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“FIELD TESTED TRAINING MODULE DEVELOPMENT ON HEALTH & NUTRITION FOR RURAL WOMEN

IN CHHATTISGARH STATE ”

FINAL REPORT
of the research project
May 2015

by
Dr. Utkarsh Ghate & Mr. Horilal Verma

The Covenant Centre for Development (CCD)


Durg
Bajpayee Bhavan, Dipak Nagar, Opp. Railway station, Durg city,
Chhattisgarh, 491001, Web: www.ccdgroup.org, Email:
ccdnorth@gmail.com Ph. 0788-4075711, 9424102440, 9993895001

A project supported by the


Chhattisgarh State Science & Technology Council, Raipur
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The project aimed to (a) document the health profile main diseases & (b) develop strategies for
preventive & curative health care using local medicinal plants esp. in kitchen gardens. The study
was conducted in Lormi block in Bilaspur district with backward community. Totally 100
persons from 3 villages were studied of these 60 were provided medicinal plants health grow &
use 49 were studied for health & haemoglobin. Thirty (30) women with low haemoglobin (<10)
were also provided herbal nutritional supplement in the form of laddu (sweet meat) made from
Ashwagandha, Satavar, Vidarikand, Giloy etc.

After few months of use of medicinal plants in the garden & nutritional supplements, the
following diseases reduced in frequency intensity – Arthritis, Jaundice, Cough & fever.

The problems that could be addressed to lesser extent are – Anaemia, Skin diseases & Malaria
However, it was noted that hunger & malnutrition besides poor hygiene & sanitation is the main
problem causing ill health here.

Almost all the women studied have low BMI (Body Mass Index) i.e. below 20 indicating drought
area condition as in the African countries (Pinson, 2011). This is due to poor fat intake. Protein
& vitamin consumption is also highly inadequate, causing poor health condition. This leads to
infant or even maternal mortality & weak, stunted or wasted children. This could result in ill-
developed, un-intelligent children or health problems in their adulthood.

There is need to provide food health supplements besides just rice & Horse Gram today being
provided through the Public Distribution System (PDS). For, it does not address the vitamin &
mineral deficiency like Zink. Similar fortified flour is distributed to children across hamlets/
schools in states like Maharashtra through health workers & even women groups are provided
contracts for its preparation/ packing.

Further, Iron tablets are often in short supply in primary healthcare centres & its absorption
may be low if vitamin C intake is low. Hence, there is need to promote healthy vegetable &
spices seeds packet distribution & education in the village through the community health
workers viz. Asha. A manual on growing 5 spices & 6 medicinal plants is provided here with in –
Hindi local language for wider use.

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1) INTRODUCTION

Chhattisgarh is one of the youngest members of the Indian Union, born on 1st November 2000 to
prevent economic and social underdevelopment of this region in undivided Madhya Pradesh (Anon,
2005). The formation of the new State has thrown both challenges and opportunities. These
challenges assume a new dimension in the backdrop of the fact that around 32 percent of the
population of Chhattisgarh belongs to Scheduled Tribes and another 12 percent belongs to the
Scheduled Castes. Undoubtedly, economic growth without social growth would further accentuate
the regional, sectoral and communal disparities.

The project covered 100 women/ children from 3 villages- Dongaria (35), Sarda (30) & BJudgepuri
(35)- in Lormi block of Bilaspur district. The area is chosen due to the prevalent problem in this hilly,
forested area in the surrounding of the Achanakmar wildlife sanctuary, with our existing social
network.

This project was proposed because the infant mortality is above 48 per 1,000 births & maternal
mortality about 2.7 per 1,000 births in Chhattisgarh (NRHM, 2006). This is amongst the poorest in
the country, similar to that in African, least developed nations. This is due to the poor food security,
malnourishment, lack & hygiene & proper medical care of the mother & the infants here. It is caused
by the predominately tribal community in the forested tracts low outreach of medical facilities &
poor agriculture development, forest area is reduced & forest harvest-hunting is prohibited that
reduced protein available from it & vitamins from forest fruits, tubers. Millets are also rare & nearly
absent in tribal diet today. This causes malnourishment.

Poor farming leaves no food for 4-6 months in the summer. This causes male emigration to cities for
employment. Women, the old, the children who remain back in villages suffer from hunger &
diseases. Women are also married early & are mostly anaemic, causing the problem of high infant
maternal mortality rate (IMR / MMR), amongst other reasons.

