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NEW SYLLLABUS

UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY, JAMAICA


SYLLABUS OUTLINE
COLLEGE/FACULTY: Science and Sport

SCHOOL/DEPT: Natural and Applied Sciences

COURSE OF STUDY: BSc. COMPUTING


YEAR: 2
MODULE TITLE: Physics for Computer Studies

MODULE CODE: PHS1019

DURATION: 90 hrs

CREDIT VALUE: Four (4)

PREREQUISITES: College Math 1B

_______________________________________________________________________________

1.0 MODULE DESCRIPTION


This module focuses on the study of the basic concepts of physics through theoretical and
practical work. Special emphasis will be placed on selected topics such as optics, electricity and
telecommunications. This syllabus is designed to facilitate discussions and projects on how
the basic concepts of physics are applied to selected areas of computer science and technology.

2.0 MODULE OBJECTIVES/ LEARNING OUTCOMES


This module will:

i) provide students with some of the fundamental concepts and principles of physics.
ii) enable students to apply certain fundamental concepts and principles of physics to
computer science and technology.
3.0 MODULE CONTENT
1
1. Measurement
2. Basic Mechanics
3. Waves
4. Optics
5. Current of Electricity
6. Electromagnetism
7. Electronics
8. Telecommunications

UNIT 1: PHYSICAL QUANTITIES, RECORDING MANIPULATING AND


PROCESSING (6 hrs)

CONTENT

1.1 Units and SI System.


1.2 Accuracy, precision, sensitivity and range.
1.3 Error Analysis.
1.4 Measuring Instruments.
1.5 Interconversion of Units.
1.6 Graphs.
1.7 Mathematical Requirements.

Specific Objectives:

At the end of this unit, students should be able to:


1. Describe the Systeme Internationale (SI) system of units.
2. List the fundamental quantities, their units and symbols.
3. List the characteristics of fundamental quantities.
3. Use base units to check the homogeneity of equations.
4. Use the prefix and their symbols to indicate multiples or sub-multiples of both fundamental
and derived quantities.
5. Apply the terms accuracy, precision, sensitivity and range to physical quantities
6. Distinguish between random error systematic error and mistake.
7. Describe ways of minimizing errors in physical measurements.
8. Evaluate the uncertainty in derived quantities by addition of actual, fractional or percentage
uncertainty.
9. Use suitable conversion factors to carry out inter-conversions among metric units.
10.Determine the number of significant figures in a measured quantity.
11. Express the result of a calculation with the correct number of significant figures.
12. Choose and use accurately laboratory equipment relevant for obtaining measurement in the
lab.
13.Determine the errors in physical quantities obtained from laboratory devices.
14. Translate information between graphical, numerical, algebraic and verbal forms.
15. Select appropriate variables and scales for graph plotting.For linear graphs, determine the
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slope, intercept.
16. Choose, by inspection, a straight line which will serve as the best straight line through a set of

data points presented graphically.


17. Recall standard linear form y = mx + c and rearrange relationships into linear form where
appropriate.
18. Recognise and use expressions in decimal and standard form.
19. Use calculators for addition, subtraction, multiplication, division square root, square, sines
cosines and tangents.
20. Change the subject of an equation.
21. Solve simple algebraic equations.
22 Solve physical equations by substituting physical quantities using consistent units.

UNIT 2: BASIC MECHANICS (5 hrs)

CONTENT

2.1 Scalar and Vector quantities


2.2 Motion with a uniform acceleration
2.3 Newton’s Laws of Motion
2.4 Linear Momentum and Impulse
2.5 Work, Power and Energy

Specific Objectives
At the end of this unit, students should be able to:
1. Distinguish between vectors and scalars.
2. Resolve and add vectors.
3. Define displacement, speed, velocity and acceleration.
4. Use graphs and diagrams to describe linear motion.
5. Recall and use the equations of linear motion to solve problems of uniformly accelerated
motion.
6. Describe the nature of free fall and acceleration due to gravity.
7. State and use Newton’s Laws of motion to solve problems.
8. State the principle of conservation of linear momentum and use it to solve problems.
9. Distinguish between elastic and inelastic collision.
10. Define work, power and energy and use to solve problems.
11. Recall and use work power and energy concepts to solve problems.

