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26 February 2007

Published by the USSU Comms. Office. Issue Number 2 FREE www.ussu.co.uk
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The University of Surrey Students’ Union Newsletter

The Onion
scheme will also have a stand. The V Project can help you find an opportunity to suit you, when ever you want & for any time commitment. The V Project also offers students regular opportunity updates, a certificate to acknowledge the contribution to the community they have made & an invitation to the annual student awards. Following the Fayre there will be a ‘Volunteering Speed Dating’ session, for students to speak to a representative from the organisations (for 3 minutes per representative!) & ask any questions about the voluntary roles available. Participants will

In this 8 page edition
STAND UP ‘07 IT’S THE ANNUAL USSU SABBATICAL ELECTIONS VOTING | PAGE 4 MANIFESTOS INSIDE: PRESIDENT | PAGE 5 VP SOCIETIES & INDIVIDUAL DEVELOPMENT | PAGE 6 VP EDUCATION | PAGE 7 VP WELFARE | PAGE 7 VP SPORTS & RECREATION | PAGE 8 RON | PAGE 8 DO YOU KNOW YOURSELF? CAMPAIGN | PAGE 2 DON’T FORGET! INTERNATIONAL GALA NIGHT UNIVERSITY HALL FRI MARCH 9TH, 7:30PM ENTRANCE FEE
DONATED TO CHARITY

USSU Celebrates National Student Volunteering Week
As part of National Student Volunteering Week USSU is hosting a Volunteering Fayre on Wednesday 28 February from 12pm3.30pm in Rubix.The fayre will be followed by ‘Volunteering Speed Dating’ from 3.30pm. The Fayre is a showcase for a wide variety of local community organisations each with great voluntary opportunities for student volunteers. If you are interested in gaining work experience, using or learning a skill, meeting new people & making a real difference to a local community organisation come along! The V project, staff & student volunteering need to sign up to the speed dating session, so if you would like to reserve a place, or have any questions about the event, please contact Helen Jackson on the email bellow. National Student Volunteering Week will also include a one day volunteering blitz at Brooklands Museum on Saturday 3 March, transport & lunch will be provided, roles include painting an indoor children’s education centre, painting outdoor areas, cleaning vintage cars & planes. For more information contact: h.jackson@surrey.ac.uk

CANDIATE

k lunteering Wee sents… ark Student Vo To M arch USSU pre Sunday 4th M Mon 26th Feb

ring te e olun yre V Fa
(followed by volunteering ‘speed dating’ 3.30pm-4.15pm)
A showcase featuring a wide variety of local community organisations with fantastic opportunities for student volunteers
For more information on this event/ V Project, or to sign up to the volunteering ‘speed dating’ section contact: h.jackson@surrey.ac.uk

Wednesday 28 February @ RUBIX 12pm- 3.30pm

FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN GET A FREE USSU AFFINITY CARD | PAGE 4 INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION MONDAY 5TH MARCH RUBIX

BAG YOUR ONION EVERY MONTH IN BAREFACTS

Know Yourself
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The Onion
26 February 2007

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Calling all students: Know Yourself campaign

WELCOME TO THE Know Yourself campaign for mental well-being. The campaign starts on Sunday. We’re trying to make you feel good through activities which you wouldn’t normally see on campus. To apply to take part in a Know Yourself focus group, email Katherine. jones@surrey.ac.uk A free lunch will be provided. www.ussu.co.uk/knowyourself

Draw Yourself Competition
As part of Know Yourself, we will be running a self-portrait competition. If you’ve got any artistic talent, or you just want to try your luck, this is the competition for you.

A prize of £50 will be awarded to the most original portrait.
What to do: Get creative on paper (no bigger than A3 please), with whatever materials you like. Even your lecture doodles will be accepted! Whatever you bring, make sure you write your full name and email address on the back. Bring your entry to the USSU activity centre where ALL of the pictures will be on display.

