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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, SCIENCE

& TECHNOLOGY

SCHOOL OF BUILDING & CIVIL ENGINEERING

Bachelor of Engineering
(Civil)

Programme Documents
&
Unit Descriptions

2013
Table of Contents
Index Page No.
1.0 BACKGROUND INFORMATION 4
1.1 Rationale 4
1.2 Aims and Objective 5
1.3 Graduate Profile 5
1.4 Programme Philosophy 6
2.0 PROGRAMME REGULATIONS 6
2.1 Admission Requirements 6
2.2 Award of Degree 6
3.0 PROGRAMME STRUCTURE 7
3.1 General 7
3.2 Compulsory Units 7
3.3 Elective Units 7
3.4 Delivery Mode 7
3.5 Order of Delivery / Table 1 – Table 3 7 - 10
4.0 ASSESSMENT 11
4.1 Assessment Philosophy 11
4.2 Methods of Assessment 11
4.3 Criteria for Assessment 11
5.0 TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS 11
5.1 Introduction 11
5.2 Methods 12
6.0 MONITORING, EVALUATING AND REVIEWING OF PROGRAMME 12
6.1 Board of Studies 12
6.2 Examination Board 12
6.3 On-going Monitoring 12
6.4 External Moderation 13
6.5 Industry Advisory Committee (IAC) 13
7.0 UNIT INFORMATION 14 - 21

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8.0 PROGRAMME UNIT DESCRIPTOR
English for Academic Studies 23 – 34
Engineering Computation 1 35 - 45
Engineering Physics 46 – 56
Engineering Graphics 57 - 67
Material Science 68 – 78
Introduction to Electrical and Electronics Engineering 79 – 89
Introduction to Computer Programming 90 – 100
Engineering Mechanics 101 – 110
Workshop Practice 111 – 121
Engineering Computation 2 122 – 132
Surveying for Engineers 133 – 142
Geomechanics 143 – 152
Hydraulics 1 153 – 163

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Structural Mechanics for Engineers 164 – 174
Engineering Geology 175 – 184
Engineering Analysis and Problem Solving 185 – 194
Earthworks, Curves & Hydrographic Survey 195 – 205
Hydraulics 2 206 – 216
ODEs & Numerical Analysis 217 – 227
Design and Analysis of Timber Structures 228 – 237
Design and Analysis of Steel Structures 238 - 247
Geotechnical Engineering 248 – 256
Engineering Hydrology 257 – 266
Reinforced Concrete Structures 267 - 275
Foundation Engineering 276 - 284
Civil Measurement and Tendering 285 – 294
Design of Masonry Structures (Project) 295 – 306
Airport Engineering 307 – 316
Water Resource Engineering 317 - 326
Civil Engineering Technology 327 – 337
Highway Engineering & Design Application 338 – 348
Ports, Harbor & Basic Coastal Engineering 349 – 360
Project Management 361 – 370
Irrigation Engineering 371 – 380
Structural Analysis 381 – 389
Earthquake Engineering 390 – 399
Advanced Water Engineering Project 400 - 422

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College of Engineering, Science and Technology
School of Building & Civil Engineering
Bachelor of Engineering (Civil)

1.0 Background Information

In 2010, the Fiji government mandated to merge Fiji Institute of Technology


with existing five colleges in Fiji. The merger of the six colleges brings to the
birth of the Fiji National University (FNU). Among the colleges of said
university are the College of Engineering, Science and Technology (CEST).
Bachelor of Engineering are offered in CEST including Bachelor of
Engineering (Civil), which is duly approved by the industry and FNU Senate.
The Bachelor of Engineering (Civil) started in January year 2010.
On October 2011, CEST/FNU decided to adopt common units for year 1 of
Bachelor of Engineering in Civil Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and
Electrical Engineering. The introduction of the common units affected the
existing Bachelor of Engineering in Civil Engineering programme and its
syllabus needs realignment/adjustment to cater for the common units.
The realignment of the whole Bachelor of Engineering (Civil) is now
presented in this document.

1.1 Rationale
FNU has a responsibility to the Nation, the student and to industry. The
student and industry in their turn have a responsibility to their chosen
profession. In these days of ever widening access to tertiary education
a bachelor’s degree is rapidly becoming the minimum qualification for
gaining entry to para-professional as well as to professional
employment. It is therefore seen as being of vital importance to all
parties to enable each student to reach the highest level of education of
which he or she is capable. In practice this means that the best
students should aspire to degree. This is the reason FNU offers a
Bachelor of Engineering (Civil) programme, to cater the needs of the
industry and to help aspiring and deserving students to fulfill their
dreams.

The curriculum documents have also been prepared to comply with the
requirements of The General Academic Statute of the Fiji Institute of
Technology and more recently the University Academic and Student
Regulations (UASR) of the Fiji National University (FNU).

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1.2 Aims and Objectives
To educate students in the field of Civil Engineering in order to prepare
them for careers in engineering industry, professional engineers,
entrepreneurs, and enable them to become a leader in their field of
expertise. The objectives of the programme are to;

a) Provide a thorough foundation in the basic physical sciences and


civil engineering fundamentals.

b) To teach students basic scientific principles of solving technological


problems in engineering by providing them instructions in analysis,
development, design and practical work in the various field of civil
engineering.

c) To train the students to acquire the capability for meaningful result


oriented research in different fields of civil engineering.

d) To acquire advance knowledge through conduct of basic, applied


and adaptive research.

e) To be capable of addressing issues of ethics, safety,


professionalism, cultural diversity, globalization, environmental
impact and social and economic impact in engineering practice.

f) To create engineering solutions (and products) with socio-economic


impact that can create wealth to the nation.

g) To attract potential investors to the country because of highly


educated work force and imply minimal costs to the operation.

1.3 Graduate Profile


The profile for student graduating in Bachelor of Civil Engineering is to
produce competent civil engineers that will become the “leading lights”
of the industry. A successful candidate who completed said field of
study should have and be able to have:

a) Sufficiency of theoretical knowledge in earthquake engineering,


environmental engineering, geotechnical engineering, materials
engineering, structural engineering, surveying, and in municipal and
urban engineering in designing a safe and reliable vertical
engineering structures, i.e., residential houses, office and
commercial buildings;

b) Design a safe and reliable horizontal engineering structures i.e.,


roadway structures, irrigation structures and other water resource
engineering structures;

c) Sufficiency of theoretical and practical knowledge in the site or in the


engineering office, application of safe construction and project
management in vertical and horizontal construction

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d) Act as an effective channel of communication between the
engineering team and the labour force.

e) Efficiently execute routine administrative tasks including those


associated with the application of modern management techniques.

f) Liaise with government and local government organisations and


generally facilitate the process of satisfying many legal requirements
to which the industry is obliged to conform.

1.4 Program Philosophy

Throughout the programme the emphasis is on personal development,


whether through project/investigative work or through more traditional
teaching methods. Courses provide a mixture of theory to develop the
intellectual skills of the student, with hands-on activities to develop the
practical skills, which are vital to the practicing eengineers.

2.0 Programme Regulations

2.1 Admission Requirements


The minimum entry requirement for admission to Bachelor of
Engineering (Civil), is a pass in Fiji Form Seven with at least obtaining a
mark of 70 % in English, Physics, Mathematics, Technical Drawing or in
Chemistry.
The students are admitted directly in the second year with credit
transfer option on completion of F.N.U. Diploma in Civil Engineering or
equivalent from any other university/institution. The students with
Advanced Diploma in Civil Engineering or equivalent are admitted in the
third year of the engineering programme.
Enrolment in the programme is done after duly verifying all the
documents including transcripts, birth certificate, identification etc. Final
enrolment is confirmed only after he or she pays the full fees or makes
alternative arrangements with the finance department in writing.

2.2 Award of the Degree


To be considered for the award of the Bachelor of Civil Engineering the
candidate must have:

a) Completed all the prescribed units and accumulated a minimum of


480 credit points.

b) Engineering work attachment in a reputable and legally recognized


engineering firm in Fiji and overseas for a period of 6 months during
the course of study.

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3.0 Programme Structure
3.1 General

The duration of the programme is four years consisting of eight


semesters. The student will be expected to undergo 6 months
engineering work attachments within these eight semesters to
complete the programme. The programme consists of 35 units drawn
from levels 5 to 7. The maximum duration of the program is six years.
Students who do not complete this programme within six years should
be automatically considered that they do not complete the programme
and are not eligible for the award of the degree.

3.2 Compulsory Units


The majority of the units are compulsory as given in Table 1.

3.3 Elective Units


The choice of elective units is offered in year 3 and 4. Elective units
may be withdrawn if there are less than ten students in an elective unit.
The elective units may be changed from time to time to suit the
requirements of the industry/availability of the faculty member in the
college.

3.4 Delivery Mode


The programme is full-time based on 18 weeks per semester. Intakes
are at the beginning of each academic year and students proceed from
one semester to another until semester eight as mentioned in the
UASR.

3.5 Order of Delivery


Units are tabled according to the year/semester in the Programme
Descriptions (Table 1 and Table 2). Unit content instruction should be
delivered chronologically as itemized in the Unit Descriptors.

