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EBC Site Remediation & Redevelopment Program:

EPA Overview & Updates


Remediation Programs & Redevelopment Success Stories
Welcome from the Committee Chair

Jon Kitchen
Chair, EBC Site Remediation &
Redevelopment Committee
Senior Project Manager
Civil & Environmental Consultants, Inc.

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
Welcome from CDM Smith

Edward Van Doren


Principal Environmental Engineer
CDM Smith

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
Program Introduction & Overview
Jessica Cajigas
Program Chair & Moderator
Vice Chair, EBC Site Remediation
& Redevelopment Committee
Project Manager, EnviroTrac Ltd.

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
US EPA Remediation and Redevelopment
Programs - Overview & Updates

Ginny Lombardo
Chief
Remediation & Restoration II Branch
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 1

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
EPA Region 1
Office of Site Remediation and Restoration (OSRR)
Cleanup Programs

Presentation for:
Environmental Business Council of New England, Inc.
Site Remediation and Redevelopment Program Session
Thursday February 1, 2018

2/2/2018 6
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Alexandra Dapolito Dunn
Administrator EPA New England
• Sworn in as Region 1 Administrator on January 8, 2018.
• Prior to EPA, Ms. Dunn served as executive director and general counsel for
the Environmental Council of States (ECOS), a national nonprofit,
nonpartisan organization committed to helping state agencies improve
environmental outcomes for all Americans. Working for ECOS, Ms. Dunn
helped state governments improve water infrastructure, air pollution
control, site cleanup, chemical management, and economic development.
• Prior to joining ECOS, Ms. Dunn served as executive director and general
counsel for the Association of Clean Water Administrators.
• Administrator Dunn has a strong background in ethics of community
advocacy, environmental justice, urban sustainability, water quality,
cooperative federalism, and the Clean Water Act.

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OSRR PROGRAMS
• Superfund National Priority List Program
– Site Assessment Program
– Remedial Cleanup Program
– Federal Facilities Program
• Superfund Emergency Response and Removal
Program
– Emergency Response to Oil and HAZMAT
– Removal Action Response
– Oil Spill Prevention
– Chemical Emergency Preparedness and
Prevention
• Brownfields
• Resource Conservation & Recovery Act
– Hazardous Waste Management
– RCRA Corrective Action
– PCB Disposal and Cleanup
• Underground Storage Tanks
– UST Prevention and LUST Cleanup
OSRR MISSION STATEMENT
Protect New England
Support State Relationships
and Community Priorities
One office, multiple programs dedicated to protecting
the public and the environment from threats posed
by chemical, biological and radiological releases and
fostering economic vitality through integrated,
coordinated approaches to prevention, cleanup, and
site revitalization.
Facilitate Strengthen Economy
Redevelopment
OFFICE OF SITE REMEDIATION & RESTORATION
OFFICE DIRECTOR
Bryan Olson
617-918-1201

DEPUTY DIRECTOR
Nancy Barmakian
617-918-1202

Emergency Planning
Remediation & Restoration I Remediation & Restoration II Technical & Support
& Response Bob Cianciarulo Ginny Lombardo Maggie Leshen
Carol Tucker 617-918-1330 617-918-1754 617-918-1421
617-918-1221

NH / RI Superfund RCRA Corrective Action


Melissa G. Taylor (incl. PCB Cleanup program) Information & Budget
Emergency Response 617-918-1310 Daniel Wainberg Management
& Removal I 617-918-1283 Ross Gilleland (Temp.)
Ted Bazenas 617-918-1188
617-918-1230
ME/VT/CT Superfund Brownfields Section
Daniel Keefe John Podgurski
617-918-1327 617-918-1296 Contracts Management
Frank Gardner (Temp.)
Emergency Response 617-918-1278
& Removal II
Bill Lovely MA Superfund RCRA Waste
617-918-1240 Lynne Jennings Management & UST
617-918-1210 Beth Deabay Technical & Enforcement
617-918-1343 Support
Meghan Cassidy
617-918-1387