contact : katherine.jones@surrey.ac.uk

Editorial Team
INFORMATION CO-ORDINATOR | LAURAN CARTER | l.carter@surrey.ac.uk WELFARE SUPPORT CO-ORDINATOR | KATHY JONES | katherine.jones@surrey.ac.uk ACADEMIC SUPPORT CO-ORDINATOR | PAUL COWARD | p.coward@surrey.ac.uk STUDENT ACTIVITIES MANAGER | AMY FAWCETT | a.fawcett@surrey.ac.uk COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CO-ORDINATOR | HELEN JACKSON | h.jackson@surrey.ac.uk UNION PRESIDENT | GREG SCOTT | ussu.president@surrey.ac.uk VP EDUCATION & WELFARE | GABBY SHOLK | ussu.edwelfare@surrey.ac.uk VP SOCIETIES & CULTURE | THAYANA DE PAULA | ussu.societies@surrey.ac.uk VP SPORTS & RECREATION | NICK ‘MANKIN’ SHORT | ussu.sports@surrey.ac.uk

Art as theraphy display
AS PART OF the Know Yourself campaign, the USSU is proud to present the art work of the ‘Extending Opportunity’ art group. The art will be displayed from Monday the 26th to Wednesday the 28th in the Main Lecture Theatre Concourse. Based locally to the campus, the group meets every Friday and is an essential centre where those who are suffering from mental distress can meet and indulge their artistic sides. For a few hours on a Friday afternoon they can lose themselves in painting and drawing. The exhibition is an excellent chance for students and staff to discover the benefits and relieving aspects of art when it’s used as a form of therapy. The artists themselves have put together their comments on where their work came from and how it has helped their condition. A selection of pictures will appear in the display, but you will be able to find all pictures on www.ussu.co.uk/knowyourself Maybe the art will inspire you to enter our draw yourself competition!

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The Onion
26 February 2007

Miscellaneous
3

Festival of Faiths Opens Minds, Builds Community, Addresses Critical Issues
BY SARAH TALCOTT INTER-FAITH EDUCATION OFFICER UNIVERSITY OF SURREY The Festival of Faiths, an initiative of the Inter Faith Education Programme, organized in partnership with the Chaplaincy, University of Surrey Students’ Union, the Interfaith Society, religious student societies and People & Planet, took place from February 19th – 23rd. It featured a lunchtime information exhibition with stalls set up by different faith groups on campus and the wider community, and evening panel discussions exploring critical issues such as climate change, development, women’s roles in religion, and religion and science. What is a festival but a celebration of what is? It is the union of seemingly disparate parts into the communion of an integrated whole. We are all individuals, with different lives, experiences, studies, interests and ideals. And yet we are also all inter-connected, to the Earth and to each other, at the very minimum by the mere fact that we depend on each other to survive. And then there are those few who say that we are also connected to something greater than ourselves – a Source of life, being, intelligence – something that is quite difficult to put into words though many have tried and call It by different names. In exploring this nebulous area of “faith” I am reminded of a passage from one religious text that says “Faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.” So… What is it that we hope for? And what is it that we see when we shut our eyes and envision a world that is less broken, more just, more peaceful, more whole? I have seen a glimpse of such a world this week during the first-ever Festival of Faiths on campus… In watching Hare Krishnas offering prashad – food blessed with loving intention – to 80 students and staff just happening to pass through the Lecture Theatre Concourse during lunch. In seeing the Christian Union serving free tea and coffee and sharing a word or two of love and fellowship as well, to the same passers-by. In seeing the Hindus mingling with the Buddhists, who are rubbing shoulders with the Baha’is, who are laughing with the Muslims, who are talking to the Christians… and so on. This Festival is also about creating the space in which to ask hard questions, wrestle with issues and deal constructively with our differences. Each evening, the Festival of Faiths featured a panel discussion exploring a different critical theme. Muslim, Catholic, Zoroastrian, Buddhist, Sikh, Anglican, Hindu, Pagan, Baptist, Baha’i, Jewish and Christian Scientist speakers articulated through their own faith lenses the issues of climate change, religious intolerance and persecution, the need for greater equality between the sexes, the devastating reality of the HIV pandemic, the plight of asylum-seekers, and the need for greater social responsibility in all areas. And they sought to answer the question, what is it that people of faith in particular can do to make a difference – to help end suffering, to promote peace, justice and healing, and to re-connect communities divided by indifference, injustice and intolerance? The word religion comes from the Latin root “religare” which literally means “to bind back together.” In essence, that is what this Festival of Faiths is all about – the joy of bringing us all together, to be present with and for each other, and learning as we go the art of building inter-faith community. In this broken world, I think it’s fair to say that we can use all the binding and healing we can get! For more information about the University’s ongoing Inter Faith Education Programme, check out: http://portal.surrey.ac.uk/chaplaincy/interfaith/ Or contact Sarah Talcott, Inter Faith Education Officer, at 01483-682754 or s.talcott@surrey.ac.uk.