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Table 1. Programme Descriptor

Code: BEC BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING


(Civil)
Year One
Semester 1 Semester 2
Unit Code Unit Title Unit Code Unit Title
LNG501 English for Academic Studies BEN506 Introduction to Electrical & Electronics
Engineering
BEN502 Engineering Computation 1 BEN601 Engineering Computation 2
BEN503 Engineering Physics BEN507 Introduction to Computer Programming
BEN504 Engineering Graphics BEN508 Engineering Mechanics
BEN505 Material Science BEN 509 Workshop Practice

Year Two
Semester 1 Semester 2
Unit Code Unit Title Unit Code Unit Title
BEC602 Surveying for Engineers BEC607 Engineering Analysis & Problem Solving
BEC603 Geomechanics BEC608 Earthworks, Curves & Hydrographic
Survey
BEC604 Hydraulics 1 BEC609 Hydraulics 2
BEC605 Structural Mechanics for Engineers BEC610 ODEs & Numerical Analysis
BEC606 Engineering Geology
Year Three
Semester 1 Semester 2
Unit Code Unit Title Unit Code Unit Title
BEC701 Design and Analysis of Timber Structures BEC705 Reinforced Concrete Structure
BEC702 Design and Analysis of Steel Structures BEC706 Foundation Engineering
BEC703 Geotechnical Engineering BEC707 Civil Measurement & Tendering
BEC704 Engineering Hydrology BEC708 Design of Masonry Structures (Project)
BEC709 Airport Engineering (Elective)

Year Four
Semester 1 Semester 2
Unit Code Unit Title Unit Code Unit Title
BEC710 Water Resource Engineering BEC714 Project Management
BEC711 Civil Engineering Technology BEC716 Structural Analysis
BEC712 Highway Engineering & Design Application BEC718 Advance Water Engineering Project
BEC713 Ports, Harbor & Basic Coastal Engineering BEC715 Irrigation Engineering (Elective)
BEC717 Earthquake Engineering (Elective)

Attachment Minimum 6 months relevant industrial training

There is a considerable degree of flexibility tolerated for students who wish to break their
studies, have to resit examinations or repeat units. The only stipulation being

 Prerequisites must be satisfied before proceeding to advanced units and


 Re-sits and repeats can only be taken when the unit is next offered officially.

The final outcome for graduation must be the accumulation of 35 appropriate units plus the
mandatory 6 months industrial experience. The student should submit the Work Experience
Record Book to the school duly signed by the employer.

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Table 2. Programme Structure
Total Total Self
Period Unit Code Technical Description Level Contact Directed Credit
Hours Learning Total Hours Points
Hours
Year LNG501 English for Academic Studies 5 84 96 180 12
1,Sem 1 BEN502 Engineering Computation 1 5 75 105 180 12
BEN503 Engineering Physics 5 84 96 180 12
BEN504 Engineering Graphics 5 90 90 180 12
BEN505 Material Science 5 84 96 180 12
Subtotal 417 483 900 60
Year BEN506 Introduction to Electrical & Electronics 5 84 96 180 12
1,Sem 2 Engineering
BEN507 Introduction to Computer Programming 5 84 96 180 12
BEN508 Engineering Mechanics 5 73 107 180 12
BEN509 Workshop Practice 5 114 66 180 12
BEN601 Engineering Computation 2 6 98 82 180 12
Subtotal 453 447 900 60
Year BEC602 Surveying for Engineers 6 70 110 180 12
2,Sem 1 BEC603 Geomechanics 6 91 89 180 12
BEC604 Hydraulics 1 6 91 89 180 12
BEC605 Structural Mechanics for Engineers 6 70 110 180 12
BEC606 Engineering Geology 6 82 98 180 12
Subtotal 404 496 900 60
Year BEC607 Engineering Analysis and Problem Solving 6 70 140 210 14
2,Sem 2 BEC608 Earthworks, Curves & Hydrographic Survey 6 70 170 240 16
BEC609 Hydraulics 2 6 70 170 240 16
BEC610 ODEs & Numerical Analysis 6 84 126 210 14
Subtotal 294 606 900 60
Year BEC701 Design and Analysis of Timber Structures 7 82 128 210 14
3,Sem 1 BEC702 Design and Analysis of Steel Structures 7 82 128 210 14
BEC703 Geotechnical Engineering 7 82 158 240 16
BEC704 Engineering Hydrology 7 70 170 240 16
Subtotal 316 584 900 60
Year BEC705 Reinforced Concrete Structures 7 70 170 240 16
3,Sem 2 BEC706 Foundation Engineering 7 70 140 210 14
BEC707 Civil Measurement and Tendering 7 70 170 240 16
BEC708 Design of Masonry Structures (Project) 7 98 112 210 14
Elective
BEC709 Airport Engineering 7 70 140 210 14
Subtotal 308 592 900 60
Year BEC710 Water Resource Engineering 7 70 170 240 16
4,Sem 1 BEC711 Civil Engineering Technology 7 70 140 210 14
BEC712 Highway Engineering & Design Application 7 76 164 240 16
BEC713 Ports, Harbor &Basic Coastal Engineering 7 78 132 210 14
Subtotal 294 606 900 60
Year BEC714 Project Management 7 70 140 210 14
4,Sem 2 BEC716 Structural Analysis 7 70 170 240 16
BEC718 Advance Water Engineering Project 7 150 90 240 16
Elective(Choose one elective for study)
BEC715 Irrigation Engineering 7 70 140 210 14
BEC717 Earthquake Engineering 7 70 170 240 16
Subtotal 360 540 900 60
Attachment ( 6 months relevant on-the job – training in any Field of Civil Engineering from reputable Engineering firm in Fiji or overseas
during the course of study)

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Table 3 Pre-requisite for every unit
Code Programme Title Pre – requisite
Year 1
LNG501 English for Academic Studies Upon due admission in the
programme
BEN502 Engineering Computation 1 -do-
BEN503 Engineering Physics -do-
BEN504 Engineering Graphics -do-
BEN505 Material Science -do-
BEN506 Introduction to Electrical and Electronics -do-
Engineering
BEN601 Engineering Computation 2 BEN502
BEN507 Introduction to Computer Programming BEN502
BEN508 Engineering Mechanics BEN503
BEN509 Workshop Practice -do-
Year 2
BEC602 Surveying for Engineers BEN601
BEC603 Geomechanics BEN508
BEC604 Hydraulics 1 BEN503
BEC605 Structural Mechanics for Engineers BEN508
BEC606 Engineering Geology BEN505
BEC607 Engineering Analysis and Problem Solving BEN601
BEC608 Earthworks, Curves & Hydrographic Survey BEC602
BEC609 Hydraulics 2 BEC604
BEC610 ODEs & Numerical Analysis BEN601
Year 3
BEC701 Design and Analysis of Timber structures BEC605
BEC702 Design and Analysis of Steel Structures BEC605
BEC703 Geotechnical Engineering BEC603
BEC704 Engineering Hydrology BEC609
BEC 705 Reinforced Concrete Structures BEC605
BEC706 Foundation Engineering BEC605
BEC707 Civil Measurement and Tendering BEC702
Bec708 Design of Masonry Structures (Project) BEC605
Year 4
BEC710 Water Resource Engineering BEC704
BEC711 Civil Engineering Technology BEC707
BEC712 Highway Engineering & Design Application BEC608
BEC713 Ports, Harbor & Basic Coastal Engineering BEC609
BEC714 Project Management BEC707
BEC716 Structural Analysis BEC605
BEC718 Advance Water Engineering Project BEC710
Electives
Year 3
BEC709 Airport Engineering BEC703

Year 4
BEC715 Irrigation Engineering BEC710
BEC717 Earthquake Engineering BEC703

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4.0 Assessment
4.1 Assessment Philosophy

Assessment is broken down into formative and summative components.


Details are expanded below.

4.2 Methods of Assessment

The aim of summative assessment is to provide the examination board


with evidence on which to base its recommendations regarding the award
of grades. The primary tool for summative assessment is by final
examination. These will normally be of either two or three hours duration as
appropriate to the subject matter. An additional ten minutes reading time
will be allowed. In preparing examination papers, consideration will be
given to the level of attainment of the candidates. The aim being to move
the candidates progressively from closed type problem solving towards a
more open ended style of examination question. The aim of formative
assessment is to guide and encourage the student to meet the
performance criteria set out in each of the unit descriptors. Its primary
purpose is therefore educational. The primary tool for formative
assessment is the assignment. Assignments are used to develop the
students’ problem solving skills and to provide guidance as to the level of
attainment expected. Marks for assignment work reflect the degree to
which the student has met the performance criteria. Comments on the
student’s submission indicate how the work could be improved to better
meet those criteria. Assignments also form the basis of the tutorial
programme where the emphasis is on active rather than passive learning.
Laboratory exercises are an essential part of the assessment procedure.
They are assessed on the basis of a report of the work carried out and the
conclusions drawn. As part of the exercise, the student is expected to
conduct a literature search and review.

4.3 Criteria for Assessment

All units require that a student obtain a total mark of 50%. In units with final
examinations the student must also obtain the stated minimum mark in the
examination. Laboratory assignments must be completed to an acceptable
standard. Attendance at laboratory sessions and completion of laboratory
reports are compulsory.

5.0 Teaching and Learning Methods


5.1 Introduction

A variety of teaching methods will be used to facilitate the achievement of


the aims and objectives of the programme. In the initial stages of the
process of intellectual development the student will be guided towards the
achievement of a successful outcome to each activity. In later stages
however, this guidance will be reduced so as to encourage the student to
become a self-motivated independent learner.

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5.2 Methods

Teaching will be by a mixture of formal lectures, laboratory sessions and


the solution of both closed and open-ended problems in engineering
design and construction. Classroom-based activities will emphasise active
participation in the learning process. In the early stages students will
participate in tradition problem solving activities. Students will be expected
to supply reasoned arguments in support of their approaches to solving
assignment problems. Later on and as a pre-requisite to solving more
open-ended problems, students will be encouraged to extend their
knowledge base through directed study of externally available resource
material. In the final semester the students will be required to carry out a
design project based on civil engineering practice. The project will be
directed towards an actual engineering problem in Fiji and will require
integration of knowledge from different parts of the programme syllabus.