New Bedford Harbor Team GE Pittsfield Team Federal Facilities Superfund


Dave Lederer Dean Tagliaferro Anni Loughlin
617-918-1325 617-918-1282 617-918-1273
OSRR'S PROGRAM STRATEGY
• Protect human health and the environment by cleaning up hazardous substance
and petroleum releases and responding to regional and national emergencies.
• Prevent or minimize the threat of hazardous substance and petroleum releases
to the environment through facility inspections, outreach/assistance, training
exercises, hazardous waste management, and contingency planning.
• Strengthen economy and spur growth of New England communities by
facilitating revitalization of contaminated sites, with a goal of bringing these properties
back to prosperous and sustainable re-use.
• Build strong partnerships with states, tribes, and local partners.
• Conduct proactive, effective engagement with communities affected by site
cleanup and waste management activities.
PROTECT HUMAN HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT

– Superfund Remedial Program


• 123 sites on the National Priority List
(NPL), construction complete at 82
• 2,153 sites (of 3,223) addressed and
removed from inventory
– Emergency Response and Removal
Program
• 960 short term clean-up actions since
the inception of the program
• 300 to 400 spill notification calls per
year
• 25 emergency responses each year
• Provide technical and cleanup
contractor support to assist local and
state responders
PROTECT HUMAN HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT
• Brownfields Program
– 2,664 assessments completed
– 328 cleanups completed
– $92 million to states and tribes
• UST Clean-up Program (in partnership with
States)
– 3,420 site cleanups completed over the
past 10 years
– 8,305 facilities with over 23,000 active
underground storage tanks – states
inspect facilities every 3 years with EPA
support
PROTECT HUMAN HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT

• RCRA Corrective Action


Program
– 296 RCRA sites on 2020
baseline, 177 construction
complete
• PCB Program
– 200+ active PCB projects at
any given time
– 150+ schools with PCB issues
PREVENT RELEASES
• Spill Prevention Control and
Countermeasure (SPCC) Program
– 5000+ facilities subject to SPCC
– 25 to 30 inspections/year
• Facility Response Plan (FRP) Program
– 18 Inspections/year
• EPA and State RCRA Programs
– Oversee 1,887 large quantity generators;
generating 377,000+ tons hazardous
waste/year
– Oversee 21 facilities that treat, store or
dispose of more than 55,000 tons
hazardous waste/year
STRENGTHEN ECONOMY AND
SPUR GROWTH
• Superfund Remedial Program (non-
Federal Facilities)
– 60+ sites in reuse
– 4,600 jobs created
– $290 million in annual employment
income
– $2.8 million in annual property tax
revenues
• Superfund Federal Facilities - BRAC
– 20,000+ acres conveyed
– 20,000+ jobs created
– $1+ billion in annual employment income
STRENGTHEN ECONOMY AND
SPUR GROWTH
• Brownfields Program
– $408 million in grants awarded have
leveraged
• 16,000+ jobs
• $2.6 billion in public and private
investment
• Emergency Response and Removal
Program
EPA Region 1 Brownfields Funds
Leveraged
(1995-2017) [CATEG
– Removes contamination-related ORY
NAME]
redevelopment obstacles [CATEG
$408M
[PERCE
NTAGE]
• RCRA Corrective Action Program ORY
NAME]
[PERCE
– Environmental cleanups occur NTAGE]
$2.6 B

while owners continue operations


BUILD STRONG PARTNERSHIPS

• Superfund Programs
– Work with state/local partners and other federal
agencies to return contaminated sites to sustainable
and productive uses
• Brownfields Program
– Work with state/tribal environmental and economic
development agencies to coordinate the use of EPA
and state/tribal Brownfields resources
– Assists state, tribal, local, and other grantees in the
implementation of grants
• EPA and State RCRA Programs
– Establish and jointly implement shared
programmatic goals
BUILD STRONG PARTNERSHIPS
• UST Prevention Program
– Collaborate with state partners to
protect groundwater from
contamination
• Emergency Response
Preparedness
– Train and conduct exercises with
other federal, state, and local
partners
– Sponsors courses annually for
state agencies
ENGAGE IN PROACTIVE
COMMUNITY OUTREACH

