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REPORT

‘Strengthening ESDP missions and operations through training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820’ Brussels, July 9, 2009

Written by the Folke Bernadotte Academy on behalf of the Swedish Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Programme Annex 2. July 9.2 3. Concept Paper 1 . Introduction……………………………………………………………………. organized by the Swedish Presidency. Key points and good practices…………………………………………. Speakers and summary of sessions…………………………………. 2 2. Recommendations for further action……………………………. Brussels. 2009 Content 1. Annexes Annex 1.…8 4.Report from the EU seminar ‘Strengthening ESDP missions and operations through training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820’.9 5.

the seminar aimed to outline concrete recommendations for further action. The inserted text boxes give examples of experience and good practice presented at the seminar. It is an obligation in itself that aligns itself with the EU’s Human Rights commitments. 2009 1. Brussels. Below is a summary of the key points extracted from the seminar. it simultaneously increases operational effectiveness. the concrete recommendations for further action and finally a summary of the different sessions. 1) Implementation of UNSCR 1325 and 1820 is both a normative principle and a matter of operational effectiveness. This report presents a summary of the key points raised at the seminar and some of the good practices that were shared. 3) Initial Seminar Brief. 2009 the Swedish Presidency of the EU organized the seminar ‘Strengthening ESDP missions and operations through training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820’. it helps missions and operations to extend to the whole population (men and women). 2) Seminar Concept Paper. The seminar aimed to support the implementation of EU’s commitments to United Nations Security Council Resolutions (UNSCR) 1325 and 1820 on women. it broadens the networks and provides new sources of information. July 9. Thus. as nicely put by one participant “without an integrated gender perspective. In so doing. peace and security as outlined in the two key policy documents ‘Implementation of UNSCR 1325 as reinforced by UNSCR 1820 in the context of ESDP’ (15782/3/08/rev 3) and ‘Comprehensive EU approach to the implementation of UNSCR 1325 and 1820’ with the more immediate purpose to promote a dialogue on how to further consolidate training practices on gender. organized by the Swedish Presidency.Report from the EU seminar ‘Strengthening ESDP missions and operations through training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820’. there cannot be sustainable peace”. Or. Key Points and Good Practices Many of the seminar sessions highlighted similar issues/experiences. Annexed are 1) Seminar Programme. relating to the relevance of gender and the resolutions to ESDP missions and operations. UNSCR 1325 and 1820 in the context of ESDP. Introduction On July 9. Many speakers gave testimony to how and why actively addressing gender specific aspects of a conflict through an ESDP mission/operation leads to more sustainable solutions and thereby more effective missions and operations. 2 . At the same time. 2. The overarching theme of the seminar departed in the wide understanding that implementing UNSCR 1325 and 1825 is the ultimate win-win situation. how to best implement training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820 and what support and resources are needed. Building on progress made up to date. including names of speakers. The seminar was organized into 7 different sessions/panels and brought together about 80 participants from the different EU Member States (EU MS) and some ESDP missions.

Brigadier General Ganascia used to have a very intellectual idea of gender and little knowledge of how to translate this concept into everyday life and practical action. organized by the Swedish Presidency. concrete steps that can be taken. the promotion of gender in ESDP operations must be linked to concrete ideas of what can be done practically and how gender adds value to the mission. Drawing on his own experience. were going to the market or ventured off to collect firewood. EUFOR Tchad/RCA. training needs to focus on how to make the resolutions operational. Therefore. 2009 Personal account of how a gender perspective adds value to an ESDP operation by Brigadier General Jean – Phillipe Ganascia. In her case. former Force Commander. Thus. 3 . It is very important to be pragmatic and work on real.g. This is what his Gender Advisor had done and subsequently he had come to see that gender is about taking the protective mission of the operation to include the whole population. Through repeated visits to IDP camps and regular reporting. i. She emphasized the importance of making the soldiers understand why gender is important to them. soldiers on the ground and staff in a Security Sector Reform (SSR) have very different training needs and therefore require different training material. mission-specific.g. Among other things. patterns of information emerged.g. gender training for ESDP missions and operations needs to include material that is tailor-made for the target audience.e. Brigadier General Ganascia said that Heads of Missions need support to see that gender is one of several technical aspects of operational planning that helps the mission/operation achieve its objectives. with a field oriented Gender Advisor who showed him how a gender perspective can be incorporated into the daily activities of the operation he changed his opinion. However. July 9. by gathering more varied information. E. As a consequence he did not consider gender relevant to the everyday life of the operation. e.Report from the EU seminar ‘Strengthening ESDP missions and operations through training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820’. The survey conducted prior to the seminar indicated a gap in the understanding of how policy links up with practice and the need for practically oriented training was raised several times. this allowed the troops to adapt their patrolling to provide protection to women when they e. 2) ESDP gender training needs to be practical and operationally relevant to support the implementation of the mandate of the mission/operation. Gillian Collins was part of the CIMIC team of the Irish contingent and also the Gender Focal point. There was a specific call for relevant material for police officers and judicial staff. Brigadier General Ganascia pointed out that as a commander you need to be practical and there is no time to work on concepts. the soldiers were trained on the importance to establish relationships and communicate with local women. Capt. how to apply them to the mandate and context of the specific ESDP mission/operation. In order to translate EU’s political commitments into practice. Gender training as the tool for making things happen on the ground: the Irish experience. Brussels.

