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BSP-02-Standard-1649

HSE STANDARD

MODULE 12
MACHINERY AND TOOLS

THIS DOCUMENT CONTAINS


ONE
MODULE IN A SET
COMPRISING
HSE STANDARDS
FOR THE
BRUNEI SHELL JOINT
VENTURE COMPANIES

Revision Approved: Damian Doherty,HSE


2.0 Document Owner: Roy Witteveen, SQI
BSP – Machinery and Tools Module 12

Document Control
DOCUMENT TYPE DOCUMENT OWNER SECURITY CLASSIFICATION
Standard SQI Unclassified
DOCUMENT REFERENCE AUTHOR APPROVED BY
TMS1849 HSE/41 HSE
KEY WORDS
Machinery, gaurds, tools, safety

Revision Record
REV REVISION DESCRIPTION DATE
1.0 1st Issue March 1996
2.0 2nd Issue – include amendments from HSE00 (being phased out) which includes June 2001
deleting reference to “welding & cutting” which are removed to Module 33;
convert from Pagemaker to MS-Word; update to TMS format; assign new doct
owner post Transition March 2001

Distribution Control
Distribution of this document is controlled by the Document Owner. This document is located on the
BSP Intranet>Homepage>Corporate>HSE>HSE Documentation.

Notice and Warning


Copyright  2001, Brunei Shell Petroleum Company Sendirian Berhad
This document is the property of Brunei Shell Petroleum Sendirian Berhad (BSP), KB3534, Negara
Brunei Darussalam. Circulation is restricted to BSP and its designated associates, contractors and
consultants. It must not be copied or used for any other purpose other than which it is supplied,
without the expressed written authority of BSP.
Except where provided for purposes of contractual requirements, BSP disclaims any responsibility or
liability for any use or misuse of the document by any person and makes no warranty as to the
accuracy or suitability of the information to any third party. Any misuse of the document is
repressible by BSP.
IMPORTANT NOTICE
This module is one of a series produced by Brunei Shell Petroleum Company Sdn Bhd. They represent
the minimum acceptable HSE standards for a wide range of operations that are carried out by, and
for, the Brunei Shell JV Companies. “Brunei Shell Joint Venture Companies refer to Brunei Shell
Petroleum Company Sdn Bhd (BSP), Brunei LNG Sdn Bhd (BLNG), Brunei Shell Marketing Company
Sdn Bhd (BSM) and Brunei Shell Tankers Sdn Bhd (BST) collectively.

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BSP – Machinery and Tools Module 12

CONTENTS
1 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................... 4

2 RESPONSIBILITIES .............................................................................................................................. 5
2.1 ASSET HOLDER .................................................................................................................................... 5
2.2 SUPERVISORS ...................................................................................................................................... 5
2.3 INDIVIDUAL PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY .............................................................................................. 5
3 REQUIREMENTS................................................................................................................................... 6
3.1 INSPECTION AND TESTING .................................................................................................................... 6
3.2 MACHINE TOOLS ................................................................................................................................. 7
3.3 POWER TOOLS ..................................................................................................................................... 8
3.4 ABRASIVE WHEELS.............................................................................................................................. 9
3.4.1 Storage and Handling of Abrasive Wheels .................................................................................... 9
3.4.2 Bench and Pedestal Grinding Machines ..................................................................................... 10
3.4.3 Fitting and Dressing of Abrasive Wheels .................................................................................... 10
3.4.4 Use of Pedestal and Bench Grinding Machines........................................................................... 10
3.4.5 Use of Portable Grinding Machines............................................................................................ 11
3.5 HAND TOOLS ..................................................................................................................................... 11
3.6 EXPLOSIVELY ACTUATED NAIL GUNS ................................................................................................ 12
3.7 MACHINERY ...................................................................................................................................... 13
3.8 HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS ........................................................................................................................ 14
4 REFERENCES ...................................................................................................................................... 15

APPENDIX 1 - INSPECTION AND TEST IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM FOR TOOLS AND PLANT.. 16

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BSP – Machinery and Tools Module 12

1 INTRODUCTION
This document provides a standard for use of tools and machinery in construction and
operations activities within Brunei Shell JV Companies.

Some equipment, tools, and machinery are NOT addressed by this module since they are dealt
with elsewhere. These include:

• Cranes and fork lift trucks (Module 14 - Materials Handling)

• Vehicles (Module 17 - Land Transport)

• High Pressure Water Jetting (Module 25).