6.0 Monitoring, Evaluating and Reviewing of Programme

6.1 Board of Studies

The Board of Studies composition as detailed in the UASR is assembled to


review, discuss and amend programme curricula.

6.2 Examination Board

The Examination Board composition as detailed in the UASR sits to review,


discuss and amend individual results by consensus at the end of every
stage.

6.3 On-going Monitoring

The Board of Studies sits quarterly to review programme curricula and


make adjustments according to various inputs including

a) new technologies
b) new industrial practices legislation
c) new educational developments
d) changes to staff responsibilities
e) employers and the Industry Advisory Committee
f) the Academic Board
g) the student body
h) staff training roster
i) reviews by external consultants etc.

The monitoring process is implemented by the application of Quality


Management System procedures which ensure timely scheduling and
recording of various meetings, regular calls to employer groups, launching
and recording questionnaires, setting of internal and external reviews and
maintaining close liaisons with industries, governments and educational
bodies locally and abroad.

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6.4 External Moderation

Final stage papers are externally moderated by experts in appropriate


fields.

6.5 Industry Advisory Committee (IAC)

Composition at the time of publication:

Chairman: A Representative from the Industry


Secretary: Head of School, School of Building & Civil Engineering
Members: Representatives from:

Ministry of Primary Industries


Ministry of Public Works
Fiji Institute of Engineers
Private Companies

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7.0 UNIT INFORMATION

YEAR ONE

English for Academic Studies (LNG501)

The unit is designed as an integrated, activity based unit, this course aims to equip the
student with the skills required to communicate ideas of a technical nature clearly and
succinctly. Modes of communication addressed in this course include written, oral,
graphical and symbolic forms. This unit also aims to improve the student’s study skills and
to encourage independent learning. The syllabus includes communication theory,
intrapersonal communication, non-verbal communication, influence of culture on
communication, group processes, strategies to manage conflict, structure and delivery of
oral presentation, research and writing analytical reports.

Engineering Computation 1 (BEN502)

The unit aims to provide the students with the mathematical knowledge and expertise
required for their engineering studies. The syllabus of the unit includes review of basic
principles of linear algebra and trigonometric functions, differential calculus, integral
calculus and finite integration.

Engineering Physics (BEN503)

The syllabus of the unit includes the study of laws of motion, work and energy, wave optics,
nuclear physics, electromagnetism, atomic and quantum structure.

Engineering Graphics (BEN504)

The unit aims to provide students understanding and interpretations of engineering


drawings. Course content includes introduction to basic sketching techniques, application
of pictorial, orthographic and auxiliary projection, visualization and production of sectional
representations, manual drafting techniques applied to drawing machines, introduction to
AUTOCAD and solid works, standards for lettering and paper layout and requirements for
both detail and assembly drawings, additional representations for surface finish, geometric
tolerancing, keyways, welding and fabrication, abbreviations applied to engineering
drawings, constructional techniques, for locus of a point, helix construction, intersection and
development.

Material Science (BEN505)

The syllabus of the unit includes structures and imperfections of crystalline solids , diffusion
in materials, solidification of metals and alloys, deformation and strengthening, heat
treatments of metals and alloys, failure and fracture toughness of materials ,structure and
properties of engineering ceramics, structure and properties of polymers, cement and
concrete, masonry, timbers, aggregates, paints and other surface finishing.

Introduction to Electrical & Electronics Engineering (BEN506)

The syllabus includes Kirchoff’s laws, concept and terminology of nodal analysis to solution
of simple resistive networks, Venin’s and Norderm’s theorem , the transient analysis,
digital electronics, Boolean algebra, the combinational logic circuits, the flip flops and

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sequential circuits, Analog electronics and discrete amplifying devices and circuits.

Introduction to Computer Programming (BEN507)

The purpose of this paper is to give the student a good understanding of computer
hardware and develop the ability to formulate the logic for general problems and writing
programs with syntax. The syllabus includes Computer Hardware, System Software,
Linux Fundamentals, Data Types, Control Structures, Arrays and Functions, Structures
and Unions and Object-Oriented Programming.

Engineering Mechanics (BEN508)

The syllabus includes the study of the theoretical principle of analysis of forces in
equilibrium of different concurrent force systems and parallel force systems, scalars and
vectors, dot and cross products, force moment and couple, resultants and free body
diagrams, trusses, torsion, centroids and second moment of area and friction.

Workshop Practice (BEN509)

The syllabus includes the history and overview of manufacturing and technology, safety in
the workshop and introduction to occupational health and safety (OHS) regulations,
principles of design considerations, material selection and manufacturing processes,
structure, mechanical behavior and testing of materials , introduction to manufacturing
processes such as milling, drilling, turning, welding (practical and theoretical), and
advanced machining operations such as CNC and EDM (theoretical), fundamentals of
cutting tools and processes (range: tool geometry, speeds feeds), properties of materials,
ferrous and non-ferrous, heat treatment of ferrous metals and alloys.

Engineering Computation 2 (BEN601)

The unit aims to introduce to the student an understanding of advanced calculus and the
ability to formulate and solve models of complex engineering systems. The syllabus
includes vectors and geometry of space, vector functions, partial derivatives, multiple
integrals; vector Fields, Laplace Transforms and Fourier series.

YEAR TWO

Surveying for Engineers (BEC602)

The unit introduces the elementary methods of conducting small scale land surveys and
acquaint students with the surveying profession and its relationship with civil engineering.
The syllabus includes: Correction in linear measurement due to sag, temperature, tension
calibration, slope and curvature; Angular measurements using compass and Theodolite
surveying instrument, angle distance and bearing calculations; levelling; setting out of
vertical and horizontal control on the ground, principle of Tacheometry, use of planimeter;
area and volume calculations; Theodolite traverse which lead to the plotting of topographic
maps; Tacheometry to determine horizontal and vertical control of land survey, surveying
calculations including area calculations and volume calculations of cut and fill; use of global
positioning system(GPS) for control surveys, topographic surveys and staking out of control
points on the ground.

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Geomechanics (BEC603)

This unit introduces the concept of total stress, pore water pressure, effective stress and its
implications on the behavior of soils. The syllabus includes the analysis of two phase and
three phase of soils; study of hydraulic properties of soil such as the permeability and
seepage, Darcy Law, and Laplace equations and flow nets including sketching, critical
hydraulic gradients, uplift pressures on weirs, shear strength of soil consisting of undrained
and drained parameters (  and cand ’ and c’); application of Mohr circle in the analysis
of shear strength parameters (long term ’ and c’) of soil; conduct of shear box laboratory
test, vane test and triaxial test to determine the shear strength parameters of soil.

Hydraulics 1 (BEC604)

This unit deals with the analysis of fluid at rest, fluid in motion and the dynamic effect of
forces created by the moving liquid. The syllabus of the unit are: study of total hydrostatic
pressure in plane and curved surface, buoyant force, stability of floating bodies,
dimensional analysis and hydraulic similitude by Buckingham Pi Theorem, application of
different hydraulic model laws ( Reynolds’s Model Law, Froude Model Law, Euler Model
Law, Weber Model Law, Mach model law) in analysis of water engineering structures;
pipeline system including minor losses in pipes, friction losses in pipes, pipes in series,
pipes in parallel, pipe network analysis by Hardy Cross method and Linearization method;
Analysis of the net positive suction head (NPSH) of pump and pump selection; Steady
open channel flow including analysis of best economic trapezoidal section, specific
energy, critical depth of flow, rapidly varying flow, hydraulic jump , gradually varying flow,
classification of surface profiles, and the analysis of backwater profile by direct step and
numerical integration methods, analysis of turbo machinery.

Structural Mechanics for Engineers (BEC605)

The unit deals with the application of elastic analysis of statically indeterminate beams
and frames using moment distribution method, three moment equation, slope deflection
equation. It also includes deflection analysis by double integration method, area moment
method, conjugate beam method and virtual work method. This theoretical knowledge of
structural analysis are mandatory for engineering student to learn being the first step in
structural design of reinforced concrete, structural steel and timber structures. It also
includes engineering analysis of suspended cables, arches, retaining wall, small gravity
dams and simple suspension bridge.

Engineering Geology (BEC606)

The unit aims to extend the students’ knowledge of the origin, composition, structure, and
history of Earth. Also, to develop an appreciation of the importance of geology to Civil
Engineering particularly with regards to the sensitive development of natural earth
resources and the need to take account of ecological and environmental protection
matters. Syllabus includes study of minerals and rocks; classification of rocks into igneous
rocks, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks; the study of land forming process; volcanoes
and volcanic activity study geothermal plant as source of renewable energy; ground water
hydrology; glaciology; structural geology and plate tectonics; marine geology, geophysics.

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Engineering Analysis and Problem Solving (BEC607)

The unit provides students with MATLAB knowledge and create awareness that MATLAB
can be a powerful computing tool to solve many engineering problems. The syllabus
includes using MATLAB for arithmetic operations, taking advantage of Math built-in-
functions in programming; creating one(vector) and two(matrix) dimensional arrays ; Array
addition and subtraction, array multiplication and addition, element by element operation,
using arrays in MATLAB built-in-math function, two dimensional plots of given data;
polynomials, curve fitting and interpolation; three dimensional plotting with special
graphics; application of MATLAB in numerical analysis of engineering problem solving.