brought forward the positive experience of having been invited to Ireland by the Irish troops to provide gender training prior to their deployment. The programme was founded on the commitment of the Directors and Gender Coaches. One participant pointed out that ‘gender is a matter of attitudes and values. While missions can promote certain values. UNSCR 1325 and 1820 should be in the predeployment phase. there needs to be opportunities for the most senior staff to be trained on gender issues and their relevance to the mission/operation. 2009 3) The bulk of training on gender. The Gender Coaches were all senior persons with good pedagogical skills. This is particularly relevant for military personnel. The importance of pre-deployment training: experience from EUFOR Tchad/RCA: Ms. it should focus more on practical implementation and instructions. She also said that having met the troops prior to their deployment made cooperation easier in the field. but closely linked to in-mission follow-up The seminar put forth that most of the training on gender. The aim of the programme was to increase the level of awareness on gender equality and related issues among directors and key individuals in organizations. Each ‘couple’ decided how often they would meet and what they would talk about. This is not to say that in-mission training should be void of gender aspects. organized by the Swedish Presidency. July 9. through which 12 high level directors from the Swedish Armed Forces. former Gender Adviser for EUFOR CHAD/RCA. senior staff needs to recognize the importance and added value of this kind of knowledge. Reaching the top management through Gender Coaching Major General Bengt Andersson from the Swedish Armed Forces spoke about the the experience from the Gender Coach programme.Report from the EU seminar ‘Strengthening ESDP missions and operations through training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820’. 4 . She pointed out that the home environment and the general anticipation of their tasks made the soldiers very motivated and receptive to learning. The Gender Coach programme was one component of the Swedish Genderforce project. The evaluation of the programme showed that the process had been mutually rewarding for both Directors and Gender Coaches. When on the ground. meetings took place for a few hours once a month. But as a follow-up. since experience shows that people are generally more receptive at this stage. the Swedish Police and the Association of Military Officers were coupled with a personal gender coach for a period of one year. 4) It is important to reach and have the support from the top management The important role of Heads of Missions and other senior staff with regards to gender related in-mission training was expressed throughout the seminar and it was agreed that neither gender training nor efforts to mainstream gender throughout the mission/operation will be effective unless it is actively supported by the top management. Recognizing that predeployment training usually also is limited by time. who both engaged on a voluntary basis. In average. Accordingly. Brussels. the troops go into operational ‘mode’ and are totally focused on solving their day to day tasks and challenges. UNSCR 1325 and 1820 should be in the pre-deployment phase. there is no time to go in depth. Monica Larsson. who once deployed tend to go into a more ‘operational mode’. For this to happen. it was suggested that the long-term education on gender aspects for military staff ideally should be integrated into the military academies.

Furthermore. The experience from the Tchad/RCA operation showed how a close cooperation between the Gender Advisor and the OP and Force Commander enabled the Gender Advisor to work out a mission specific plan and establish a training structure through Gender Focal Points (who in turn trained the troops within their own divisions). Depending on the mission/operation. Another example came from the EULEX Kosovo mission. the session on EULEX Kosovo showed the need to locate gender training within a comprehensive gender strategy that encompasses all aspects of a mission/operation. Bäckstedt also emphasized that in an integrated Rule of Law mission like EULEX Kosovo. organized by the Swedish Presidency. Both options should be further explored. including police officers. observing of existing training events. Ms.Report from the EU seminar ‘Strengthening ESDP missions and operations through training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820’. Training and Evaluation Unit is key. of which training is a very important pillar. This implies a need for refresher trainings and suggests the importance to integrate new experiences into the training cycle. From here a training plan will be designed. The main task of the mission is to give advise to local counterparts. Susanne Bäckstedt is the Gender Advisor for EULEX Kosovo since October 2008. where the Gender Advisor has supported the mission by undertaking a comprehensive training needs assessment prior to designing relevant training to the different categories of staff. 6) Gender training should be seen as a continuous process that is part of a wider gender strategy and based on the continuous sharing of best practices The seminar brought forward the view that we should think of gender training as a continuous process. July 9. good cooperation with other units like (in the case of EULEX Kosovo) the Best Practices. combining induction trainings. reading of documents. Accordingly it is important to also have training courses for Gender Advisors. This enabled her to formulate a gender strategy. Gender training as one important pillar of a larger gender strategy: EULEX Kosovo. a learning cycle. the exact role of the Gender Advisor may look different. 2009 5) The Gender Advisor function is vital for strengthening gender training and the implementation of the resolutions A recurrent theme related to the function of the Gender Advisor and the seminar gave several accounts of the effective role played by the Gender Advisor function in strengthening gender training into ESDP missions and operations. One way would be to involve already trained and deployed staff in the training of new personnel. customs officials and judges. it is important that gender training is weaved throughout the different components of the mission. For this to happen. Brussels. in-service training and subject specific workshops and seminars. interaction with local government and civil society. Another way could be to have a dedicated internet site where practitioners can document and share best training practices. an important first step has been to undertake a training needs assessment through interviews. Ms. It was furthermore stressed that the personnel functions of gender advisor/gender focal point is a matter of expertise and hence gender advisors/gender focal points can – and should – be held by both men and women. One of her main challenges has been to design training that will be useful for a very diverse group of colleagues. 5 . In order to meet the training requirements.