PROBLEM:

The poor families comprise about 40% of the state population. Majority of them are schedules
caste/ tribe, who lack lands, thus weak or no agriculture & suffer in hunger & malnutrition. Hence,
their disease burden is high causing high medical expenditure, low work output due to illness & poor
saving, causing higher vulnerability to disasters/ climate change impacts. They were hunter
gatherers and wild fruits, tubers and meat from the forest provided them nutrition before, which is
stopped in the last few decades. So the problem of malnutrition is acute as rice, the staple diet lacks
proteins or vitamins. Vegetables are rarely and milk is hardly available or consumed in the tribal
villages.

Most of the women in villages, especially in the forest margins are Anaemic, illiterate. They lack
property, eat less & last, often suffer from disease & workload. Maternal & infant mortality
(MMR/IMR) rates are thus high- about 60 & 580 respectively per 10,000 births, putting Chhattisgarh
in the bottom 5 states in human development index (HDI). For, institution delivery & prenatal care is
less due to remoteness & poverty.

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2) METHODOLOGY

Location map of state of Location of project area in the


Chhattisgarh in E. India state (near centre)

It was proposed to develop a nutritional, healthy product & local garden plants package. Also, local
language, well illustrated training module & posters are prepared for the tribal community. These
will be taught in rapid courses / village meetings & posted in the Panchayat building for awareness
creation. Local clinics & physicians, Govt. health workers such as ‘Asha” was involved in it. This made
the tribal women aware of these issues & this could improve their health, reduce mortality due to
the better reproductive & infant/ child care, in future.

Kitchen gardens, with vegetables like Melon, Gourd etc. & leafy ones like Amaranth & tubers like
Sugarbeat was promoted. It included medicinal herbs like Tulsi, Turmeric, Ginger etc. Their uses for
diet nutrition & primary healthcare, besides that of the milk & poultry, was taught to the tribal
women groups. Their leaders will be trained specially to monitor adoption of these healthy practices
& provide feedback reg. its success, any difficulty to CCD staff for guidance. Regular visit & advice of
the medical experts was sought.

The project results were assessed after 6 months of monitoring & discussed with the Govt. health
officers, industry, media & policymakers – Ayush & NRHM- to upscale & replicate the approach, as it
was found useful & economic.

In all, health profile of 100 persons– women & children was surveyed. Of these 60 women with
weak health were screened for Haemoglobin.

These families were provided 6 herbs each to grove & use. They were trained in it, besides 30
critically ill looking women were provided nutritional supplements.

CCD will work in the 3 villages in Lormi block, Bilaspur district, a forest margin, poor community area
where it has social connection- Sardha, Jhajpuri, Dogaria.

CCD conducted baseline survey of local population diet, lifestyle & health profile- with 100 women
studied initially- who are mothers/ pregnant to reveal the disease burden & its causes. This includes
haemoglobin test, for about 60 weak women, besides weight, body mass index (BMI), disease
frequency, duration & medicine cost after their prior informed consent (PIC) & following the ethical
guidelines.

Local staff & women group representatives will be trained in diet, health & kitchen garden raising &
use for nutrition & primary healthcare.

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Nursery of about 1,000 plants of nutritious & healthy vegetable/ medicinal species will be raised &
about 10 plants each will be distributed to the target women to raise & use.

The plants included

Kumari (Aloe vera),

Satavar (Asparagus racemosa),

Giloy (Tinospora cordifolia),

Kalmegh (Andrographis paniculata),

Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera),

Stevia (Stevia rabadiana).

Amla (Emblica officinalis), Harra (Terminalia chebula) are forest trees, easily available in the area.
These were also used & taught to people.

About 5 women groups with 60 members will be trained by their leaders, with CCD supervision in
raising & using these plants for primary healthcare, as low cost method.

About 20 women will also be trained in making laddu i.e. sweetmeats from these plant products as
healthy diet & promote their regular, limited consumption by the women & the children. It
comprised of

(a) Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera)

(b) Satavar (Asparagus racemosus)

(c) Vidari kand (Pureria tuberosa)

(d) Giloy (Tinospora cordifolia)

(e) Chandrasur (Lepidium sativa)

(f) Arjun (Terminalia arjuna)

The impacts of the consumption of these vegetables & sweetmeat on pregnant women/ mothers &
children health were noted & analyzed after 6 months in terms of

(a) weight,

(b) Hemoglobin level,

(c) disease frequency, duration & cost, besides

(d) BMI (Body mass index).

The exit point data on these parameters was compared with the entry level data (baseline).