• Superfund Programs
– Get to know affected community
and key players early
– Develop tailored communication
plans
– Work with communities to ensure
their concerns and priorities are
considered in cleanup/reuse plans
ENGAGE IN PROACTIVE
COMMUNITY OUTREACH
• Brownfields Program
– Outreach on funding and technical 2017 Phoenix Award Grand Prize
assistance opportunities to prospective Union Station, Springfield, MA
grantees
– Extensive administrative/technical
support and training to grantees
– Coordinate with States and Regional
Planning Commissions to support
grantees, particularly rural and small to
mid-size communities
– Result:
• Higher application rates for national
brownfields grants
• Better success rate for Region
1 applicants
SUPERFUND TASK FORCE REPORT
• Issued July 2017: https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2017-
07/documents/superfund_task_force_report.pdf
• Five Goals:
– Expediting Cleanup and Remediation;
– Re-invigorating Responsible Party Cleanup and Reuse;
– Encouraging Private Investment;
– Promoting Redevelopment and Community Revitalization; and
– Engaging Partners and Stakeholders
• Total of 42 Recommendations – to be initiated over 12 months
• December 2017 – Administrator’s “Expedite Superfund Emphasis List (XSEL)” (top 10 list) released -
two Region 1 sites on that list – Centredale Manor in Rhode Island and Mohawk Tannery in New
Hampshire
• January 2018 – Administrator’s “Superfund Redevelopment Focus List” released – two Region 1 sites
on that list – New Bedford Harbor, New Bedford, MA and Raymark Industries Inc., Stratford, CT
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EPA’S DRAFT FY18-22 STRATEGIC PLAN
• October 5, 2017 - Issued for public comment: https://www.epa.gov/planandbudget/strategicplan (public
comment period has closed)
• Final Strategic Plan expected to be released this month (February 2018)
• Goal 1 – Core Mission: Improve Air Quality; Provide for Clean & Safe Water; Revitalize Land & Prevent
Contamination; Ensure Safety of Chemicals in the Marketplace
• Goal 2 – Cooperative Federalism: Enhance Shared Accountability; Increase Transparency & Public
Participation
• Goal 3 – Rule of Law and Process: Compliance with the Law; Create Consistency & Certainty; Prioritize
Robust Science; Streamline & Modernize; Improve Efficiency & Effectiveness
• Strategic Measures Relevant to OSRR:
– Make additional Superfund site Ready for Anticipated Use (RAU*) Site-Wide
– Make additional Brownfield Sites RAU
– Make additional RCRA Corrective Action Facilities RAU
– Complete additional Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) cleanups
– Accelerate Permitting-Related Decisions
• *RAU generally means construction of the remedy is completed and institutional controls, if required, are in
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place
SUPERFUND CLEANUPS IN WOBURN, MA
ONE TOWN, TWO LARGE NPL SITES
Site #1 – Industri-Plex
• 245 acre site, 10 miles north of Boston, adjacent I95 and Industri-Plex
I93
• Over 110 years of chemical and glue manufacturing
(1853-1969)
• Development in 1970s and 1980s disturbed animal
waste hide piles causing obnoxious “rotten egg” odors
resulting in law suits and site listing
Site #2 – Wells G&H (Subject of Book and Film “A
Civil Action”)
• 330 acre site, downstream from Industri-plex Wells G&H
• Operations included dry cleaning, solvent storage, truck
terminals, drum disposal and plastics manufacturing
• Five different source areas on several parcels owned by
several large and small corporations
SUPERFUND CLEANUPS IN WOBURN, MA
ONE TOWN,TWO LARGE NPL SITES