• Blasting and Painting [Module 32]

• Pressure Testing is included in [Module 08 - Vessels, Pipelines and Equipment]

However, there are aspects of this module which are relevant to them, for example hydraulic
systems are used extensively in excavation machinery, and where this is the case, these other
modules will cross-refer to the appropriate section of this one.

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2 RESPONSIBILITIES
2.1 Asset Holder
The Asset Holder of a BRUNEI SHELL JV COMPANIES operating area shall ensure that all
persons reporting to him who are involved in operations, repair, maintenance and construction
activities are aware of and comply with the requirements of this document.

The Asset Holder shall also ensure the same level of awareness and compliance in supervisory
staff who report to him but are working in an area under the control of another Asset Holder.

Where a standard is set for the inspection and test of a piece of equipment at an unspecified
interval of time, the Asset Holder shall ensure that appropriate frequencies have been
established by his Supervisors for that work to be carried out.

2.2 Supervisors
Line and Worksite Supervisors are responsible for ensuring that:

• operators of machine and power tools select the correct equipment for the intended
application and know how to use the equipment safely.

• operators are aware of the rated capacities and the limitations of the equipment.

• operators carry out manufacturers recommended pre-start checks on equipment.

• the relevant inspections and tests specified in this document are carried out.

• personnel under their supervision are aware of and comply with the requirements set out in
this document.

2.3 Individual Personal Responsibility


All persons engaged in activities at BRUNEI SHELL JV COMPANIES locations whose work
includes the operation or use of machinery or tools as defined in this document shall:

• be aware of and comply with the requirements set out in this document.

• ensure that they protect themselves in accordance with the requirements set out in HSE
Standard Module 02 - Personal Protective Equipment.

• ensure that any necessary permits and certificates are obtained before starting work (see
HSE Standard Module 03 - Permit to Work Procedure for BSP worksites and BLNG
Procedures for BLNG worksites).

• ensure that only power tools with current inspection tags are used.

• ensure that hand tools are properly used and maintained.

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BSP – Machinery and Tools Module 12

3 REQUIREMENTS
3.1 Inspection and Testing
In general, all machinery and tools referred to in this module shall receive appropriate
inspection and testing at intervals not exceeding 6 months to ensure they are in satisfactory
condition and capable of safely performing the functions for which they were designed and built.
The exceptions to this requirement are:

• Fixed process and utilities machinery included in planned maintenance programmes.

• Fixed machine tools included in a planned maintenance programme.

• Hand tools which are inspected by the user prior to each time they are used. In addition to
user checks, Supervisors shall regularly spot-check the condition of hand tools in toolboxes,
on the workbench and at the worksite, and shall encourage the correct use and
maintenance of hand tools.

Machinery and tools (except hand tools) for which an Asset Holder is responsible and which are
not included in a planned maintenance programme shall be identified in an equipment or
inspection register which records the type of item with model number, serial number, date and
result of last scheduled inspection and date of next inspection. Contractors shall keep and
maintain a similar register for equipment owned by them and used on BRUNEI SHELL JV
COMPANIES assets. Items included in the Register shall be inspected and tested before being
used for the first time and then at intervals not exceeding 6 months. The results of inspection
and testing shall be recorded in the Register. Registered items which fail testing or for which
the due inspection date has been exceeded shall be withdrawn from use and have a “Do Not
Use” label attached (see Appendix 1 for details of the labelling system).

There are two elements of the inspection, electrical and mechanical, and the work carried out
may involve either or both, depending on the item. Both types of inspection require safety
guards and devices to be checked.

Requirements for electrical inspection and testing are given in HSE Standard Module 13 -
General Electrical Safety. For mechanical inspection and testing, the work shall be carried out
by suitably trained and experienced persons who have been authorised by BRUNEI SHELL JV
COMPANIES or Contractor line management to carry out such work.

The mechanical inspection and testing of machinery and tools shall be carried out in
accordance with manufacturers’procedures and recommendations and shall include:

• a visual check of external condition.

• a check of lubricant quantities and condition.

• a check on the security of bolts, nuts and fasteners.

• a check on recommended torque settings.

• a check on operating clearances and free-play settings.

• a check that all guards and safety stops are fitted and work properly.

• checking the condition of wheels, tyres, brakes, suspension, towing gear, lights, etc. on
towed items (welding sets, compressors, pumps, etc.),

• function testing of the item.