Earthworks, Curves & Hydrographic Survey (BEC608)

The unit introduces the basic principles and analysis of earthworks, roadway curves and
the basic principle of hydrographic surveying in order to increase the students’ depth of
knowledge in the field of engineering surveying. It is a necessary knowledge for
engineering students to have an in-depth theoretical knowledge of geometrical design of
horizontal alignment [simple curve, horizontal compound curve, horizontal reverse curve,
and the clothoid (spiral easement curve)] and vertical alignment [symmetrical vertical
parabolic curve and unsymmetrical vertical parabolic curve] of roadway. It also includes the
analysis of horizontal movement of earthworks such as the preparation of earthwork mass
diagram. The unit further give emphasis to the study of the basic principle of hydrographic
surveying such as measurement of discharge of river by slope area method or by using
current meters or floats.

Hydraulics 2 (BEC609)

This unit is the continuation of Hydraulics 1. It is concentrated on the analysis of unsteady


flow problems, i.e., unsteady rapidly varied flow and numerical analysis of gradually varied
flow in open channel using the explicit finite difference quotient method, solitary surge
waves propagation [upstream positive surge wave, upstream negative surge wave,
downstream positive surge wave & downstream negative surge wave due either to partial
rapid closure or opening of sluice gate ], sediment transport, design of erodible and non
erodible channel using the tractive force method, pipe and pump analysis, pipe network
analysis using linearization method , principle of water hammer, principle of surge tank
analysis, hydraulic analysis of control regulating structures and control measurement
structures.

ODEs & Numerical Analysis (BEC610)

The unit introduces the principle of Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs) & Numerical
Analysis and create awareness of its importance in solving engineering problems. The
syllabus includes first and second orders ordinary differential equations; numerics in
general; numeric linear algebra and numeric for ODEs and PDEs.

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YEAR THREE

Design and Analysis of Timber Structures (BEC701)

The unit deals with the importance of structural design codes in the design of timber
structures and develop the students’ ability to determine the structural design loads to
which an engineering timber structure will be subjected. It also includes the procedural step
of designing wooden bearer, wooden post, timber floor deck, timber trusses and the
connection details between each part of the different components of timber building
structures.

Design and Analysis of Steel Structures (BEC702)

The unit deals with the importance of structural design codes in the design of steel
structures and develop the students’ ability to determine the structural design loads to
which an engineering steel structure will be subjected. It also includes the procedural step
of designing universal structural beams, structural steel stanchions, structural steel floor
trim deck, different kinds of steel truss and the connection details between each part of the
different components of building structures made of structural steel.

Geotechnical Engineering (BEC703)

The syllabus of the unit are: Determination of shear strength parameters of cohesive and
cohesionless soil ; Ultimate bearing capacity of shallow foundations using Terzaghi theory
and Meyerhoff theory; analysis of lateral active and passive earth pressure of a retaining
wall by Rankine theory and Coulomb Wedge theory; analysis of slope stability of roadway
embankment by Swedish method , Bishop method or by the use of Taylor Chart ; analysis
of cantilever and anchored sheet pile wall; Structural analysis of gravity retaining wall,
analysis of axial capacity of pile foundations and bearing capacity of rock foundations.

Engineering Hydrology (BEC704)

The unit aims to introduce to the students the study of the principles of hydrology and its
importance in flood estimation which includes the importance meteorological data like
evaporation, transpiration precipitation percolation, formation of clouds and the hydrologic
cycle and ground water hydrology. It also includes the study of four different methods of
flood forecasting to determine the design discharge of a river, such as: Flood Frequency
Analysis (FFA), Intensity Frequency Duration (IFD) Curve, Unit Hydrograph and Runoff
routing method.

Reinforced Concrete Structures (BEC705)

Concrete is a versatile building material which is used extensively in multi-story buildings,


airports, dams, roads and many other important parts of today's modern infrastructure.
Whilst it is inherently strong in compression, its weakness in tension is offset by suitable
steel reinforcement which is initially either unstressed or prestressed. This results in a
composite material which requires a detailed understanding of its behavior before safe and
economical designs can be produced. Accordingly this course provides a detailed coverage
of: The Behavior of Reinforced and Prestressed Concrete, Durability and Fire Resistance,

18
Behavior and Design for Strength and Serviceability of Reinforced Concrete Beams, Slabs
and Columns, Anchorage, Detailing, Behavior and Design for Strength and Serviceability of
Fully Prestressed and Partially Prestressed Concrete Beams and Slabs. It also includes the
application of the theories and principles of reinforced concrete design in design calculation
of rectangular concrete beams, suspended concrete slab, concrete columns using ultimate
strength design (USD).

Foundation Engineering (BEC706)

The unit is of two parts. The first part deals with the study of theoretical principles and
procedures of designing different kinds of foundation structures such as block wall footings,
square and rectangular footings, combined rectangular, trapezoidal footings, continuous
footing, mat foundations and footing on piles using the principle of USD. The second
partdeals with the study of disastrous effect of earthquake to engineering structures; the
study includes analysis and design of engineering structures subject to the combined effect
of dead load and live load.

Civil Measurement & Tendering (BEC707)

This unit consists of two parts. The first is the study of the principles and requirements of
civil measurement as applied to civil engineering works to familiarize students with the
terminologies of project documentation and trade activities. The second is the study of the
principles and requirement of tendering and estimating as applied to civil engineering
works. Thread 2 also includes study of preparation of bill of quantities and cost analysis of
engineering projects for purposes of decision making whether to enter into a contract and
tender in a certain project.; study of the procedure of preparation of tender documents.

Design of Masonry Structures (Project) (BEC708)

The unit aims to check whether the student upon reaching year 3 semester 2 of the Civil
Engineering Programme has sufficient structural knowledge in structural design and
analysis of reinforced concrete design, foundation engineering, earthquake engineering
and geotechnical engineering. The student will be required to design at least a three
storey building made of reinforced concrete. The progress of the design works of the
student will be closely supervised by the unit lecturer to ensure that his/her design is in
accordance with existing engineering design criteria and standards. The method of
teaching will be similar to a class-based unit where students will be given example of
complete design of three storey building as reference and guidance on their actual design.

Airport Engineering (BEC709)

The aim of the unit is to introduce to students the principle governing the planning and
design of airports, including visual flight rules and regulations, structural method of design
of airport pavements, airport capacity and delay, airport configuration, various lighting and
marking system.

19
YEAR FOUR

Water Resource Engineering (BEC710)

The unit aims to introduce to the student the theoretical principle of analysis and design of
water supply distribution system and urban sewer design whether functioning as a
separate sewer or as a combined sewer system. It also includes the study of importance
of water treatment plant and sewage treatment plant. The unit further gives importance to
solid waste management. Syllabus includes study of water treatment, design of water
supply distribution system, waste water and sewage treatment, design of sanitary sewer
line, solid waste management and environmental impact assessment.

Civil Engineering Technology (BEC711)

The unit aims to introduce to the students the different construction method adopted in
construction of engineering works. It consists of two parts; the first is engineering
construction technologies and the second is building services for human convenience.
Syllabus includes. Power requirements of mobile equipment, dozers, scrapers, hydraulic
excavators, loaders, trucks and hauling equipments, pumps and compressors, explosives,
drilling and blasting, aggregate production, asphalt mix production and placement, cranes,
cofferdams, caissons, piling and dredging.

Highway Engineering & Design Application (BEC712)

The unit aims to develop and strengthen the students’ knowledge in design and
construction of roadways. The syllabus includes highway evaluation; planning and design
of roadway; preliminary road alignment studies; Road construction materials and testing;
Road drainage and erosion control; design analysis of rigid and flexible pavements. It also
gives emphasis to basic design principle of airport pavement and railroad track roadway
ballast pavement.

Ports, Harbor & Basic Coastal Engineering (BEC713)

The unit aims to introduce to students the study of wave mechanics and coastal processes
along with fundamentals that underline the practice of coastal engineering. The syllabus
includes the study of the physical characteristics and behavior of coastal environment;
analysis of surface gravity waves by small amplitude wave theory; the formulation of finite –
amplitude wave theory; wave refraction, diffraction and reflection; coastal water level
fluctuations; wind generated waves; study of different coastal structures and the study of
different zone processes. It also includes the study of basic principles of design and layout
of ports and harbors.

Project Management (BEC714)

The unit is of three parts. The first part is about engineering contract management; the
second part deals with the quality control or quality assurance and the last part is about

20
project planning management. The syllabus includes study of pre-contract procedures,
normal contracting procedures, arbitration procedures, organization of quality assurance,
design aspects of quality assurance, defective prevention system, network technique for
project management, project unit cost schedule by S-curve the importance of Programme
Evaluation and Review Technique – Critical Path Method (PERT-CPM) in construction and
management of engineering projects.

Irrigation Engineering (BEC715)

The unit aims to introduce students the theories and principles of design and analysis of
conveyance structures of canal system for irrigation purposes. It also includes the study of
drip irrigation, design analysis of irrigation canal structures such as inverted canal
siphons, elevated flumes, pipes crossing, drops and chutes, the principles involved in
design of small overflow irrigation dams.

Structural Analysis (BEC716)

The unit aims to introduce students to the study of the basic fundamentals of structural
analysis using the matrix based method of analysis (Direct stiffness method and finite
element method) of analysis of trusses, beams and frame structures. It also includes the
study of approximate method of analysis of lateral loads due to wind and earthquake (portal
method, cantilever method, or the factor method). It further includes the review of structural
analysis of statically indeterminate structures using the classical methods (method of
consistent deformation, slope deflection method and moment distribution method), matrix
method of analysis, stiffness method and flexibility method.