3
UNIT 3: OSCILLATIONS AND WAVES (4 hrs)

CONTENT
3.1 Waves
3.2 Progressive Waves
3.3 Transverse and Longitudinal Waves
3.4 Electromagnetic Waves and their applications to industries

Specific Objectives
At the end of this unit, students should be able to:
1. Define a wave.
2. Define and use the terms amplitude, frequency, period, speed, wavelength, angular
frequency and phase difference in relation to a wave.
3. Categorize waves as longitudinal, transverse, mechanical or electromagnetic, progressive,
stationary or standing.
Identify all terms in the progressive wave equation.
4. Utilize the progressive wave equation y = Asin(kx -ωt) to solve problems.
5. Use the wave equation to calculate frequency, wavelength, period phase difference of the
wave, and speed of a wave particle.
6. Recall and use wave speed = frequency x wavelength to solve problems.
7. Define wave phenomena - refraction, reflection, diffraction, interference and
superposition.
8. Discuss the notion that electromagnetic waves are transverse and travel with the same
speed in a vacuum.
9. Identify the different sections of the electromagnetic spectrum including the various
operating frequency range.
10. Utilize the knowledge of the electromagnetic spectrum in relation to areas of computer
studies.
11. Describe how waves are used in industry, telecommunication, medicine and navigation.

4
UNIT 4 PHYSICAL OPTICS (6 hrs)

CONTENT

4.1 Reflection of Light


4.2 Refraction of Light: Snell’s Law
4.3 Total Internal Reflection and critical angle
4.4 Interference
4.5 Two source interference pattern
4.6 Applications of total internal reflection
4.7 Diffraction

Specific Objectives
At the end of this unit, students should be able to:
1. Explain that light travels in a straight line if there is no change in the medium.
2. Outline the principles of refraction and refection of light.
3. Discuss how the laws of refraction and reflection relate to sections of computer studies.
4. Predict the direction of the emergent ray as light travels through different mediums.
5. Use the equations of refraction and reflection to solve optical problems.
6. Define refractive index as sin i/sin r, c1/c2.
7. Use the concept of two medium refraction to solve problems.
8. Describe what is meant by total internal reflection and critical angle.
9. Use the equation n = 1/ sin C to solve problems.
10. Identify and discuss practical applications of total internal reflections in optical fibres
11. Explain and use the principle of superposition.
12. Define the meaning of the terms interference and diffraction.
13. Explain the conditions required if two- source interference fringes are to be observed.
14. Recall and use the equation dsin Ѳ =mλ for double slit interference using light to solve
problems of interference.
15. Explain the formation of stationary wave using a graphical method identifying the nodes
and antinodes.

UNIT 5: CURRENT OF ELECTRICITY (5 hrs)

CONTENT

5.1 Electric Current


5.2 Charge Carriers and Transport
5.3 Potential Difference
5.4 Resistance and resistivity
5.5 Ohm’s Law

Specific Objectives
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At the end of this unit, students should be able to:

1. Explain that there are two kind of charge: positive and negative charges.
2. Recall that like charges repel where as unlike charges attract.
3. Describe electric current in terms of flow of charge particles.
4. Define the coulomb and charge.
5. Recall that current is the rate of flow of charge.
6. Recall and use the equation Q = It.
7. Define potential difference and the volt.
8. Define resistance and the ohm.
9. Add resistances in series and parallel.
10. Draw and interpret circuit diagram which contains various electrical components.
11. Recall and use R = ρl/A
12. State and use Ohm,s to solve problems.
13. Apply characteristics of series and parallel circuit to solve given problems.
14. Recall and use the equation V = W/Q
15. Define power and energy.
16. Recall and use the power equations: P = IV, P = I 2 R
17. Distinguish between materials that are conductors, insulators or semi-conductors.
18. Sketch and explain the I-V characteristics of a metallic conductor and a
filament lamp.
19. Differentiate between a.c and d.c currents.

UNIT 6: ELECTOMAGNETIC INDUCTION (6 hrs)

CONTENT
6.1 Magnetic properties and Fields
6.2 Magnetic Induction
6.3 Magnetic Effect of an electric current

Specific Objectives
At the end of this unit, students should be able to:
1. Describe the concept of magnetic poles and magnetic field lines.
2. Recognize that a magnetic field is produced by either current carrying conductor or
permanent magnet.
3. Represent magnetic field by field lines.
4. Show that a current- carrying conductor placed in a magnetic field experiences a force
5. Recall and use the equation F = BIL sinθ, with the direction of the force interpreted by
Flemings Left Hand Rule.
6. Define magnetic flux and the Weber.
7. Recognize that forces exist between magnets can be repulsive or attractive.
8. Define magnetic flux density and the Tesla.