• safety device and cutout function tests.

• any other items recommended by the manufacturer.

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On completion of successful inspection and testing, an adhesive label showing the due date of
next inspection shall be fixed to the item. Items for which electrical and mechanical inspection
are required shall not be labelled and released back into use until all inspection and testing is
complete. Machinery and tools which do not successfully pass inspection or testing shall have a
“Do Not Use” label attached (see Appendix 1).

3.2 Machine Tools


Machine tools are powered items of equipment installed in workshops to facilitate repair,
maintenance and fabrication activities. They are normally fixed in position and the majority are
used in cutting processes such as turning, milling, grinding, sawing and drilling. Fixed
pneumatic and hydraulic presses are also considered to be machine tools.

Machine tools shall only be installed, maintained and operated by suitably trained and
experienced personnel and shall be fully integrated into site planned inspection and
maintenance programmes.

Machine tools shall be fitted with ergonomically designed controls located to enable safe and
efficient operation.

Controls shall include stop buttons or switches which are clearly visible and located within easy
reach of the operator. In addition, each machine tool shall be fitted with an emergency stop
button which is within reach of both the operator and others, and is clearly identified with the
appropriate safety sign (see HSE Standard Module 28 - Safety Signs and Colour Codes, Section
2).

All machine tools shall be fitted with guards which, as far as is practicable, cover all moving
parts and prevent personnel being caught up in the machinery.

In addition to the requirements of planned inspection and maintenance programmes,


Supervisors shall check all machine tools at frequent intervals to ensure guards are in place
and all safety devices are operating correctly.

Operators of machine tools shall ensure that:

• prior to the start of work, guards are in place and safety devices are working.

• the workstation at the machine tool (where the operator stands) is unobstructed, clean and
tidy.

• long sleeved coveralls are secured at the wrists to prevent catching in moving machine
parts.

• long hair cannot be caught in moving machine parts (long hair can be tucked into a cap).

• jewelery (rings, bracelets, watches, neck chains, etc.) which could become caught in
machine parts is removed before commencing work.

• goggles or other suitable types of eye or face protection are worn where there is any risk of
flying particles. Note, safety spectacles are adequate for working with machine tools such
as lathes and milling machines but not when using a pedestal grinder. (See HSE Standard
Module 02 - Personal Protective Equipment, for detailed information)

• gloves are not worn when working with machine tools producing swarf or cuttings.

• measurements of the workpiece are taken only when the machine tool is stopped.

• defective machine tools are shut down and the fault reported to the Supervisor.

• the area around each machine tool is kept clean and tidy with swarf and cuttings swept up
and coolant/lubricant spills cleaned up. (Note that coolant used should be biodegradeable
and changed at manufacturers’recommended frequency) Sweeping up and cleaning shall
only be done when the machine tool is stopped.

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3.3 Power Tools


Power tools are hand-portable items of equipment used to facilitate repair, maintenance and
fabrication activities. They are normally driven by electric motors (mains or battery powered) or
pneumatic motors and have a wide variety of applications including drilling, cutting, abrading
and bolt tightening. Hydraulically driven tools are less common and tend to have specialised
functions.

In process areas, the use of pneumatically powered tools is preferred to electrically powered
tools and, in some instances, the use of electrically powered tools is not permitted (see Module
13 - General Electrical Safety)

Power tools shall only be operated and maintained by suitably trained and experienced
personnel and shall be included in an inspection and test programme (see Section 3.1).

The task for which a power tool is used shall be within the rated capacity of the tool and carried
out in accordance with manufacturer's instructions.

Power tools which are supplied with guards shall have the guards fitted and correctly adjusted.
Safety devices such as fail-safe "dead man handles" shall be operable with no attempt made to
defeat them.

The operator of a power tool shall ensure that:

• it is checked out before use and is in a safe and serviceable condition with a current
inspection tag attached.

• it is used strictly in accordance with the requirements stated in any related Work Permit.

• the supply hose or cable is protected from damage and does not present an obstruction or
tripping hazard.

In particular, ensure that it is not routed:

– over sharp edges or rough/abrasive surfaces.

– through oil, water, caustic, corrosive or other fluids.

– over, or in contact with hot surfaces or sources of heat.

– across or through doorways, passages or corridors.

• moving parts are kept away from your body and other persons.

• torque exerted by the tool is expected and the operator positioned to overcome any torque
reaction should the driven element "hang-up" or become stuck.