it is important that the impact of gender training is adequately evaluated and if necessary re-designed. not the least from ESDP missions. 9) It is important to integrate a gender perspective into existing training and courses Gender is a cross cutting issue and for adequate impact it ultimately needs to be integrated throughout existing trainings and courses. 2) develop gender-training packages. 8) Common training elements should be consolidated and made available to all Member States Several reviews have concluded that the training capacity. 3) train instructors/trainers. particularly on the civilian side. The European Security and Defence College (ESDC) is working on integrating a gender perspective into their courses and is interested in developing this further. 4) implement the training packages in the different training centres and 5) after one year. the Genderforce project of the Dutch Ministry of Defence had set forth to integrate a gender perspective into all initial and career training courses of the Armed Forces. The project successfully outsourced the development of training packages and subsequently trained 380 instructors on how to implement the training package. using the ESDCs Internet-Based Distance Learning (IDL) system. varies greatly between Member States. however. To achieve this goal they lined out five broad steps: 1) allocate the budget and set together a team of gender and educational experts who made a detailed plan. requires adequate allocation of resources both in terms of money. It was also suggested that the development of e learning courses be explored. Ella van den Heuvel shared the Dutch Genderforce experience of developing a specific gender training module. 6 . While recognizing that gender training always needs to be tailored to the specific context. 2009 7) Results require adequate resources. Current practice suggests that a focused session early on combined with a mainstreamed perspective throughout the course modules and case studies is what works best. This experience showed that developing and implementing gender training materials needs to be accompanied by continuous advocacy and effective monitoring. It proved. time and human resources. the seminar concluded that common training elements and possibly a curriculum should be consolidated and made available to all Member States.Report from the EU seminar ‘Strengthening ESDP missions and operations through training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820’. Brussels. It also showed that the implementation of gender training needs to be closely monitored and backed up with sustained advocacy. evaluate progress. including the implementation of gender training. continuous advocacy and follow-up The seminar stressed that successful integration of a gender perspective. and existing training material. In addition. The basis of such consolidated training material will build on documented best training practices. For this purpose it is important to find ways to support non-gender trainers to include a gender perspective into their course modules. Integrating gender into the training of the Dutch Armed Forces Ltcdr. organized by the Swedish Presidency. July 9. Convinced that ‘gender’ cannot be addressed in isolation from other issues. difficult to convince all schoolmasters to make use of the training package and an evaluation showed that (only) about 50% of the training centers were using the training module.

7 . b) share information on EC funded gender training. NATO and AU The European Commission clearly stated its readiness to enhance cooperation with regards to the ESDP through the sharing of its broad experience on gender mainstreaming by a) opening up their training modules on gender to ESDP staff. Brussels. Since all EC missions have a gender focal point. OSCE. and c) provide support on gender analysis through EC focal points in the field. 2009 10) There is much to gain from increased cooperation with the European Commission as well as organizations like the UN. NATO and the AU in order to improve coordination and share experiences and knowledge. also in the earliest planning stages. ESDP personnel was encouraged to make contact with them for advice. July 9. the seminar reiterated the need to strengthen the links between organizations like the UN. Moreover. organized by the Swedish Presidency. OSCE.Report from the EU seminar ‘Strengthening ESDP missions and operations through training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820’.