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9. Discuss the concept of electromagnetic magnetic induction.
10. Apply the concept of magnetic induction to explain operation of a transformer.
11. Apply transformer equation to solve given problems.
12. Recall and use the right hand grip rule.
13. Describe and explain simple applications of electromagnets.

UNIT 7: ELECTRONICS (4 hrs)

CONTENT

7.1 Semi-conductors
7.2 Capacitors
7.3 Semi-conducting diodes and Rectification
7.4 Impact of electronics in society and industry

Specific Objectives
At the end of this unit, students should be able to:
1. Describe the electrical properties of semiconductors.
2. Describe the most common type of semiconductor used in manufacturing electrical
components.
3. Distinguish between p-type and n-type semi – conductors.
4. Identify ways in which semiconductors are formed.
5. Compare population density of holes and electrons for semi conductors and conductors.
6. Define capacitance and the Farad.
7. Recall and use the equation Q = CV.
8. Recall and use formulae for capacitors in series and parallel.
9. Illustrate the function of a capacitor in simple circuits.
10. Explain how semiconductor diodes are used to rectify ac to dc .
11. Describe the features of diodes.
12. Describe the I-V characteristics of p-n junction diode.
13. Explain how simple characteristics of p-n type junction diode lead to applications in
industry.
14. Describe the function of simple electronic devices and systems which are found on
homes industry and in communication.
15. State how electronic devices and systems influences modern communication.

UNIT 8: TELECOMMUNICATIONS (6HRS)

CONTENT
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8.1 Representing information
8.2 Transmission of information
8.3 Amplitude modulation
8.4 Pulse code modulation
8.5 Radio waves
8.6 Communication satellites
8.7 Optical fibre systems

Specific Objectives

At the end of this unit, students should be able to:


1. Define the terms bandwidth and telecommunications.
2. Calculate bandwidth.
3. Describe the ways in which information can be represented such as digital and analogue.
4. Recall that information may be transmitted by a number of different channels including

wire pairs, coaxial cable, radio and microwave link and optical fibres.
5. Discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of channels of communication in terms

of available bandwidth, noise, cross linking, security, signal attenuation, repeater and
regeneration and cost and convenience.
6. Differentiate between amplitude, frequency and pulse code modulations.
7. Construct Pulse Code Modulation code words given the coding scheme.
8. Deconstruct Pulse Code Modulation code words given the coding scheme.
9. Discuss the role of the earth’s surface and ionosphere in the propagation of radio waves over
long distances.
10. Discuss the coverage of communication satellite networks worldwide.
11. Discuss the basic operation of the Global Positioning System.
12. Explain the role of optical fibre systems to the development of 20 first century
communication system.

4.0 LEARNING AND TEACHING APPROACHES

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i. White board or Slides and PowerPoint lecture presentations.
ii. Handouts (optional).
iii. Tutorials: Tutorial sheets for each unit will be provided prior to their discussion.
Students are required to complete all tutorial questions ahead of tutorial discussions.
iv. Class Discussions
v. Co-operative Learning Strategies- Every student is advised to attend every lecture
and tutorial and participate in class.

5.0 ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES


Test 1 Units 1 - 4 Week 6 12.5 %
Test 2 Units 5 - 8 Week 12 12.5 %
Attendance at Lectures 5%
Laboratory Units 1-9 10 %
Tutorials Units 1-9 10 %
Final examination 50 %

Course Tests

Absence from IN COURSE-TESTS will automatically attract a Zero percent (0 %)


mark unless a valid UTECH medical certificate is produced. There are
ABSOLUTELY NO MAKE-UP TESTS.

Absence from laboratory work will automatically attract a Zero percent (0 %) mark
unless a valid UTECH medical certificate is produced.