The Challenge
• High incidence of leukemia in town as a result of drinking water contamination created a
stigma for the town and a fear in the people
• Two NPL sites in same town requiring complex cleanups
• Several responsible parties with diverse interests
• Highly desirable location for redevelopment
The Cleanups
• Consolidation of contaminated materials, covered by permeable and impermeable caps,
thermal oxidation of collected gases, several active and passive groundwater collection and
treatment and extensive wetlands mitigation
• Extensive coordination with responsible parties, the Department of Transportation,
developers, the community, the state
SUPERFUND CLEANUPS IN WOBURN, MA
ONE TOWN, TWO LARGE NPL SITES
The Results
• Regional Transportation Center
including new highway interchange
• Several new commercial
establishments including retail,
hotels and restaurants
• New recreational opportunities
including walking trails, hockey
arena
• Over 2,000 jobs
• Over $200 million annual
employment income
• Over $4 million in annual local
property taxes
• Additional redevelopment plans in
the works, including residential uses
PHARMACIA/UPJOHN CORRECTIVE ACTION SITE
The Site
• Former Pharmacia and Upjohn site located in North Haven, CT
• Pharmacia/Upjohn acquired by Pfizer who is now performing cleanup under EPA
oversight
• Primarily chemical manufacturing since the mid-19th century until 1993;
currently only cleanup related operations
• Heavily contaminated with PCBs, VOCs, SVOCs
The Challenge
• Work with RP to address complex groundwater contamination and large
quantity of PCB contaminated soils
• Community input and acceptance
The Cleanup
• Involved EPA’s RCRA Corrective Action and TSCA programs collaborating
closely with CTDEEP
• Citizens Advisory Panel (CAP) deeply involved
• Over $150 million cleanup involving groundwater treatment, source reduction,
containment, and future reuse considerations
• Greener Cleanup principles employed to reduce carbon footprint and increase
community acceptance
PHARMACIA/UPJOHN CORRECTIVE ACTION SITE
(CONTINUED)
The Results 60+ acres
• Effective, protective, and sustainable remedy Tidal marshes,
Inland
• 60+ acres of ecological restoration will be wetlands
available to the public Upland
• 17 Acres slated for commercial development meadows
• Local buying commitment during remedial
activities
• Local job creation
• Market based and stakeholder driven re-use
planning process
• Redevelopment opportunities
• North Haven CAP honored with 2011 USEPA
Environmental Merit Award for their long-term
commitment and outstanding efforts
Thank you!
Ginny Lombardo, Chief
Remediation and Restoration II Branch
OSRR, EPA Region 1
lombardo.ginny@epa.gov

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US EPA Brownfields Program Updates

Jim Byrne
Program Lead
Cleanup & State Funding
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 1

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
Brownfields
EPA’s Brownfields Program
February 2018
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 Brownfields sites are “real property, the expansion,
redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated
What is a by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous
substance, pollutant, or contaminant.”
Brownfield?
The term “brownfields” is often used to describe a
wide range of federal, state, and non-regulated sites.

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 Even though the Brownfields Law was passed in 2002,
Federal there are still many potential property owners who are
Liability not clear about what to do prior to purchasing
property.
Protection

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 The Brownfields Law provides that under certain
Federal circumstances, simply owning contaminated property
does not result in CERCLA liability.
Liability
 The law provides federal liability protection to a group
Protection we call “Bona Fide Prospective Purchasers” (BFPPs).
 A BFPP must do certain things prior to purchasing a
property in order to be protected.
 Rule #1: Have an ASTM Phase I Assessment done prior
to purchase (shelf life).
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 There are other things you must do as well after
Federal acquiring the property:
 Exercise appropriate care by taking reasonable steps which
Liability includes:
 Stopping any continuing releases
Issues  Preventing any threatened future releases
 Preventing or limiting human or environmental exposure to the
site.
 Comply with land use restrictions.
 Comply with information requests.

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 Paying attention and doing these things ensures a
Federal higher probability of success when you apply for an
EPA cleanup grant or try to borrow funding through an
Liability EPA revolving loan fund grant.
Issues

36
Annual Brownfields General Appropriation
Fiscal Years 1997 - 2015, in millions of dollars

$200
$167 $170 $169 $173 $173 $168 $167
$180 $164 $162 $163 $163 $163
$153
$160
$140
$120
$88 $90 $88 $93 $93
$100
$80
$60 $38
$40
$20
$0

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 Eligible Entities
 States
Eligible  General Purpose Unit of Local Government
Entities for  Tribes
EPA Grants  Redevelopment Agencies
 Land Clearance Authority
 Councils of Government
 Non-profits (cleanup only)

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Assessment Grants
$200,000 - $350,000

Revolving Loan Fund Cleanup Grants


$1,000,000 $200,000

Targeted Brownfields Job Training Grants


Assessments (TBA) $200,000
Grant of Service
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 EPA coordinates with state environmental agencies in a number of
ways:
 State approves sites for petroleum eligibility.
Coordination  Properties are assessed and cleaned up according to state
with States regulations through Voluntary Cleanup Programs.
 Some states provide staff person to assist each grantee
throughout the entire performance period of the grant. This
includes attending meetings and providing technical
expertise and oversight.
 EPA provides the states with funding to establish and
enhance Voluntary Cleanup Programs.

