear and devices for cutting off power Precautions near Self-acting machines Casing of new machinery Prohibition of employment of women and children near cotton openers Providing Hoists and lifts Provision for Lifting machines, chains, ropes and lifting tackles Protection near revolving machinery Protection near Pressure plant Provision for Floors, stairs and means of access Providing and precautions near Pits, sumps openings in floors, etc. No Excessive weights Protection of eyes Precautions against dangerous fumes, gases, etc Precautions regarding the use of portable electric light Explosive or inflammable dust, gas etc. Precautions in case of fire Power to require specifications of defective parts or tests of stability Safety of buildings and machinery. Maintenance of buildings Appointment of Safety Officers

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Safety of Employees
y

Fencing of machinery: All dangerous and moving parts of machinery shall be securely fenced. Screws, bolts and teeth shall be completely encased to prevent danger. Work on or near machinery in motion: Lubrication or other adjusting operation on moving machinery shall be done only by a specially trained adult male worker. Employment of young person¶s on dangerous machines: No young person shall be allowed to work on any dangerous machine (so prescribed by the state government) unless he is sufficiently trained or is working under the supervision of knowledgeable person. Device for cutting off power: Suitable device for cutting of power in emergencies shall be provided. Hoists and lifts: These shall be made of good material and strength, thoroughly examined at least once in every six months and suitably protected to prevent any person or thing from being trapped.

y

y

y

y

WELFARE
Section 42: Providing Washing facilities Section 43: Providing Facilities for storing and drying clothing Section 44: Providing Facilities for sitting Section 45: First-aid appliances to be kept. Section 46: Canteens at subsidized rates. Section 47: Shelters, rest rooms and lunch rooms for workmen. Section 48: Crèches for babies of working women. Section 49: Appointment of Welfare officers. It is the duty of the Chief Inspector of Factories to ensure enforcement of all the above Provisions of the Factories Act in respect of safety, health and welfare of employees.

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Employee Welfare Officer
Section 49 of the factories act provides that in every factory wherein 500 or more workers are ordinarily employed the employer shall appoint at least one welfare officer. The welfare officer should possess; (i) a university degree; (ii) degree or diploma in social service or social work or social welfare from a recognized institution; and (iii) adequate knowledge of the language spoken by the majority of the workers in the area where the factory is situated. ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ Supervision Counseling workers Advising management Establishing liaison with workers working with management and workers to improve productivity. working with outside public to secure proper enforcement of various acts.

Welfare of Employee
Chapter V of the factories Act contains provisions about the welfare of employees. These are as follows:
y

There shall be separate and adequately screened washing facilities for the use of male and female employees. There shall be suitable places provided for clothing not worn during working hours and for the dying of wet clothing. There shall be suitable arrangement for all workers to sit for taking rest if they are obliged to work in a standing position.

y

y

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y

There shall be provided the required number of first-aid boxes or cupboard (at the rate of one for every 150 workers) equipped with the prescribed contents readily available during the working hours of the factory. The State Government may make rules requiring that in any specified factory employing more than 250 employees a canteen shall be provided and maintained by the occupier for the use of the employee. There shall be provided sufficiently lighted and ventilated lunch room if the number of employees ordinarily employed is more than 150.

y

y

THE WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION ACT 1923
Purpose of the Act: An Act to provide for the payment of certain classes of employers to their workmen of compensation for injury by accident. The workmen's compensation Act1923 is one of the earliest pieces of labour legislation. This act encompasses all cases of accidents arising out of and in course of employment. The rate of Compensation to be paid in a lump sum is determined by a schedule provided in the act proportionate to the extent of injury and the loss of earning capacity. The younger the age of he worker and higher the wage the greater is the compensation. The Act provides the formula for calculating the compensation. The injured person can claim compensation and in the case of death, the compensation is claimed by dependents of the deceased. This law applies to the organized as well as unorganized sectors that are not covered by the E.S.I. scheme. The following definitions and the sections of law are presented for the students to take note of them. Administration: The act is administered by the State Governments which appoint Commissioners for this purpose under Sec.20 of the Act. Benefits: Under the Act, compensation is payable by the employer to workman for all personal injuries caused to him by accident arising out of and in the course of his employment which disable him for more than 3 days. If the workman dies, the compensation is to be paid to his dependants. The Act distinguishes among three types of injuries: permanent total disablement,

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE permanent partial disablement and temporary disablement. The amount of compensation to be paid on the death or disablement of workman is given in Fourth Schedule of the Act and varies according to his wages, the type of injury and age. It is an obligation upon the employer to make the payment of compensation within one month from the date on which it falls due. Sources of Funds: All compensation under the act is payable by the employer.

THE PAYMENT OF WAGES ACT:
The Payment of Wages Act was enacted as early as 1936 during the colonial rule. The purpose of this act is to regulate payment of wages. This insists on the payment of wages by the seventh day or the tenth day of the succeeding month and in case of weekly payment the last day of the week. Section 3: Responsibility for payment of wages. - Every employer shall be responsible for the payment to person employed by him of all wages required to be paid under this Act. Provided that, in the case of persons employed (otherwise than by a contractor) ±  In factories, if a person has been named as the manager of the factory under Clause of sub-section (1) of section 7 of the Factories Act, 1948 (63 of 1948)  In industrial or other establishments, if there is a person responsible to the Employer for the supervision and control of the industrial or other establishments  Upon railways (otherwise that in factories), if the employer is the railway administration and the railway administration has nominated a person in this behalf for the local area concerned, the person so named, the person so responsible to the employer, or the person so nominated, as the case may be (shall also be responsible) for such payment.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE Section 4: Fixation of wage-periods: > Every person responsible for the payment of wages under section 3 shall fix periods (in this Act referred to as wage-periods) in respect of which such wages shall be payable. > No wage-period shall exceed one month.