FINAL YEAR Students, we need your help
Over 50% of the final year students at Surrey have already filled out the National Student Survey… Have you?? This is your chance to have your say about your university experience here at Surrey. Have you made the most of your time here? What could the University do better? What do they do well? This year, we’re looking for as many students to complete the survey as we can get, and for that, we need YOUR help… The Students’ Union, in support of the University, have proposed that if 80% of final years respond to the survey, ALL FINAL YEARS will receive a free Life Membership Affinity Card giving them member access to Union events for life once they graduate + giving them 10% discount on their Graduation 2007 DVD. The Survey can be found online at www. thestudentsurvey.com/survey.asp. It should take you no more than 5 minutes to complete and it really can help to improve the life of students at Surrey in years to come. This is YOUR chance to let us know your views of Surrey, good and bad, and your voice will be heard! But you had better hurry, as the survey closes SOON. The NSS ranks how universities around the country compare to each other. So not only is this a chance for you to voice your views, it could also indirectly affect the strength of your degree in “the real world”. You will find brochures around campus entitled “I Love Surrey (Although to be frank, there are a few things I’d change...)” that will explain a bit more about the NSS and what it can do for you. And, of course, for any more information, please go to the website above. Thanks in advance for filling it out! www.thestudentsurvey.com

Stand Up ‘07
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The Onion
26 February 2007

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The Onion tells you ‘how to vote’!
Single Transferable Vote The Union uses the Single Transferable Vote (STV) System in their elections. It can be quite a confusing system if you have not come across it before and even if you have you may find the following guide useful. Why do we use it? Parliamentary Elections use the first past the post system, which gives you one vote. The STV System allows each voter the fullest freedom of choice between candidates and the maximum use of their vote. In a first past the post election a candidate is elected simply by coming top of the poll. Let us look at a typical result in a Parliamentary Election Homer Simpson Ned Flanders Krusty the Klown Mr. Burns 9,999 10,000 9,500 8,000 the majority of the electorate. Single Transferable Vote The ballot paper shown below gives the Returning Officer a message; Homer Simpson 1 Ned Flanders 4 Krusty the Klown Mr Burns 2 RON (ReOpen Noms) 3 If you were to meet that voter in the bar she might say; “…I would like to see Homer Simpson elected to this position, however if he is out of the running then I would prefer Mr Burns be elected. If he too is no longer available as a candidate then none of the others really impress me and I would prefer that Nominations were opened up again... if that is not going to be possible then I can live with Ned Flanders but under no circumstances do I want Krusty the Klown running things…” Once all the completed ballot forms have been collected in, all the papers are sorted out into first preferences. During this sorting process any incorrectly marked papers will come to light and will be set aside as invalid. Such “invalid” votes usually occur because the voter has not made their intentions clear, for example, they may have put two number ones, and
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of course some people deliberately spoil their ballot papers.. At this stage once the entire ballot papers have been sorted into their piles the Returning Officer has to work out a quota. This is simply the minimum number of voters a candidate must gain to be sure of election. For single posts the quota is quite easy, the successful candidate must gain a minimum of 50 per cent plus one. So to use the example given above then 37,499 votes were cast, so the quota is 18,749 + 1 = 18750. As can be seen Ned Flanders has not achieved that amount of support - so the candidate will the least amount of votes is eliminated and their votes are allocated to the next expressed preference. Mr Burns 8,000 votes are distributed between the remaining candidates. So back to our example; Homer Simpson Ned Flanders Krusty the Klown Mr Burns 9,999 + 3000 = 12,999 10,000 + 500 = 10,500 9,500 + 4,500 = 14,000 8,000 Eliminated.

