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Introduction

To the readers;

The intention of these documents is to provide potential Steel Panthers scenario designers an
understanding and ability to create historical and realistic scenarios. Additionally, E-Mail games can now
be “based” real force distributions instead of spur of the moment and ad hov creations. There are three
take aways:

1. Realistic force creations


2. New tactical opportunities
3. New units creations

REALISTIC FORCE CREATIONS

Most nationalities utilized triangular formations. The different forms were dependent upon units available,
strength of units and operational goals. Almost all armies used battalion sized unit formations as their
minimum size. Steel Panthers limits this important characteristic with formation sized parameters.

I am not recommending playing regimental sized battles, but true battalion sized battles are currently
impossible with the limits on unit numbers. An example of an realistic operational unit would be an
American Regimental Combat Team.

Please refer to the RCTs organization.

Normally the RCT would have two advancing formations with a third in reserve. Each advancing
formation would be a battalion of infantry and 1 or 2 companies of engineers. The artillery battalion and
battery would be with the reserve formation. The armored company would be split between the
advancing formations. This basic formation (one of the advancing columns) requires: 1 or 2 platoons of
tanks, 2 or 3 sections of off board artillery (maybe on board), 1 or 2 platoons of engineers with trucks,
roughly 28 infantry squads with supporting heavy weapons. The divisional motor pool would provide
transportation for the infantry - some on the tanks and the rest in trucks. This may seem like a lot of units
but it is only roughly 400 points!! (120 for the tanks, 40 for the artillery, 32 for the engineers, 16 for their
trucks, 84 for the infantry, 36 for their trucks, and 70 for misc. (like a company from the Recon battalion -
ACs)). This would be a standard formation used in SP. Yet, this type of formation is impossible to
achieve with the unit number limitation.

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NEW TACTICAL OPPORTUNITIES

If players could create this type of formation, tactics would be dramatically different. Effective flanking
maneuvers, thrusts ,etc. could be staged. You could afford to be aggressive because you could have
some on board reserve to accomplish the mission if you make a mistake or miscalculation. Now, if a
tactical mistake is made, you are essentially up a creek.

My goal was not to compliant, but provide an easy reference source to truly challenge other players in
games. With unit formation charts, players can simulate an armored attack against an infantry unit and
know what possible units would be available. Again it changes tactics. If you know the enemy will not
have tanks, your selection of forces is going to be different. You might choose slow moving SP artillery
units to “blast” at bunkers, etc. versus fast moving mobile tanks because you do not have to worry about
an armored counter attack.

Thus, challenges would be what type of engagement, the year and month, the nationalities, and the unit
type (Armor division versus an infantry or Armored infantry). This will create “unbalances” in player
formations strengths. Armored units will have force advantages over infantry. This is what real military
commanders hoped to achieve when attacking.

So how to make the game “fair”? Simple, negotiate point reallocations before the game; such as the
infantry division defender has a 25% point bonus or the armor attacker has 25% penalty. Again these
point reallocations change your tactics. It is not enough to capture two of the three objective areas, but
as the armored commander you must assault all three to win.

My goal is to provide the resources to create circumstances like these, allowing different tactical plays.
Unit structures and organizations create limits for force selections. In turn these limits provide different
opportunities for tactics based on unit types. Indeed you’ll be faced with the same chooses actual
commanders had or the lack of chooses dependent on you perspective.

NEW UNITS CREATIONS

Furthermore, anyone using Spedit can now create additional units based on realistic structures. For
example, I have integrated (with the editor) the 4th platoon of the standard German infantry company into
the other three platoons. This is realistic, the heavy weapons rarely operated alone, and it allows a large
group (pool) of men to transport (carry) the heavy weapons. So their movement rates are not
dramatically different than infantry (now they are so slow without motorized transport).

NATIONALITIES COMPLETED

I have researched four force structures:

1. German
2. American
3. British (still being cleaned up)
4. Russian (still being cleaned up)

FREE AND PUBLIC INFORMATION

These documents are not commercial in nature and the information found in them is freely
available in public libraries, etc. I highly recommend reading the reference sources listed. Most of the
stories and accounts are dramatic and compelling. Any copyright infringement is unintentional and this
documents distribution is free. My sole request is: if you create scenarios with these charts, I’d love to
play them.

Please include this preface and the reference sources with any distribution.

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CONCLUSION

I do not plan to update or revise the documents - the compilation took too much time. I would appreciate
receiving corrections or adjustments. Again these charts and tables are from multiple sources, which
sometimes had slightly different organizations and unit strengths. Additionally, I have rough draft forms
of the British and Russian forces. Once I clean them up, I post ‘em.

Have fun. Thanks.

S. Sheckells
SSHECKE277@AOL.com

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Soviet Units

These notes provide some knowledge of Soviet strategy, structures and forces. They are general in
nature. Furthermore, many aspects of the Soviet forces are counter intuitive and unique. I
recommend reading or at least skimming In Pursuit of Deep Battle by David Glantz for a deeper
understanding.
An understanding of Soviet strategy is critical because the Soviet military was (currently ?) a formal and
rigid structure. The doctrines and strategies outlined in their manuals were adhered to or the general
was “removed”. One would believe exceptions existed and success win these unique endeavors was
rewarded. No, that didn’t happen. Most innovative officers (who were potentially politically unstable)
were purged from the army in a violent and ruthless manner. Consequently, the Soviet command
played by a very rigid textbook.
This does not imply they were not intelligent or creative, but only that they fought in a rigid structure
unlike western forces. Consequently, how does an intelligent, capable commander compensate for
having to fight from a set rulebook or playbook? He or she makes sure the “plays” will work and
designs a force structure capable of allowing the “plays” to be successful. Thus the Soviet force
structure was critical in winning the war. It allowed the formalized and limited (compared to other
nationalities) strategy to be successful.

1. There are three types of formations:

 Organizational: The “paper” strength a unit has.


 Operational: A time period assessment of unit (based on reality). Operational is how the
forces were grouped and typically engaged the enemy in the field.
 Field: Snapshot of unit’s current strength. For example: an unit should have 5 tanks in a
platoon per company operating with 2 other companies. But recent losses in fighting has field
forces at 4 tanks per platoon with only 2 companies (the third was too badly damaged).

2. The formations specified have optimums unit numbers. A misconception of Soviet forces was
they had an abundance of troops and material. Actually they had a manpower shortage. Remember
within the first year of the war, their losses were roughly the equivalent of their entire standing army
before the war! Indeed, there were two distinct camps (replenishment) within the Soviet forces: Rifle
and Mechanized units. The Rifle forces were infantry, cavalry and various support forces for those
units. The Mechanized forces were Tank and Mechanized units with their support forces. The Rifle
forces were always understrength because they were the last ones to receive replacements and
supplies (see theoretical vs. actual Rifle Battalions). The Mech. Forces were rarely understrength,
typically operating at full men, tanks, and vehicle strengths. The reason for the difference in resource
allocation relates to their operational strategies (later notes).

3. The Rifle Corp.’s battalions and regiments use the Infantry Rifle Battalion OOBs. The Rifle
Brigades and Battalions in the Tank And Mechanized Corps use the Mechanized Rifle battalion
OOBs. Please note: in actuality the Infantry Rifle Battalion OOBs were the real forces present in a
Rifle battalion in a Rifle or Cavalry Corp. and the Mechanized Rifle Battalion OOBs were what the
OOBs for all battalions were supposed to be (but were not from manpower shortages). Thus only the
Mechanized and Tank Corp. had truly full strength Rifle Battalions.

4. Soviet organization is fundamentally triangular. It is what? In almost all cases, there were 3
prime units to each force; 3 Tank Brigades to a tank corps, 3 Rifle Divisions to a Rifle Corps, 3 Tank
Corps to a Tank Army, etc. Triangular force structures allow simple concise and manageable
battlefield units, which is critical in large confusing and chaotic battles.