Section 5: Time of payment of wages. ± (1) The wages of every person employed upon or in   Any railway, factory or {industrial or other establishment} upon or in which less than one thousand persons are employed, shall be paid before the expiry of the seventh day. Any other railway, factory or {industrial or other establishment}, shall be paid before the expiry of the tenth day, after the last day of the wage-period in respect of which the wages are payable: (2) Where the employment of any person is terminated by or on behalf of the employer, the wages, earned by him shall be paid before the expiry of the second working day from the day on which his employment is terminated. (3) The State Government may, by general or special order, exempt, to such extent and subject to such conditions as may be specified in the order, the person responsible for the payment of wages to persons employed upon any railway (otherwise than in a factory) from the operation of this section in respect of the wages of any such persons or class of such persons. (4) Save as otherwise provided in sub-section (2), all payments of wages shall be made on a working day.

THE EMPLOYEES¶ PROVIDENT FUND ACT 1952
The purpose of this Act: An Act to provide for the institution of Provident Funds, pension funds and deposit linked fund for employees in factories and other establishments. Contributions of 10% of the wages are paid by the employer and another 10% by the employees. This amount is deposited with the government which pays an interest. This Act also now has provisions for pension scheme.
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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

Administration: The employees Provident Funds, Pension and Insurance Schemes framed under the Act are administered by a tripartite Central Board of trustee, consisting of representatives of employers and employees and persons nominated by the Central and State Governments. Benefits: The act has made schemes for 3 types of benefits, provident fund, family pension and deposit linked insurance. Family pension is payable to the widow or widower up to the date of death or re-marriage whichever is earlier. In the absence of the widow or the widower it is payable to the eldest surviving unmarried daughter until she attains the age of 21 years or marries whichever is earlier. The dependents of the employee also receive an additional amount known as the deposit linked insurance which is equivalent to the average balance lying to the credit of the employee on his provident fund during the preceding 3 years, subject to a maximum of Rs 10000 provided that such employee has kept a minimum average balance of Rs. 1000 in the provident fund. Source of Funds: Here both the employer and the employee are required to contribute the provident fund every month at 8.33% of the basic wages, dearness allowance and retaining allowance. An employee can make a larger contribution up to 10% but there is no compulsion for the employer to make a matching contribution.

THE PAYMENT OF GRATUITY ACT, 1972
Purpose of the Act: An act to provide for scheme for the payment of gratuity to employees engaged in factories, mines, oil fields, plantations, ports, railway companies, shops or other establishments and matters connected therewith or incidental thereto. Gratuity shall be payable to an employee on the termination of his employment after he has rendered continuous service for not less than five years. (a) On his superannuation (b) On his retirement or resignation (c) On his death or disablement
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EMPLOYEE WELFARE For every completed year of service or part thereof in excess of six months the employer shall pay gratuity to an employee at the rate of 15 days¶ wages based on the rate of wages last drawn by the employee concerned.

Section 4: Payment of gratuity (1) Gratuity shall be payable to an employee on the termination of his employment after he has rendered continuous service for not less than five years: (a) On his superannuation, or (b) On his retirement or resignation, or (c) On his death or disablement due to accident or disease; Provided that the completion of continuous service of five years shall not be necessary where the termination of the employment of any employee is due to death or disablement; provided further that in the case of death of the employee, gratuity payable to him shall be paid to his nominee or, if no nomination has been made, to his heirs, and where any such nominees or heirs is a minor, the share of such minor, shall be deposited with the controlling authority who shall invest the same for the benefit of such minor in such bank or other financial institution, as may be prescribed, until such minor attains majority. (2) For every completed year of service or part thereof in excess of six months, the employer shall pay gratuity to an employee at the rate of fifteen days' wages based on the rate of wages last drawn by the employee concerned; provided that in the case of a piece-rated employee, daily wages shall be computed on the average of the total wages received by him for a period of three months immediately preceding the termination of his employment, and, for the purpose, the wages paid for any overtime work shall not be taken into account; provided further that that in the case of {an employee who is employed in a seasonal establishment and who is not so employed throughout the Year} the employer shall pay the gratuity at the rate of seven days' wages for each season. (3) The amount of gratuity payable to an employee shall not exceed {three lakhs and fifty thousand} rupees.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE (4) For the purpose of computing the gratuity payable to an employee who is employed, after his disablement, on reduced wages, his wages for the period preceding his disablement shall be taken to be the wages received by him during that period, and his wages for the period subsequent to his disablement shall be taken to be the wages as so reduced. (5) Nothing in this section shall affect the right of an employee to receive better terms of gratuity under any award or agreement or contract with the employer. (6) Notwithstanding anything contained in sub-section (a) The gratuity of an employee, whose services have been terminated for any act, willful omission or negligence causing any damage or loss to, or destruction of, property belonging to the employer 'shall be forfeited to the extent of the damage or loss so caused. (b) The gratuity payable to an employee {may be wholly or partially forfeited} (i) If the services of such employee have been terminated for his riotous or disorderly conduct or any other act of violence on his part, or (ii) If the services of such employee have been terminated for any act which constitutes an offence involving moral turpitude, provided that such offence is committed by him in the course of his employment.