6.0 BREAKDOWN OF HOURS


Classroom Lectures = 2 hrs/week
Laboratory session = 3hrs/week
Tutorial Sessions = 1 hr/week

7.0 TEXTBOOKS AND REFERENCES


Required:

9
1. Advanced level Physics, 4th Edition, Tom Duncan
2. Physics ,Fullick, Patrick; Heineman Advanced Science
Additional Reading:
1. College Physics, 2nd Edition, Giambattista, Alan; Richardson, McCarthy
Betty; Richardson, Robert C. McGraw Hill Higher Education

2. Advanced level Physics, 7th Edition, Nelkon, Michael Heineman

8.0 NAME OF SYLLABUS WRITER/ DEVELOPER: StacyAnn Nelson


Clayon Harrison

9.0 DATE PRESENTED: July 6, 2010

Revised October 8, 2010

November 1, 2012

10.0 DATE OF ACCEPTANCE:

OLD SYLLLABUS
10
UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY, JAMAICA
SYLLABUS OUTLINE

FACULTY : Science and Sport


Division of Physics
COURSE OF STUDY : BSc. COMPUTING
YEAR : Two (2)
MODULE TITLE : Physics for Computer Science
MODULE CODE : PHS1019
DURATION : 90 hrs.
CREDIT VALUE : Four (4)
PRE-REQUISITES : College Math 1B

1.0 MODULE DESCRIPTION


This module focuses on the study of the basic concepts of physics through theoretical and
practical work. Special emphasis will be placed on selected topics such as optics, electricity and
magnetism. This syllabus is designed to facilitate discussions and projects on how the basic
concepts of physics are applied to selected areas of computer science and technology.

2.0 MODULE OBJECTIVES/ LEARNING OUTCOMES


This module will:
(i) provide students with some of the fundamental concepts and principles of physics
(ii) enable students to apply certain fundamental concepts and principles of physics to
computer science and technology

3.0 MODULE CONTENT


11
1. Measurement
2. Basic Mechanics
3. Oscillation and Waves
4. Optics
5. Current of Electricity
6. Electromagnetism
7. Electronics
8. Telecommunications

UNIT 1: MEASUREMENTS (3 hrs)

CONTENT

1.1 Units and SI System


1.2 Accuracy, precision, sensitivity and range
1.3 Error Analysis
1.4 Measuring Instruments
1.5 Interconversion of Units

Specific Objectives:

At the end of this unit, students should be able to:


1. Describe the Systeme Internationale (SI) system of units.
2. List the fundamental quantities, their units and symbols.
3. Use base units to check the homogeneity of equations.
4. Use the prefix and their symbols to indicate multiples or sub-multiples of both fundamental
and derived quantities.
5. Apply the terms accuracy, precision, sensitivity and range to physical quantities
6. Distinguish between random error and systematic error.
7. Evaluate the uncertainty in a derived quantity by addition of actual, fractional or percentage
uncertainty.
8. Use suitable conversion factors to carry out inter-conversions among metric units.
9. Determine the number of significant figures in a measured quantity.
10. Express the result of a calculation with the correct number of significant figures.
11. Choose accurately the laboratory equipment relevant for obtaining measurement in the lab.

UNIT 2: BASIC MECHANICS (4 hrs)

12
CONTENT

2.1 Scalar and Vector quantities


2.2 Motion with a uniform acceleration
2.3 Motion in two dimensions
2.4 Newton’s Laws of Motion
2.5 Linear Momentum and Impulse
2.6 Work, Power and Energy

Specific Objectives
At the end of this unit, students should be able to:
1. Add vectors and scalars to given physical quantities.
2. Use graphs and diagram to describe linear motion.
3. Recall and use the equations of linear motion to solve given problems.
4. Describe the nature of free fall and acceleration due to gravity.
5. Describe projectile motion and perform calculation for projectile motion.
6. State and use Newton’s Laws of motion to solve problems.
7. Use concepts of linear momentum and impulse-momentum to solve problems
8. Distinguish between elastic and inelastic collision
9. Use the definition of work, power and energy to solve given problems.

UNIT 3: OSCILLATIONS AND WAVES (5 hrs)

CONTENT
3.1 Waves and Energy Transport
3.2 Simple Harmonic Motion
3.3 Progressive Waves
3.4 Transverse and Longitudinal Waves
3.5 Reflection and Refraction
3.6 Interference and Diffraction
3.7 Family of Electromagnetic Waves and their applications to industries