Strengthen the requirements for pre-deployment training standards in existing EU documents on training requirements. OSCE. . This should include. AU.g.Ensure adequate training and/or briefings of all ESDP staff.Establishing a Community of Experts should be explored. E-learning training material should be developed under the umbrella of the ESDC using its IDL system. organized by the Swedish Presidency.Include gender-related issues/aspects in the mission handbook currently being developed by the CPCC. . Recommendations for further action 1) Establish mechanisms for sharing and documentation of best training practices: .Integrate gender and UNSCR 1325 and 1820 into existing standard courses.The Council Secretariat Web Page on UNSCR 1325. A ‘Train the Trainers’ course should also be considered. but not be limited to. allow for Gender Advisor to train troops prior to deployment. within the ESDC. .Further explore ways to ensure that Heads of Missions and Op Cdrs have adequate understanding and knowledge of the content of UNSCR 1325 and 1820.Increase collaboration and exchange with the European Commission. in line with the experience from EUFOR Tchad/RCA. 2009 3. 2) Focus on training in the pre-deployment phase and strengthen the links between predeployment and in-mission training: . . . taking into consideration security aspects. 4) Increase requirements in job profiles. including Brussels based staff. could also provide a forum allowing for exchange of information on training opportunities and good practice.When possible. .Invite UN DPKO staff to participate in EU gender advisors meetings to share experiences at field level.Elaborate the inclusion of gender awareness/skills into job profiles and promote it to become a recognized qualification. July 9. Brussels. . NATO to ascertain how they approach gender training.Develop and make available training materials based on existing material and best practices for the EU MS to use. the most senior ESDP staff having a gender briefing prior to starting their assignment.Explore contacts with other relevant UN agencies.Report from the EU seminar ‘Strengthening ESDP missions and operations through training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820’. 8 . e. management and chains of command. selection processes and ensure training/briefings for senior staff: . the EU training policy in ESDC and the EU HQ Training Guide. currently being set up. 5) Liaison with other international organizations to exchange/share each others' experiences: . 3) Harmonization of training efforts would be useful in furthering a common European approach: . .

Kionka opened the session by stressing that the decision to organize this seminar in the very beginning of the Swedish Presidency to the EU in itself shows the importance of the topic. EUFOR Tchad/RCA Ms. July 9. Sweden Ms. former Force Commander. Training Director. Personal Representative for Human Rights of the High Representative for the EU's Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) Javier Solana (CHAIR) Ms. DGE VIII Defence Issues Brigadier General Jean-Philippe Ganascia. He emphasized that this seminar is about strengthening EU pre-deployment and in-mission training with the purpose to make sure that ESDP missions and operations reach the whole population in a mission area and that appropriate codes of conduct are followed. The survey reviewed lessons and existing practices on gender related training in ESFP missions/operations. Summary of Sessions Opening and Welcome Ambassador Olof Skoog. UNSCR 1325 and 1820 is important for ESDP missions and stressed the need to be practical and pragmatic rather than conceptual and theoretical. Riina Kionka. there is still a need to make training on gender. Director. Claude-France Arnould. UNSCR 1325 and 1820 more comprehensive. efforts to involve them benefit everyone. Such efforts require political strength. Results indicated that while many good initiatives are ongoing. It also emphasized the responsibility of the Head of Mission to ensure that a gender perspective is included in all trainings as well as the need to increase the number of women in ESDP missions. organized by the Swedish Presidency. 9 . 2009 4. Larsson presented the findings from the survey conducted by Sweden prior to the seminar that was directed to all EU Member States and all ESDP Missions/Operations. the Folke Bernadotte Academy. Session 2: Findings from the survey of existing training practices on gender. It also showed that it is important to consider the need to train on gender aspects that are both internal and external to the mission/operation and that there appears to be a link between National Action Plans and more elaborate gender training practices.Report from the EU seminar ‘Strengthening ESDP missions and operations through training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820’. Swedish Ministry for Foreign Affairs (MFA) and Representative to the Political and Security Committee Ambassador Olof Skoog opened the seminar by saying that while girls and women are continuously marginalized in conflicts and peace processes. This first session went on to establish why training on gender aspects. UNSCR 1325 & 1820 in EU crisis management missions and operations? Ms. Lena Larsson. UNSCR 1325 & 1820 Ms. Session 1: Why training on gender. Brussels. practical and mission focused.