THE MATERNITY BENEFIT ACT, 1961
Purpose of the Act: An Act to regulate the employment of women in certain establishments for certain period before and after child-birth and to provide for maternity benefit and certain other benefits. Section 4: Employment of or work by, women, prohibited during certain periods (1) No employer shall knowingly employ a woman in any establishment during the six weeks immediately following the day of her delivery, (miscarriage or medical termination of pregnancy). (2) No women shall work in any establishment during the six weeks immediately following the day of her delivery (miscarriage or medical termination of pregnancy).
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(3) Without prejudice
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EMPLOYEE WELFARE to the provisions of section 6, no pregnant women hall, on a request being made by her in his behalf, is required by her employer to do during the period specified in subsection (4) Any work which is of an arduous nature or which involves long hours of standing, or which in any way is likely to interfere with her pregnancy or the normal development of the foetus, or is likely to cause her miscarriage or otherwise to adversely after her health. (4) The period referred to in sub-section (3) shall be (a) The period of one month immediately proceeding the period of six weeks, before the date of here expected delivery; (b) Any period during the said period of six weeks for which the pregnant woman does not avail of leave of absence under section 6. Section 5: Right to payment of maternity benefits: (1) Subject to the provisions of this Act, every woman shall be entitled to, and her employer shall be liable for, the payment of maternity benefit at the rate of the average daily wage for the period of her actual absence, that is to say, the period immediately preceding the day of her delivery, the actual day of her delivery and any period immediately following that day. (2) No woman shall be entitled to maternity benefit unless she has actually worked in an Establishment of the employer from whom she claims maternity benefit, for a period of not less than{eighty days} in the twelve months immediately preceding the date of her expected delivery. Provided that the qualifying period of {eighty days} aforesaid shall not apply to a woman who has immigrated into the State of Assam and was pregnant at the time of the immigration. (3) The maximum period for which any woman shall be entitled to maternity benefit shall be twelve weeks of which not more than six weeks shall precede the date of her expected delivery. Provided that where a woman dies during this period, the maternity benefit shall be payable only for the days up to and including the day of her death ; Provided further that where a woman, having been delivered of a child, dies during her delivery or during the period immediately following the date other delivery for which she is entitled for the maternity benefit, leaving behind in either case the child, the employer shall be liable for the maternity benefit for that entire period but if the child also

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE Dies during the said period, then, for the days up to and including the date of the death of the child.

EMPLOYEES STATE INSURANCE ACT 1948
Purpose of the Act: This Act covers all workers whose wages do not exceed Rs 1600 per month and who are working in factories, other than seasonal factories, run with power and employing 20 or more workers. The coverage can be extended by the State Government with the approval of the Central Government. Administration: The Act is administered by the E.S.I Corporation, an autonomous body consisting of representatives of the Central and State Governments, employers, employees, medical profession and Parliament. Benefits: The Act, which provides for a system of compulsory insurance, is a landmark in the history of social security legislation in India. An insured person is entitled to receive the following types of benefits:  Medical Benefit  Sickness Benefit  Maternity Benefit  Disablement benefit  Dependant¶s Benefit  Funeral benefit Sources of Funds: the Act provides for the setting up of the Employees State Insurance fund from the contributors received from employers and employees and various grants, donations and gifts received from Central or State Governments, local authorities and individuals. The rate of employer¶s contribution is 5% of the wage bill and that of the employee¶s contribution is 2.25%.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

VOLUNTARY WELFARE MEASURES:
These are some of the voluntary welfare measures given by the employer to the employees. They are as follows:  Housing facilities  Transportation facilities  Medical facilities  Cultural facilities  Recreation facilities  Consumers co-operative society  Loans and various advances  Leave travel concession  Gifts to the employees holiday games  Labour welfare fund  Vehicle stand for parking  Libraries  Cafeterias

Voluntary Benefits
Benefits are also given voluntarily to workers by some progressive employers. These include loans for purchasing houses and for educating children, leave travel concession, fair price shops for essential commodities and loans to buy personal conveyance. Machinery Connected with Employee Welfare Work 1. Chief inspector of Factories: It is the duty of the Chief inspector of factories (who

generally works under the administrative control of the labour commissioner in each state) to

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE ensure enforcement of various provisions of Factories Act i8n respect of safety, health and welfare of workers. 2. Central Labour Institute:

The institute was set up in Bombay in 1966 to facilitate the proper implementation of the Factories Act, 1948; to provide a centre of information for inspectors, employers, workers and others concerned with the well being of industrial labour and to stimulate interest in the application of the principles of industrial safety, health and welfare. 3. National Safety Council

The National Safety Council was wet up on 4th March, 1966 in Bombay at the initiative of the Union Ministry of Labour and Rehabilitation, Government of India, as an autonomous national body with the objective of generating developing and sustaining an movement of safety awareness at the national level. 4. Director General of Mines Safety

The Director General of Mines Safety enforces the Mines Act, 1952. He inspects electrical installation and machinery provided in the mines and determines the thickness of barriers of 2 adjacent mines in order to prevent spread of fire and danger of inundation. Appraisal of Welfare Services 1. One of the main obstacles in the effective enforcement of the welfare provisions of the Factories Act has been the quantitative and qualitative inadequacy of the inspection staff. 2. at present, a labour welfare officer is not able to enforce laws independently because he has to work under the pressure of management. 3. Women workers do not make use of the crèche facilities either because they are dissuaded by the management to bring their children with them or because they have to face transport difficulties.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE National Commission on Employee Recommendations 1. The statutory provisions on safety are adequate for the time being effective enforcement is the current need. 2. Every fatal accident should thoroughly be enquired into and given wide publicity among workers. 3. Employers should play a more concerted role in safety and accident prevention programmes and in arousing safety consciousness. 4. Safety should become a habit with the employers and workers instead of remaining a mere ritual as at present. 5. Unions should take at least as much interest in safety promotion as they take in claims for higher wages.

SOCIAL SECURITY
The connotation of the term ³Social Security´ varies from country to country with different political ideologies. In socialist countries, the avowed goal is complete protection to every citizen form the cradle to the grave. There are some components of Social Security:
y y y y y y y y

Medical care Sickness benefit Unemployment benefit Old-age benefit Employment injury benefit Family benefit Maternity benefit Invalidity benefit and Survivor¶s benefit

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE TABLE - 1 1. What is your opinion about canteen facilities? Responses Excellent Satisfy Not satisfy Total No. of respondents 65 22 13 100 Percentage 65 22 13 100

CANTEEN FACILITIES
70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Percentage Inference: The table 1 and diagram reveal that 65% of the workers are excellent on the canteen facilities, such as maintain clean in the canteen and with a well furniture of 20 chair and two fans (conditioned) and proper ventilation and lighting etc., apart from this they provide the news Maxine¶s and television with a (21´ monitor colored and dish connected) and phone connection, connected with internal to all the departments etc. The remaining respondents will aware these facilities in course of their service at the factory.
Excellent Satisfy Not Satisfy

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE TABLE - 2

2.