Specific Objectives
At the end of this unit, students should be able to:
1. Define free oscillations.
2. Use the concept of waves in explaining simple harmonic motion and oscillating systems.
3. Categorize waves as longitudinal, transverse, mechanical or electromagnetic, progressive,
stationary or standing.
4. Describe waves in terms of amplitude, frequency, period, speed, wavelength, angular
frequency and phase difference.
5. Deduce from definition the equation wave speed = frequency x wavelength.
6. Recall and use wave speed = frequency x wavelength to solve problems.
7. Define wave phenomena - refraction, reflection, diffraction, interference and
superposition.
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8. Determine the energy transfer by to a progressive wave.
9. Derive the equation x = A cos(ωt)
10. Use x = A cos(ωt) to derive equation for velocity and acceleration of a particle
undergoing SHM
11. Utilize the progressive wave equation y = Asin(ωt –φ) to solve problems.
12. Discuss the notion that electromagnetic waves are transverse and travel with the same
speed in a vacuum.
13. Identify the different sections of the electromagnetic spectrum including the various
operating frequency range.
14. Utilize the knowledge of the electromagnetic spectrum in relation to areas of computer
studies.
15. Apply the concept of waves to the field of computer studies.

UNIT 4: OPTICS (6 hrs)

CONTENT

4.1 Sources of Light


4.2 Reflection of Light
4.3 Refraction of Light: Snell’s Law
4.4 Total Internal Reflection and critical angle
4.5 Interference
4.6 Two source interference pattern
4.7 Applications of total internal reflection
4.8 Diffraction

Specific Objectives
At the end of this unit, students should be able to:
1. Explain that light travels in a straight line if there is no change in the medium.
2. Outline the principles of refraction and refection of light.
3. Discuss how the laws of refraction and reflection relate to sections of computer studies.
4. Predict the direction of the emergent ray as light travels through different mediums
5. Use the equations of refraction and reflection to solve optical problems.
6. Define refractive index as sin i/sin r, c1/c2
7. Use the concept of two medium refraction to solve problems.
8. Describe what is meant by total internal reflection and critical angle.
9. Use the equation n = 1/ sin C to solve problems.
10. Identify and discuss practical applications of total internal reflections in optical fibres
11. Explain and use the principle of superposition.
12. Define the meaning of the terms interference and diffraction.
13. Explain the conditions required if two- source interference fringes are to be observed.
14. Recall and use the equation dsin Ѳ =mλ for double slit interference using light to solve
problems of interference.
15. Explain the formation of stationary wave using a graphical method identifying the nodes

14
and antinodes.

UNIT 5: CURRENT OF ELECTRICITY (5 hrs)

CONTENT

5.1 Electric Current


5.2 Charge Carriers and Transport
5.3 Potential Difference
5.4 Resistance and resistivity
5.5 Ohm’s Law

Specific Objectives

At the end of this unit, students should be able to:

1. Explain that there are two kind of charge: positive and negative charges.
2. Recall that like charges repel where as unlike charges attract.
3. Describe electric current in terms of flow of charge particles.
4. Define the coulomb and charge.
5. Recall that current is the rate of flow of charge.
6. Recall and use the equation Q = It.
7. Define potential difference and the volt.
8. Recall and use the equation V = W/Q
9. Define power and energy
10. Recall and use the power equations: P = IV, P = I 2 R
11. Distinguish between materials that are conductors, insulators or semi-conductors.
12. Sketch and explain the I-V characteristics of metallic conductors at constant
temperature, a semi-conductor diode and a filament lamp.
13. Solve problems using Ohm’s Law .
16. Differentiate between a.c and d.c currents.
16. Recall and use R = ρl/A
17. Arrange and solve problems for components in series, parallel or series-parallel
arrangements.
18. Apply characteristics of series and parallel circuit to solve given problems.
19. Draw and interpret circuit diagram which contains various electrical components.

UNIT 6: ELECTOMAGNETISM (6 hrs)

CONTENT
6.1 Magnetic properties and Fields
15
6.2 Magnetic Theory
6.3 Magnetic Induction
6.4 Magnetic Effect of an electric current

Specific Objectives
At the end of this unit, students should be able to:
1. Describe the concept of magnetic poles and magnetic field lines.
2. Recognize that a magnetic field is produced by either current carrying conductor or
permanent magnet.
3. Represent magnetic field by field lines.
4. Show that a current- carrying conductor placed in a magnetic field experiences a force
5. Recall and use the equation F = BIL sinθ, with the direction of the force interpreted by
Flemings Left Hand Rule.
6. Define magnetic flux and the Weber.
7. Recognize that forces exist between magnets can be repulsive or attractive.
8. Define magnetic flux density and the Tesla.
9. Discuss the concept of magnetic induction
10. Apply the concept of magnetic induction to explain operation of a transformer.
11. Apply transformer equation to solve given problems.
12. Recall and use the right hand grip rule
13. Describe and explain simple applications of electromagnets.