• impact (percussion) tools have safety clips fitted to prevent attachments from being
expelled.

• only heavy duty sockets are used with impact wrenches.

• the tool is motionless before setting it down.

• attachments such as chisels are removed when not in use and not used in place of hand
tools.

• appropriate personal protective equipment, particularly eye protection, is worn.

• a good safe footing is achieved and both hands used to operate the tool when working in
elevated or restricted areas such as on scaffolding.

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In the case of electrically driven power tools, ensure that:


• they meet the requirements specified in HSE Standard Module 13 - General Electrical Safety
and carry a current inspection tag.
• the supply voltage and the rating on the tool are the same.
• the cable and connections are in good condition and undamaged.
• the tool is disconnected from its power source before making adjustments, fitting other
attachments or carrying out maintenance.
In the case of pneumatically driven power tools, ensure that:
• they carry a current inspection tag.
• the air supply is fitted with a pressure regulator and the tool is not operated at a working
pressure greater than that for which it is certified.
• only industrial air supplies are used, not instrument air supplies.
• only sound, strong hoses with secure couplings and connections from an approved supplier
are used.
• hose connections are safety-clipped and fitted with safety strops to prevent ‘whiplash’in the
event of coupling failure.
• the line is blown through for a short time, to remove dust and grit, before a tool is connected.
• hoses are located and secured to prevent damage to them.
• the air supply is isolated and depressurised before disconnecting any tool.
• the tool is disconnected from its supply before making adjustments, fitting other attachments
or carrying out maintenance.
• where sparks or heat generated by the use of a pneumatic tool could represent a hazard, use
coolant to disperse heat and reduce the possibility of sparks.
• air hoses are not used for hoisting, lowering or suspending tools.
Compressed air can be dangerous; it must not be used for cleaning purposes unless the air
hose is fitted with a special low pressure nozzle designed for the purpose, and the users are
wearing eye protection; hearing protection may also be required. Never use compressed air for
cleaning overalls or personal equipment. Horseplay involving air hoses or pneumatic tools is
extremely dangerous and is strictly forbidden. Personnel indulging in such horseplay will be
subject to disciplinary action.
NOTE: Compressed gases stored in cylinders must never be used as the supply for
pneumatic power tools.
3.4 Abrasive Wheels
In addition to the requirements for machine and power tools, there are special requirements for
grinding wheels and these are based on the UK Abrasive Wheels Regulations, SI 1970: 535
Only persons qualified by training and experience to the standards required by these
Regulations shall mount, dress and maintain abrasive wheels.

The Asset Holder shall appoint suitably qualified persons to mount, dress and maintain
abrasive wheels in his asset and shall keep and maintain a register of these appointed persons.

Eye protection to BS 2092 Grade I shall be worn during the fitting, dressing and use of abrasive
wheels (see HSE Standard Module 02 – Personal Protective Equipment).

3.4.1 Storage and Handling of Abrasive Wheels

Abrasive wheels shall be handled with care and stored in accordance with the manufacturer’s
instructions (knocking, dropping or sudden impact must be avoided).

Wheels shall be stored in cool dry conditions in a position suited to the shape/size of the wheel.

Wheels have a limited shelf life. Supervisors shall ensure that abrasive wheels which are
beyond their ‘use-by date’are discarded.

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3.4.2 Bench and Pedestal Grinding Machines

For all fixed, power driven grinding machines, the following is required:

• the maximum grinding wheel size must be shown.

• the maximum working speed of the grinding wheel spindle in rev/min. must be shown.

• the maximum working speed of grinding wheels with a diameter of 55 mm or more must be
marked in rev/min on the wheels.

• for wheels with a diameter of 55 mm or more, a notice must be posted at the machine
showing the maximum permissible working speed in rev/min. of each type of wheel.

Appropriate safety signs shall be displayed beside or near fixed power driven grinding machines
and shall give the requirements for guards, workpiece rests, machine controls and the
precautions to be observed in the use of the machines. (See HSE Standard Module 28 - Safety
Signs and Colour Codes)

3.4.3 Fitting and Dressing of Abrasive Wheels

Before fitting, an abrasive wheel shall be checked to ensure that:

- it is compatible with the maximum wheel size and speed marked on the machine.

- it is within its shelf-life and is not out of date.

- it is undamaged and in sound condition.

On fixed grinding machines, the wheel must be run-in after fitting and a balance check carried
out before any grinding is attempted.