What is your opinion about drinking water facilities in factory?

Responses satisfy better not satisfy Total

No. of respondents 85 15 0 100

Percentage 85 15 0 100

DRINKING WATER FACILITIES

00 15
Satisfy Better Not Satisfy

85

Inference: Table 2 and diagram shows the drinking water facilities available in the factory which was provided by the company. The company was put the water drums with a distance of the 500 meters. In the campus and put a water drum in the each and every department office with a purifier filters. And arrange the sign boards on the above of the drum as a ³DRINKING WATER´
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EMPLOYEE WELFARE TABLE - 3

3.

How far you satisfied with clean, lighting and ventilation provided by company?

Opinion Satisfy Better Some extent Total

No. of Respondents 62 28 10 100

Percentage 62 28 10 100

Ligthing & Ventilation & Clean

0 10
Satisfy

28 62

Better Some Extent

Inference: Table 3 and diagram focus on the specific induction programme related to the health & safety aspects of the workers in the factory unit. This table also springs surprise that seminar type is marginally ahead of practical demo and interaction. It is generally believed that practical orientation will help in a long way in improving the performance levels as well as safeguarding the health & safety aspects of the workers. Whatever may be the induction programme the ultimate result should lead to increase the productivity levels of the workers without detrimental to their health and safety.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE TABLE - 4

4.

What is your opinion about shift allowances provided by company?

Opinion Good Better Not satisfy total

No. of Respondents 47 33 20 100

Percentage 47 33 20 100

SHIFT ALLOWANCES

0 20 47 33
Satisfy Better Not Satisfy

Inference: The table 4 and diagram relate to the shift allowance which was provided by the company to the employee. Most of the employees are expressing their opinions as satisfy. ³Night Shift Allowance is being paid to all the workmen to manager cadre of employee¶s.´

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE TABLE - 5

5.

How did you feel about the administrative arrangements within a plant for welfare provided by company?
Opinion Comfort & satisfy Partly satisfy Not satisfy total No. of Respondents 69 15 16 100 Percentage 69 15 16 100

ADMINISTRATIVE ARRANGEMENTS

0 16 15 69
Comfort & Satisfy Partly Satisfy Not Satisfy

Inference: The table 5 and diagram deal administrative arrangements implemented within the plant location. The Human resource department and the security department and some other departments are inside. In that the employee who are in that departments are mostly satisfied with the administrative arrangements which are provided by the company.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE TABLE - 6

6.

What is your opinion about health services and occupational safety provided by company? Opinion Satisfy Partly satisfy Some extent total No. of Respondents 68 18 16 100 Percentage 68 18 16 100

HEALTH SERVICES
0 14
Satisfy

18 68

Partly Satisfy Some Extent

Inference: Table 6 and diagram focus on the specific induction programme related to the health & safety aspects of the workers in the factory unit. This table also springs surprise that seminar type is marginally ahead of practical demo and interaction. It is generally believed that practical orientation will help in a long way in improving the performance levels as well as safeguarding the health & safety aspects of the workers. Whatever may be the induction programme the ultimate result should lead to increase the productivity levels of the workers without detrimental to their health and safety.
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EMPLOYEE WELFARE TABLE - 7

7.

What is your opinion about Toilet facilities in the factory?

Opinion Satisfy Better Some extent total

No. of Respondents 61 25 14 100

Percentage 61 25 14 100

TOILET FACILITIES
70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Percentage Inference: The table 7 and diagram reveal that the majority of the workers are satisfied with the maintenance of the clean and ventilated, with a sufficient water facility in that. The company is provided the detergents for the washing.
Satisfy Better Some Extent

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE TABLE - 8

8.

Are you satisfied about arrangements for the prevention of fatigue?

Opinion Satisfy Better Some extent total

No. of Respondents 68 22 10 100

Percentage 68 22 10 100

ARRANGEMENTS FOR PREVENTION
0 0 0 40 30 20 10 0 Percentage

Satisfy Better Some Extent

Inference: The table 8 and diagram reveal that majority of the respondents give their opinion on measures taken by the company for prevention of the fatigue in the factory.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE TABLE - 9

9.

Are you satisfying the working conditions in the company?

Opinion satisfy Partly satisfy Not satisfy total

No. of Respondents 59 28 16 100

percentage 59 28 16 100

WORKING CONDITIONS

0 16
Satisfy Partly Satisfy

25

59

Not Satisfy

Inference: The table 9 and diagram pertain to the working conditions of the workers in the organization. As per the workers the conditions such as work timings are comfortable. In the sense shift timings and the break hours such as for breakfast, lunches, refreshing between the works are satisfiable. The response of the majority of workers are positive towards the management such that they won¶t give stress to worker about the production and the dignity of labour will be exist So that workers express cheer and happy about the working conditions.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE TABLE - 10

10.

Response on provision for social insurance measures provided by company.

opinion Yes To some extent No Total

No. of respondents 67 19 14 100

Percentage 67 19 14 100

SOCIAL INSURANCE

14 19 67

Yes To Some Extent No

Inference: The table 10 and diagram relative to the provisions for social Insurance measures which provided by company mostly the 67% employees are satisfied well and 19% of employees are partly satisfied but 14% of employees are not satisfied with the social insurance measures which the company has provided to them.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE TABLE - 11

11. Are you able manage your work pressure, tension, Stress?

Opinion Yes No

No. of Respondents 56 26

Percentage 56 26 18 100

To Some Extent 18 total 100

WORKING CONDITIONS

0 18
Yes No

26

56

To some extent

Inference: The table 11 and diagram relate to the successful management and control of health &stress level by the workers in the company. They are about only 56%of the respondents could manage both health & stress level without any major problem. Though this is satisfactory still there is a scope for increasing the percentage levels. They are about 26% respondents unable to manage both health &work stress due to the work pressures and other tensions.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE TABLE - 12

12. Are you satisfied with health check up camp conduct by the management every year?

Opinion Strongly agree Agree Avg.agree total

No. of Respondents 86 14 00 100

Percentage 86 14 00 100

HEALTH CHECKUP CONDUCT BY MANAGEMENT

Strongly agree Agree Avg.Agree

Inference: From the above table it can be inferred that all of the respondents are agree with master health checkup group conducted by the management every year.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE TABLE 13 13. Do you satisfy with the first aid boxes provided by the management in case of any accident on emergency period?