5. The Soviet were the first to fully develop the Blitzkrieg tactic! However, they were not the first to
use it. As a result, they never developed a defensive strategy to counter the Blitzkrieg. The Germans
attacked first - history speaks of the result: wholesale slaughter of Soviet forces early in the war.
The Soviet Blitzkrieg was called Deep Battle and Deep Operations. Unlike western strategists, they
developed an intermediate stage between strategy (the ultimate goal of the war or war phase) and
tactics (the actions needed to accomplish small battlefield goals), which was an operational level.

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Thus their planners thought in terms of a strategy, operations, and tactics. The intermediate step is
extraordinarily useful in expansive protracted conflicts like those in the wide expanses of Russia and
the Eastern Front.
The military was segmented into two parts: a Attack or Mobile Group (I could not find a general term,
the group was always referred to by its parts: the Shock Group or Pinning Group) and the Group for
Further Operations (Group DD). The Attack Group and Group DD functioned at a theatre level like
the Pinning Group and Shock Group did at an operational level (see below).
Operational actions split the forces into two groups: a Pinning Group (skovyayushchaya gruppa)
accounting for 1/3rd of the forces and a Shock Group (udarnaya gruppa) being the other 2/3rd of the
forces. The Pinning Group would engage the enemy, tie up his forces, probe for weak points, and
“bleed” the enemy’s front line forces (necessitating enemy reserves being called up which further
weaken the enemy’s rear). The Shock Group, after a weak point was found and the enemy
sufficiently bled (the Pinning Group too), would assault through the enemy defensive lines; break into
the rear; engage and crush weak ancillary enemy units (artillery, AA, support units, etc. ); capture,
utilize or destroy enemy supplies; destroy logistical resources and means, etc..
The Attack Groups were tank and mechanized units. The Group DDs were what was left over. Who do
you think got the honors in such battles? The Attack Group. Explains why the Rifle Divisions were
the last in line for replenishment.
Within the Shock Group there was an Advance Guard Group (Forward Detachment). It was a
brigade whose purpose was to quickly engage and assault the enemy (as encountered), take and
hold operational positions allowing further exploitation of the enemies rear. It acted as a recon force,
but unlike western recon forces (who probed enemy formations and terrain), the Forward Detachment
was expected to overrun and annihilate the enemy. As one would expect, this vaulted position (it was
considered an honor to lead) was frequently shifted among brigades because of the high casualty
rate.
However, its most important role was taking and holding operational positions. In other words, the
Shock Group did not care about strategic positions, but was intent on capturing positions to continue
the Shock Group’s advance into the enemy’s rear. It would leave “pockets” of enemy forces behind
and advance securing operational objectives which ensured the enemy pockets were isolated and
without logistical support.
Then, after the Shock Group had past, the bulk of the army (Group DD) would surround, siege, starve,
bomb, and annihilate the now isolated and desperate enemy pocket. Please note, like the American
Island Hopping Strategy, this was fundamentally unique for those times. The German Blitzkrieg
called for force breakthroughs into rear areas, but then subsequent destruction of enemy forces from
the rear (envelopment vs. isolation). Most armies still attacked and attempted to defeat the enemy,
not just isolate and starve them to surrender.

6. Soviet divided the war into three periods: Strategic Defense (June 1941 - Nov. 1942), the
Transition (Dec. 1942 - Dec. 1943) and the Strategic Offensive (1944 - 1945). The transition was a
period of learning and readjusting from the disastrous defeats and looses during the Strategic
Defense. Interestingly, during the Strategic Defense the Soviets learned to counter Blitzkrieg
strategies.

7. Storm Detachments. The Soviets created Storm Detachments for urban fighting. Storm
Detachments were a battalion of infantry, a company of tanks or assault guns (a company of each
was better), and artillery (the assault guns could be SP artillery moving with the tanks). The infantry
were typically 50% sappers and 50% SMG squads (rifles have little use in close environments). Most
assaults were down main streets (once “pacified”); allowing armor units to move freely to areas for
support and firepower. The Soviets divided a city up and took a section of a city at a time. This divide
and conquer tactic massed forces and “pushed” the defenders into smaller pockets. Consequently,
once a small enough pocket formed the Soviets starved (food and water) the defenders and bombed
them into oblivion (artillery). Strategic artillery shelling (shelling large areas without targets) is very
wasteful of ordnance. However, if the area is “small enough” it becomes very destructive and
demoralizing, especially to starving, dehydrated, and desperate men who know they will eventually
lose. (Red Storm on the Reich by Christopher Duffy)

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8. Grinding Detachments. This is the term the Soviets used to designate the actions taken by the
Pinning Groups. They would grind the enemy in certain areas. Grinding is the assault on enemy
areas to create breakthrough points for the Shock Group. It, unlike the general goal of a Pinning
Group, was to probe, penetrate and secure the area to allow a unopposed passage way for the Shock
Group. In general the Pinning Group didn’t secure areas, but looked for more enemies to “tie up”.
Most Grind Detachments were engineer, heavy tank, heavy SP, etc. units. These were the slow units
that used large caliber weapons to blow the hell out of the enemy. (Red Storm on the Reich by
Christopher Duffy)

9. Meeting engagements were common. Sounds good to a E-Mail gamer! With Deep Operations,
tank groups (brigades, corps., etc.) would frequently encounter German units of various sizes
attempting to find their parent units or even return to stable German lines. Thus anywhere at any
time a battle could ensue. The Soviets constantly prepared for attacks and defensive operations on
all sides of their forces.

10. Soviet Strategy: In the first part of the war (1941 to mid 1942), their defensive formations were front
line heavy with essentially a single line of defense (traditional) and reserve forces waiting to reinforce
the line. Blitzkrieg broke through the strong front line, assaulted the line from the rear, and destroyed
the line from its weak and non-defended rear. Their defensive reserve force were not mobile and did
not respond to the rear entry threat. Thus both forces, the line and reserves, were devastated.
Traditional military strategy was attack the lines / troops / etc., defeat the enemy and win the day.
Blitzkrieg is punch a hole and hit them from their weak soft cushy side. As a result, the Soviets began
to experiment with multiple and subsequent defensive positions with mobile response reserves.
Their defensive strategy evolved into “Fronts” (meaning operational area). A metaphor for a Front is a
group of interlocked bubbles. A unit (division, corp., etc.) is a bubble and the front is a group of
bubbles lining up into two or three rows. The enemy will attack between the spaces in the bubbles
(where the front seems weakest) and weaves through the rows of bubbles.
Each bubble is a compact and intact force that strikes against an exposed flank of the weaving and
extended enemy formation. These bubbles are flexible and adaptable. They can move and shift
according to need. Additionally, the Soviets developed tiny specialized bubbles to “fit” in between
selected larger ones (mainly along the most obvious entrant paths and routes). These specialized
bubbles were anti tank groups. So as an enemy force weaved through the bubble labyrinth it hit
blocks (the AT groups) and the enemy force split up to take other paths, each time dividing itself into
smaller (and more defeatable) units). Hence the methodology to defeat Blitzkrieg like tactics was fluid
defensive groups.
The Germans did not learn from the Soviet’s early mistakes. When the Soviet began attacking west, the
German forces used traditional defenses (single or double defensive lines) and got creamed. But
their generals learned quickly and attempted to create fluid defensive lines and mobile response
groups (the famous kampgruppen), but Hitler ordered the Fester Platze. Fester Platze were fortress
areas and were to be defended to the last man. In his order (Hitler’s), he even stated that the German
forces should allow themselves to be surrounded to tie up enemy forces and allow other German
units to counter attack. This might have worked if the Soviets had a finite number of men and tanks,
but they (the Soviets) could afford to allow Group DDs to be tied down. As a matter of fact, this
defense was exactly what the Soviets wanted - given their Deep Operation Strategy. It allowed them
to isolate and destroy large German armies, which the Germans could not replace. Please note,
after several disastrous defeats, most German Army Group commanders disobeyed the Fester Platze
orders, but it was too late (three or four Army Groups had already been isolated and were defeated or
going to be defeated).