The results were shared with NGOs, health experts & government health officials.

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3) RESULTS

Body measurements of the 60 study women are mentioned in annexure 1.

The community is affected by (a) hunger & malnutrition causing poor immunity, (b) poor
hygiene & sanitation. This is evident from the low body mass index- BMI- of the women studied.
It is reflected in Table 1 & Fig. 1.

Table 1- Frequency of BMI class

BMI Frequency
17 4
19 7
21 15
23 14
26 12
30 8
Fig 1- Frequency Distribution of BMI values

BODY MASS INDEX (BMI) DISTRIBUTION- WOMEN


16
14
12
10
Frequency

8
6
4
2
0
17 19 21 23 26 30
BMI

It was noted that after 6 months (June- December 2014) use of the medicinal plants package by
the women following reduction was observed in the major diseases –

DISEASE REDUCTION % HERBS USED

1 Arthritis 70% Ashwagandha

2 Jaundice 70% Mung

3 Fever 70% Giloy

4 Cough 70% Ginger

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The diseases below did not show much reduction -

DISEASE REDUCTION % HERBS USED

1 Skin diseases 30% Giloy, Kumari

2 Malaria 20% Tulsi, Giloy

3 Diarrhoea 20% Bael, Guava plum, Satavar

There was no change in the weight or height of women/ children resp. in 6 months.

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4) DISCUSSION

The main problem here is the hunger & malnutrition. For, the people here consume inadequate
fat, protein & vitamins. This results in the deficiency below that can be reduced by growing &
consuming the vegetable/spice plants as below –

NUTRIENT Food Sources Diseases caused

Fat Milk, meat, oilseeds, Grains Low BMI- @18

Protein Pulses, meat, milk Diarrhoea, Immunity,

Vitamins

Chilly, Coriander, fish, meat,


A milk Eye, skin disorders

Leafy vegetables, Legumes,


B flax, Milk, fish, meat, eggs Anaemia, Arthritis, Diarrhoea,

Chilly, Coriander, Lemon,


C Drumstick Muscle pain, Immunity, Iron intake

D Fish, egg, mushroom, heart, Weak Bones

Chilly, Leafy vegetable, Milk,


meat, fish, nuts, Whole
E grains/ Wheat, oilseeds Low Weight Infants

CG State Medicinal Plants Board (CGSMPB) has distributed millions of saplings of medicinal plants
the last few years to ensure health security, school gardens, urban families/ villagers are its
recipients. It was thus proposed to assess effectiveness of this strategy in health security in this
project so as to suggest any modifications for future intervention.

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The UNICEF report (2013) on child nutrition indicates its 3 aspects–

a) Stunting - % children below 5 years age with height below the standard
b) Under weight - % children below 5 years age with weight below age standard
c) Wasting - % children below 5 years age with weight below standard for height

South Asia, including India has 49% rural children stunted as per the report. Further, India has
25 million wasted children; largest in the globe 16 times that in Pakistan & Nigeria, 10 times
that in Bangladesh & 15 times the China.

At least 10% of the children are severely wasted in India like in sub-Saharan Africa. Worst, there
is little or no progress in India on Annual Avg Rate of Reduction (AARR) in underweight
prevalence like sub-Saharan Africa & South Asian nations.

The report following interventions to suggests the overcome these problems –

a) Better maternal nutrition


b) Breast tending
c) Complementary feeding from 6 months
d) Micronutrient supplements
e) Good sanitation & clean drinking water

The following nutritional supplements in are suggested in the report –

Vitamin A – 30% preschool age children & 15% pregnant women are vitamins deficient due to
poor diet. Papaya, mango, chilly, fish, coriander Beary are a good source.

Some health measures such as Iodized salt are common today now widely available due to free
distribution in PDS.

Pulse like Horse gram & Soyabean flour is also provided in PDS/school but the intake is poor
due to ignorance, dislike/dysentery. There is need for awareness of the villagers’ reg. its
purpose & utility.

Similar fortified flour is distributed to children across hamlets/ schools in states like
Maharashtra through health workers & even women groups are provided contracts for its
preparation/ packing.