Earthquake Engineering (BEC717)

The unit aims to introduce to students the theories and principles of engineering
seismology, i.e., origin, cause and effect of earthquake , calculation of design lateral
forces using static and the basic dynamic analysis, building forms for earthquake
resistance, seismic design and detailing of masonry building, seismic design and detailing
of Reinforced Concrete building and earthquake soil dynamics.

Advanced Water Engineering Project (BEC718)

The aim of the unit is to check whether the student upon reaching year 4 semester 2 of
the Civil Engineering Programme has sufficient hydrological knowledge in design and
analysis of water engineering structure. The student will be required to design a baby
ogee shape irrigation dam with a height less than 6.00 meters. The progress of the design
works of the student will be closely supervised by the unit lecturer to ensure that his/her
design is in accordance with existing engineering design criteria and standards. The
method of teaching will be similar to a class-based unit where students will be given
example of complete design of one irrigation dam as reference and guidance on their
actual design.

21
8.0 Programme Unit Descriptor

22
LECTURER: TBA

LNG501 Semester : 1 Venue: Derrick Campus Title: English for Academic Studies
12
Credit Points

LECTURES: Students are to attend 1 x 2 hours of lectures per week.


TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 2 x 2 hours tutorial class per week.
LABS: N/A
SELF DIRECTED Students are to spend about 7 hours per week for this unit.
LEARNING
CONSULTATION Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according to the
TIME following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)
PREREQUISITE: The student must have passed Form 7 English or Equivalent
E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the unit shall be posted on Moodle or Class shares.
Students are required to check emails regularly for communication from the lecturer.

TOTAL LEARNING Contact Hours


84
HOURS:
Lectures 28
Tutorials 56
Labs/Workshops 0
Self Directed Learning (during term) 84
Self Directed Learing (Mid-Term Break) 5
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks) 7
Total Recommended Learning Hours 180

1.0 Welcome
We welcome to this unit and hope that you will find it enriching and interesting. This course will introduce you to
linguistic, rhetorical and strategic competencies needed to succeed in academic courses at undergraduate level.
This unit has the broad aim of helping learners develop research skills. It will help you grow proficiency in the
four macro-skills – listening, speaking, reading and writing – sufficient to enable you to participate effectively in
an academic environment.

1.1 Course Description


This unit offers learners the opportunity to grasp various components of English for research purposes. It begins
with visiting core grammatical constituents. Learners will be exposed to the mechanics of the planning and
writing processes, honing the skills of data collection, and acknowledging sources of literature and ideas in
referencing. Students will learn to plan, prepare and present proposals/seminars. This unit makes students
aware that plagiarism is unacceptable.

23
1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes
On completion of this unit the students should be able to:
1. Develop well-organised notes from relevant spoken and written information.
2. Reconstruct notes to write summaries, essays, reports, proposals or answer discussion questions.
3. Use interpretive skills to respond to questions that require recall, analysis, synthesis and/or evaluation of
material learned in class or course work.
4. Develop an understanding to use relevant concepts, vocabulary and sentence structures in particular
content areas
5. Utilise and apply research tools (e.g. Library and Internet) to find supporting information.
6. Present information to class in a clear, well-organised and visually attractive manner.
7. Illustrate and/or use reference to an author and a source into written and/or spoken text.
8. Utilise technological tools to support in-class and out-of-class work.

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1 Pinner, D & Pinner, D., 2004, Communication Skills (4th ed.), New Zealand, Pearson
2.1.2 Bhindi, B. K., 2012. LNG 501 Study guide. Suva: FNU
2.1.3 Bhindi, B. K., 2012. LNG 501 Lecture & Tutorial guide. Suva: FNU
2.1.4 LNG 501 Study Guide and Workbook, developed by Zakia Ali Chand 2010

2.2 Supplementary Materials

2.2.1 Thomson, A.J., 2009, A Practical English Grammar, New York, OUP
2.2.2 Choy, T.W., 1997, English the basics: a practical handbook
2.2.3 Alice, O. & Hogue, A., 1997, Writing Academic English (3rd ed.), White Plains, NY, Addison-Wesley
Longman
2.2.4 Davis, J. & Liss, R., 2006, Effective Academic Writing 3, NY, Oxford University Press
2.2.5 Beglar, D. & Murray, M., 2002, Contemporary Topics, (2nd ed.) White Plains, NY, Addison-Wesley
Longman

2.3 Class Shares


Supplementary notes are placed on class shares.

3.0 Course Content and Reading References Hours


Week 1
ORIENTATION
1. Introduction
2. Tutorial sign up
No of Lectures 2

24
No. of Tutorials 4
No of Labs/Workshops etc. 0

SDL/ Readings:
Bhindi, B. K., 2012. LNG 501 Study guide. Suva: FNU, pp 3-7. 2
Reading lecture notes 1
Doing tutorial exercise 2
Internet 1
Research
Library Research 1
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 2
INTRODUCTION
1. Study skills
2. Goal setting
3. Course rationale.
No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 4
No of Labs/Workshops etc. 0

SDL/ Readings:
LNG 501 Study Guide and Workbook, developed by Zakia Ali Chand 2010, pages 10 - 22 2
Pinner, D. & Pinner, D. 1999. Communication Skills. Auckland: Pearson/Longman, pp. 28-36. 1
Reading lecture notes 1
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Internet 1
Research
Library Research 1
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 3
Note taking
Summary writing
1. Identify key points from a lecture or a written article. Write a set of notes using one of the methods you’ve learnt in this
unit.
2. Write a set of clear notes from any written or oral source.
3. Using the notes, write a coherent summary identifying the key points from any written or oral source.
No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 4
No of Labs/Workshops etc. 0

25
SDL/ Readings:
Bhindi, B. K., 2012. LNG 501 Study guide. Suva: FNU, pp 8-54. 1
Pinner, D. & Pinner, D. 1999. Communication Skills. Auckland: Pearson/Longman, pp. 75-87. 1
Reading lecture notes 1
Doing tutorial exercise 2
Internet 1
Research
Library Research 1
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 4
Writing an Academic Essay
1. Analyze the question in an academic essay writing task and define key terms.
2. Establish your argument/point of view.
3. Research the topic; use books, journals and other credible academic sources for support and evidence.
4. Take notes from your readings.
5. Write your plan and organize your ideas.
6. Write your first draft to include your introduction, body and conclusion.
7. Edit and redraft your essay.
8. Write in-text references and bibliography.

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 4
No of Labs/Workshops etc. 0
SDL/ Readings:
Bhindi, B. K., 2012. LNG 501 Study guide. Suva: FNU, pp 134-231. 1
Pinner, D. & Pinner, D. 1999. Communication Skills. Auckland: Pearson/Longman, pp. 147- 1
184.
Reading lecture notes 1
Doing tutorial exercise 2
Internet 1
Research
Library Research 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 5
Research questions , writing – proposal, essay, report
1. Critical thinking skills.
2. Research questions, data collection, choosing a research topic, organizing information for a research paper.

26
3. Selecting refining and proposing a topic for research.
No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 4
No of Labs/Workshops etc. 0
SDL/ Readings:
Bhindi, B. K., 2012. LNG 501 Study guide. Suva: FNU, pp 55-82. 2
LNG 501 Study Guide and Workbook, developed by Zakia Ali Chand 2010, pages 84 - 91 1
Reading lecture notes 1
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Internet 1
Research
Library Research 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7


Week 6
1. Academic research skills
2. Retrieving information from sources effectively: internet, library, textbooks, reference books, dictionary, and
thesaurus.
No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 4
No of Labs/Workshops etc. 0
SDL/ Readings:
Bhindi, B. K., 2012. LNG 501 Study guide. Suva: FNU, pp 83-102. 2
Pinner, D. & Pinner, D. 1999. Communication Skills. Auckland: Pearson/Longman, pp. 40-50. 1
Reading lecture notes 1
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Internet 1
Research
Library Research 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

27
Week 7
Features of a good research project.
1. Interpret research data collected from primary and secondary sources.
2. Organize information and ideas logically into a coherent report.
3. Present your report using the correct structure, format and techniques.
4. Differentiate between each section of a report in format, layout and content.
5. Write your report in clear and unambiguous language.
6. Identify key ethical considerations in research
7. To conduct your research in an ethical way

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 4
No of Labs/Workshops etc. 0
SDL/ Readings:
Bhindi, B. K., 2012. LNG 501 Study guide. Suva: FNU, pp 232-246. 2
Pinner, D. & Pinner, D. 1999. Communication Skills. Auckland: Pearson/Longman, pp. 147- 1
184.
Reading lecture notes 1
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Internet 1
Research
Library Research 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 8
Features of a good research project.
1. Interpret research data collected from primary and secondary sources.
2. Organize information and ideas logically into a coherent report.
3. Present your report using the correct structure, format and techniques.
4. Differentiate between each section of a report in format, layout and content.
5. Write your report in clear and unambiguous language.

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 4
No of Labs/Workshops etc. 0
SDL/ Readings:
Bhindi, B. K., 2012. LNG 501 Study guide. Suva: FNU, pp 232-246. 2
Pinner, D. & Pinner, D. 1999. Communication Skills. Auckland: Pearson/Longman, pp. 147- 1
184.
Reading lecture notes 1

28
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Internet 1
Research
Library Research 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 9
1. Bibliography & Referencing.
2. In text citation Bibliography & Referencing.
3. Format and layout.
4. Referencing – journals, magazines, newspapers, brochures, books, articles, encyclopedias, dictionaries,
websites.
No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 4
No of Labs/Workshops etc. 0
SDL/ Readings:
Bhindi, B. K., 2012. LNG 501 Study guide. Suva: FNU, pp 104-133. 2
Reading lecture notes 1
Doing tutorial exercise 2
Internet 1
Research
Library Research 1
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 10
Proof reading and editing
Basic skills of correct writing.
1. Develop correct writing skills.
2. Know the 5 steps of writing process.
3. Proof reading and editing.
4. Find out what errors you typically make and learn how to fix those errors.
5. Use the strategies detailed in this unit to find and correct your particular errors in usage, sentence structure,
and spelling and punctuation.