11. The Soviets seemed to mix TDs and SPs together. Adherent to their third period strategy
(offensive), TDs and SPs were slow (13 or 14 speeds vs. 20 for T34s). Consequently most Soviets
armored forces were tanks. This is unlike the Germans, who extensively used TDs in Late 1944 and
1945. The TDs or Jagpanzers were designated as tanks. Consequently, many scenario designers
assume tanks mean Panthers or PzIVs, when in many cases they were TDs. Simply put, TDs were
less expensive in raw materials to build. Germany had a severe shortage of raw materials - so they
built vehicles that were just as powerful, but required less material. Additionally, Germany’s strategy

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had become more defensive (advantageous for TDs, which were generally slower) rather than
offensive (advantageous for tanks with speed) as in the beginning of the war.

12. Usually tanks were not “mixed”. This statement indirectly applies to the Soviets. The Soviet forces
were medium tank “heavy” (T34s), which were fast (speed 20). Their other units were slower, but
since the bulk of their forces were a single design group (the T34s), they would mix attack groups.
You will find heavy tanks and medium tanks operating together even with the differences in
speed (this is unique for most nationalities - because in general different speeds mean they will be
unable to support each other - hence the enemy can divide and conquer).

13. A brigade is tank or mechanized unit. A distinction (as far as I can tell) exists between Tank /
Mechanized Corps designation and Rifle / Cavalry / Air Assault Corps units. The Tank / Mechanized
Corps used brigades vs. the divisional structure in Rifle units. The exceptions to this are Tank units
which are designated in a battalion or regimental form. These units are independent of a Corps such
as a Heavy Tank regiment, which is all heavy tanks versus a mix of medium, heavy and light tanks.
These were force augmentors, who could also be attached to Rifle (infantry) Armies providing some
armored forces for the primarily infantry units. Specifically the units were grouped into:

Tank / Mechanized Forces Rifle / Cavalry / Air Assault / Support Forces


Attack / Mobile Group Group DD
Army Army
Corps Corps
Division
Brigade Regiment
Battalion Battalion
Company Company

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
SOVIET ORGANIZATIONAL UNITS

1. Soviet Armed Forces 1941 - 1945

2. Rifle Corps
1935 Rifle Corp.
1940 - 1941 Rifle Corp.
1942 Rifle Corp.
Dec. 1943 Rifle Corp.
1944 Rifle Corp.
1944 Guards Rifle Corp.

3. Rifle Divisions
12 / 1941 Rifle Division
3 / 1942 Rifle Division
7 / 1942 Rifle Division
12 / 1942 Rifle Division
7 / 1943 Rifle Division
12 / 1944 Rifle Division
6 / 1945 Rifle Division

4. Rifle Regiments
1940 - 1942 Rifle Regiment
1943 - 1945 Rifle Regiment

5. Divisional and Regimental Companies

6. Mechanized Rifle Battalions


1941 - 6 / 1942 Mechanized Rifle Battalion
7 / 1942 - 12 / 1942 Mechanized Rifle Battalion
1/ 1943 - 12 / 1944 Mechanized Rifle Battalion
1 / 1945 - 6 / 1945 Mechanized Rifle Battalion

7. Infantry Rifle Battalions


1941 - 6 / 1942 Rifle Battalion
7 / 1942 - 12 / 1942 Rifle Battalion
1/ 1943 - 12 / 1944 Rifle Battalion
1 / 1945 - 6 / 1945 Rifle Battalion

8. Tank Corp.
3 / 1942 Tank Corp.
4 / 1942 Tank Corp.
7 / 1942 Tank Corp.
7 / 1943 Tank Corp.
12 / 1943 Tank Corp.
12 / 1944 Tank Corp.
8 / 1945 Tank Corp.
9. Tank Brigades and Battalions
Tank Brigade 12 / 1941
Tank Battalion 1941
Separate Tank Battalion 1941

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Tank Brigade 3 / 1942
Tank Battalion 3 / 1942
Separate Tank Battalion 3 / 1942

Tank Brigade 7 / 1942


Tank Battalion 7 / 1942
Separate Tank Battalion 7 / 1942

Tank Brigade 9 / 1942


Tank Battalion 9 / 1942
Separate Tank Battalion 9 / 1942

Tank Brigade 7 / 1943 - 1945


Tank Battalion 7 / 1943 - 1945
Separate Tank Battalion 7 / 1943 - 1945

10. Rifle Brigades


1941 Rifle Brigade
Mechanized Rifle Battalion 1941 - 6 / 1942

1942 Rifle Brigade - 7 / 1942


Mechanized Rifle Battalion 7 / 1942

1943 - 1944 Rifle Brigade


Mechanized Rifle Battalion 1943 - 12 / 1944

1945 Rifle Brigade


Mechanized Rifle Battalion 1945

11. Tank Regiments


Tank Regiment
Infantry Tank Battalion
Assault Gun Battalion

12. Mechanized Corp. 1942 - 1945


9 / 1942 Mechanized Corp. Type 1
9 / 1942 Mechanized Corp. Type 2
9 / 1942 Mechanized Corp. Type 3
9 / 1943 Mechanized Corp.
12 / 1942 Mechanized Corp.
12 / 1944 Mechanized Corp.

13. Mechanized Brigades and Battalions


Mechanized Brigade 1941
Mechanized battalion 1941 - 6 /1942

Mechanized Brigade 1942


Mechanized battalion 7 / 1942 - 12 /1942

Mechanized Brigade 1943 - 1944


Mechanized battalion 1 / 1943 - 12 /1944

Mechanized Brigade 1945


Mechanized battalion 1 / 1945 - 6 /1945

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14. Air Assault Corp.
Air Assault Corp. 1941 - 1943
Air Assault Division 1941 - 1943
Airborne Battalion

15. Artillery, Anti Tank, and Anti Aircraft Units


16. Sappier Battalions
17. Cavalry Corp.
18. December 1941
December 1941 Light Corp.
1943
1944 - 1945
19. Cavalry Divisions

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Soviet Armed Forces 1941 - 1945

There were five types of Soviet forces during World War II:

1. Rifle (Infantry based units)


2. Air Assault (Airborne units)
3. Tank (Armored forces)
4. Mechanized Rifle (Armored Infantry forces)
5. Cavalry (Mobile forces)

Notes, Assumptions, Qualifications

Armored:

* The number of tanks and their relative structure was provided. Consequently, their structure is
accurate unless noted.

Artillery:

* The number of guns and their relative structure was provided. Consequently, their structure is
accurate unless noted.

Infantry:

* Unfortunately, I could not find any references to size and structure below a regiment and
battalion level for infantry formations.

So how did I come up with infantry formations?

Their structures were designed (speculation) utilizing these qualified facts:

1. The total manpower and strength of the units was known.


2. The actual manpower of the units was known.
3. The typical squad size was known (about 10 men).
4. The Soviet forces were based upon a European model similar to German, British and French
forces.
5. The Soviet forces were always (rare exceptions) triangular in nature: allowing two sections
and a reserve. An example is 2/3rd of forces in a Shock group and a 1/3rd in a Pinning group.
Furthermore, the Army, Corp., and Brigade structure were based on three. This also tells you
how to play and create their forces.