When dressing a wheel, the operator shall wear a dust mask in addition to eye protection.

3.4.4 Use of Pedestal and Bench Grinding Machines


Before starting a grinding machine, the operator shall:

- inspect the wheel faces for defects.

- check the positioning of safety guards.

- ensure that the workpiece rest is properly adjusted in relation to the wheel.

On starting the machine, the operator shall stand to one side until the wheel reaches its normal
rotational speed then check for wobbling and vibration. When the machine is running
smoothly, the operator shall:

• apply the workpiece gradually without using excessive pressure.

• avoid striking any part of the wheel with excessive impact.

• keep the workpiece secured, if necessary using a holder for small pieces.

• avoid using the side of the wheel if it is not specifically designed for that purpose.

• avoid grinding or dressing high speed steel tools on a wheel designed for tungsten carbide
tipped tools.

• avoid grinding non-ferrous metals and stainless steels on wheels designed for carbon steels
(this practice clogs the wheel and can result in its disintegration).

• traverse the workpiece across the wheel to prevent grooving and possible breakup of the
outer edges.

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The operator shall switch off the machine and wait until wheel rotation has stopped before
making any adjustments.

3.4.5 Use of Portable Grinding Machines


Operators of portable grinding machines shall be trained in their use and shall only use
machines which are within their physical ability to control.

Portable grinding machines shall be:

• included in the inspection and test programme (see Section 3.1)

• stored in authorised toolstores (their retention by employees is not permitted).

• numbered, and maintenance records must refer to that number.

• fitted with adequate guards which must not be removed without the permission of the Asset
Holder Supervisor.

• fitted with ‘Dead-Man’ switches/triggers which must not be tied or secured in the ‘ON’
position.

Electrical portable grinders shall be adequately inspected and tested in accordance with the
requirements of HSE Standard Module 13 – General Electrical Safety.

Air-hoses on pneumatic portable grinders must be securely connected (see Section 3.3,
pneumatically driven power tools).

3.5 Hand Tools


A hand tool is an individual piece of equipment which is held by hand and powered by nothing
other than the person holding it. They are used in repair, maintenance and construction
activities and come in a huge range of types including hammers, chisels, saws, files, wrenches
and screwdrivers.

Users of hand tools shall ensure that:

• the tools selected are suitable for the task to be performed.

• the tools to be used are in good condition with no sign of damage and with handles securely
attached. Examples of tools in bad condition are:

- hammers with loose heads and split shafts.

- chisels with “mushroom” heads.

- screwdrivers which have been used as chisels.

- open jaw spanners with distorted jaw openings.

- ring spanners with worn contact points.

• damaged or worn tools are repaired or replaced.

• tools are correctly stored when not in use.

In addition to the above user checks, Supervisors shall regularly spot-check the condition of
hand tools in toolboxes, on the workbench and at the worksite, and shall encourage the correct
use and maintenance of hand tools.

Spark Suppression

Wherever possible, work shall only be carried out in areas which are known to be gas free or, if
there is the possibility of flammable vapours being present, have been certified free of flammable
gas. Sometimes, however, tools have to be used in an area where there is the possibility of the

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presence of flammable gas. In such circumstances, the likelihood of sparks being generated
from the use of the tools must be reduced and this can be achieved by:

• keeping the contact area flooded.

• wetting the tools with running water

• covering the contact area with wet sacking or dampening material.

• wetting the tools with a viscous oil.

Note: So-called “non-spark” tools cannot be guaranteed not to produce sparks and their use is
not recommended. If they are to be used, however, then the same preventive measures as for
ordinary tools described above shall be put into effect.

3.6 Explosively Actuated Nail Guns


A nail gun is a tool which uses the energy of an explosive cartridge to drive a nail into the
material to be secured, e.g. steel sheet, timber, concrete, etc. Nail guns come in a variety of
sizes and can fire different strengths of cartridge to drive different sizes of nail. They are often
referred to as ‘Hilti guns’, after the name of the predominant manufacturer of this type of tool.

The use of tools actuated by explosive devices is controlled by Bruneian legislation, and is not
normally permitted other than under very strict conditions, agreed in writing with the relevant
authorities prior to the task. ALL operations which involve the use of explosively actuated nail
guns shall be carried out under a Permit to Work.

Goggles manufactured to BS 2092 Grade 1 and hearing protection to BS 5108 shall be worn at
all times during the operation of a nail gun. (See HSE Standard Module 02 - Personal Protective
Equipment)

Nail guns and the cartridges used in them shall be kept in special containers in a secure place
under lock and key and shall be issued from store only against an authorised signature.