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REFERENCES

CG-Govt. 2005.Human development in Chhattisgarh.


http://www.im4change.org/docs/chhat_chap6-189-198.pdf

GoI, 2013. Report of 5th Joint Review Mission on Mid Day Meal Scheme-
MAHARASHTRA. Government of India Ministry of Human Resource, Department of School
Education & Literacy, New Delhi.
http://mdm.nic.in/Files/Review/Fifth_Review/Mah/Final_Report_JRM_MDM_Maharashtra.pdf

GoI, 2014. Mother & child nutrition portal. http://www.poshan.nic.in/jspui/index.html

NRHM, 2006. National Rural Health Mission- Chhattisgarh profile. http://nrhm.gov.in/nrhm-in-


state/state-wise-information/chhattisgarh.html

Pinson, Richard, 2011. Body Mass Index and malnutrition: Interrelated comorbidities.
http://www.hcpro.com/content/271737.pdf.

UNDP, 2011. Chhattisgarh Economic & Human Development Indicators.


www.in.undp.org/content/dam/india/docs/chhattisgarh_factsheet.pdf

UNICEF, 2013. IMPROVING CHILD NUTRITION- The achievable imperative for global progress.
http://www.unicef.org/gambia/Improving_Child_Nutrition_-
_the_achievable_imperative_for_global_progress.pdf

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ANNEXURE 1

Body measurement data of the sample women

Dongariya village

S.no NAME AGE WEIGHT(kg.) Height m HB(gm) BMI


1 sangita kasyap 23 40 1.56 10 16.4
2 puneshwari kasyap 35 55 1.53 11 23.5
3 tirthin bai kasyap 60 55 1.5 12 24.4
4 sati bai kasyap 37 65 1.56 14 26.7
5 lalita kasyap 25 46 1.25 10 29.4
6 namkumari shrivas 42 35 1.4 11 17.9
7 gulaba bai shrivas 65 65 1.4 15 33.2
8 shashi sharma 35 83 1.56 16 34.1
9 gouri kasyap 30 35 1.4 15 17.9
10 sakun bai shrivas 43 42 1.37 13 22.4
11 madhu diwadi 40 44 1.6 11 17.2
12 sail bai shrivas 35 36 1.5 11 16.0
13 shyama yadav 60 37 1.43 11 18.1
14 mantora shrivas 35 39 1.42 13 19.3
15 saroj kasyap 35 55 1.37 14 29.3
16 kavita diwadi 40 52 1.6 14 20.3
17 sunita sharma 35 48 1.43 11 23.5
18 nirmala nishad 35 62 1.53 15 26.5
19 radika yadav 46 53 1.53 14 22.6
20 fona kasyap 22 40 1.4 15 20.4

9
Shardha village

S.NO. NAME AGE WEIGHT(KG) HEIGHT M HB(GM) BMI


19
1 maina devi 60 45 1.53 14
23
2 manju rajput 24 55 1.56 16
23
3 trivani rajput 28 57 1.56 13
18
4 kusma bai 22 37 1.42 11
20
5 aswani rajput 25 52 1.6 10
31
6 koushiliya tiwari 60 60 1.4 11
25
7 laxmi tiwari 33 56 1.49 16
23
8 saroj tiwari 30 55 1.56 14
23
9 durga bai rajput 33 53 1.53 14
31
10 eshwari bai 32 63 1.42 16
21
11 shyama bai rajput 28 43 1.42 13
22
12 ramkumari rajput 25 44 1.4 10
30
13 shanti bai 25 45 1.22 16
20
14 yamini bai 23 46 1.5 11
17
15 videh bai 45 35 1.43 13
24
16 santoshi 22 50 1.43 11
19
17 priti 23 48 1.6 12
28
18 ambika bai 42 60 1.46 15
21
19 prabha bai 28 52 1.56 14
20
20 nandini bai 30 50 1.6 12

10
Jhajpuri village

HEIGHT BMI
S.NO. NAME AGE WEIGHT(KG) M HB(gm)
26
1 saloni kasyap 44 51 1.4 14
24
2 laxmi kasyap 24 49 1.42 13
20
3 fuleshwari yadav 20 43 1.48 11
22
4 bhuri bai yadav 50 50 1.51 13
27
5 shyamkali yadav 48 52 1.4 11
21
6 radhiya bai yadav 42 49 1.52 12
26
7 rani bai yadav 25 50 1.4 14
26
8 madhu bai yadav 35 51 1.4 12
21
9 anita sahu 30 49 1.52 12
21
10 kalyani sahu 25 48 1.51 12
23
11 sumitra bai sahu 50 52 1.52 11
32
12 jatiya bai 48 49 1.24 12
22
13 urvashi kasyap 36 50 1.51 9
22
14 rampyari 42 50 1.52 12
20
15 durpatiya 22 46 1.51 13
20
16 tirbani sahu 23 45 1.51 11
25
17 ganga bai kewat 40 49 1.4 10
21
18 priti bai 24 48 1.51 12
21
19 savitri bai kasyap 50 52 1.57 10
22
20 baleshwari yadav 23 48 1.48 11

