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Today when we reflect upon our history the only names of rulers that

come to our mind are males. We can hardly remember any names of
Indian queens, this is Indias history. But this is not what defines us today.
What defines us is, the future we create for ourselves. Together as one
nation, one community, one family we believe that it is our responsibility
to eradicate gender disparity.

GRANDPARENT INTERVIEW 1

GENERAL QUESTIONS

Q1. How many people were there in your parents’ family? How many people lived in the same
house? What was the profession of your father/mother?
ANS: We lived in a joint family, where there were 5 brothers, 1 sister, my mother, my maternal
aunt and uncle and 3 of their children living in one bungalow. My father was a big landlord owning
hectares of agricultural land. He expired when I was 4 years old. We lived in a village called ‘Penn’
where there was a municipal school for girls and one high school.

Q2. Do you remember any historical event when you were a teenager?
ANS: We got independence from the British in the year 1947 when I was 12 years old. We were all
enthusiastic since we had studied about Gandhiji’s struggle for freedom, I was highly motivated
and inspired by him.

MAIN QUESTIONS

Q1. Were there differences in upbringing of boys and girls?


ANS: though my sister was quite bright and capable to pursue further studies, she chose to get
married instead because of various reasons. During, those times, their minds were conditioned in
this way. They were trained to put limit to their dreams.this was the way of upbringing. After a
certain age, when a girl was yet unmarried everyone believed that there was a flaw in her. In
educated families, especially Maharashtrians educated both the male and the female members.
But in a Gujarati family, this was the case.

Q2. Did boys and girls have the same rights to education at school?
ANS: During our time, there were no co-ed schools, everything was very different. In Pune
schools we would not even get to communicate freely with any girl. Majority of the girls had to
drop out of school because of their family pressure togged married. They were not allowed to
attend any extra classes or cultural activities without being chaperoned by a male family member.
They weren’t even allowed to opt for further studies because they had to undergo training for
household chores so that they could be married off easily. Even though boys were allowed to go
for outdoor picnics the girls weren’t.

Q3. What differences were there between men and women with reference to work?
ANS: The job opportunities given depended on the beliefs of a particular caste for example
Maharashtrians were service minded people who encouraged their daughters to pursue further
studies but Gujaratis were stereotypical and limited the rights of the women. Women as well as
men were either appointed as teachers or clerks, but only men received promotions since they
believed that the first priority of women should be handling household chores.

Q4. Did women have the same salaries compared to men?


ANS: No, they were not at par with males even though they did the same amount of work.

Q5. How was household work divided among men and women?
ANS: All household chores were usually carried out by the women of the family. Generally the
men did not contribute towards household work. I extended help bringing in the vegetables and
drying the clothes. Usually the presence of a male member was necessary when an extensive
object had to be bought.

Q6. Do you consider women to be completely emancipated in 2014? Why (not)?


ANS: In cities, women were getting emancipated but in remote villages gender bias was yet
rampent. The residents of rural area were not even aware of the advantages of having a girl child
because in the villages there were less educational facilities provided.
Q7. Has the position of women in the society changed with the help of the government ? Yes/No
If yes, how?
ANS:Government has initiated many schemes and projects wherein more schools are built in the
villages and primary education has become free of cost and mandatory for girls and boys. The
cost of secondary education was also subsidised to promote girl’s right to education. Scholarships
were granted to girls. With this progress observed in the career of women, families are also
convinced to provide motivation to the women to pursue further goals and higher education.

PARENT INTERVIEW 1
GENERAL QUESTIONS

Q1. How many people were there in your parents’ family? How many people lived in the same
house? What was the profession of your father/mother?
ANS: “I lived in a nuclear family. My family comprised of my father, mother and my two younger
brothers. I lived in Santacruz, in Mumbai. My father was working as a Pharma marketing
consultant and my mother was a homemaker.

Q2. Do you remember any historical event when you were a teenager?
ANS: In 1977, my parents worked as volunteers for the political party Janta Dal and I loved running
small errands for them. When the Janta Dal won the parliamentary elections and came to power,
we all were very jubilant. From that time onwards I got very interested in the politics of my
country and I follow it closely till date. There was also another very significant event that I will
never forget. In 1983, the Indian cricket team wont the world cup. I was an avid cricket fan and
was absolutely ecstatic. I felt so proud that we were the world champions. In India, cricket is like a
religion and it can create so much fervour in the people.