Cartridges shall always remain in the possession of the person to whom they were issued and
all cartridges shall be accounted for on completion of the job.

Nail guns shall be:

- operated only by trained personnel aged 18 years or more.

- operated in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions.

- used only with cartridges of sufficient power for the job in hand.

- used only on surfaces of sufficient thickness to prevent the nail passing right through.

- fitted with protective guards.

- always pointed downwards when not in use, even when unloaded.

- examined before each use, regularly cleaned and maintained, and overhauled annually.

Nail guns shall NOT be:

- forcibly loaded.

- loaded until immediately before use.

- pointed in the direction of another person.

- used to penetrate live pipelines, vessels or equipment.

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- used on surfaces which may allow the nail to pass right through.

- used to fire nails through existing holes.

- carried around or left unattended whilst loaded.

Only the operator and his assistant shall be in the immediate vicinity of the firing place. The
protective guard shall be used when firing.

In the event of a misfire, the gun shall be:

- kept in its firing position.

- fired a second time.

If the gun misfires a second time, it must be kept depressed for 15 seconds before removing the
cartridge with a special cartridge removing tool, in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions
misfired cartridges must not be used again. They shall be stored and disposed of in accordance
with HSE Standard Module 21 - Explosives.

3.7 Machinery
Machinery is a general term used to describe an assembled piece of equipment which uses or
applies mechanical power to perform work. In the context of this module, it includes fixed
process and utility equipment such as generating sets, pumps, compressors, etc.

With one exception, the examination, lubrication and adjustment of unguarded, exposed
machinery which is operating or in motion is forbidden. The exception to this requirement is
where such examination, lubrication or adjustment can only be carried out when the machinery
is running and has to be exposed for such purposes. In such cases, only a suitably trained and
experienced operator shall perform the work and there shall be a second person standing by at
all times during the work to shut down the machinery in the event of an emergency.

Safety devices, including guards, governors, overspeed trips and other emergency
shutdown devices fitted to machinery shall not be removed or over-ridden without
the written authorisation of the owner or Asset Holder.

Persons involved in the lubrication of guarded machinery which is in motion shall be provided
with long, flexible-spout oil cans and grease guns with proper attachments. Any abnormal
increase in lubricant consumption shall be reported to the appropriate Supervisor. Similarly,
any significant variation in surface temperatures and noise levels should be reported.

Whenever possible, maintenance shall be carried out with machinery rendered inoperable by
means of electrical/mechanical isolation, and appropriate tags displayed (see HSE Standard
Module 03 - Permit to Work Procedure).

Where any inspection or test shows that equipment cannot be safely used until repaired, the
person who made the inspection or test shall immediately:

• inform the relevant supervisor.

• ensure that the equipment is electrically or mechanically isolated so that it can not be
started.

• label the equipment ‘DO NOT USE’.

• report the fact in writing to the Asset Holder or owners representative.

Upon receiving such information the equipment owner shall initiate further action as required.
Such equipment shall not be used until repaired and inspected and tested by an authorised
person.

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Note: The issue of verbal instructions forbidding the use of any machinery is not
considered an adequate safety precaution.

Guards shall be replaced and secured in position before warning signs are removed and
machinery restarted.

3.8 Hydraulic Systems


This section covers machines such as pipe benders and jacking devices which use hydraulic
fluid, usually oil, as their power medium. High pressure jet washing with water is covered
separately in HSE Standard Module 25 - High Pressure Water Jetting and contains information
that may be useful in the context of hydraulic systems.

Hydraulic fluid leaking under pressure can produce jets which may ignite on contact with hot
surfaces and are capable of penetrating human skin, causing serious injury. Any person struck
by a jet of hydraulic fluid escaping at pressure must immediately obtain medical attention.

Personnel involved in any maintenance or work on hydraulic systems shall wear appropriate
personal protective equipment, in most cases goggles and gloves as a minimum requirement.
As a further precaution, barrier cream should be applied to hands and forearms to reduce the
possibility of skin infection, e.g. dermatitis.

Hydraulic fluid escaping under high pressure from a small hole can be almost invisible and
personnel engaged in locating suspected leaks shall use a piece of thick card or thin plywood,
never bare hands, to detect the leak.