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ANNEXURE 2

HEALTH SURVEY

A) Dongariya village

S.NO WEIGH VEGITABL NONVEG MILK/FRUI


. NAME GENDER F/H/NAME AGE T HIGHT E DAL . T
1 sangita kasyap Female shrvan kasyap 23 40 5.2' yes yes yes very low
2 puneshwari kasyap Female manoj kasyap 35 55 5.1' yes yes yes very low
3 tirthin bai kasyap Female smaru kasyap 60 55 5.0' yes yes yes very low
4 sati bai kasyap Female narottam kasyap 37 65 5.2' yes yes yes very low
5 lalita kasyap Female sanatkumar kasyap 25 46 4.2' yes yes yes very low
6 nemkumari shrivas Female chetan shrivas 42 35 4.10' yes yes yes no
7 gulababai shrivas Female niya shrivas 65 65 4.8' yes yes yes no
8 shashi sharma Female narayan sharma 35 83 5.2' yes yes no yes
9 gouri kasyap Female rohini kasyap 30 35 4.8' yes yes yes no
10 sakunbai shrivas Female ramkumar shrivas 43 43 4.7' yes yes yes yes
11 madhu diwadi Female diverce 40 44 5.4' yes yes no yes
12 sail bai shrivas Female pradeep shrivas 35 36 5.4' yes yes yes very low
13 shyma yadav Female dhiraj yadav 60 37 4.9' yes yes yes very low
14 mantora shrivas Female kallu shrivas 35 39 4.11' yes yes yes very low
15 saroj kasyap Female nandram kasyap 35 55 4.7' yes yes yes very low
16 kavita diwadi Female laxmi diwadi 40 52 5.5' yes yes no yes
17 sunita sharma Female hazarilal 35 48 4.9' yes yes no yes
18 nirmala nishad Female parasram nishad 35 62 5.1' yes yes yes yes
19 fona kasyap Female pushuram kasyap 22 40 4.8' yes yes yes yes
20 radika yadav Female mela yadav 46 53 5.1' yes yes yes yes
21 ku.annu shrivas Female dindayal shrivas 5 12 yes yes no yes
22 ku.hansa shrivas Female manoj shrivas 1 5 no no no yes
23 jaikumar shrivas male manoj 5 12 yes yes yes yes

a
24 yogesh nishad male parasram nishad 6 13 yes yes no yes
25 payal kasyap Female rohini kasyap 6 12 yes yes no very low
26 aakash yadav male laxman yadav 7 15 yes yes no very low
27 ashish kasyap male nandram kasyap 5 12.5 yes yes yes very low
28 guddu male pushuram kasyap 5 10 yes yes yes very low
29 roshni kasyap Female sanatkumar kasyap 4.5 9 yes yes no very low
30 jagriti kasyap Female sanatkumar kasyap 6 12 yes yes no very low
31 abhishek kasyap male manoj kasyap 14 48 yes yes yes yes
32 pankaj kasyap male manoj kasyap 11 30 yes yes yes yes
33 parchi kasyap Female sharvan kasyap 5 12 yes yes yes very low
34 janvi kasyap Female sharvan kasyap 3 10 yes yes no very low
35 manvi kasyap Female shrvan kasyap 1.5 6 no no no very low