Antonio Tanca. Ursula Gamauf. Swedish Armed Forces. Programme Director. It brought forward the advantage of having troops trained on gender aspects prior to deployment. in-mission training can focus on briefings and updates. it rarely does. UNSCR 1325 and 1820 is about making political commitments practical so that we can go from principles to concrete action. EUFOR Tchad/RCA Mr. the Netherlands Ms. Ministry of Defence. Didier Lenoir. EULEX Kosovo Ms. Austrian Study Center for Peace and Conflict Resolution (ASPR) 10 . Brussels. Antti Haikio. Monica Larsson. July 9.Report from the EU seminar ‘Strengthening ESDP missions and operations through training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820’. before being operationally focused. This is why EULEX Kosovo is the biggest ESDP training provider at the moment. The importance to break down the mandate into key areas and relate the gender training to concrete tasks was also emphasized. Gender Advisor EULEX Mr. Thus. Irish Armed Force and former member of the CIMIC team. EUFOR Tchad/RCA Capt. UNSCR 1325 & 1820: the case of EULEX Kosovo Mr. DGE VIII Defence Issues (CHAIR) Ms. organized by the Swedish Presidency. As a result. it falls on the mission to compensate for poor predeployment training. Directorate of Operations. The session went on to give concrete accounts from EUFOR Tchad\RCA on how training is a way to make the soldiers talk to local women and include gender specific information in their daily reports. former Gender Advisor EUFOR RD CONGO and Nordic Battle Group 08 (OHQ) (CHAIR) Major General Bengt Andersson. Tanca started the fourth session and reminded the seminar that EULEX Kosovo was the first ESDP mission that had benefited from a fully fledged planning team (EUPT). former Operation Commander Nordic Battle Group 08 Ltcdr. Training and Evaluation Unit (BPU). even though the bulk of gender training preferably should happen prior to deployment. UNSCR 1325 & 1820: the case of EUFOR Tchad/RCA Mr. This session pointed out that while the military and police benefit from clear training structures. 2009 Session 3: Pre-deployment and in-mission training on gender. and suggested that with adequate predeployment training. Susanne Bäckstedt. Session 5: National initiatives on how to strengthen training on gender. Gillian Collins. Charlotte Isaksson. Senior Gender Advisor. UNSCR 1325 & 1820 Ms. Ella van den Heuvel. Former Gender Advisor to the Operation Commander and Force Commander. Chief Logistic Officer. The session also showed that gender training must be an integral part of a coherent gender strategy and that gender training needs to touch upon all the areas of a mission’s work. Swedish Armed Forces. Lenoir opened by stating that training on gender. Head of Unit. well defined training concepts and a deployed training and best practices unit. Head of Operational Unit DGE IX Civilian Crisis Management (CHAIR) Mr. there is no equivalent for civilians. Session 4: Pre-deployment and in-mission training on gender. Head of Best Practices. Project Leader Genderforce.

Session 7: Elements of a roadmap: how to take the work forward within the EU in the coming 12 months Ms. Austrian Study Center for Peace and Conflict Resolution (ASPR) Ms. DCAF The sixth session was chaired by Mr. Head Special Programmes. financial as well as human. Veronica Cody. conflict and post-conflict situations. organized by the Swedish Presidency. Acting Head of the ESDC Secretariat (CHAIR) Ms. Ops EUMS Ms. Isaksson closed the session by underlining that results require adequate allocation of resources. General Secretariat of the Council. Head of Horizontal Issues Unit. The Dutch Ministry of Defence has made efforts to integrate a module on gender into all military training courses and found that in addition to good training material. Assistant Director. Hans Bernhard Weisserth. sustained monitoring and advocacy is required. Ursula Gamauf. Session 6: Experiences from EU-wide training: ESDC. but this can and should be further developed. DCAF encouraged the development of common standards but cautioned against standardized modules. This session also emphasised that gender training must be linked to the larger context and the need to train non-gender trainers on gender issues. as gender training always needs to be adapted to the specific context. 2009 The fifth session focused on national training experiences. Furthermore. DCAF Mr. Programme Director. The accounts from the specialised course on ‘Women in Armed Conflict’ developed by the Austrian training centre underlined the important link between gender issues in pre conflict. This requires substantial pre-deployment training (minimum of 4 hours) and effective leadership. The Swedish Armed Forces aims to make the implementation of gender considerations the responsibility of each and every soldier/officer. Policy Unit/DGE VIII Defence Issues. Josef Völker. General Secretariat of the Council of the European Union Operation Unit: Afghanistan Desk 11 . DGE IX Civilian Crisis Management Mr. Ms. this session raised the question whether a gender coach programme that couples senior officials with a personal ‘gender coach’ for the duration of one year would be feasible for ESDP. July 9. The European Security and Defence College (ESDC) has found it fruitful to incorporate different levels of staff and to have a mix of both military and civilian participants in their courses. Brussels. Gender aspects are included into ESDC’s courses. EGT. Riina Kionka.Report from the EU seminar ‘Strengthening ESDP missions and operations through training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820’. Weisserth and brought forward experiences from EU wide level. Anja Ebnöther. Personal Representative for Human Rights of the High Representative for the EU's CFSP Javier Solana (CHAIR) BrChief capt(N) Antoine Devaux. combined with a mainstreamed gender perspective throughout the different course sessions and case studies. Experiences from both the European Group on Training (EGT) and Geneva Centre for Democratic Control of Armed Forces (DCAF) underlined the importance to include gender from the very beginning of a course and suggested that best practice is to have a gender specific module early on in the course.