Opinion Yes No total

No. of Respondents 100 00 100

Percentage 100 14 100

FIRST AID BOXES PROVIDED BY THE MANAGEMENT

100 80 60 40 20 0 No. of Respondents Percentage Yes No Yes No

INFERENCE From the above table and chart shows that all of the respondents are 100% satisfied with First Aid boxed provided by the company

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE TABLE 14 14. Are you satisfied with uniforms and shoes issued by the company?

Opinion Satisfied Dissatisfied total

No. of Respondents 96 04 100

Percentage 96 04 100

UNIFORM AND SHOE FACILITES

100 80 60 40 20 0 No. of Respondents Percentage

INFERENCE From the above table it can be inferred that 96% employees are satisfied with uniform and shoes issued by the company remaining 4% employees are not satisfied with those facilities provided by the company.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE TABLE 15 15. Are you satisfied by the direction, guidance and support provided by superiors?

Opinion Highly satisfied Satisfied Dissatisfied Neither satisfied dissatisfied total nor

No. of Respondents 23 45 02 30

Percentage 23 45 02 30

100

100

Direction, Guidance and Support provided by the superiors

No. of Respondents

Highly satisfied

Satisfied

Dissatisfied

Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied

INFERENCE From the above table and chart it can be inferred that 23% are highly satisfied and 45% are satisfied and 02% are dissatisfied and remaining 30% are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied by the direction, guidance and support provided by the superiors in the factory.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

TABLE 16 16. How often you interact with your colleagues in your work-place (only job related interactions)?

Opinion Very often Often Rarely Very rarely total

No. of Respondents 12 40 35 13 100

Percentage 12 40 35 13 100

Interact with colleagues in work-place

45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 Very often Often Rarely Very rarely
No. of Respondents Percentage

INFERENCE The table and diagram shows that often workers are interact with their colleagues in the work-place

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE TABLE 17 17. How often do you seek cooperation from your boss?

Opinion Yes No total

No. of Respondents 88 12 100

Percentage 88 12 100

Cooperation from boss in the factory

120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Yes No total No. of Respondents Percentage

INFERENCE From the table and chart shows that 88% are satisfied with their cooperation from their boss and remaining 12% are not satisfied.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE TABLE 18

18. Are you satisfied with recreation facilities (trips and games) provided by the company?

Opinion Satisfied Dissatisfied total

No. of Respondents 87 13 100

Percentage 87 13 100

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES PROVIDED BY THE COMPANY

100 80 60 40 20 0

No. of Respondents No. of Percentage

INFERENCE From the above table and chart it can be inferred that maximum employees are satisfied with the recreational facilities provided by the company.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE TABLE 19

19. Do you feel free to offer comment and suggestion in your factory?

Opinion Yes No total

No. of Respondents 82 18 100

Percentage 82 18 100

Working hours of the job

100 80 60 40 20 0 Yes No total No. of Respondents Percentage

INFERENCE From the table it can be inferred that 82% of respondents are satisfied with their working hours of the job and remaining 18% are not satisfied with their working hours.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE TABLE 20 20. How motivating is the work environment?

Opinion Extremely motivating Fairly motivating Demotivating Neither motivating nor Demotivating Total

No. of Respondents 42

Percentage 42

25

25

03 30

03 30

100

100

Motivating in the work environment
120 100 80 60 40 20 0

No. of Respondents Percentage

INFERENCE From the above table and chart shows that 42% extremely motivating, 25%fairly motivating, 03% Demotivating and 30% neither motivating nor Demotivating in the work environment.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

CHI SQUARE TESTS
1. TO TEST THE RESPONDENT¶S RESPONSE ON CANTEEN FACILITIES PROVIDED BY COMPANY?

Dimensions Respondents Null Hypothesis:

EXCELLENT SATISFY 65 22

NOT SATISFY 13

TOTAL 100

Ho: More number of the respondents that the canteen & shelter provided by the company is not excellent. Observed frequency: OBSERVED FREQUENCY (Oi) (Ei) 65 22 13 33.3 33.3 33.3 31.7 -11.33 -20.3 1004.89 127.69 412.09 971.59 94.34 378.79 Total 1444.72 Expected frequency: Ei =100/3 = 33.33 Calculated value: X2 = (Oi-Ei) 2/Ei = 1444.72 Tabulated value = Degree of freedom = (n-1) = (3-1) =2 5% significance level for 2 degree of freedom at = 3.96 Calculated value 1444.72 > > table value 3.96 EXPERIMENTAL FREQUENCY Oi-Ei (Oi-Ei)2 (Oi-Ei)2/Ei

Conclusion:
It is significant hence we reject the null hypothesis. More number of the respondents that the canteen & shelter provided by the company is excellent.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE 2. TO TEST THE RESPONDENT¶S RESPONSE OPINION ABOUT DRINKING WATER FACILITIES IN COMPANY? Dimensions Respondents Null Hypothesis: Ho: More number of the respondents that the drinking water facility in company is not satisfies. Observed frequency: OBSERVED FREQUENCY (Oi) 85 15 00 33.3 33.3 33.3 51.7 -18.3 -33.3 2672.89 334.89 1108.89 80.26 10.84 33.3 Total 124.43 Expected frequency: Ei =100/3 = 33.33 Calculated value: X2 = (Oi-Ei) 2/Ei = 124.43 Tabulated value = Degree of freedom = (n-1) = (3-1) =2 5% significance level for 2 degree of freedom at = 3.96 Calculated value 124.43 > > table value 3.96 EXPERIMENTAL FREQUENCY(Ei) Oi-Ei (Oi-Ei)2 (Oi-Ei)2/Ei SATISFY 85 BETTER 15 NOT SATISFY 0 TOTAL 100