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 4
No of Labs/Workshops etc. 0
SDL/ Readings:
Bhindi, B. K., 2012. LNG 501 Study guide. Suva: FNU, pp 247-264. 2
Reading lecture notes 1

29
Doing tutorial exercise 2
Internet 1
Research
Library Research 1
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 11
Project presentation skills
Oral presentation skills
1. Using visual aids.
2. Oral presentation skills
3. Research your topic to ensure you have all the information.
4. Present your information within the time limits provided to you.
5. Prepare and supplement your presentation with appropriate visual aids.
6. Use appropriate body language that will convey the appropriate information and emotion to your audience

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 4
No of Labs/Workshops etc. 0
SDL/ Readings:
LNG 501 Study Guide and Workbook, developed by Zakia Ali Chand 2010, pages 265 - 282 2
Reading lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Internet 1
Research
Library Research 1
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 12
Oral
presentation
skills
(continued)
ORAL EXAM WEEK
1. Present your information within the time limits provided to you.
2. Prepare and supplement your presentation with appropriate visual aids.

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 4
No of Labs/Workshops etc. 0

30
SDL/ Readings:
Bhindi, B. K., 2012. LNG 501 Study guide. Suva: FNU, pp 265-282. 1
Reading lecture notes 1
Doing tutorial exercise 3
Internet 1
Research
Library Research 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 13
Exam techniques
1. Understand types of exam technique
2. Learn to deal with stress and anxiety
3. Learn how to prepare for exams
4. Learn how to take the exam successfully
5. Know the important direction words

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 4
No of Labs/Workshops etc. 0

SDL/ Readings:
Bhindi, B. K., 2012. LNG 501 Lecture and Tutorial guide. Suva: FNU, pp 221-281. 2
Reading lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Internet 1
Research
Library Research 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 14
Evaluation
1. Evaluation of course and course delivery

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 4
No of Labs/Workshops etc. 0
SDL/ Readings:

31
Bhindi, B. K., 2012. LNG 501 Lecture and Tutorial guide. Suva: FNU, pp 221-281. 1
Reading lecture notes 1
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Revise past 4
exam papers

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

4.0 Assessment
(a)The overall mark for the course depends on performance during the semester (50%) and performance in the
final examination (50%).

Component Weighting Minimum Level


Essay Writing 10% 50%
Project proposal
50%
writing 10%
Tutorial work 5% 50%
Major research
project writing 50%
skills 25%
Final
50%
Examination 50%
Oral - 10%
Written - 40%

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary to score at least 50% (i.e.
50/100) in the final examination. It is highly recommended that students attend all lectures and tutorials

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting
Assignment 1 -
Essay Writing
Week 6 10%
Assignment 2 -
Project Proposal Week 7 10%
Writing
Assignment 3 -
Major research Week 13 25%
project writing skills
Tutorial work Week 14 5%

32
Letter Grade Scale:
Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33-5.00
A 85-89 4.00-4.27
A- 80-84 3.73-3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33-3.60
B 70-74 3.00-3.27
B- 65-69 2.67-2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33-2.60
C 55-59 2.00-2.27
C- 50-54 1.67-1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33-1.60
D 40-44 1.00-1.27
D- 35-39 0.67-0.93
E Below 35 0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0
CT Credit Transfer 0
NV Null & Void for Dishonest Practice 0
I Results Withheld/Incomplete 0
Assessment
X Continuing course 0
DNC Did Not Complete 0
CP Compassionate Pass 0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0
PT Pass Terminating 0
P Pass 0
NP Not Passed 0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment


The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation
(UASR). All students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves
with all academic matters.

Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following
steps to get redress of their grievance.
Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and
reassessment. Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to
the HOD. The HOD will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

33
Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your
work is found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In
more serious cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism
may even lead to your expulsion from the university.

ACTIONS THAT CONSTITUTE PLAGIARISM


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing
service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and
adding proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly
your own work.

6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

34
Lecturer: TBA
Other Lecturers: TBA

BEN502 Semester : 1 Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Engineering Computation 1 12


Credit Points

LECTURES: Students are to attend 2 x 2 hours of lectures per week.


TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour tutorial class per week.
LABS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour of Labs in week 1, 6, 7, 13 and 14.
SELF DIRECTED Students are to spend about 6 - 8 hours per week for this unit.
LEARNING
CONSULTATION Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according to
TIME the following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)

PREREQUISITE: The student must have passed Form 7 Maths or Equivalent


E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the course shall be posted on Moodle, Class
shares and emails. Students are required to check emails regularly for communication
from the lecturer.

TOTAL LEARNING Contact Hours 75


HOURS:
Lectures 56
Tutorials 14
Labs/Workshops/Practicals 5
Self Directed Learning (during term) 87
Self Directed Learing (MidTerm Break) 8
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks) 10
Total Recommended Learning Hours 180

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to this Unit and hope that you will find it enriching and interesting.

1.1 Course Description


To provide the students with the mathematical knowledge and expertise required for their Engineering
studies.

1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes


On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

35
1.2.1 Transpose an algebraic expression so as to swap dependent and independent variables.
1.2.2 Correctly use the “ is a function of ” notation.
1.2.3 Solve equations for any unknown by transposition
1.2.4 Solve quadratic equations by factorisation and by the quadratic formula
1.2.5 Define and sketch the trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions
1.2.6 Evaluate the above functions for any value of the independent variable
1.2.7 Explain the difference between a scalar and a vector quantity
1.2.8 Represent a vector both graphically and in terms of the unit vectors i, j and k
1.2.9 Add and subtract vectors graphically and in terms of the unit vectors
1.2.10 Explain the significance of the dot and cross products of two vectors
1.2.11 Find dot and cross products of vectors
1.2.12 Derive and use the rules for differentiating various types of function
1.2.13 Find local slopes of tangents and normal and hence find angles of intersection
1.2.14 Calculate the extreme values of a function and find where they occur.
1.2.15 Use second derivatives to find direction of bending and contra flexure points
1.2.16 Derive the formula for the radial acceleration of a body moving in a circle
1.2.17 Differentiate trig, exponential and logarithmic functions.
1.2.18 Differentiate a vector and explain the significance of the result
1.2.19 Evaluate definite and indefinite integrals of simple functions
1.2.20 Derive and use the basic rules of integration
1.2.21 Perform integration by parts.
1.2.22 Integrate trig, exponential and logarithmic functions.
1.2.23 Integrate trig’ functions by substitution
1.2.24 Find the area under a curve using Simpson’s rule

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1 James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition [2008]
2.1.2 Anton, Howard. “Calculus (5th Edition), John Wiley, New York

2.2 Supplementary Materials


Supplementary notes will either be given during the lectures or placed on class share.

2.3 Class Shares


Notices & Announcements, Unit descriptor, Assessment and Assessment details, and supplementary notes
(details) will be provided.

3.0 Course Content and Reading References


Week 1: Functions and Models

36
1. Four ways to represent a function
2. Mathematical Models
3. New Functions from old functions
4. Graphs
5. Exponential functions, Inverse function, logarithms

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition (Chapter 1 pages 10 -81) 2
Reading lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical preparation 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 2: Limits and Continuity


1. Limit of function
2. Calculating Limits using the limits laws
3. The precise definition of limit
4. Continuity
5. Limits at Infinity

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 0
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition (Chapter 2 pages 88 - 130) 2
Reading lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical preparation 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

37
Week 3: Derivatives
1. Derivates and Rates of change
2. The derivative as a function
3. Derivatives of Polynomial and Exponentials
4. Product and Quotient rule

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 0
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition (Chapter 2 pages 143 - 165, Chapter 3 2
pages 172 - 188)

Reading lecture notes 2


Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical preparation 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

Week 4: Derivatives
1. The Chain rule
2. Implicit Differentiation
3. Derivative of log functions
4. Derivatives of Trig and Inverse Trig functions

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 0
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition (Chapter 3 pages 189 - 215) 2
Reading lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 2
Practical preparation 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

38
Week 5: Derivatives
1. Rates of change
2. Exponential growth and decay
3. Linear approximations
4. Derivatives of hyperbolic functions

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 0
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition (Chapter 3 pages 221 - 265) 2
Reading lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 2
Practical preparation 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 6: Applications of Differentiation


1. Maximum and Minimum values of single variable function
2. Mean value theorem
3. Curve sketching
4. Newton's Method

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 6

Readings:
James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition (Chapter 4 pages 272 - 339) 2
Reading lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 2
Practical preparation 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 7: Integration

39
1. Definition of Integration
2. Substitution Rule
3. Integration by Parts
4. Trigonometric Integrals

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition (Chapter 4 pages 340 - 351, Chapter 5 2
pages 400 - 408, Chapter 7 pages 453 - 460)
Reading lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 2
Practical preparation 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 8: Integral Techniques


1. Trigonometric Substitution

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 0
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition (Chapter 7 pages 467 - 472) 2
Reading lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 2
Practical preparation 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 9: Integral Techniques


1. Integration by Partial Fractions

No of Lectures 4

40
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 0
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition (Chapter 7 pages 473 - 482) 2
Reading lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 2
Practical preparation 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 10: Definite Integrals