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 The grant competition is held annually.
 We expect an announcement of the FY’18 awards in
This Year’s May.
Competition  We anticipate the “guidelines” will be issued in the fall
with proposals due by early winter.
 Guidelines outreach sessions by EPA (Usually in
Oct0ber)
 Award announcements are made the following spring.

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North Dam Mill – Biddeford, ME
North Dam LLC (private developer)
Cleanup utilized a $1,000,000 RLF Loan from
the Southern Maine RPC
Brownfields Transformed 300,000 SF of abandoned mill
Success buildings into residential, commercial, and light
industrial space
Story
Leveraged over $6M in private investment and
Revolving 40 new jobs
Loan Fund
Grants

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Modern Electroplating – Boston, MA
Former electroplating shop abandoned with
extremely hazardous chemicals
$78,000 in EPA TBA funds used for assessment –
Brownfields contaminants include lead, VOCs, and asbestos
Success Story $200,000 EPA Cleanup Grant plus over $6M in
Targeted leveraged cleanup funding
Brownfields Redeveloped by City into new $15M police
Assessment station which opened 7/30/11

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$394 million in EPA brownfields grants awarded to
Summary of New England communities
Brownfields 2,671 sites have been assessed with EPA brownfields
Successes grant funds
Leveraged 340 Sites cleaned up & ready for re-use
Activities in 16,182 jobs leveraged
New England Over $2.5 billion leveraged from cleanup, construction,
and redevelopment of brownfields

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Source:
Source: US EPA– Sep 2015
ACRES
EPA Region 1 Brownfields Site:
http://www2.epa.gov/brownfields/brownfields-
and-land-revitalization-connecticut-maine-
massachusetts-new-hampshire-rhode
Available EPA Headquarters Brownfields Site:
Resources http://www2.epa.gov/brownfields

MassDEP Brownfields Site:


http://www.mass.gov/dep/cleanup/brownfie.htm

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Case Study: Lawrence Metals
& Hotel Site in Chelsea, MA

Kathy Campbell
President
CDW Consultants, Inc.

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
EBC Site Remediation and Redevelopment Program

Brownfields Redevelopment Case Study:


Former Lawrence Metals
Beech Street, Chelsea MA
Feb 1, 2018

Kathy Campbell, PE, LSP, LEED AP


kcampbell@cdwconsultants.com

CDW CONSULTANTS, INC.


6 Huron Drive
Natick MA 01760
508-875-2657
www.cdwconsultants.com
 1950-1974 American Barrel Company – drum reclamation facility
 May 1974 – origin of a devastating fire that destroyed entire city
block
 1986-2000 –Lawrence Metals Finishing (LMF) Corp
 2000 – City of Chelsea acquires Site
Site
 Primary Contaminant of Concern (Soil):
 PCBs (up to 208,000 ppm!)
 Secondary Contaminants:
 Heavy Metals especially Lead (up to 7,000 ppm)
 Petroleum Hydrocarbons
 Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and CVOCs
 Groundwater Impacts from PCBs and CVOCs
 U.S. EPA maintained jurisdiction over cleanup, but
 Site is also regulated under the MCP
 RISKS
 Receptors (Adults, Children, Workers,
Trespassers)
 Contaminant Levels and Distribution
 Development Issues
 Small footprint <2 acres
 Recovering Neighborhood
 Fear of Unknowns

 Site languished for years with no


feasible path
 2012 – Chelsea formally asked MassDEP to request assistance
from U.S. EPA
 2013-2014 EPA’s Time Critical Remedial Action:
 To achieve <50 ppm average on active use part of Site, with no individual
concentration >100 ppm on parking extension
 Lien Waiver signed with City and Developer in exchange for $1.4 million
contribution to the cleanup
 EPA directed the cleanup, achieved cleanup goals and backfilled to -2 feet below
grade to allow for redevelopment
July 2014 - EPA completed initial cleanup

Removed and Disposed of:


19,000 tons of PCB soils
4 newly discovered USTS
2 subsurface vaults
 EPA Risk-Based Action Levels were achieved
 Barrier Layer installed for separation of remaining PCB soils
 2+ feet of clean soil, gravel and crushed concrete placed as a low-risk working
surface for construction
 Further work to create a permanent cap was anticipated as part of redevelopment
 Conduct Final Remediation for Future Use:
 Complete targeted soil testing for PCBs in areas where soil below EPA
fabric would be disturbed
 Submit a combined Risk Based Cleanup (RBC) Plan for EPA Approval
under TSCA Program, and a Phase IV Remedy Implementation Plan for
MassDEP approval under MCP
 Construct the hotel building on the least contaminated portion
of the Site
 Cap the Site and achieve a Permanent Solution
 To complete utility work in Beech
Street to serve new FBI building
 To coordinate sidewalk elevations
with the future Site cap to comply
with ADA
 To negotiate the final development
agreement and TIF

 Discovered that Beech Street was a paper street – Prior to sale


the City Council had to vote to accept the Street
 Summer-Fall 2014 - Heavy Rains
 Deeper soils with residual PCBs mixed and contaminated
clean soil above barrier
 Required re-characterization of ALL site soils by Developer
to satisfy RBC Plan requirements
 Re-Defined boundaries of the Disposal Site in May 2015
 Accepted the new Tier Classification, and issued a Notice of Responsibility to
Developer in August 2015
 Established an Interim Deadline of June 17, 2017 for achieving a Permanent Solution
DEVELOPER RESPONSIBILITIES:
 Remediation Design and Implementation
 Risk Based Cleanup Plan specific to future uses
 <50 ppm avg N side, <100 ppm avg S side
 Soil Mgmt Planning
 Cap Construction

<N
 Segregated by origin and final characterization
 Any soils with PCBs>29 ppm required to be Haz Waste
 Re-Used any Structurally Suitable Soils under foundation
 Transported and Disposed of Excess Soils
 Dust mitigation
 Minimize worker contact with PCB soils
 Tracking of soils by disposal characterization
 Site was capped with 2 feet of clean soil and concrete/asphalt
 Landscaped areas have 3 foot layer of clean soil
Risk Based Cleanup Plan Final Report
▪ Final site concentrations and verification of the cap thickness
▪ Operation, Maintenance and Monitoring Plan
Phase IV Completion Report and Permanent Solution with Conditions
▪ MCP Method 3 Risk Characterization demonstrated no
significant risk from remaining concentrations
▪ Final site survey to verify final grades
▪ Activity and Use Limitation recorded
▪ Submitted 1 day before Interim Deadline
 EPA:
 6 underground vaults and storage tanks
 More soil contamination than expected
 Additional soil testing to meet Action Memo goals
 More $$ spent on cleanup
 DEVELOPER
 Weather worsens contamination
 RBC soil segregation/disposal
 Additional soil characterization
 Off-site VOC discovery
 More $$ spent on cleanup
 Two (2) Risk-Based Cleanups
 EPA’s mass reduction of PCB contamination
 Multi-Agency responsive & cooperative efforts
 Waste minimization/Reclamation soil use
 Effective siting of hotel features and utilities
 A permanent cap over what’s left
 Institutional Controls for site closure
Environmental Assessment
Former LMF Corp $200,000
City of Chelsea $50,000
MassDevelopment $83,000
US EPA-grants $400,000
Developer $412,840
TOTAL $1,145,840
Soil and/or Groundwater Remediation
Former LMF Corp $500,000
City of Chelsea $1,900,000
MassDevelopment $250,000
US EPA $6,582,772
Developer $2,371,717
TOTAL $11,354,739
GRAND TOTAL $12,500,579

Or $7 million dollars Per Acre !


ECONOMIC BENEFITS
145 Beech Street -Chelsea Hilton Homewood Suites
Tax Property Tax Assessed Taxes Room Tax/Yr Meals Tax/Yr
Year Exemption Value Collected/Yr (estimated) (estimated)
2000-2016 0% $204,500 $0 $0 $0

2017 60% $6,911,504 $20,458 $250,000 $120,000


2018 60% $8,775,664 $25,976 $250,000 $330,000
2019 50% $9,353,614 $27,687 $250,000 $330,000
2020 50% $9,353,614 $27,687 $250,000 $330,000
2021 40% $11,224,336 $33,224 $250,000 $330,000
2022 35% $14,030,420 $41,530 $250,000 $330,000
2023 25% $14,030,420 $41,530 $250,000 $330,000
2024 0% $18,000,000 $53,280 $250,000 $330,000
2025 0% $18,000,000 $53,280 $250,000 $330,000
2026 0% $18,000,000 $53,280 $250,000 $330,000