Fluids in a continuously-operating hydraulic system become very hot and caution shall be
exercised before disconnecting hoses on any part of a machine or equipment that has been
operating continuously.

Excessive pressures in an hydraulic system can result in system failure whilst low pressures
can result in loss of control; either condition can prove disastrous. Therefore, system pressure
relief valve settings shall only be adjusted by qualified and appointed personnel.

When topping up or refilling an hydraulic system, only the types and quantities of fluid
recommended by the manufacturer shall be used.

Note: Topping-up hydraulic fluids while hydraulic machinery is in operation can result in
damage to pump casings and overflow of fluid reservoirs.

Mixing different hydraulic fluids can result in emulsification and seal damage with consequent
loss of pressure and control. The make, grade and type of fluid shall therefore be displayed at
the reservoir filling point.

Note: - Use fire resistant hydraulic fluid whenever possible.

- The highest standards of cleanliness are essential for work on hydraulic systems.

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4 REFERENCES

UK Legislation

Health and Safety at Work (etc.) Act 1974

Abrasive Wheel Regulations, SI 1970: 535

British Standards

BS 2092 Eye Protection.

BS 5108 Hearing Protection.

Codes of Practice

IP Model Code of Safe Practice, Part 6, “Pipeline Safety Code”.

“Sparks from Hand Tools” published by American Petroleum Institute.

The Engineering Equipment and Materials Users Association - Publication 107


“Recommendations for the Protection of Diesel Engines Operating in Hazardous Areas”

SIPM Documents

Design Engineering Practice (DEP) 31.38.60.10-Gen - “Hot-Tapping on Pipelines, Piping and


Equipment”

BRUNEI SHELL JV COMPANIES Documents

HSE Standard Modules:

02 - Personal Protective Equipment

03 - Permit to Work Procedure

07 - Confined Spaces

08 - Vessels, Pipelines and Equipment

10 – Electrical Safety Rules

13 - General Electrical Safety

21 - Explosives

22 - Compressed Gases

25 - High Pressure Water Jetting

28 - Safety Signs and Colour Codes

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APPENDIX 1 - INSPECTION AND T EST IDENTIFICATION


SYSTEM FOR TOOLS AND PLANT

For the purposes of inspection and testing, machinery and tools which are identified in Equipment or
Inspection Registers fall into the two categories of power tools and mobile plant. The basic principles
for inspecting and testing them are the same but the method of identifying the results is different. The
methods are as follows:

Power Tools (drills, angle grinders, impact wrenches, etc.)

• Power tools which have been inspected and tested and are safe to use will be identified with
a silver adhesive label, a sample of which is shown below.

POWER TOOL

NEXT INSPECTION:

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4

96 97 98 99

• The next inspection and test will be identified by ringing the appropriate quarter and year on the label
with a ball-point pen.

• The label will be stuck to the power tool in a prominent position such as the main body without
obscuring the manufacturer’s plate or blocking ventilation/exhaust air slots.

• The Equipment Register will be updated.

• Power tools which are found to be defective or fail their tests and cannot quickly be repaired will be
identified with an adhesive label, a sample of which is shown below.

DEFECTIVE
DEFECTIVE
DO NOT USE
DO NOT USE

The “DO NOT USE” label will be stuck on top of the silver inspection label so that only the red and
white prohibition label is visible.

Mobile Plant (generators, welding sets, etc.)

• The “Multitag” system is used to give immediate visual indication of the condition of mobile plant.

The system components are shown opposite and comprise:

- a holder which is attached to the item of plant by wire or a tie-wrap and displays a red and white
prohibitory

- a holder which is attached to the item of plant by wire or a tie-wrap and displays a red and white
prohibitory message.

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BSP – Machinery and Tools Module 12

- an insert for the holder, one side green and yellow with boxes in which to enter the tag reference
number, date of inspection and initials of the inspector, the other side yellow and black and carrying
a warning message.

• Mobile plant which has been inspected and tested and is safe to use will show the green and yellow side
of the insert and will contain the reference/date/initials information.

• The Equipment Register will be updated with the information on the tag.

• Mobile plant which is found to be defective or unsafe, either during periodic inspection or during
worksite operation, will have its Multitag insert removed to display the prohibition of use message.
Note, although a tag may be removed by anyone at the worksite discovering a defective machine, a
worker would normally report the defect to a Worksite Supervisor who would pull the tag.

• After repair, the suitably updated insert may be replaced only by the authorised technician who carried
out the work.

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