6. I applied the “building a wall” (BAW) paradigm.

Essentially, “Building a Wall” (BAW) is how you construct a brick wall. The bricks are the
fundamental building blocks, the battalions and companies in this case. The mortar binds the
bricks together, the ancillary, specialized, or support units in this case. When you build a wall and
encounter a slight irregularity, you solve the problem with mortar i.e. the mortar smoothes out the
problem. You do not break or redesign the bricks (in general). Consequently, with the fluctuations
in force structures throughout the war, the Soviets would not (normally) redesign their bricks (the
infantry and tanks - they are the bricks of a company or battalion). Thus if a lack of bricks
occurred would you redesign all of the bricks (break the in two, etc.) into smaller bricks to build a
miniature reproduction of your original wall? No, you would modify the walls design - make it
shorter, less thick, not as long, etc.. You would not modify the bricks because they would not “fit”

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together anymore, which weakens the walls strength or effectiveness. Thus the Soviet command
would not modify the basic squad, company, battalion, or regiment; but would add or subtract a
company, battalion or even regiment (as long as it maintained the triangle concept). As a result, I
formed (given the factual assumptions) representations of force structures.

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Rifle Corps

1935 1940 - 1941


3 Rifle Divisions 3 Rifle Divisions
1 Signal Battalion 1 Signal Battalion
1 Sapper Battalion 1 Sapper Battalion
2 Artillery Regiments 2 Artillery Regiments
1 Anti Aircraft Battalion 1 Anti Aircraft Battalion

1942 December 1943


2 or 3 Rifle Divisions 3 Rifle Divisions
1 Signal Battalion
(These Corp. had STAVKA units attached) 1 Sapper Battalion
1 122mm Artillery Regiment (optional)

1944 1944 Guards


3 Rifle Divisions 3 Rifle Divisions
1 Signal Battalion 1 Signal Battalion
1 Sapper Battalion 1 Sapper Battalion
1 Self Propelled Artillery Battalion 1 Self Propelled Artillery Battalion
1 Anti Aircraft Battalion 1 Anti Aircraft Battalion
1 Artillery Regiment 1 Artillery Regiment
1 Mortar Regiment

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Rifle Divisions

Rifle Division December 1941:

Manpower: Theo: 11,626 Actual: 4000 - 9000

Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.


Components
1st Infantry Regiment 1 Artillery Regiment 1 Sapper Battalion
2nd Infantry Regiment 1 Antiaircraft 1 Signal Company
Battalion
3rd Infantry Regiment 1 Anti Tank Battalion

Rifle Division March 1942:

Manpower: Theo: 12,795 Actual: 3500 - 7500

Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.


Components
1st Infantry Regiment 1 Artillery Regiment 1 Sapper Battalion
2nd Infantry Regiment 1 Antiaircraft 1 Signal Company
Battalion
3rd Infantry Regiment 1 Anti Tank Battalion

Rifle Division July 1942:

Manpower: Theo: 10,386 Actual: 3000 - 5000

Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.


Components
1st Infantry Regiment 1 Artillery Regiment 1 Sapper Battalion
2nd Infantry Regiment 1 Antiaircraft 1 Signal Company
Battalion
3rd Infantry Regiment 1 Anti Tank Battalion

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Rifle Divisions

Rifle Division December 1942:

Manpower: Theo: 9,435 Actual: 3000 - 7000

Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.


Components
1st Infantry Regiment 1 Artillery Regiment 1 Sapper Battalion
2nd Infantry Regiment 1 Anti Tank Battalion 1 Signal Company
3rd Infantry Regiment
1 Recon company

Rifle Division July 1943:

Manpower: Theo: 9,380 Actual: 3000 - 7000

Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.


Components
1st Infantry Regiment 1 Artillery Regiment 1 Sapper Battalion
2nd Infantry Regiment 1 Anti Tank Battalion 1 Signal Company
3rd Infantry Regiment
1 Recon company

Rifle Division December 1944:

Manpower: Theo: 11,706 Actual: 3500 - 4500

Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.


Components
1st Infantry Regiment 1 Artillery Regiment 1 Sapper Battalion
2nd Infantry Regiment 1 Anti Tank Battalion 1 Signal Company
3rd Infantry Regiment 1 Anti Aircraft Battalion
(only Gds)
1 Recon company

Rifle Division June 1945:

Manpower: Theo.: 11,780 Actual: 3500 - 6000

Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.


Components
1 Self Propelled 1st Infantry Regiment 1 Artillery Regiment 1 Sapper Battalion
Artillery Regiment
2nd Infantry Regiment 1 Anti Tank 1 Signal Company
Battalion
3rd Infantry Regiment 1 Anti Aircraft
Battalion
1 Recon company

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Rifle Regiments

Rifle Regiment 1940 - 1942:

Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.


Components
1st Infantry Battalion 1 Artillery Battery 1 HQ Company
2nd Infantry Battalion 1 Anti Tank
Company
3rd Infantry Battalion

Rifle Regiment 1943 - 1945:

Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.


Components
1st Infantry Battalion 1 Artillery Battery 1 HQ Company
2nd Infantry Battalion 1st Anti Tank
Company
3rd Infantry Battalion 2nd Anti Tank
Company

Divisional and Regimental Companies:

Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3


HQ Company (1) sqd INTEL (2) sqd RECON (2) Cav sqd
Recon Company (1) sqd (4) Cav sqd (4) Cav sqd (4) Cav sqd
Signal Company (1) sqd INTEL (2) sqd INTEL (2) sqd
Towed AT (1) sqd (3) 45mm AT guns (3) 45mm AT guns
(3) trcks (3) trcks
Company
Towed Artillery (1) sqd (2) 76mm Art (2) 76mm Art
(2) trcks (2) trcks
Battery
• In many cases the towed companies used horses instead of trucks.

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Mechanized Soviet Rifle Battalions

Mechanized Rifle Battalion 1941 - June 1942:

Battalion Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4 Platoon 5


HQ (1) sqd INTEL (2) sqd AMMO (2) sqd
1 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
2 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
3 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
4 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
5 Mortar (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr (5) sqds (5) sqds
Service unknown

Infantry Unit Strength Chart

Unit Inf. 82mm


Sctns Mtr
Platoon 5
Company 20 2
Battalion 95 17

Mechanized Rifle Battalion July 1942 - December 1942:

Battalion Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4 Platoon 5


HQ (1) sqd INTEL (2) sqd AMMO (2) sqd
1 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
2 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
3 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
4 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
5 Mortar (4) 82mm Mtr (4) 82mm Mtr (4) 82mm Mtr (5) sqds (5) sqds
Service unknown

Infantry Unit Strength Chart

Unit Inf. 82mm


Sctns Mtr
Platoon 5
Company 20 3
Battalion 95 24

17
Mechanized Soviet Rifle Battalions

Mechanized Rifle Battalion December 1942 - December 1944:

Battalion Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4 Platoon 5


HQ (1) sqd INTEL (2) sqd AMMO (2) sqd
1 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
2 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
3 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
4 Mortar (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr
Service unknown

Infantry Unit Strength Chart

Unit Inf. 82mm


Sctns Mtr
Platoon 5
Company 20 3
Battalion 65 18

Mechanized Rifle Battalion January 1945 - June 1945:

Battalion Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4 Platoon 5


HQ (1) sqd INTEL (2) sqd AMMO (2) sqd
1 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
2 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
3 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
4 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
5 Mortar (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr (5) sqds (5) sqds
Service unknown

Infantry Unit Strength Chart

Unit Inf. 82mm


Sctns Mtr
Platoon 5
Company 20 2
Battalion 95 17

18
Infantry Soviet Rifle Battalions

Rifle Battalion 1941 - June 1942:

Battalion Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4 Platoon 5


HQ (1) sqd INTEL (2) sqd AMMO (2) sqd
1 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
2 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
3 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
4 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
5 Mortar (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr
Service unknown

Infantry Unit Strength Chart

Unit Inf. 82mm Mtr


Sctns
Platoon 5
Company 15 2
Battalion 65 17

Rifle Battalion July 1942 - December 1942:

Battalio Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4 Platoon 5


n
HQ (1) sqd INTEL (2) sqd AMMO (2) sqd
1 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
2 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
3 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
4 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
5 Mortar (4) 82mm Mtr (4) 82mm Mtr (4) 82mm Mtr
Service unknown