1. Definition of Definite Integral
2. Fundamental Theorem of Definite Integral
3. Areas and Arc Length

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 0
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition (Chapter 5 pages 355 - 390, Chapter 8 2
pages 524 - 532)
Reading lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 2
Practical preparation 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 11: Applications of Integration


1. Approximate Integration
2. Trapezoidal and Simpson's Rule

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 0
Field Trip(s) 0

41
Readings:
James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition (Chapter 7pages 495 - 507) 2
Reading lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 2
Practical preparation 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 12: Vectors and Geometry of Space


1. Three Dimensional Coordinates
2. Definition of Vector
3. Dot Product
4. Cross Product
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 0
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition (Chapter 12 pages 765 - 793) 2
Reading lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 2
Practical preparation 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 13: Vectors and Geometry of Space


1. Equations of Lines
2. Equations of Planes

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition (Chapter 12 pages 794 - 843) 2
Reading lecture notes 2

42
Doing tutorial exercise 2
Practical preparation 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 14: Vectors and Geometry of Space


1. Cylinders
2. Quadratic Surfaces

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition (Chapter 12 pages 804 - 815) 2
Reading lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical preparation 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

4.0 Assessment
Component Weighting Minimum Level
Assignment 5%
Class 10%
50%
Exercises/Quizes
Short Tests 35%
Final Examination 50% 50%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting
Assignment 1 Week 4 2.5%
Assignment 2 Week 9 2.5%
Class Test 1 Week 7 15%
Class Test 2 Week 13 20%
Quiz-1 Week 4 5%
Quiz-2 Week 9 5%

43
(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary for students get a
minimum attendance of 75% and pass the coursework and score at least 50% (ie. 50/100) in the final
examination. The following grading system will be used:

Letter Grade Scale:


Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33-5.00
A 85-89 4.00-4.27
A- 80-84 3.73-3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33-3.60
B 70-74 3.00-3.27
B- 65-69 2.67-2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33-2.60
C 55-59 2.00-2.27
C- 50-54 1.67-1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33-1.60
D 40-44 1.00-1.27
D- 35-39 0.67-0.93
E Below 35 0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0
CT Credit Transfer 0
NV Null & Void for Dishonest Practice 0
I Results Withheld/Incomplete Assessment 0
X Continuing course 0
DNC Did Not Complete 0
CP Compassionate Pass 0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0
PT Pass Terminating 0
P Pass 0
NP Not Passed 0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment


The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation
(UASR). All students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves
with all academic matters.

44
Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following
steps to get redress of their grievance.
Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and
reassessment. Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to
the HOD. The HOD will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your
work is found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In
more serious cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism
may even lead to your expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagrism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing
service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and
adding proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly
your own work.
6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

45
Lecturer: TBA
Other Lecturers: TBA

BEN503 Semester : 1 Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Engineering Physics


Credit Points 12

LECTURES: Students are to attend 1 x 2 and 1x1 hours of lectures per week.
TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hours tutorial class per week.
LABS: Students are to attend 1 x 2 hours of Labs per week.
SELF Students are to spend about 6 - 8 hours per week for this unit.
DIRECTED
LEARNING
CONSULTATION Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according to the
TIME following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)

PREREQUISITE: Pass in Form 7 Physics or Equivalent


E- All pertinent information relating to the course shall be posted on Moodle, Class shares and
INFORMATION: emails. Students are required to check emails regularly for communication from the lecturer.

TOTAL Contact Hours 84


LEARNING
HOURS:
Lectures 42
Tutorials 14
Labs/Workshops/Practicals 28
Field Trip(s) 0
Self Directed Learning (during term) 89
Self Directed Learing (Mid-Term Break) 3
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks) 4
Total Recommended Learning Hours 180

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to this exciting unit which was designed to introduce physics to engineering problems.

1.1 Course Description


Engineering Physics program will have a strong grounding in engineering design, science, practice and the
application of physics to engineering.

1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes 46


On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
1.2.1 Demonstrate the ability to analyze and solve introductory physics to engineering problems
1.2.2 Measure and record the physical quantities by scientific method
1.2.3 Demonstrate the ability to communicate analysis of problems in a professional manner
1.2.4 Exhibit the ability to work in teams/groups effectively
1.2.5 Apply the concept of engineering physics to solve practical problems
1.2.6 Analyse and discuss the outcome of given problem

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1 'College Physics'; Serway & Vuille; 9th edition [2012].

2.2 Supplementary Materials


2.2.1 'Fundamentals of Physics ' ; Halliday & Resnick 9th Edition
2.2.2 'College Physics',Franklin Miller & Schroeer, 6th edition
2.2.3 'Physics', Cutnell & Johnson ,8thn edition

2.3 Class Shares


Notices & Announcements, Unit descriptor, Assessment and Assessment details and supplementary notes
(details) will be provided.

3.0 Course Content and Reading References


Week 1: Mechanics
1. Motion in one dimension; Displacement ,Velocity , Acceleration, Motion Diagrams, motion with constant
acceleration
2. Motion in two dimension; Vectors and their properties, component of a vector, displacement, velocity and
accelaration in two dimension

3. Vector Diagrams

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
College Physics', Serway & Vuille, 9th edition. (Chapter 2 pages 25 - 47, Chapter 3 pages 56 - 75) 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving problems 2
Preparation of Laboratory Reports 0

47
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 2: Mechanics (continued)


1. Forces
2. Newton's First Law
3. Newton's Second Law and Third Law
4. Application of Newton's Law

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
College Physics', Serway & Vuille, 9th edition. (Chapter 4 pages 86 - 112) 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 3: Work and Energy


1. Work and Kinetic Energy
2. Work Done by Gravitational Force
3. Work Done by a Spring Force
4. Work Done by a General Variable Force
5. Power
6. Work and Potential Energy
7. Conservation of Energy

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
'College Physics', Serway & Vuille, 9th edition. (Chapter 5, pages 124-154) 2
Revision of lecture notes 2

48
Solving problems 2
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 4: Rotational Motion


1. Rotational Variables
2. Rotation with Constant Angular Acceleration
3. Relating Linear and Angular Variables & Trend Gantt charts
4. Kinetic Energy of Rotation
5. Rotational Inertia, Torque, Work and Rotational Kinetic Energy

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
'College Physics', Serway & Vuille, 9th edition. (Chpt 7 & 8, pg198-261) 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 5: Oscillations (Vibration and Waves)


1. Hooke's Law
2. Simple Harmonic Motion
3. Energy in Simple Harmonic Motion
4. Comparing Simple Harmonic Motion with Uniform Circular Motion
5. Damped Oscillation and Resonance

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
'College Physics', Serway & Vuille, 9th edition. (Chapter 13, pages 437- 454) 2

49
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 6: Waves (Vibration and Waves)


1. Wavelenth, Frequency, Speed of a Travelling Wave
2. Types of Waves,Transverse and Longitudinal Waves
3. The Wave Equation
4. Principle of Superposition for Waves
5. Interference of Waves,Standing Waves and Resonance

No of Lectures 3
` No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
'College Physics', Serway & Vuille, 9th edition. (Chapter 13, pages 455-463) 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving problems 2
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 7: Sound
1. Sound Waves
2. Speed of Sound, Travelling Sound Waves
3. Energy and Intensity and Sound waves
4. Doppler Effect,
5. Interference of sound waves
6. Sources of Musical Sound, Beats Supersonic Speeds, Shock Waves

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

50
Readings:
'College Physics', Serway & Vuille, 9th edition. (Chapter 14, pages 473-503) 3
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 8: Electricity
1. Electric Force & Electric Field; Coulomb's Law, Electric flux and Gauss's Law
2. Electriccal energy and capacitance; Potential difference, Electric potential, capacitance, parallel plate
capacitors, Dielectrics

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
'College Physics', Serway & Vuille, 9th edition. (Chapter 15 pages 513 - 539, Chapter 16 pages 2
548- 579)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 9: Electricity
1. Current and Resistance; Direct Current Circuits - Kirchoff's Voltage Law, Kirchoff's Current Law, Alternating
Current: RLC Series Circuit, Reactance, Impedance, Phase Angle (Lead and Lag), Resonance

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
'College Physics', Serway & Vuille, 9th edition. (Chapter 17, pages 590 - 608, Chapter 18, pages 2
616 - 638)
Revision of lecture notes 2

51
Solving problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 10: Wave Optics


1. Light as a Wave
2. Interference of wave
3. Young's Interference Experiment
4. Application of Interference

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
'College Physics', Serway & Vuille, 9th edition. (Chapter 24, pages 824 - 829) 1
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving problems 2
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 11: Wave Optics


1. Interference from Thin Films
2. Diffraction
3. Single Slit Diffraction, Diffraction Grating
4. Michelson's Intererometer (Chapter 25 page 876)

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
'College Physics', Serway & Vuille, 9th edition. (Chapter 24, pages 830 - 839) 1
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving problems 2

52
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 12: Quantum Physics


1. Photon, the Quantum of Light
2. Dual nature of light and Matter;Wave Particle Duality: De Broglie Waves
3. Wave Particle Duality: De Broglie Waves

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
'College Physics', Serway & Vuille, 9th edition. (Chapter 27, pages 911-928) 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving problems 2
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 13: Quantum Physics


1. The Wave function
2. The Schrodinger Equation
3. Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle,
4. Photoelectric Effect and Compton Effect

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
'College Physics', Serway & Vuille, 9th edition. (Chpt 27 ; pg 911-928) 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving problems 2
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