MAIN QUESTIONS

Q1. Were there differences in upbringing of boys and girls?


ANS: No, there were no differences. We were treated the same.

Q2. Did boys and girls have the same rights to education at school?
ANS: Yes, they did in the urban areas but in most of the rural areas the girls did not have the
rights to education and even if they did go to school, they were not allowed to study beyond a few
years.

Q3. What differences were there between men and women with reference to work?
ANS: Yes, there were jobs for both but women could not hold senior positions due to male
dominance in the work scenario. Women normally had jobs like secretory, teacher, beautician,
dress designer or receptionist and few worked towards being a doctor or being an entrepreneur.
Men could do their own business or work in the factories or corporate world. They could be
engineers or doctors.

Q4. Did women have the same salaries compared to men?


ANS: No, I dont think that women had the same salaries as compared to the men.

Q5. How was household work divided among men and women?
ANS: Yes, my father used to shop for fruits and vegetables. He would help my mom with the
Diwali cleaning. He would take up our studies and also cook sometimes.
Q6. Do you consider women to be completely emancipated in 2014? Why (not)?
ANS: Yes, women are emancipated in the urban and most of the rural areas but in the remote
areas, they are still struggling to overcome the gender disparity.

Q7. Has the position of women in the society changed with the help of the government ? Yes/No
If yes, how?
ANS: Yes, the government has implemented many projects and schemes, which encourage and
help the women to gain the right for education and to make an identity for themselves. The
government has launched many scholarship programs which motivate the women to work
towards achieving their goals and dreams.

STUDENT INTERVIEW 1

Q1. Are there differences in the upbringing of boys and girls?


ANS1: Boys had more advantages, they were allowed to go wherever they wanted and dress up
how they want, while girls were not allowed to leave the house wearing particular clothes. Also,
very often, girls were not allowed to go out of the house late at night or anywhere far without
atleast 5-6 people being there w them.

Q2. Do boys and girls have the same rights to education at school?
ANS2: As for schooling, in our generation there isnt a very biased schooling system, but the
stereotypes are still there. Girls and boys were treated as equals.

Q3.what differences are there between men ansd women with reference to work?
ANS3: Where work is considered, men and women were given the opportunity to work in very
different fields. Women are less preferred, because owners/managers feel that beacuse women
take maternity leaves and leaves for their marriages, they feel that they will be less efficient and
hardly prefer to give women jobs over men. There are also differences in pay gaps due to this.
Typically, you will never see a women work as a construction worker or mine worker whereas all
the jobs requiring physical strength and labour will be given to men.

Q4. Do women have the same salaries compared to men?


ANS4: Women get comparitively less salary in many if not all cases. Managers feel that women
will take too many leaves for various reasons and hence will offer a lesser salary as they feel that it
is unreasonable to pay women the same when women to "less work".

Q5. How is household work divided between men and women?


ANS5: Most of the times, women did most of the household jobs like cooking or cleaning. Even if
men do help, they mostly justify themselves by saying they pay the bills and do not have time to
do chores because they have a job at which they spend most of their time in.
Q6. Do you consider women to be completely emancipated in 2014?
ANS6: Women are not completely liberated but there has been a change, however small it may
be, and if we keep making a change, we may be able to create an impact.