Infantry Unit Strength Chart

Unit Inf. 82mm


Sctns Mtr
Platoon 5
Compan 15 3
y
Battalion 65 24

19
Actual Soviet Rifle Battalions

Rifle Battalion December 1942 - December 1944:


Battalio Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4 Platoon 5
n
HQ (1) sqd INTEL (2) sqd AMMO (2) sqd
1 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
2 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
3 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
4 Mortar (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr
Service unknown

Infantry Unit Strength Chart

Unit Inf. 82mm


Sctns Mtr
Platoon 5
Compan 15 3
y
Battalion 50 18

Rifle Battalion January 1945 - June 1945:


Battalio Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4 Platoon 5
n
HQ (1) sqd INTEL (2) sqd AMMO (2) sqd
1 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
2 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
3 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
4 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
5 Mortar (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr
Service unknown

Infantry Unit Strength Chart

Unit Inf. 82mm


Sctns Mtr
Platoon 5
Compan 15 2
y
Battalion 65 17

20
Tank Corps 1942 - 1945

March 1942 April 1942


2 (1941) Tank Brigades 3 (1941) Tank Brigades
1 (1941) Motorized Rifle Brigade 1 (1941) Motorized Rifle Brigade

July 1942 July 1943


3 (1941) Tank Brigades 3 (1943) Tank Brigades
1 (1941) Motorized Rifle Brigade 1 (1943) Motorized Rifle Brigade
1 Mortar Battery 1 Mortar Regiment
1 Armored Car Battalion 1 Light (1943) SP Artillery Regiment
1 Sapper Company 1 Anti Aircraft Regiment
2 Repair Companies 1 Anti Tank Regiment
1 Motorcycle Battalion 1 Heavy Anti Tank Battalion
(w/ Guards) 1 Mortar battalion 1 Armored Car Battalion
1 Signal Battalion
1 Sapper Battalion
2 Repair Companies
1 Motorcycle Battalion
(w/ Guards) 1 Mortar battalion

December 1943 December 1944


3 (1943) Tank Brigades 3 (1943) Tank Brigades
1 (1943) Motorized Rifle Brigade 1 (1943) Motorized Rifle Brigade
1 Mortar Regiment 1 Light Artillery Regiment
1 Anti Aircraft Regiment 1 Mortar Regiment
1 Light (1943) SP Artillery Regiment 1 Anti Aircraft Regiment
1 Medium (1943) SP Artillery Regiment 1 Light (1944) SP Artillery Regiment
1 Signal Battalion 1 Medium (1944) SP Artillery
Regiment
1 Sapper Battalion 1 Heavy SP Artillery Regiment
2 Repair Companies 1 Signal Battalion
1 Motorcycle Battalion 1 Sapper Battalion
(w/ Guards) 1 Mortar battalion 2 Repair Companies
1 Motorcycle Battalion
(w/ Guards) 1 Mortar battalion

21
Tank Corps 1942 - 1945

August 1945
3 (1943) Tank Brigades
1 Heavy Tank Regiment
1 (1943) Motorized Rifle Brigade
1 Light Artillery Regiment
1 Mortar Regiment
1 Light (1944) SP Artillery Regiment
1 Medium (1945) SP Artillery Regiment
1 Heavy SP Artillery Regiment
1 Signal Battalion
1 Sapper Battalion
2 Repair Companies
1 Motorcycle Battalion
(w/ Guards) 1 Mortar battalion

22
Tank Brigade and Battalions 1941

Tank Brigade December 1941:


> 1941 Tank Brigade

Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.


Components
1st (1941) Tank 1 Motorized Rifle 1 HQ Company
Battalion Battalion
2nd (1941) Tank 1 Recon Company
Battalion

Tank Battalion 1941:


Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4
HQ (1) sqd
1 Heavy Tank (1) KVs (2) KVs (2) KVs
2 Medium Tank (1) T34s (2) T34s (2) T34s (2) T34s
3 Light Tank (1) T60s (3) T60s (3) T60s (3) T60s
Service unknown

Vehicle Strength Chart


Unit KV T34 T60 Total
Platoon 2 2 3
Compan 5 7 10
y
Battalion 5 7 10 22

Separate Tank Battalion 1941:


Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4
HQ (1) sqd
1 Heavy Tank (1) KVs (2) KVs (2) KVs
2 Medium Tank (2) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s
3 Light Tank (1) T60s (3) T60s (3) T60s (3) T60s
4 Light Tank (1) T60s (3) T60s (3) T60s (3) T60s
Service unknown

Vehicle Strength Chart


Unit KV T34 T60 Total
Platoon 2 3 3
Compan 5 11 10
y
Battalion 5 11 20 36

23
Tank Brigade and Battalions 1942

Tank Brigade March 1942:


> March 1942 Tank Brigade

Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.


Components
1st Tank Battalion 1 Motorized Rifle 1 HQ Company
Battalion
2nd Tank Battalion 1 Recon Company

Tank Battalion March 1942:


Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4
HQ (1) sqd
1 Heavy Tank (1) KVs (2) KVs (2) KVs
2 Medium Tank (1) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s
3 Light Tank (1) (3) T60/T70s (3) T60/T70s (3) T60/T70s
T60/T70s
Service unknown

Vehicle Strength Chart


Unit KV T34 T60 Total
Platoon 2 3 3
Compan 5 10 10
y
Battalion 5 10 10 25

Separate Tank Battalion March 1942:


Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4
HQ (1) sqd
1 Heavy Tank (1) KVs (2) KVs (2) KVs
2 Medium Tank (2) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s
3 Light Tank (1) (3) T60/T70s (3) T60/T70s (3) T60/T70s
T60/T70s
4 Light Tank (1) (3) T60/T70s (3) T60/T70s (3) T60/T70s
T60/T70s
Service unknown

Vehicle Strength Chart


Unit KV T34 T60 Total
Platoon 2 3 3
Compan 5 11 10
y
Battalion 5 11 20 36

24
Tank Brigade and Battalions 1942

Tank Brigade July 1942:


> July 1942 Tank Brigade

Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.


Components
1st Tank Battalion 1 Motorized Rifle 1 HQ Company
Battalion
2nd Tank Battalion 1 Recon Company

Tank Battalion July 1942:


Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4
HQ (1) sqd
1 Medium Tank (1) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s
2 Medium Tank (1) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s
3 Light Tank (3) T60/T70s (3) T60/T70s (3) T60/T70s
Service unknown

Vehicle Strength Chart


Unit KV T34 T60 Total
Platoon 0 3 3
Compan 0 10 10
y
Battalion 0 20 10 29

Separate Tank Battalion July 1942:


Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4
HQ (1) sqd
1 Heavy Tank (1) KVs (2) KVs (2) KVs
2 Medium Tank (1) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s
3 Medium Tank (1) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s
4 Light Tank (1) T60s (3) T60s (3) T60s (3) T60s
Service unknown

Vehicle Strength Chart


Unit KV T34 T60 Total
Platoon 2 3 3
Compan 5 10 10
y
Battalion 5 20 10 35

25
Tank Brigade and Battalions 1942

Tank Brigade September 1942:


> September 1942 Tank Brigade

Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.


Components
1st Tank Battalion 1 Motorized Rifle 1 HQ Company
Battalion
2nd Tank Battalion

Tank Battalion September 1942:


Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4
HQ (1) sqd
1 Medium Tank (1) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s
2 Medium Tank (1) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s
3 Light Tank (2) T70s (2) T70s (2) T70s
Service unknown

Vehicle Strength Chart


Unit KV T34 T70 Total
Platoon 0 3 2
Compan 0 10 6
y
Battalion 0 20 6 26

Separate Tank Battalion September 1942:


Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4
HQ (1) sqd
1 Heavy Tank (1) KVs (3) KVs (3) KVs (3) KVs
2 Medium Tank (1) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s
Service unknown

Vehicle Strength Chart


Unit KV T34 T60 Total
Platoon 3 3
Compan 10 10
y
Battalion 10 10 20

26
Tank Brigade and Battalions 1943

Tank Brigade July 1943:


> July 1943 Tank Brigade

Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.