UNIT 7: ELECTRONICS (4 hrs)

CONTENT

13.1 Semi-conductors
13.2 Capacitors
13.3 Semi-conducting diodes and Rectification
13.4 Transistors
13.5 Impact of electronics in society and industry

Specific Objectives
At the end of this unit, students should be able to:
1. Explain that the resistances of semiconductors are intermediate between conductors and
insulators.
2. Describe the most common type of semiconductor used in manufacturing electrical
components.
3. Distinguish between p-type and n-type semi – conductors.
4. Identify ways in which semiconductors are formed.
5. Compare population density of holes and electrons for semi conductors and conductors.
6. Illustrate the function of a capacitor in simple circuits.
16
7. Define capacitance and the Farad.
8. Recall and use the equation Q= CV
9. Explain how semiconductor diodes are used to rectify ac to dc .
10. Describe the features of diodes.
11. Describe the I-V characteristics of p-n junction diode.
12. Explain how simple characteristics of p-n type junction diode lead to applications in
industry.
13. Describe the function of simple electronic devices and systems which are found on
homes industry and in communication.
14. State how electronic devices and systems influences modern communication.

UNIT 8: TELECOMMUNICATIONS (6HRS)

CONTENT

a. Representing information
b. Transmission of information
c. Amplitude modulation
d. Pulse code modulation
e. Radio waves
f. Communication satellites
g. Optical fibre systems

Specific Objectives

At the end of this unit, students should be able to:


1. Define the terms bandwidth and telecommunications.
2. Calculate bandwidth.
3. Describe the ways in which information can be represented such as digital and analogue.
4. Recall that information may be transmitted by a number of different channels including

wire pairs, coaxial cable, radio and microwave link and optical fibres.
5. Discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of channels of communication in terms
of available bandwidth, noise, cross linking, security, signal attenuation, repeater and
regeneration and cost and convenience.
6. Differentiate between amplitude, frequency and pulse code modulations.
7. Construct Pulse Code Modulation code words given the coding scheme.
8. Deconstruct Pulse Code Modulation code words given the coding scheme.
9. Discuss the role of the earth’s surface and ionosphere in the propagation of radio waves
over long distances.
10. Discuss the coverage of communication satellite networks worldwide.
11. Discuss the basic operation of the Global Positioning System.
12. Explain the role of optical fibre systems to the development of 20 first century
communication system.

17
4.0 LEARNING AND TEACHING APPROACHES

i. White board or Slides and PowerPoint lecture presentations.


ii. Handouts (optional).
iii. Tutorials: Tutorial sheets for each unit will be provided prior to their discussion.
Students are required to complete all tutorial questions ahead of tutorial discussions.
iv. Class Discussions
v. Co-operative Learning Strategies- Every student is advised to attend every lecture
and tutorial and participate in class.
5.0 ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES
Test 1 Units 1 - 4 Week 6 15%
Test 2 Units 5 - 8 Week 12 15 %

Laboratory Units 1-9 20%


Final examination 50 %
Course Tests
Absence from IN COURSE-TESTS will automatically attract a Zero percent (0 %)
mark unless a valid UTECH medical certificate is produced. There are
ABSOLUTELY NO MAKE-UP TESTS.

Absence from laboratory work will automatically attract a Zero percent (0 %) mark
unless a valid UTECH medical certificate is produced.
6.0 BREAKDOWN OF HOURS
Classroom Lectures = 2 hrs/week
Laboratory session = 3hrs/week
Tutorial Sessions = 1 hr/week
7.0 TEXTBOOKS AND REFERENCES
Required:
1. Advanced level Physics, 4th Edition, Tom Duncan
2. Physics ,Fullick, Patrick; Heineman Advanced Science
Additional Reading:
1. College Physics, 2nd Edition, Giambattista, Alan; Richardson, McCarthy Betty;
Richardson, Robert C. McGraw Hill Higher Education

2. Advanced level Physics, 7th Edition, Nelkon, Michael Heineman

8.0 NAME OF SYLLABUS WRITER/ DEVELOPER: StacyAnn Nelson


Clayon Harrison

9.0 DATE PRESENTED: July 6, 2010

18
Revised October 8, 2010

November 1, 2012

10.0 DATE OF ACCEPTANCE:

19