Crisis Response and Peacebuilding. organized by the Swedish Presidency. The speakers all reaffirmed the EU’s commitment to implement UNSCR 1325 and 1820 in the context of ESDP from their different perspectives. 2009 Ms. European Commission The last session was chaired by Ms. the 10th anniversary of UNSCR 1325 in 2010 and what the EU can do to gather momentum.Report from the EU seminar ‘Strengthening ESDP missions and operations through training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820’. July 9. The final session furthermore opened up for questions by the participants. To conclude the session. Riina Kionka congratulated the participants of the seminar for having identified a number of ideas for concrete action. the importance of making sure this meeting is different from other meetings in terms of moving towards concrete action and the need to coordinate all the different initiatives and structures working to promote the implementation of UNSCR 1325 and 1820. 12 . many which will be followed up on immediately. Brussels. Key questions revolved around how to fulfil the commitments to appoint more women to senior ESDP positions. Kionka. Genoveva Ruiz Calavera. It presented the concluding remarks and suggestions for further action (as presented above). it is equally important to keep in mind that gender mainstreaming needs to be everyone’s business and not left to a handful of experts. Ms. DG Relex – Head of Unit. It was emphasised that ESDP mandates need to be clearer with regards to gender and Human Rights and while it is important to have gender expertise on board from the early planning of a mission/operation.

Participants are invited for lunch at the Swedish Representation Drawing on concrete experiences from Mr. Brussels. UNSCR 1325 & 1820 is important for ESDP missions and operations. Irish Armed Force and former member of the CIMIC team in EUFOR Tchad/RCA 12.15 11. Antonio Tanca. Personal Representative for Human Rights of the High Representative for the EU's CFSP Javier Solana Ms. Swedish MFA .Seminar Programme ‘Strengthening ESDP missions and operations through training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820’ . Sweden 10. July 9. former Force Commander for EUFOR Tchad/RCA Ms.15 9. 2009 Annex 1. DGE VIII Defence Issues Brigadier General Jean-Philippe Ganascia.15 - Lunch Pre-deployment and in-mission Mr. Claude-France Arnould. Director.30 Session Registration Opening Why training on gender. Gillian Collins. Seminar Programme 8. Head of Operational Unit DGE IX Civilian Crisis 1 .15 13.30 – 10. UNSCR 1325 & 1820: the case of EUFOR Thad/RCA Presentation of the results from the review exercise: where are we and where do we need to go? Drawing on concrete experiences from integrating training on gender. Former Gender Advisor to the Operation Commander and Force Commander for EUFOR Thad/RCA Capt. UNSCR 1325 & 1820: what do we want to achieve? Speakers Ambassador Olof Skoog.00 11.00 – 11. UNSCR 1325 & 1820 in EU crisis management missions and operations? Session Focus Welcome and introduction Give examples of why training on gender. Monica Larsson.15 – 12.45 9. Representative to the Political and Security Committee Ambassador Olof Skoog. Head of Unit. Training Director. DGE VIII Defence Issues (CHAIR) Ms.15 – 13. UNSCR 1325 & 1820 Coffee break Pre-deployment and in-mission training on gender. Lena Larsson.30– 11. UNSCR 1325 & 1820 in EUFOR Tchad/RCA: what are the challenges and what works? Sharing of Good Practice: the role of the gender advisor in strengthening the link between pre-deployment and in-mission training. the Folke Bernadotte Academy.15 Findings from review of existing training practices on gender. What are the objectives of training on gender.EU seminar organized by the Swedish Presidency. Representative to the Political and Security Committee (CHAIR) Ms. Didier Lenoir. Swedish Ministry for Foreign Affairs (MFA). Riina Kionka.