Components
1st Tank Battalion 1 Motorized Rifle 1 HQ Company
Battalion
2nd Tank Battalion 1 Recon Company

Tank Battalion July 1943:


Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4
HQ (1) sqd
1 Heavy Tank (1) KVs (2) KVs (2) KVs (2) KVs
2 Medium Tank (1) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s
3 Medium Tank (1) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s
4 Light Tank (2) T70s (2) T70s (2) T70s
Service unknown

Vehicle Strength Chart


Unit KV T34 T60 Total
Platoon 2 3 2
Compan 7 10 6
y
Battalion 7 20 6 33

Separate Tank Battalion July 1943:


Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4
HQ (1) sqd
1 Heavy Tank (1) KVs (2) KVs (2) KVs (2) KVs
2 Heavy Tank (1) KVs (2) KVs (2) KVs (2) KVs
3 Medium Tank (1) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s
4 Medium Tank (1) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s (3) T34s
Service unknown

Vehicle Strength Chart


Unit KV T34 T60 Total
Platoon 2 3 0
Compan 7 10 0
y
Battalion 14 20 0 34

27
Rifle Brigades 1941

• Rifle Brigades were attached to Tank and Mechanized Corps.


• Occasionally, there would be independent Rifle Brigades attached to other larger parent
units.
• Most Rifle Brigades were motorized or mechanized. The two primary methods of transport
for motorized infantry was by truck and riding AFVs. Mechanized Rifle Brigades used half
tracks and armored trucks. Half tracks were not as plentiful as with western armies.
Motorized Rifle Brigades used trucks and AFVs as transport.

Rifle Brigade December 1941:


> 1941 Rifle Brigade

Manpower: Theo.: 4400 Actual: 4000 - 5000

Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.


Components
1st Rifle Battalion 1 Artillery Battalion 1 Signal Company
2nd Rifle Battalion 1 Anti Tank
Battalion
3rd Rifle Battalion 1 Light Mortar
Battalion
1 Heavy Mortar
Battalion

Motorized Rifle Battalion 1941 - June 1942:


Battalio Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4 Platoon 5
n
HQ (1) sqd INTEL (2) sqd AMMO (2) sqd
1 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
2 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
3 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
4 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
5 Mortar (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr (5) sqds (5) sqds
Service unknown

Infantry Unit Strength Chart

Unit Inf. 82mm


Sctns Mtr
Platoon 5
Compan 20 2
y
Battalion 95 17

28
Rifle Brigades 1942 - 1943

Rifle Brigade July 1942:


> 1943 Rifle Brigade

Manpower: Theo.: 6000 Actual: 5500 - 6500

Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.


Components
1st Rifle Battalion 1 Artillery Battalion 1 Signal Company
2nd Rifle Battalion 1 Anti Tank
Battalion
3rd Rifle Battalion 1 Heavy Mortar
Battalion
4th Rifle Battalion
1 Automatic Weapons
Battalion

Motorized Rifle Battalion July 1942 - December 1942:


Battalio Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4 Platoon 5
n
HQ (1) sqd INTEL (2) sqd AMMO (2) sqd
1 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
2 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
3 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
4 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
5 Mortar (4) 82mm Mtr (4) 82mm Mtr (4) 82mm Mtr (5) sqds (5) sqds
Service unknown

Infantry Unit Strength Chart

Unit Inf. 82mm


Sctns Mtr
Platoon 5
Compan 20 3
y
Battalion 95 24

29
Rifle Brigades 1943 - 1944

Rifle Brigade January 1943:


> 1943 - 1944 Rifle Brigade

Manpower: Theo.: 6000 Actual: 5500 - 6500

Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.


Components
1st Rifle Battalion 1 Artillery Battalion 1 Signal Company
2nd Rifle Battalion 1 Anti Tank
Battalion
3rd Rifle Battalion 1 Heavy Mortar
Battalion
4th Rifle Battalion
1 Automatic Weapons
Battalion

Motorized Rifle Battalion 1943 - December 1944:


Battalio Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4 Platoon 5
n
HQ (1) sqd INTEL (2) sqd AMMO (2) sqd
1 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
2 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
3 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
4 Mortar (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr
Service unknown

Infantry Unit Strength Chart

Unit Inf. 82mm


Sctns Mtr
Platoon 5
Compan 20 3
y
Battalion 65 18

30
Rifle Brigades 1945

Rifle Brigade January 1945:


> 1945 Rifle Brigade

Manpower: Theo.: 6000 Actual: 5500 - 6500

Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.


Components
1st Rifle Battalion 1 Artillery Battalion 1 Signal Company
2nd Rifle Battalion 1 Anti Tank
Battalion
3rd Rifle Battalion 1 Heavy Mortar
Battalion
4th Rifle Battalion
1 Automatic Weapons
Battalion

Motorized Rifle Battalion January 1945 - June 1945:


Battalio Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4 Platoon 5
n
HQ (1) sqd INTEL (2) sqd AMMO (2) sqd
1 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
2 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
3 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
4 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
5 Mortar (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr (5) sqds (5) sqds
Service unknown

Infantry Unit Strength Chart

Unit Inf. 82mm


Sctns Mtr
Platoon 5
Compan 20 2
y
Battalion 95 17

31
Tank Regiments

Tank Regiment:
Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.
Components
1st Tank Battalion 1 SP Artillery 1 HQ Company
Battery
2nd Assault Gun
Battalion

Infantry Tank Battalion:


Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4
HQ (1) sqd
1 Medium Tank (1) T34s (2) T34s (2) T34s (2) T34s
2 Medium Tank (1) T34s (2) T34s (2) T34s (2) T34s
3 Light Tank (1) (2) T60/T70s (2) T60/T70s (2) T60/T70s
T60/T70s
Service unknown

Assault Gun Battalion:


Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4
HQ (1) sqd
1 Medium (1) SU76/85 (2) SU76/85 (2) SU76/85
Company
2 Medium (1) SU76/85 (2) SU76/85 (2) SU76/85
Company
3 Light Company (1) SU76 (2) SU76 (2) SU76
Service unknown

Vehicle Strength Chart


Unit T34 T60/70 SU76/85 SU76 Total
Platoon 2 2 2 2
Compan 7 7 5 5
y
Battalion 14 7 10 5
Regimen 14 7 10 5 36
t

32
Mechanized Corps 1942 - 1945

September 1942
Type 1 Type 2 Type 3
3 Mech. Brigades 3 Mech. Brigades 3 Mech. Brigades
1 (Sept 42)Tank Brigade 2 (Sept 42)Tank Brigade 3 Separate Tank Battalions
1 Anti Aircraft Regiment 1 Anti Aircraft Regiment 1 Anti Aircraft Regiment
1 Anti Tank Regiment 1 Anti Tank Regiment 1 Anti Tank Regiment
1 Armored Car Battalion 1 Armored Car Battalion 1 Armored Car Battalion
1 Sapper Battalion 1 Sapper Battalion 1 Sapper Battalion
1 Medical Battalion 1 Medical Battalion 1 Medical Battalion
1 Repair Battalion 1 Repair Battalion 1 Repair Battalion
1 Signal Company 1 Signal Company 1 Signal Company

September 1943 December 1943


3 Mech. Brigades 3 Mech. Brigades
1 (Sept 42)Tank Brigade 1 (Sept 42)Tank Brigade
1 Anti Aircraft Regiment 1 Anti Aircraft Regiment
1 Mortar Regiment 1 Mortar Regiment
1 SP Artillery Regiment (SU76) 1 SP Artillery Regiment (SU76)
1 Armored Car Battalion 1 SP Artillery Regiment (SU85)
1 Sapper Battalion 1 Armored Car Battalion
1 Medical Battalion 1 Sapper Battalion
1 Repair Battalion 1 Medical Battalion
1 Signal Battalion 1 Repair Battalion
1 Motorcycle Battalion 1 Signal Battalion
1 Motorcycle Battalion
(w/ Guards) 1 Mortar battalion
(w/ Guards) 1 Mortar battalion (w/ Guards) 1 TD Battalion (SU76)

