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Net Ionic Equations Practice

Net Ionic equations can be written for both single replacement reactions and double
replacement reactions.

For double replacement reactions:


1. Write the complete molecular equation for the reaction.
2. Use the solubility rules to determine which of the new products is/are soluble.
3. Re-write the equation with the reactants written as aqueous ions, and the
soluble product also written as aqueous ions (aq). Write the insoluble product as
a compound (s).
4. Cross out any aqueous ions that occur on both sides of the equation (these are
“spectator” ions).
5. Write the remaining reactants (two aqueous ions) and the product (solid
compound) as the net ionic equation. Now, balance your equation.

For single replacement reactions:


1. Write the complete molecular equation for the reaction.
2. Rewrite the reaction with both the reactant compound and the product
compound written as aqueous ions. The free elements will either be solids
(metals) or gases/liquids (non-metals).
3. Cross out any aqueous ions that occur on both sides of the equation (these are
“spectator” ions).
4. Write the remaining reactants (the free element and one aqueous ion) and the
products (a free element and one aqueous ion) as the net ionic equation.

Remember to check double replacement reactions for “N.R.” (both product compounds
soluble), and single replacement reactions for “N.R.” (more active metal/nonmetal
already in the compound).

Here you go. For each of the following, write the molecular equation (balanced, of
course), the total ionic equation and the net ionic equation (also balanced).
Before you begin, check the examples presented on the back of this page!!

1. Solutions of potassium chloride and lead (II) nitrate are mixed.


2. Iron metal is added to a solution of copper (II) sulfate. Use iron III.
3. Solutions of sodium hydroxide and ammonium phosphate are mixed.
4. Solutions of calcium nitrate and ammonium carbonate are mixed.
5. Aqueous solutions of silver nitrate and copper (II) chloride are combined.
6. Chlorine gas is added to a solution of aqueous potassium iodide.
7. Fluorine gas is added to a solution of CaCl2.
8. Metallic silver is added to a solution of copper (II) chloride.
9. Metallic zinc is added to a solution of NiCl2.
10. An aqueous solution of hydrochloric acid is added to aqueous barium hydroxide.
Double replacement:

1. Solutions of aluminum sulfate and calcium chloride are mixed.

Molecular equation: Al2(SO4)3(aq) + 3CaCl2(aq) → 2AlCl3(aq) + 3CaSO4(s)

Complete Ionic Equation: Al+3(aq) + SO4−2(aq) + Ca+2(aq) + Cl−(aq) → Al+3(aq) + Cl−(aq) + CaSO4(s)

Net Ionic Equation: Ca+2(aq) + SO4−2(aq) → CaSO4(s)

2. Solutions of ammonium phosphate and potassium bromide are mixed.

Molecular equation: (NH4)3PO4(aq) + 3KBr(aq) → 3NH4Br(aq) + K3PO4(aq)

(NH4)3PO4(aq) + 3KBr(aq) → N. R.

Single Replacement:

1. Copper metal is added to a solution of silver nitrate.

Molecular equation: Cu(s) + 2AgNO3(aq) → 2Ag(s) + Cu(NO3)2(aq)

Complete Ionic Equation: Cu(s) + Ag+(aq) + NO3−(aq) → Ag(s) + Cu+2(aq) + NO3−(aq)

Net Ionic Equation: Cu(s) + 2Ag+(aq) → Cu+2(aq) + 2Ag(s)

2. Zinc metal is added to a solution of magnesium nitrate.

Molecular equation: Zn(s) + Mg(NO3)2(aq) → Mg(s) + Zn(NO3)2(aq)

Zn(s) + Mg(NO3)2(aq) → N. R.