Conclusion:
It is significant hence we reject the null hypothesis. More number of the respondents that the drinking water facility in company is satisfies.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE 3. TO TEST THE RESPONDENT¶S RESPONSE ON SATISFIED WITH CLEAN LIGHTING &VENTILATION PROVIDED BY COMPANY? Dimensions Respondents Null Hypothesis: Ho: More number of the respondents that the clean, lighting & ventilation provided by company is not satisfies. Observed frequency: OBSERVED FREQUENCY (Oi) 62 28 10 33.3 33.3 33.3 28.7 -5.3 -23.3 823.69 28.09 542.89 24.73 0.84 16.30 Total 41.87 Expected frequency: Ei =100/3 = 33.33 Calculated value: X2 = (Oi-Ei) 2/Ei = 41.87 Tabulated value = Degree of freedom = (n-1) = (3-1) =2 5% significance level for 2 degree of freedom at = 3.96 Calculated value 41.87 > > table value 3.96 EXPERIMENTAL FREQUENCY(Ei) Oi-Ei (Oi-Ei)2 (Oi-Ei)2/Ei SATISFY 62 BETTER 28 SOME EXTENT 10 TOTAL 100

Conclusion:
It is significant hence we reject the null hypothesis. More number of the respondents that the clean, lighting & ventilation provided by company is satisfies.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE 4. TO TEST THE RESPONDENT¶S RESPONSE ON OPINION ABOUT SHIFT ALLOWENCES PROVIDED BY COMPANY? Dimensions Respondents Null Hypothesis: Ho: More number of the respondents that the shift allowance provided by company is not good. Observed frequency: OBSERVED FREQUENCY (Oi) 47 33 20 33.3 33.3 33.3 13.7 -0.3 -13.3 187.69 0.09 176.89 5.63 0.002 5.31 Total 10.94 EXPERIMENTAL FREQUENCY(Ei) Oi-Ei (Oi-Ei)2 (Oi-Ei)2/Ei GOOD 47 BETTER 33 NOT SATISFY 20 TOTAL 100

Expected frequency: Ei =100/3 = 33.33 Calculated value: X2 = (Oi-Ei) 2/Ei = 10.94 Tabulated value = Degree of freedom = (n-1) = (3-1) =2 5% significance level for 2 degree of freedom at = 3.96 Calculated value 10.94 > > table value 3.96

Conclusion:
It is significant hence we reject the null hypothesis. More number of the respondents that the shift allowance provided by company is good.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE 5. TO TEST THE RESPONDENT¶S RESPONSE ON FEEL ABOUT ADMINISTRATIVE ARRANGEMENT WITH IN PLANT FOR WELFARE PROVIDED BY COMPANY? Dimensions Respondents Null Hypothesis: Ho: More number of the respondents that the administrative arrangements with in a plant for welfare provided by company is not comfort &satisfy. Observed frequency: OBSERVED FREQUENCY (Oi) 69 15 16 33.3 33.3 33.3 35.7 -18.3 -17.3 1274 334.89 229.29 38.27 10.05 06.88 Total 55.30 EXPERIMENTAL FREQUENCY(Ei) Oi-Ei (Oi-Ei)2 (Oi-Ei)2/Ei SATISFY 69 PARTLYSATISFY 15 NOT SATISFY 16 TOTAL 100

Expected frequency: Ei =100/3 = 33.33 Calculated value: X2 = (Oi-Ei) 2/Ei = 55.30 Tabulated value = Degree of freedom = (n-1) = (3-1) =2 5% significance level for 2 degree of freedom at = 3.96 Calculated value 55.30 > > table value 3.96

Conclusion:
It is significant hence we reject the null hypothesis. More number of the respondents that the administrative arrangements with in a plant for welfare provided by company is not comfort &satisfy.
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EMPLOYEE WELFARE 6. TO TEST THE RESPONDENT¶S RESPONSE ON OPINION ABOUT HEALTH SERVICE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY PROVIDED BY COMPANY? Dimensions Respondents Null Hypothesis: Ho: More number of the respondents that the health service &occupational safety provided by company is not satisfy. Observed frequency: OBSERVED FREQUENCY (Oi) 68 18 16 33.3 33.3 33.3 34.7 -15.3 -17.3 1204.94 234.89 229.29 36.15 07.02 06.88 Total 50.05 EXPERIMENTAL FREQUENCY(Ei) Oi-Ei (Oi-Ei)2 (Oi-Ei)2/Ei SATISFY 68 PARTLYSATISFY 18 SOME EXTENT 16 TOTAL 100

Expected frequency: Ei =100/3 = 33.33 Calculated value: X2 = (Oi-Ei) 2/Ei = 50.05 Tabulated value = Degree of freedom = (n-1) = (3-1) =2 5% significance level for 2 degree of freedom at = 3.96 Calculated value 50.05 > > table value 3.96

Conclusion:
It is significant hence we reject the null hypothesis. More number of the respondents that the health service &occupational safety provided by company is satisfy.
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EMPLOYEE WELFARE 7. TO TEST THE RESPONDENT¶S RESPONSE ABOUT TOILET FACILITIES IN COMPANY? Dimensions Respondents Null Hypothesis: Ho: More number of the respondents on toilet facilities in factory is not satisfied. Observed frequency OBSERVED FREQUENCY (Oi) 61 25 14 33.3 33.3 33.3 27.7 -13.3 -19.3 767.29 176.89 372.49 23.04 05.31 11.18 Total 39.53 EXPERIMENTAL FREQUENCY(Ei) Oi-Ei (Oi-Ei)2 (Oi-Ei)2/Ei SATISFY 61 BETTER 25 SOME EXTENT 14 TOTAL 100

