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This presentation consists of highlights


from the interview with Moe Abdou,
founder & host of 33voices®.
Amy E. Herman
Author of Visual Intelligence

Amy E. Herman, JD, MA, designed, developed and conducts all


sessions of the The Art of Perception, an educational program on
which her new book, Visual Intelligence, is based. While working
as Head of Education at The Frick Collection, she instituted the
program for medical students to improve their observation skills.
Insight #1

Change the way you look at the world, and the


world you look at will change. Perception is a
skill that will forever be a work-in-progress.

“The real voyage of discovery


consists not in seeking new landscapes,
but in having new eyes.”
- Marcel Proust
Insight #2

No two individuals see anything the exact


same way, so refrain from making assumptions.
Not only do we observe, notice, and gather in-
formation differently; we also perceive
what we’ve gathered differently.
Insight #3

Leaders who approach complex


problems with fresh eyes make it a habit to
step back and remember the acronym COBRA:
Insight #3

Leaders who approach complex


problems with fresh eyes make it a habit to
step back and remember the acronym COBRA:
Concentrate on the Camouflaged.
Look for what’s hiding & not obvious
Insight #3

Leaders who approach complex


problems with fresh eyes make it a habit to
step back and remember the acronym COBRA:
One Thing at a Time.
Keep your focus sharp and single minded
Insight #3

Leaders who approach complex


problems with fresh eyes make it a habit to
step back and remember the acronym COBRA:
Take a Break.
To avoid overstimulation, take a walk
Insight #3

Leaders who approach complex


problems with fresh eyes make it a habit to
step back and remember the acronym COBRA:
Realign Your Expectations.
Let go of any preconceived notions
Insight #3

Leaders who approach complex


problems with fresh eyes make it a habit to
step back and remember the acronym COBRA:
Ask Someone Else to Look with You.
Bring someone else in to look with fresh eyes
Insight #4

It’s the Evolved Leader who never mistakes


assumptions for facts, for she knows that every
person she meets is fighting a battle she knows
nothing about. To her, communication has
to be Clear, Precise, and Objective.
Insight #5

How you innately feel about something is


largely shaped by your personal experiences,
which in turn contributes to your perceptual
filters. Try asking yourself these questions:
Am I being influenced by ….
Insight #5

How you innately feel about something is


largely shaped by your personal experiences,
which in turn contributes to your perceptual
filters. Try asking yourself these questions:
Am I being influenced by ….
My values, morals, culture, or religious beliefs?
Insight #5

How you innately feel about something is


largely shaped by your personal experiences,
which in turn contributes to your perceptual
filters. Try asking yourself these questions:
Am I being influenced by ….
My professional desires, ambitious, or failures?
Insight #5

How you innately feel about something is


largely shaped by your personal experiences,
which in turn contributes to your perceptual
filters. Try asking yourself these questions:
Am I being influenced by ….
My physical state (illness, height, weight, etc)?
Insight #5

How you innately feel about something is


largely shaped by your personal experiences,
which in turn contributes to your perceptual
filters. Try asking yourself these questions:
Am I being influenced by ….
My financial experience or outlook?
Insight #5

How you innately feel about something is


largely shaped by your personal experiences,
which in turn contributes to your perceptual
filters. Try asking yourself these questions:
Am I being influenced by ….
My inherent likes or dislikes?
Insight #6

Opt not to view your biases as


weakness, but be vigilant as to not
substitute them for fact-finding. Follow these
three steps to better manage them:
Insight #6

Opt not to view your biases as


weakness, but be vigilant as to not
substitute them for fact-finding. Follow these
three steps to better manage them:
Become aware of them and
boot out the bad ones
Insight #6

Opt not to view your biases as


weakness, but be vigilant as to not
substitute them for fact-finding. Follow these
three steps to better manage them:
Don’t mistake your biases for facts,
instead use them to find facts
Insight #6

Opt not to view your biases as


weakness, but be vigilant as to not
substitute them for fact-finding. Follow these
three steps to better manage them:
Run your conclusions past others as to
avoid reaching unconscious decisions
Insight #7

As with observation skills, the most


important thing you can do to sharpen
your communication skills, especially in times
of stress or duress, is to separate the
objective from the subjective:
Insight #7

As with observation skills, the most


important thing you can do to sharpen
your communication skills, especially in times
of stress or duress, is to separate the
objective from the subjective:
In assessing, separate fact from fiction
Insight #7

As with observation skills, the most


important thing you can do to sharpen
your communication skills, especially in times
of stress or duress, is to separate the
objective from the subjective:
In analyzing, separate inference
from opinion
Insight #7

As with observation skills, the most


important thing you can do to sharpen
your communication skills, especially in times
of stress or duress, is to separate the
objective from the subjective:
In stressful communication, separate the
message from any and all emotion
Insight #8

Words matter. Regardless of whether you’re


writing or speaking, choice of words is 100%
within your control. Choose substance!

“The difference between the almost right


word and the right word is really a large
matter - ’tis the difference between
the lightning-bug and the lightning.”
- Mark Twain
Insight #9

Next time you’re facing an important issue,


ask yourself these three questions:
Insight #9

Next time you’re facing an important issue,


ask yourself these three questions:
What’s happening here?
Insight #9

Next time you’re facing an important issue,


ask yourself these three questions:
What did I see?
Insight #9

Next time you’re facing an important issue,


ask yourself these three questions:
What didn’t I see?
Insight #10

To crystallize your communication, assume that


the person you are communicating with can’t
see what you’re seeing at all. Ask yourself:
Insight #10

To crystallize your communication, assume that


the person you are communicating with can’t
see what you’re seeing at all. Ask yourself:
Was I clear as possible?
Insight #10

To crystallize your communication, assume that


the person you are communicating with can’t
see what you’re seeing at all. Ask yourself:
Did I ask the right questions to elicit
the answers I need?
Insight #10

To crystallize your communication, assume that


the person you are communicating with can’t
see what you’re seeing at all. Ask yourself:
Am I only dealing with objective facts?
Did you notice the time on the
clock to be 12:42?
Did you notice the “C”?
Did you notice the six strands of
pearls on her neck?
What questions does the
painting elicit for you?
Reflect
How are your priorities
defining your behavior?
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Jenna@33voices.com

Presentation by Chase Jennings

Insights by Jenna Abdou


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