b
HEALTH SURVEY

B) Shardha village

s.no. NAME F/H/NAME GENDER AGE WEIGHT HEIGHT VEGITABLE DAL NONVEG. MILK/FRUIT
1 shyma bai rajput mahavir rajput female 28 43 4.11' yes yes very low very low
2 ramkumari rajput panchram female 25 44 4.11' yes yes very low very low
3 shantibai pradeep female 25 45 4.1' yes yes very low very low
4 yamini bai ashishkumar female 23 46 5.0' yes yes very low very low
5 vedehibai ramkumar female 43 35 4.9' yes yes very low very low
6 eshwari bai suknandan female 32 63 4.11' yes yes very low very low
7 manju rajput jitendra rajput female 24 55 5.2' yes yes very low very low
8 mainadevi mayaram female 60 45 5.1' yes yes very low very low
9 trivani rajput vimal rajput female 28 57 5.2' yes yes very low very low
10 kusmabai narayan singh female 22 37 4.11' yes yes very low very low
11 saroj tiwari kanhiya tiwari female 30 55 5.2' yes yes no very low
12 laxmi tiwari manharan tiwari female 33 56 4.9' yes yes no very low
13 kousiliya tiwari satyanarayan female 60 60 4.8' yes yes no very low
14 ashwani rajput mithlesh female 25 52 5.4' yes yes very low very low
15 durgabai rajput devanand female 33 53 5.1' yes yes very low very low
16 santoshi parmanand female 22 50 4.9' yes yes very low very low
17 ambika bai dilipkumar female 42 60 4.10' yes yes very low very low
18 nandnibai narendra singh female 30 50 5.4' yes yes very low very low
19 prabha bai late.gajendra singh female 28 52 5.2' yes yes very low very low
20 priti santanand female 23 48 5.4' yes yes very low very low
21 tejeshvi tiwari kanhiya tiwari male 4 15 very low yes no very low
22 vashali kanhiya tiwari female 2 10 very low yes no very low
23 anchal narayan singh female 5month 5 very low yes very low very low
24 chanchal narayan singh male 4 11 very low yes yes very low
25 mayank trivani male 4 13.5 very low yes no yes

c
26 chandrakant jitendra rajput male 3 10 very low yes yes yes
27 suryakant jitendra rajput male 2month 5 no no no no
28 sameer suknandan male 5 15 yes yes yes yes
29 pooja suknandan female 3.5 14 yes yes yes yes
30 dipika panchram female 4 11 very low yes very low very low

d
HEALTH SURVEY

d) Jhajpuri village

NON
S.NO. NAME F/H/NAME GENDER AGE WEIGHT HEIGHT VEGITABLE DAL VEG. MILK/FRUIT
1 saloni kasyap sulekh kasyap female 44 51 4.10' yes yes very low very low
2 laxmi kasyap arun kasyap female 24 49 4.11' yes yes very low very low
3 fuleshwari yadav daduram female 20 43 4.8' yes yes very low very low
4 bhuribai yadav amle yadav female 50 50 4.9' yes yes very low very low
5 shyamkali yadav bihari yadav female 48 52 4.10' yes yes very low very low
6 radiyabai melaram yadav female 42 49 5.0' yes yes very low very low
7 ranibai vijay yadav female 25 50 4.10' yes yes very low very low
8 madhu bai yadav manharan yadav female 35 51 4.10' yes yes very low very low
9 anita sahu shivchalak female 30 49 5.0' yes yes very low very low
10 kalyani sahu chamru sahu female 25 48 4.9' yes yes very low very low
11 sumitra bai sahu fakuram sahu female 50 52 5.0' yes yes very low very low
12 baleshwari yadav gautam yadav female 23 48 4.8' yes yes very low very low
13 jatiya bai rajaram female 48 49 4.10' yes yes very low very low
14 urvashi kasyap omprakash kasyap female 36 50 4.9' yes yes very low very low
15 pritibai parmeshwar female 24 48 4.9' yes yes very low very low
16 savitri bai kasyap narayan kasyap female 50 52 5.1' yes yes very low very low
17 tirbeni sahu onkar sahu female 23 46 4.9' yes yes very low very low
18 gangabai kewat arjun kewat female 40 49 4.11' yes yes very low very low
19 rampyari milakram female 42 50 5.1' yes yes very low very low
20 durpatiya balmiki female 22 46 4.9' yes yes very low very low
21 urmila bai late.kunjan kasyap female 65 50 5.0' yes yes very low very low
22 dhaneshwari arun kasyap female 1month 5 no no no no
23 riya yadav melaram yadav female 2 9 no yes no very low
24 priyanka yadav melaram yadav female 4 12 yes yes very low very low

e
25 malika yadav melaram yadav female 5.5 15 yes yes very low very low
26 parton makhanlal female 5 13 yes yes very low very low
27 lalli makhanlal female 3 12 very low very low very low very low
shahilkumar
28 kasyap rekhram kasyap male 6 14 very low very low no very low
29 krishnakumar rekhram kasyap male 3 9 very low very low no very low
30 taddu bihari yadav male 6 13 very low very low very low very low
31 mantu bihari yadav male 4 12 yes yes yes yes
32 reena sahu janiram sahu female 6 13 yes yes no very low
33 laxmin sahu janiram sahu female 4.5 12 yes yes no very low
34 chanda sahu janiram sahu female 3 9 very low yes no very low
35 saroj yadav santosh yadav female 5 11 yes yes very low very low