33
Mechanized Corps 1942 - 1945

December 1944
3 Mech. Brigades
1 (July 43)Tank Brigade
1 Anti Aircraft Regiment
1 Mortar Regiment
1 SP Artillery Regiment (SU76)
1 SP Artillery Regiment (SU85)
1 SP Artillery Regiment (SU152)
1 Armored Car Battalion
1 Sapper Battalion
1 Medical Battalion
1 Repair Battalion
1 Signal Battalion
1 Motorcycle Battalion

(w/ Guards) 1 Mortar battalion

34
Mechanized Brigade and Battalions

Mechanized Brigade 1941:


Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.
Components
1st Tank Regiment 1st Mech. Rifle Battalion 1 HQ Company
2nd Mech. Rifle Battalion
3rd Mech. Rifle Battalion

• Note: SU76 were upgraded to SU85s, then SU85 were upgraded to SU122s.
• The Mechanized Brigades did not change structure throughout the war (as far as I can tell).

Tank Regiment:
Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.
Components
1st Tank Battalion 1 SP Artillery 1 HQ Company
Battery
2nd Assault Gun
Battalion

Tank Battalion:

Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4


HQ (1) sqd
1 Medium Tank (1) T34s (2) T34s (2) T34s (2) T34s
2 Medium Tank (1) T34s (2) T34s (2) T34s (2) T34s
3 Light Tank (1) (2) T60/T70s (2) T60/T70s (2) T60/T70s
T60/T70s
Service unknown

Assault Gun Battalion:


Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4
HQ (1) sqd
1 Medium (1) SU76/85 (2) SU76/85 (2) SU76/85
Company
2 Medium (1) SU76/85 (2) SU76/85 (2) SU76/85
Company
3 Light Company (1) SU76 (2) SU76 (2) SU76
Service unknown

Mechanized Rifle Battalion 1941 - June 1942:

Battalio Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4 Platoon 5


n
HQ (1) sqd INTEL (2) sqd AMMO (2) sqd
1 SMG (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
2 SMG (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
3 SMG (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
4 SMG (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr

35
5 Mortar (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr
Service unknown

36
Mechanized Brigade and Battalions

Mechanized Brigade 1942:


Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.
Components
1st Tank Regiment 1st Mech. Rifle Battalion 1 HQ Company
2nd Mech. Rifle Battalion
3rd Mech. Rifle Battalion

• Note: SU76 were upgraded to SU85s, then SU85 were upgraded to SU122s.
• The Mechanized Brigades did not change structure throughout the war (as far as I can tell).

Tank Regiment:
Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.
Components
1st Tank Battalion 1 SP Artillery 1 HQ Company
Battery
2nd Assault Gun
Battalion

Tank Battalion:

Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4


HQ (1) sqd
1 Medium Tank (1) T34s (2) T34s (2) T34s (2) T34s
2 Medium Tank (1) T34s (2) T34s (2) T34s (2) T34s
3 Light Tank (1) (2) T60/T70s (2) T60/T70s (2) T60/T70s
T60/T70s
Service unknown

Assault Gun Battalion:


Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4
HQ (1) sqd
1 Medium (1) SU76/85 (2) SU76/85 (2) SU76/85
Company
2 Medium (1) SU76/85 (2) SU76/85 (2) SU76/85
Company
3 Light Company (1) SU76 (2) SU76 (2) SU76
Service unknown

Mechanized Rifle Battalion July 1942 - December 1942:

Battalio Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4 Platoon 5


n
HQ (1) sqd INTEL (2) sqd AMMO (2) sqd
1 SMG (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
2 SMG (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
3 SMG (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
4 SMG (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr

37
5 Mortar (4) 82mm Mtr (4) 82mm Mtr (4) 82mm Mtr
Service unknown

38
Mechanized Brigade and Battalions

Mechanized Brigade 1943 - 1944:


Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.
Components
1st Tank Regiment 1st Mech. Rifle Battalion 1 HQ Company
2nd Mech. Rifle Battalion
3rd Mech. Rifle Battalion

• Note: SU76 were upgraded to SU85s, then SU85 were upgraded to SU122s.
• The Mechanized Brigades did not change structure throughout the war (as far as I can tell).

Tank Regiment:
Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.
Components
1st Tank Battalion 1 SP Artillery 1 HQ Company
Battery
2nd Assault Gun
Battalion

Tank Battalion:

Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4


HQ (1) sqd
1 Medium Tank (1) T34s (2) T34s (2) T34s (2) T34s
2 Medium Tank (1) T34s (2) T34s (2) T34s (2) T34s
3 Light Tank (1) (2) T60/T70s (2) T60/T70s (2) T60/T70s
T60/T70s
Service unknown

Assault Gun Battalion:


Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4
HQ (1) sqd
1 Medium (1) SU76/85 (2) SU76/85 (2) SU76/85
Company
2 Medium (1) SU76/85 (2) SU76/85 (2) SU76/85
Company
3 Light Company (1) SU76 (2) SU76 (2) SU76
Service unknown

Mechanized Rifle Battalion 1943 - December 1944:

Battalio Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4 Platoon 5


n
HQ (1) sqd INTEL (2) sqd AMMO (2) sqd
1 SMG (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
2 SMG (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
3 SMG (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (3) 82mm Mtr
4 Mortar (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr

39
Service unknown

40
Mechanized Brigade and Battalions

Mechanized Brigade 1945:


Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.
Components
1st Tank Regiment 1st Mech. Rifle Battalion 1 HQ Company
2nd Mech. Rifle Battalion
3rd Mech. Rifle Battalion

• Note: SU76 were upgraded to SU85s, then SU85 were upgraded to SU122s.
• The Mechanized Brigades did not change structure throughout the war (as far as I can tell).

Tank Regiment:
Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.
Components
1st Tank Battalion 1 SP Artillery 1 HQ Company
Battery
2nd Assault Gun
Battalion

Tank Battalion:

Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4


HQ (1) sqd
1 Medium Tank (1) T34s (2) T34s (2) T34s (2) T34s
2 Medium Tank (1) T34s (2) T34s (2) T34s (2) T34s
3 Light Tank (1) (2) T60/T70s (2) T60/T70s (2) T60/T70s
T60/T70s
Service unknown

Assault Gun Battalion:


Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4
HQ (1) sqd
1 Medium (1) SU76/85 (2) SU76/85 (2) SU76/85
Company
2 Medium (1) SU76/85 (2) SU76/85 (2) SU76/85
Company
3 Light Company (1) SU76 (2) SU76 (2) SU76
Service unknown

Mechanized Rifle Battalion January 1945 - June 1945:

Battalio Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4 Platoon 5


n
HQ (1) sqd INTEL (2) sqd AMMO (2) sqd
1 SMG (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
2 SMG (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
3 SMG (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr
4 SMG (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (4) sqds (2) 82mm Mtr

41
5 Mortar (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr (3) 82mm Mtr
Service unknown

42
Air Assault Corps

1941 - 1943
3 Air Assault Divisions
1 Signal platoon
1 Light Tank Battalion

Air Assault Division 1941 - 1943:


Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.
Components
1st Airborne Battalion 1 Anti Aircraft
Company
2nd Airborne Battalion
3rd Airborne Battalion
4th Airborne Battalion
1 Recon Company
(bikes)

Airborne Battalion 1941 - 1943:


Battalio Company HQ Unit Platoon 1 Platoon 2 Platoon 3 Platoon 4 Platoon 5
n
HQ (1) sqd INTEL (2) sqd AMMO (2) sqd
1 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds
2 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds
3 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds
4 Rifle (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds (5) sqds
5 AT (3) 45mm AT (3) 45mm AT guns (3) 45mm AT (3) 45mm AT
guns guns guns
6 Gun (2) 76mm Art (2) 76mm Art guns (2) 76mm Art
guns guns
7 Mortar (2) 82mm Mtr (2) 82mm Mtr (2) 82mm Mtr

Infantry Unit Strength Chart

Unit Inf. 82mm 45mm 76mm


Sctns Mtr AT Art
Platoon 5
Compan 20 6 12 6
y
Battalion 85 6 12 6

43
Artillery, Anti Tank and Anti Aircraft Units

There are literally hundreds of formation variants dependent on unit affiliation (rifle, tank,
etc.), year, unit composition (light, medium, etc.), and type (howitzer, gun, etc.).
Therefore I will provide a general overview and a few examples.