UNSCR 1325 & 1820 Ms. Austrian Study Center for Peace and Conflict Resolution (ASPR) 15. Management (CHAIR) Mr.30 National initiatives on how to strengthen training on gender. Policy Unit/DGE VIII Defence Issues. Project Leader Genderforce. Chief Logistic Officer. former Gender Advisor EUFOR RD CONGO and Nordic Battle Group 08 (OHQ) (CHAIR) Major General (M) Bengt Andersson. Susanne Bäckstedt.Seminar Programme ‘Strengthening ESDP missions and operations through training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820’ . Senior Gender Advisor. Ella van den Heuvel.45 15. Programme Director. General Secretariat of the Council. Assistant Director. Ministry of Defence. Acting Head of the ESDC Secretariat (CHAIR) Ms. UNSCR 1325 & 1820 throughout the planning. pre-deployment and in-mission stages of EULEX Kosovo: What are the challenges and what works? What role can the gender advisor function play in strengthening ESDP training practices on gender.30 Coffee Experiences from EU-wide training: ESDC. Head of Best Practices. Austrian Study Center for Peace and Conflict Resolution (ASPR) Ms. Training and Evaluation Unit (BPU). Programme Director. the Netherlands Ms. Anja Ebnöther. Gender Advisor EULEX 14. EGT and DCAF Presentations of concrete experiences from integrating gender. Antti Haikio.30 – 15. Directorate of Operations. Swedish Armed Forces. UNSCR 1325 & 1820 into courses on EU wide level and discussion on possible ways forward. July 9. DCAF 2 . UNSCR 1325 & 1820? What strategies and good practices do we have to strengthen training and education beyond the formal predeployment and in-mission training? Three different examples of national initiatives from Sweden. UNSCR 1325 & 1820: the case of EULEX Kosovo integrating training on gender. Swedish Armed Forces. Ursula Gamauf. EULEX Kosovo Ms. Mr. 2009 14.45 – 16.EU seminar organized by the Swedish Presidency. Brussels. Ursula Gamauf.30 – 15. Head Special Programmes. former Operation Commander Nordic Battle Group 08 Ltcdr. Hans Bernhard Weisserth. Charlotte Isaksson.30 training on gender. the Netherlands and Austria.

European Commission 17. Ms. DGE IX Civilian Crisis Management Mr. Personal Representative for Human Rights of the High Representative for the EU's CFSP Javier Solana (CHAIR) BrChief capt(N) Antoine Devaux. Ops EUMS Ms. DG Relex – Head of Unit.EU seminar organized by the Swedish Presidency. Riina Kionka.45 Elements of a roadmap: how to take the work forward within the EU in the coming 12 months Concluding discussion on the best way forward to further strengthen the training on gender. 2009 16. Head of Horizontal Issues Unit. Veronica Cody. UNSCR 1325 & 1820 in ESDP missions and operations. General Secretariat of the Council of the European Union Operation Unit: Afghanistan Desk Ms. Brussels. Josef Völker.Seminar Programme ‘Strengthening ESDP missions and operations through training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820’ . Crisis Response and Peacebuilding.00 Closing Representative of the Swedish Presidency 3 . July 9.30 – 17. Genoveva Ruiz Calavera.45 18.

training tends to be more comprehensive. The decision to appoint gender advisers to a number of ESDP missions and operations has proven to be particularly effective. all categories of ESDP staff need to have an understanding of the implications that UNSCR 1325 and 1820 have on the implementation of their tasks. 1 . adopted by the Council on the same day. including conceptual clarifications on gender. Despite being a relatively new training requirement in Crisis Management. ‘Implementation of UNSCR 1325 as reinforced by UNSCR 1820 in the context of ESDP’ calls for adequate training of all categories of staff on gender aspects and urges EU Member States to develop and implement relevant training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820. UNSCR 1325 and more recently UNSCR 1820. contextualize the understanding of sexualized and gender based violence as well as secure the commitment to the Code of Conduct and a zero-tolerance for sexual abuse and harassment. In ESDP missions with gender advisers.EU seminar organized by the Swedish Presidency. acknowledging the topic’s crosscutting nature. ESDP missions and operations need to take account of how their interventions affect and support the different roles. 2009 Annex 2. This new implementation document recognizes that to be effective and to fulfill their mandates. The review on training practices conducted ahead of the Swedish Presidency shows that gender awareness and knowledge on UNSCR 1325 and 1820 is a stated objective in many predeployment and in-mission training curricula. In addition. Brussels. Concept Paper Concept Paper to the seminar ‘Strengthening ESDP missions and operations through training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820’ Rationale In December 2008 the European Council adopted the document ‘Implementation of UNSCR 1325 as reinforced by UNSCR 1820 in the context of ESDP’ (15782/3/08/rev 3). needs and interests of women (girls) and men (boys). both civilian and military. The document also states that a gender perspective should be reflected in the training conducted by the ESDC and that pre-deployment training ought to be followed up with in-mission training during deployment. not the least for training purposes. In order for political commitments and policy recommendations to translate into action. which aims to secure the integration of a gender perspective and the implementation of the UN Security Council Resolutions 1325 and 1820 from the very planning stage of ESDP missions and operations throughout their conduct and evaluation. In line herewith. the EU commitment to systematic gender training of ESDP staff was included in the ‘Comprehensive EU approach to the implementation of UNSCR 1325 and 1820’. have found their way onto many training agendas. In some Member States. gender. July 9. This has generated a growing interest to strengthen the integration of these issues into the ESDP missions and operations and produced both experience-based knowledge and good practices. country specific gender related data and practical case studies on how to implement UNSCR 1325 and 1825 within the mandate. Several Member States give positive examples of how gender is dealt with in relation to cultural awareness or in the context of the Code of Conduct.Concept Paper ‘Strengthening ESDP missions and operations through training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820’ . Such in-mission training should further the capacity of all EDSP personnel to integrate the objectives of UNSCR 1325 and 1820 into the every day work of the ESDP missions and operations. particularly in relation to the wider opportunities offered on human rights. training institutes have begun to mainstream a gender perspective throughout their different training sessions.