Expected frequency: Ei =100/3 = 33.33 Calculated value: X2 = (Oi-Ei) 2/Ei = 39.53 Tabulated value = Degree of freedom = (n-1) = (3-1) =2 5% significance level for 2 degree of freedom at = 3.96 Calculated value 39.53 > > table value 3.96

Conclusion:
It is significant hence we reject the null hypothesis. More number of the respondents on toilet facilities in factory is satisfied.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE 8. TO TEST THE RESPONDENT¶S RESPONSE ABOUT ARRANGEMENTS FOR THE PREVENTION OF FATIGUE? Dimensions Respondents Null Hypothesis: Ho: More number of the respondents on arrangements for the prevention of fatigue is not satisfied. OBSERVED FREQUENCY (Oi) 68 22 10 33.33 33.33 33.33 -34.67 11.33 23.33 1202.00 128.36 544.28 TOTAL 36.06 3.85 16.33 56.24 EXPERIMENTAL FREQUENCY(Ei) Oi-Ei (Oi-Ei)2 (Oi-Ei)2/Ei SATISFY 68 BETTER 22 SOME EXTENT 10 TOTAL 100

Expected frequency: Ei =100/3 = 33.33 Calculated value: X2 = (Oi-Ei) 2/Ei = 56.24 Tabulated value = Degree of freedom = (n-1) = (3-1) =2 5% significance level for 2 degree of freedom at = 3.96 Calculated value 56.24 > > table value 3.96

Conclusion:
It is significant hence we reject the null hypothesis. More number of the respondents on arrangements for the prevention of fatigue in the factory is satisfied.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE 9. TO TEST THE RESPONDENT¶S RESPONSE ABOUT WORKING CONDITIONS IN THE FACTORY? Dimensions SATISFY PARTLY SATISFY Respondents Null Hypothesis: Ho: More number of the respondents on working conditions in the factory is not satisfied. OBSERVED FREQUENCY (Oi) 59 28 16 33.33 33.33 33.33 25.67 -5.33 -17.33 658.94 28.40 300.32 TOTAL 19.77 0.85 9.01 29.63 EXPERIMENTAL FREQUENCY(Ei) Oi-Ei (Oi-Ei)2 (Oi-Ei)2/Ei 59 28 16 100 NOT SATISFY TOTAL

Expected frequency: Ei =100/3 = 33.33 Calculated value: X2 = (Oi-Ei) 2/Ei = 29.63 Tabulated value = Degree of freedom = (n-1) = (3-1) =2 5% significance level for 2 degree of freedom at = 3.96 Calculated value 29.63 > 3.96 > table value

Conclusion:
It is significant hence we reject the null hypothesis. More number of the respondents on working conditions in the factory is satisfied.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE 10. TO TEST THE RESPONDENT¶S RESPONSE ABOUT SOCIAL INSURANCE MEASURES PROVIDED BY THE COMPANY? Dimensions YES TO SOME EXTENT Respondents Null Hypothesis: Ho: More number of the respondents on working conditions in the factory is not satisfied. OBSERVED FREQUENCY (Oi) 67 19 14 33.33 33.33 33.33 33.67 -14.33 -19.33 1133.66 205.34 373.64 TOTAL 34.01 6.16 11.21 50.38 EXPERIMENTAL FREQUENCY(Ei) Oi-Ei (Oi-Ei)2 (Oi-Ei)2/Ei 67 19 14 100 NO TOTAL

Expected frequency: Ei =100/3 = 33.33 Calculated value: X2 = (Oi-Ei) 2/Ei = 50.38 Tabulated value = Degree of freedom = (n-1) = (3-1) =2 5% significance level for 2 degree of freedom at = 3.96 Calculated value 50.38 > 3.96 > table value

Conclusion:
It is significant hence we reject the null hypothesis. More number of the respondents on social insurance measures provided by the company is satisfied.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

PRIMARY OBJECTIVE:
1. To know about the Employee welfare measures being implemented in GALLA FOODS LIMITED.

SECONDARY OBJECTIVE:
1. 2. 3. To know about the awareness of statutory welfare measures in company. To know about the workers expectations on welfare measures. To know about the satisfaction level of workers on welfare measures.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

SCOPE OF THE STUDY

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

SCOPE OF THE STUDY
The study covers 100 respondents of workers. The study of Employee welfare covers weather the company providing welfare schemes to the workers, the hygienic is maintained by the company and weather the company maintaining the safety precautions or not. The focus of the study is confined to one organization GALLA FOODS LIMITED. It help to understand the workers atmosphere at the work place and helps the company to check if the existing schemes are providing good facilities to workers or not. Employee welfare is by its very nature must necessarily be elastic, bearing a somewhat interpretation in their company according to the different social customers, the degree of industrialization and the education development of the workers. The management has to be elastic prerequisites of the life, and the minimum basic amenities. It may include not only minimum basic standard of hygienic and safety but also laid down in general labour legislation

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY

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LIMITATION OF THE STUDY 
My study confines to welfare, Health and safety aspects of Galla Foods.  Efforts are made to collect the true information as far as possible without resorting to any guess work.  In case of sensitive information in nature, direct personal interviews are conducted in order to glue as much information as possible.  Few of the employees were a little bit hesitant to answer the questions this might have deviated the findings at least to some extent.  Due to time constraints study was limited to a part of the employees, which in turn may reflect the overall attitude of the employees.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

BIBLIOGRAPHY

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BIBLIOGRAPHY
WEB SITES: www.gallafoods.com www.amararaja.co.in www.Scribd.com www.citehr.com www.google.com www.allprojectreports.com www.mbaguys.net www.docstoc.com