Q7. Has the position of women in the society changed with the help of the government?
ANS7: No, it hasn’t

REPORT ON INTERVIEWS
The interviews were conducted on the 16th of December, at the house of a
team member. The work was distributed amongst us; one person would ask
questions, the other would write answers (record), and the third would take
pictures and videos of the interviews. We began with excitement, enthusiasm
and energy, starting off with the grandparent’ interviews. At the start, we were
taken aback by the answers given, and soon, our awe-stricken selves
realised how the answers were all related and quite similar, for they belonged
to the same generation, having almost the same beliefs. the most surprising
answers given were the ones in response to the question related to the
witnessing of historic events. The events that occurred at that time period
were utterly devastating because of the instability of the nation after recent
independence. the parent interviews, however, made us realise how the
situation is changing, even though the progress was terribly slow. Women
were given strikingly few rights in urban areas, and none in the rural. A myth
believed by all during those times was that the birth of a girl child was
considered unlucky, leading to the abandonment or abortion of the innocent
infant. As time passed, girls received education and equality. This practice
was further encouraged with the help of the government and the position of
women in society changed. Answers given by the parents were similar,
revolving around the same ideas. We were intensely inquisitive and wanted a
detailed research, so we asked them questions related to the roles played by
men and women during festivals, religious practices and rituals. Nonetheless,
everyone who was interviewed believes that even today in many rural areas
the girls are not given the same privileges that a boy receives. Our interviews
went remarkably well and our research was immensely productive, giving us
an exceptionally clear picture of what exactly the situation was, and how it is
changing.

INTERVIEW COMPARISONS

Answers of Grandparents
Similarities-
1. All our grandparents lived in joint families.
2. There were separate schools for boys and girls.
3. Even though most of the women were homemakers, few who worked were not given
salaries on parr with the men and were not given promotions beyond a certain limit.
4. In those days, the women were often married off at an earlier age. If they would have
got a choice between educating themselves and taking care of a household, they
would have chosen the latter since they were “conditioned” by the men of the family to
think in such a way.

Differences-
1. Each of them witnessed a different historical event, the satyagraha and the declaration
of independence from the British rule.
2. The upbringing of a son and a daughter varied from household to household, some
were treated equally while some were not even allowed to spread their wings beyond
the household.
3. Education and opportunities were granted to the girls, depending upon their castes.
For example, in Maharashtrian families were service-minded and encouraged their
women to study further while in Gujarati families, the members had a typical mindset
and limited the women’s work to the household.
Conclusion- In the older generation, male superiority was given a lot of importance.
Women were not granted the complete right to education and offered jobs which the men
also took interest in. Women had to obey the orders of the male head of the family and
their dreams were limited.

Answers of Parents
Similarities-
1. In the urban areas the women were slowly getting emancipated but in the rural areas
there was no sign of change.
2. The government played an important role in liberating the women from the holds of the
men in the family. It implemented many projects and schemes to encourage and help
women gain the right to education and make an identity for themselves. It launched
scholarship programs to aid this process.
3. The way of upbringing had changed. The son and the daughter were treated equally.
In some families the daughter received more importance.
4. Coed schools were in existence .

Differences-
1. In some of the families, the males started helping out in the basic household chores
while in the other the mindset had yet not undergone a change.The males helped out
in shopping for fruits and vegetables and the cleaning before festivals.
2. Due to the difference in age groups, our parents witnessed different historical events,
be it the Indian cricket team winning the world cup in 1983 or riots after the
assassination of our late prime minister, Indira Gandhi.
3. In urban areas, many families gave their daughters education and job opportunities
while in some household they were married off after a certain age.
Conclusion- There were signs of the women getting emancipated in the urban areas but
they were not granted any freedom in the villages. Men showed some responsibility in the
household chores. The government introduced many programs and schemes to promote
women empowerment.

Answers of the Grandparents and Parents


Similarities-
1. Between both the generations, male dominance played a significant role in the
patriarchal society.
2. Over time, the gender disparity in the rural areas is yet a part of the way of life there.
3. Males are yet given more preference in work scenarios. Even though women do the
same amount of work, they are paid poorly.

Differences-
1. There was a huge shift in paradigm with the generations with regards to the women’s
right to education and their job opportunities.
2. The policies introduced by the government have helped in the empowerment of the
women. This includes the launching of free education programs and many other
schemes.
3. Nowadays, the son and daughter of the family are treated equally while in the previous
generation, there was a great difference between the upbringing.
Conclusion-
The turning of the clocks brought in a drastic change in the mindsets of people. People
changed their vision and became more open-minded towards women receiving equals
rights as men. The government also implemented various schemes and programs to aid
giving the women equal rights, but yet there weren’t any improvements in the wages given
to the women.