First of all, the Soviet artillery (I will use this term to refer to artillery, anti tank, and anti
aircraft as a group, unless otherwise noted) is fundamentally based upon a section
(platoon) size of two. Therefore the typical artillery battery (company) is 4 tubes (2
sections of 2 tubes). Consequently, different units would add or subtract sections
(always 2 tubes) to a battery making it 6 tubes (3 sections of two).

Additionally, there is little consistantecy in battalion sizes. Typically a battalion would be


2 or 3 batteries (companies). In turn a regiment could be 2 or 3 battalions. In some
cases rifle armies or corps had artillery regiments with 5 or 6 battalions.

Interestingly most gun sections did not seem to have tubes attached to the HQ sections.
On the other hand, the howitzer units id seem to have tubes attached to the HQ
sections.

In general:

Generic Howitzer Regiment

Battalion Company HQ Unit Section 1 Section 2 Section 3


1 HQ (1) sqd (2) Tubes
1st battery (2) Tubes (2) Tubes
2nd battery (2) Tubes (2) Tubes
2 HQ (1) sqd (2) Tubes
1st battery (2) Tubes (2) Tubes
2nd battery (2) Tubes (2) Tubes
Service unknown

Generic Gun Regiment

Battalion Company HQ Unit Section 1 Section 2 Section 3


1 HQ (1) sqd
1st battery (2) Tubes (2) Tubes (2) Tubes
2nd battery (2) Tubes (2) Tubes (2) Tubes
Service unknown
2 HQ (1) sqd
1st battery (2) Tubes (2) Tubes (2) Tubes
2nd battery (2) Tubes (2) Tubes (2) Tubes
Service unknown

44
Artillery, Anti Tank and Anti Aircraft Units

Types of Towed Artillery:

From 1941 - 1943

Light = 76mm
Medium = 122mm
Heavy = 152mm

From 1943 - 1945

Light = 76mm or 122mm


Medium = 122mm or 152mm
Heavy = 152mm or 210mm

The medium and heavy artillery units usually utilized the 152mm for medium and
the 210mm for heavy.

Types of Self Propelled Artillery:

From 1941 - 1943

Light = SU 76
Medium = none
Heavy = none

From 1943 - 1944

Light = SU 76
Medium = SU 85
Heavy = SU 122

From 1944 - 1945

Light = SU 85
Medium = SU 100
Heavy = SU 152

45
Artillery, Anti Tank and Anti Aircraft Units

Types of Towed Anti Tank Guns:

From 1941 - 1943

Light = 45mm
Medium = 57mm
Heavy = none

From 1943 - 1945

Light = 45mm
Medium = 57mm
Heavy = 76mm

Types of Mortars:

From 1941 - 1945

Standard = 80mm
Heavy = 120 mm

46
Artillery, Anti Tank and Anti Aircraft Units

Units:

Rifle Artillery (within a Corp.):

Unit Type Pre 1942 1942 - 1944 1 /1945 - 8/ 9/ 1945 +


1945

1st Regiment 24 32 32 20
2nd Regiment 20 20
Battalion 8 8 8 8
SP Battalion 16 SU 76
Battery 4 4 4 4

Light 16 20 32 10
Medium 8 12 20 20
Heavy 0 0 0 10

• The number of tubes.

Rifle Anti Tank and Anti Aircraft (within a Corp.):

Unit Type Pre 1942 1942 - 1944 1 /1945 - 8/ 9/ 1945 +


1945
Anti Tank
Battalion 12 12 18 18
Battery 4 4 6 6

Light 12 12 6 6
Medium 0 0 6 6
Heavy 0 0 6 6

Anti Aircraft
Battalion 6 0 12 12
Battery 2 0 4 4

• The number of tubes.

47
Artillery, Anti Tank and Anti Aircraft Units

Units:

Tank Artillery (within a Corp.):

Unit Type Pre 1943 1943 - 1944 1945

1st Regiment 20
1st SP 21 30
Regiment
2nd SP 21
Regiment
3rd SP 21
Regiment
Mortar 36 36
Regiment
Mortar 10
Battalion

Light 0 21 50
Medium 0 0 21
Heavy 0 0 21

• The number of tubes.

Tank Anti Tank and Anti Aircraft (within a Corp.):

Unit Type Pre 1943 1943 - 1944 1945


Anti Tank
Battalion 12
Battery 6

Light 20
Medium 12
Heavy 0

Anti Aircraft
Regiment 12 12
Battalion 6 6
Battery 2 2

• The number of tubes.

48
49
Engineering or Sapper Battalions

• I could not find any OOBs on the Soviet Sapper Battalions.

• I would use the Infantry Rifle Battalion OOB as a generic unit structure for a Sapper
Battalion. Additionally, there would be bridging companies, etc.

• The Soviet forces utilized Sapper Battalions frequently and considered them elite
troops. Remember rapid advances are stalled by natural obstacles such as rivers,
gorges, etc.. Engineering units are the key to advance maintain. Furthermore, an
integral component of the Grinding detachments were Sapper units. They were the
ones who blow up boob wire, bunkers, etc..

50
Cavalry Corps

December 1941 December 1941


2 or 3 Cavalry Divisions 2 or 3 Light Cavalry Divisions
1 or 2 Rifle Divisions 1 or 2 Rifle Divisions
1 Signal Battalion 1 Signal Battalion
1 Artillery Regiments 1 Artillery Regiments
1 Tank Brigade 1 Tank Brigade

1943 1944 - 1945


3 Cavalry Divisions 3 Cavalry Divisions
2 Light Tank Regiments 2 Light Tank Regiments
1 SP TD Regiment 1 SP TD Regiment
1 Mortar Battalion 1 Mortar Battalion
1 Separate TD (towed) Battalion 1 Separate TD (towed) Battalion
1 Signal Battalion
1 Sapper Battalion

(w/ Guards) 1 Mortar Regiment (w/ Guards) 1 Mortar Regiment

51
Cavalry Divisions
Cavalry Division December 1941:
Actual Manpower: 6000

Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.


Components
1 Light Tank 1st Cavalry Regiment 1 Cavalry Artillery 1 Sapper Company
Regiment Regiment
1 Recon Battalion 2nd Cavalry Regiment 1 Antiaircraft 1 Signal Company
(18 ACs) Battalion
3rd Cavalry Regiment
4th Cavalry Regiment

Cavalry Division 1943 - 1945:


Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.
Components
1st Cavalry Regiment 1 Cavalry Artillery 1 Sapper Company
Regiment ( 16 *76mm &
8*122mm)
1 Recon Battalion 2nd Cavalry Regiment 1 Antiaircraft 1 Signal Company
(18 ACs) Company (six 37mm
AA)
3rd Cavalry Regiment

Light Cavalry Division 1941:


Actual Manpower: 3500

Armored Infantry Artillery Misc.


Components
1st Cavalry Regiment 1 Cavalry Artillery
Battalion
1 Recon Battalion 2nd Cavalry Regiment 1 Signal Company
(18 ACs)
3rd Cavalry Regiment

• Cavalry Regiments and battalions are like Infantry Rifle Regiments and
Battalions, except their basic squadron (platoon) had 4 squads instead 5;
and the troop was equivalent to a company.

52