$377,932 $2,500,000 $3,090,000

AFTER 10 YEARS, TOTAL CITY RETURN ON INVESTMENT = $5,967,932


(Ci ty acqui si ti on cost, and sal e proceeds both used for cl eanup)
Open for Business - March 15, 2017
Case Study:
Union Station in Springfield, MA

Brian Connors
Deputy Director of Economic Development
City of Springfield

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
City of Springfield
Massachusetts

Brian M. Connors
Office of Planning & Economic Development
Union Station & Downtown Development
springfield-ma.gov 75

SPRINGFIELDSUMMARY
• 154,074
• 4th largest city in New
England
• Headquarters:
MassMutual Financial,
Big Y Supermarkets,
Smith & Wesson, Peter
Pan Bus Lines
• Located in center of
Knowledge Corridor
springfield-ma.gov 76

SPRINGFIELDSUMMARY
Best known:

• Birthplace of Dr. Theodor


Geisel, aka “Dr. Seuss”

• Birthplace of Basketball/home
of Basketball Hall of Fame

• The “first” Springfield

• City of Homes, City of Firsts,


Hoop City

• Top Ten lists: MSNBC


Business, Green City, AARP
Retire, Advocate, Old House
Magazine, Forbes
springfield-ma.gov 77

DOWNTOWNDEVELOPMENT

• BBHOF
• MGM Springfield
• Museum Quadrangle
• TDI/TOD District
• Union Station
• Park once – concept
• Walkable/bikeable
springfield-ma.gov 78

UNIONSTATION
• Grand opening in 1926
• Center of Economic Activity in
the region for decades
• 97 trains per day in the late
1920’s
springfield-ma.gov 79

UNIONSTATION

• 1958 – MassPike
• 1960’s – 12 trains
• 1973 – closure
• 1989 – SRA
ownership
• 2010 – Federal
funding, plan
development
springfield-ma.gov 80

UNIONSTATION
springfield-ma.gov 81

UNIONSTATION
Catalyst
• EPA - $600,000
• Former Hotel site
• MassDevelopment -
$2.1 million
• Underground
Storage tanks
• Asbestos/Hazmat
• TRC/Tighe & Bond
springfield-ma.gov 82

UNIONSTATION
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UNIONSTATION
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UNIONSTATION
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UNIONSTATION
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UNIONSTATION
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UNIONSTATION
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UNIONSTATION
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UNIONSTATION
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UNIONSTATION
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UNIONSTATION
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COMMUTERRAIL
• Existing Amtrak service

• Commuter rail to Hartford


and New Haven begins in
May, 2018

• 12 trains a day, thousands of


new daily passengers

• New MassDOT 2018 rail


plan includes funding East-
West rail study
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TRANSITORIENTEDDEVELOPMENT
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TRANSITORIENTEDDEVELOPMENT

122 Chestnut Willy’s Overland Building


The Silverbrick Group Davenport Companies
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SPRINGFIELDMUSEUMS
• Amazing World of
Dr. Seuss
Museum
• Springfield
Science Museum
• Wood Museum of
Springfield History
• D’Amour Museum
of Fine Arts
• GWVS Museum of
Art
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JUNE2011TORNADO
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MGMSPRINGFIELD What we like:

• Points of Entry
• Urban Design
• Appropriate scale
• Tax revenue
• Retail/restaurants
• Outdoor skating
• Movies
• Bowling
• 3,000 perm. jobs
• 2,000 const. jobs
• Public safety
• Entertainment
• Historic fabric
• :
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MGMSPRINGFIELD
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MGMSPRINGFIELD
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MGMSPRINGFIELD
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MGMSPRINGFIELD

April, 2016
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MGMSPRINGFIELD
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MGMSPRINGFIELD
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MGMSPRINGFIELD
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Contact/Questions
Brian Connors
Deputy Director
City of Springfield
413.787.6020
bconnors@springfieldcityhall.com
EBC Site Remediation & Redevelopment Program:

EPA Overview & Updates


Remediation Programs & Redevelopment Success Stories