7) Increasing training opportunities between Member States and strengthening the links between pre-deployment and in-mission training. 2009 This progress notwithstanding.EU seminar organized by the Swedish Presidency. Building on progress made up to date. ESDP missions have built up a body of experience-based knowledge and best practices. February 12. could provide a forum allowing for exchange of information on training opportunities and good practice. This makes it difficult for several Member States to make adequate provisions for pre-deployment training1. training on gender. which need to be fed into training praxis. July 9. UNSCR 1325 and 1820 in the context of ESDP. 8) Harmonization of training efforts. needs and opportunities within a mission area/area of operation and the impact these differences may have on the implementation of the mandate (or vice versa). Below are some areas to be considered in more detail: 6) Sharing and documentation of best training practices. Brussels. Concretely this requires training on how to account for women and men’s different situations. While pre-deployment training remains the responsibility of the Member States. 2009. new mechanisms need to be identified and put in place. Such efforts would also promote a discussion on common standards and objectives. The seminar will be an opportunity to both share and document some of these experiences and best practices. the seminar aims to outline concrete recommendations for further action. Czech Republic 1 2 . Responsibility for pre-deployment training lies with the Member States and as of today budgets of missions and operations only make financial allocations for in-mission training. Member States are encouraged to pro-actively keep each other informed of training opportunities open to other EU citizens. Expected Outcomes In order to support the EU’s commitments to implementing UNSCR 1325 and 1820. Meeting in Prague. currently being set up. ’Food for thought paper on civilian pre-deployment paper’. due to differing priorities and disparities in institutional. UNSCR 1325 and 1820 faces a number of challenges. However. To fulfill the mandates of UNSCR 1325 and 1820 it is important that training includes practical and context related knowledge on how to apply a gender perspective within the context of ESDP missions and operations.Concept Paper ‘Strengthening ESDP missions and operations through training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820’ . making standardized training modules on gender aspects and UNSCR 1325 and 1820 available for all Member States would help reduce the currently observed discrepancies in resources. in order to support continuous sharing and documentation of best training practices. many of which are similar to challenges found generally in the area of crisis management training. The Council Secretariat Web Page on UNSCR 1325. Consequently many Member States tend to depend on ad-hoc solutions. Other key training aspects include strategies on how to make sure local women and other marginalized groups are adequately listened to and how to identify and address gender dimensions within the mission/operation. human and financial training capacities the actual content of gender training varies significantly between Member States. While systems are in place to share information on existing courses. In many places it is crucial that personnel understand the dynamics of sexual and gender based violence. specifically in the context of conflict and in relation to their own behaviour. the Swedish Presidency of the EU is organizing the seminar ‘Strengthening ESDP missions and operations through training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820’ to promote a dialogue for the purpose of further consolidating training practices on gender. In addition.

Concept Paper ‘Strengthening ESDP missions and operations through training on UNSCR 1325 and 1820’ .EU seminar organized by the Swedish Presidency. 10) Requirements in job profiles. 2009 appropriate methodologies and minimum training requirements. An additional possibility could be to provide centrally organized. This is especially important for Head of Mission and Operation Commander posts. requirements for gender awareness and training on gender aspects should be included for all operational staff. In order to strengthen synergies and avoid duplication and training gaps. Brussels. Documented knowledge on gender issues should also be a key competency in recruitment processes to ESDP missions and operations. training efforts would benefit from enhanced coordination between pre-mission and in-mission training. selection processes and for senior staff. Brussels as well as ESDP missions and operations. It is therefore crucial that senior staff is allocated adequate time for gender briefings prior to deployment. When job descriptions are drawn up for missions and operations. regularly available training to ESDP staff. July 9. 9) Strengthen coordination between pre-mission and in-mission training. This requires cooperation between functions with well-defined responsibilities for both gender and training in Member States. 3 . particularly those in senior/command positions.