Flanders is first past the post and will represent that constituency despite the fact that 27,499 did not want him to be their representative and chose other people. In effect their votes are wasted. In the Transferable Vote System each voter is asked to give an order of personal preference. Using this method a candidate either has just enough to be elected or has too few votes and has to be eliminated. If this occurs their votes do not go to waste but are redistributed to their next choice of candidate and so on. In this way a greater proportion of the total vote is used to elect the successful candidate(s) who should, therefore, be more likely to represent the views of

This gives us a new leader in Krusty the Klown. No-one has yet got the quota that is required so again the candidate with the least number of votes is eliminated and that is Ned Flanders, who you will remember won under the first past the post system. Homer Simpson Ned Flanders Krusty the Klown 12,999 + 5,000 = 17,999 Eliminated 14,000 + 5,500 = 19,500

So Krusty wins because he has exceeded the quota of 18,750. By using this system the supporters of Ned Flanders and Mr Burns have still been able to influence the final outcome.

WHERE DO I VOTE?
Library
Tuesday 27th February 10am - 8pm Wednesday 28th February 10am - 8pm Thursday 1st March 10am - 8pm

Management School
Tuesday 27th February 10am - 8pm Wednesday 28th February 10am - 8pm Thursday 1st March 10am - 8pm

Lecture Theatre Concourse
Tuesday 27th February 10am - 8pm Wednesday 28th February 10am - 8pm Thursday 1st March 10am - 8pm

Rubix
Tuesday 27th February 10am - 8pm Wednesday 28th February 10am - 8pm 10pm-12pm Thursday 1st March 10am - 8pm

BE SURE TO MAKE THE CHOICE FOR THE FUTURE OF YOUR UNION!
The Positions
President VP Societies & Individual Development VP Education VP Welfare VP Sports & Recreation

For more information:
www.ussu.co.uk/ And click “Democracy & Governance”, “Elections”, then “Stand Up ‘07”

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The Onion
26 February 2007

Manifestos
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ALEX COLLINS BIG A 4 PRESIDENT L
Alex Collins? Are you shi**ing me...?
Hello, I’m Alex Collins, a final year Business Management student and I am running for Students’ Union President. I am a friendly, outgoing and committed leader, dedicated to making what I believe in happen. I have now spent nearly four years as a student at the University of Surrey and it has been the best time of my life. I have been involved in a lot of things, one of which was GU2 Radio where I am a presenter and have also been responsible for the recruitment and training of new presenters for the past two years. Even whilst I was on my placement year in London, I showed my dedication by travelling back to Guildford for weekly meetings and weekend training sessions. I have also had experience of the position of Academic Affairs Officer and I was also an NUS Conference delegate putting the concerns of the University of Surrey into the national scene. Finally, I have been an active member of the Surrey Ski and Snowboard Club, partaking in the previous 3 trips and often leading from the front (socially not skiing!). format for all coursework submissions. This will allow you to see where you have gone wrong and ultimately how you can improve. The next logical follow on from feedback for coursework is feedback for exams and ultimately the returning of exam scripts to students. I will aim to start the ball rolling on a national level with this issue to enable students to receive the scripts back and again review and improve for the future.

I need help!?!?

Less Talk, More Communication

For me the major part of being the Students’ Union President is to represent you. Therefore, communication is vital and I will strive to improve the communication links not only between the USSU and students, but between the student body as a whole. Using GU2 Radio, Barefacts and the newly developed USSU Website, I will aim to stimulate Interest, Interaction and Integration.

I have been an active member of the Management School, starting as a Student Representative in my first year, before being voted in as Chairman of the Student Committee for my 2nd year at Uni. This was a great experience allowing me to show my leadership potential and my passion for what I believe in whilst gaining an understanding of the importance of having a link between us as students and academic schools. The student reps are this link and they play a vital role in making things that are affecting students change. I want every school to have the full student rep system which we have been promised for a while. This will enable the cross school representation committee to happen, bringing together the opinions and issues from student reps from all schools and for the first time allowing us to get an understanding of what issues affect all students.

Did I pay to watch this?

Why don’t I get 100% each year?

There is nothing that annoys me more than when I get a piece of work back and all that is there is a mark, no comments, ticks or Feedback! My next aim is to produce a standardised feedback

My manifesto is heavily based around education and communication; however university is about the whole student experience. I firmly believe we should have a venue that you should be proud of, I want the Rubix to be a venue with acts that the students want. I will aim to introduce methods that allow more interaction with students when our entertainment is being decided.

Big Ideas, Big Changes, Big Al 4 President

Manifestos
6

The Onion
26 February 2007

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The Onion
26 February 2007

Manifestos
7

Manifestos
8

The Onion
26 February 2007

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