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

GLOSARY

GFL ESI GPF WC LTA FPF ILO WHO

- Galla Foods Limited - Employees State Insurances - Group Provident Fund - Workmen Compensation - Leave Travel Allowance - Family Pension Fund - International Labour Organization - Worker Health Organization

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

FINDINGS

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

FINDINGS
The following are the major findings from the Survey and Analysis on Employee welfare, health and safety measures at GALLA FOODS.  65% of respondents have expressed their satisfaction regarding the welfare facilities provided by the company such as canteen & rest shelter.  85% of respondents agreed that the pure drinking water is facilitated in the company.  62% of respondents satisfy with clean, lighting & ventilation provided by company.  47% of respondents have expressed that the shift allowances provided by company.  69% of respondents are comfort & satisfy about the administrative arrangement with in a plant for welfare provided by the company.  68% of respondents satisfy with the health service and occupational safety provided by the company for every year.  61% of respondents have expressed their satisfaction towards Toilet facilities provided.  68% of respondents satisfied about arrangement for the prevention of fatigue.  59% of respondents satisfying the working conditions in the company.  85% of respondents are fairer to buy the products available in company operative stores.  67% of respondents are satisfied of the social insurance measurers.  They are about only 56% of respondents can manage the work pressure, tension, and stress.  86% of respondents consider medical facilities of the company are outstanding.  100% of respondents are satisfied on first-aid boxes provided by the factory.  96% of workers are satisfied with uniform and shoes provided by the company.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

SUGGESTIONS

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

SUGGESTIONS 
Welfare facilities like canteen & rest shelter has to be provided to the employees as a whole.  Only half of the respondents said that a shift allowance provided by the company is good, so that satisfy more respondents certain change should be taken in shift allowances.  Only 60% of the respondents are satisfied with cleaning &ventilation, so for more respondents satisfaction with cleaning &ventilation should be more effective.  The working condition in the company is implemented in such a way that it should satisfied more number of respondents.  Welfare measures regarding recreational facilities should be properly implemented by company.  The social insurance measures provided to the respondents should be taken necessary steps.  The satisfaction facilities must be properly implemented in the company for more respondents¶ comfort ability.  The company should maintain good relationship with the workers and superiors.  The work pressure, tension& stress should not be implemented more towards the respondents for more increase of productivity in the company.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

CONCLUSIONS

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

CONCLUSIONS
It is matter of great satisfaction that majority of the respondents observe that welfare measures are good. There is always scope for improving health and safety measures for the workers. It argues well for the company that majority of the respondents have expressed their satisfaction with regard to training in their area of job operations. The pleasant surprise is that the company provides training for the workers according to their most preferred choice. This motivates the workers in a long way in achieving both organizational and individual goals. Workers are able to manage work and family life without any major problem shows again that stress levels are manageable at Galla.

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

QUESTIONNARIES

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE

A STUDY ON ³EMPLOYEE WELFARE´ IN GALLA FOODS QUESTIONNARIES
DEPARTM ENT QUALIFICATION MARITAL STATUS : : :

1. What is your opinion about canteen facilities? a) Excellent ( ) b) satisfy ( ) c) not satisfy ( )

2. What is your opinion about drinking water facilities in factory? a) Satisfy ( ) b) better ( ) c) not satisfy ( )

3. How far you satisfied with lighting and ventilation provided by company? a) Satisfy ( ) b) better ( ) c) some extent ( )

4. What is your opinion about shift allowances provided by company? a) Good ( ) b) better ( ) c) not satisfy ( )

5. How did you feel about the administrative arrangements within a plant for welfare provided by company? a) Comfort satisfy ( ) b) partly satisfy ( ) c) not satisfy ( )

6. What is your opinion about health services and occupational safety provided by Company? a) Satisfy ( ) b) partly satisfy ( ) c) some extent ( )

7. What is your opinion about toilet facilities in the factory?

a) Satisfy (

)

b) better (

)

c) some extent (

)

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE
8. Are you satisfied about arrangements for the prevention of fatigue?

a) Satisfy (

)

b) better ( )

c) some extent (

)

9. Are you satisfying working conditions in the company?

a) Satisfy (

)

b) partly satisfy (

)

c) not satisfy (

)

10. Response on provision for social insurance measures provided by the company?

a) Satisfy (

)

b) partly satisfy (

)

c) not satisfy

11. Are you able managing your work pressure, tension, Stress?

a) Yes

( )

b) No ( )

c) To some extent ( )

12. Are you satisfied with health check up camp conduct by the management every year?

a) Strongly agree ( )

b) Agree ( )

c) Ave. agree ( )

13. Do you satisfy with the first aid boxes provided by the management in case of any accident or emergency period? Very Satisfied ( ) Uncertain ( ) Satisfied ( ) Dissatisfied ( )

14.. Are you satisfied with uniforms and shoes issued by the company? Very Satisfied ( ) Uncertain ( ) Satisfied ( ) Dissatisfied ( )

15. Are you satisfied by the direction, guidance and support provided by superiors? Highly Satisfied ( ) Dissatisfied ( ) Satisfied ( ) neither Satisfied nor Dissatisfied ( )

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EMPLOYEE WELFARE 16. How often you interact with your colleagues in your work-place (only job related interactions)? Very often ( ) Rarely ( ) Often ( ) Very rarely ( )

17. How often do you seek cooperation from your boss? Very often ( ) Rarely ( ) Often ( ) Very rarely ( )

18. Are you satisfied with recreation facilities (trips and games) provided by the company? a) Satisfied ( ) b) Uncertain ( ) c) Dissatisfied ( )

19. Do you feel free to offer comments and suggestions? Yes ( ) No ( )

20. How motivating is the work environment? Extremely motivating ( ) Demotivating ( ) fairly motivating ( ) neither motivating nor Demotivating ( )

21. What are the critical challenges and the areas of the improvement in the organization, also suggest ways to achieve them. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------THANKS FOR YOUR PARTICIPATION

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