53
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 14: Nuclear Physics


1. Nuclear Binding and Nuclear Structure
2. Nuclear Stabilty and Radioactivity
3. Decay Rates and Half-Lives
4. Medical Application of Radiation
5. Nuclear Reactions
6. Nuclear Fission
7. Nuclear Fusion

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
'College Physics', Serway & Vuille, 9th edition. (Chapter 29, pages 957-976, Chapter 30, pages 2
982 - 986)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving problems 2
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

4.0 Assessment
Component Weighting Minimum Level
Assignment 10% 50%
Laboratory 10% 50%
Project N/A N/A
Short Tests 30% 50%
Final 50% 50%
Examination

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting
Assignment 1 Week 5 5.0%
Assignment 2 Week 10 5.0%

54
Class Test 1 Week 6 15%
Class Test 2 Week 11 15%
Laboratary (x10) During the semester 10%
Project N/A

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary for students get a
minimum attendence of 75% and pass the coursework and score at least 50% (ie. 50/100) in the final
examination. The following grading system will be used:

Letter Grade Scale:


Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33-5.00
A 85-89 4.00-4.27
A- 80-84 3.73-3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33-3.60
B 70-74 3.00-3.27
B- 65-69 2.67-2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33-2.60
C 55-59 2.00-2.27
C- 50-54 1.67-1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33-1.60
D 40-44 1.00-1.27
D- 35-39 0.67-0.93
E Below 35 0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0
CT Credit Transfer 0
NV Null & Void for Dishonest Practice 0
I Results Withheld/Incompleste 0
Assessment
X Continuing course 0
DNC Did Not Complete 0
CP Compassionate Pass 0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0
PT Pass Teminating 0
P Pass 0
NP Not Passed 0

55
Dissatisfaction with Assessment
The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR).
All students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.
Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps
to get redress of their grievance.

Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and
reassessment. Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to
the HOD. The HOD will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your
work is found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In
more serious cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may
even lead to your expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagrism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing
service.
2.Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and
adding proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly your
own work.
6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

56
Lecturer: TBA
Other Lecturers: TBA

BEN504 Semester : 1 Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Engineering Graphics


Credit Points 12

LECTURES: Students are to attend 1 x 2 hours of lectures per week.


TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour of tutorial per week.
LABS: Students are to attend 1 x 3 hours of Labs per week.
SELF DIRECTED Students are to spend about 4 - 8 hours per week for this unit.
LEARNING
CONSULTATION Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according to the
TIME following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)
PREREQUISITE: The student must have passed Form 7 or Equivalent
E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the course shall be posted on Moodle, Class shares
and emails. Students are required to check emails regularly for communication from
the lecturer.

TOTAL LEARNING Contact Hours 90


HOURS:
Lectures 28
Tutorials 14
Labs/Workshops/Practicals 42
Field Trip(s) 6
Self Directed Learning (during term) 85
Self Directed Learing (MidTerm Break) 5
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks) 0
Total Recommended Learning Hours 180

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to this exciting unit which was designed to provide an introductory understanding of
engineering drawings.

1.1 Course Description


To provide an introductory understanding of engineering drawings, the conventions and
representations used and practical application of these techniques.

1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes

57
On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
1.2.1 Define and communicate clearly and professionally the component/assembly specification to enable the
manufacture/assembly of a machine component or system.
1.2.2 Visualise and represent a three dimensional object or assembly in pictorial and orthographic projections.
1.2.3 Comprehend the geometric and functional relationships between components making up assemblies and
sub-assemblies
1.2.4 Apply drawing representations within detail and assembly drawings through freehand sketches, manual
drafting and computer aided drawing techniques
1.2.5 Introduction to design of 2D and 3D parametric CAD models
1.2.6 Determine methods used to control drawings and associated documents
1.2.7 Apply techniques of Auto CAD and solid works

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1 Boundy, AW. Engineering Drawing. 6th Edition, (2002) McGraw-Hill, Sydney, ISBN 0-07-471043-5.

2.2 Supplementary Materials


Supplementary notes will either be given during the lectures or placed on class share.

2.3 Class Shares


Notices & Announcements, Unit descriptor, Assessment and Assessment details, and supplementary notes
(details) will be provided.

3.0 Course Content and Reading References


Week 1: Introduction to Basic Sketching Techniques
1. Sketching techniques. Pictorial Projection -Types of projection: Axonometric, trimetric, and diametric.
Planometric & perspective drawing. Oblique projection - cavalier, cabinet, angled features. Isometric projection,
isometric curves & circles, angled features.

2. Planometric & perspective drawing. Oblique projection - cavalier, cabinet, angled features. Isometric
projection, isometric curves & circles, angled features.

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Boundy, AW. Engineering Drawing. 6th Edition, (2002) McGraw-Hill, Sydney, ISBN 0-07-471043-5. (Pg. 1
198-207)

58
Revision of lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical preparation 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 4

Week 2: Application of pictorial, orthographic and auxiliary projection


1. Orthographic Projection 1st & 3rd angle projection, natural & glass box methods. 3rd angle projection with
hidden detail.
2. Auxiliary Projections - Auxiliary orthogonal primary & auxiliary views
3. Sectional Drawing Conventions, full sections. Thin sections, half, local, removed, revolved, scrap, auxiliary
sections. Assessment 1: Pictorial/Orthographic sketching.

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Boundy, AW. Engineering Drawing. 6th Edition, (2002) McGraw-Hill, Sydney, ISBN 0-07-471043-5. (Pg 1
132-142), (Pg168-194)

Revision of lecture notes 1


Doing tutorial exercise 2
Practical prepartaion 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

Week 3: Dimensioning
1. Principles & methods of dimensioning for size & location only. Dimensioning datum, keys & keyways, tapers.
3rd angle with hidden detail.
2. Limits & Fits Terminology/vocabulary. ISO system, symbols, notation, selection of fit. Use of tables to
determine tolerance

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

59
Readings:
Boundy, AW. Engineering Drawing. 6th Edition, (2002) McGraw-Hill, Sydney, ISBN 0-07-471043-5. 1
(Pg.15-27), (Pg.53-65)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical prepartaion 2

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 4: Fastenings
1. Designation of screw threads, form, pitch, starts, hand. Types of screw threads (unified, imperial, metric, acme,
buttress, square). Representation of screw threads, identification of common fasteners. Drawing hexagonal nuts,
bolt heads & washers.

2. Conventional Representation Threads, interrupted views, repeated views, splines, pitched holes, rolling
bearings, springs, spur gears.

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Boundy, AW. Engineering Drawing. 6th Edition, (2002) McGraw-Hill, Sydney, ISBN 0-07-471043-5. (Pg 1
28-31), (Pg 49-53)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical prepartaion 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

Week 5: Manual drafting techniques applied to drawing machines


1. Introduction to Manual Drawing Techniques - Care and checking for accuracy, set squares, protractors,
drafting machines. Drawing equipment
2. Equipment & drawing standards - Standards for line work, letters & numerals. A series drawing sheets,
drawing layout & title blocks

3. Detail Drawings Views, information, layout.

60
4. Assembly Drawing Parts list, itemising, detailing, materials list, working drawings. Assembly & detail drawings,
numbering systems. Bill of Materials, change notices, drawing change notation, document control. Assessment
2: Manual Drawing Sectional/Detail.

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Boundy, AW. Engineering Drawing. 6th Edition, (2002) McGraw-Hill, Sydney, ISBN 0-07-471043-5. (Pg 2
4-6), (Pg 6-10), (Pg 216-245)
Revision of lecture notes 1
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical prepartaion 2

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 6: Additional representations for surface finish, geometric tolerancing, keyways, welding and
fabrication.
1. Surface Finish Symbols & application. Geometric Tolerancing Terminology/vocabulary. straightness, flatness,
squareness, angularity, concentricity, roundness, symmetry. positional tolerance
2. Keyways Correct representation, use of tables
3. Assessment 3: Manual Drawing Conventional Representation

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 6

Readings:
Boundy, AW. Engineering Drawing. 6th Edition, (2002) McGraw-Hill, Sydney, ISBN 0-07-471043-5. (Pg 2
41-49), (Pg 69-83), (Pg 24-27)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical prepartaion 2

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

61
Week 7: Welding/Fabrication
1. Types of structural steel, abbreviations & notation (RSJ, RHS, RSS, UB & UC) Bolted & welded connections.
Fabricated & machined parts. Types of weld, symbols, application to working drawings.

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Boundy, AW. Engineering Drawing. 6th Edition, (2002) McGraw-Hill, Sydney, ISBN 0-07-471043-5. (Pg 1
38-41)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical prepartaion 2

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 8: Abbreviations
1. Assembly, centres, centre line, chamfer, countersink, counter-bore, diameter, drawing, external, internal,
left/right hand. Material maximum, minimum, pitch circle diameter, radius, specification, spot face, square,
standard, undercut, taper on diameter or width.

2. Project 2 - Manual drawing

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Boundy, AW. Engineering Drawing. 6th Edition, (2002) McGraw-Hill, Sydney, ISBN 0-07-471043-5. (Pg 2
2-3)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical prepartaion 2

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 9: Locus of a point

62
1. Loci construction for a simple crank mechanism. Simple cam design limited to constant velocity/acceleration &
simple harmonic motion.

2. Helix construction Square & round section springs.

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Boundy, AW. Engineering Drawing. 6th Edition, (2002) McGraw-Hill, Sydney, ISBN 0-07-471043-5. (Pg 2
92-128)

Revision of lecture notes 2


Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical prepartaion 2

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 10: Intersections & Development


1. Curve of intersection for two pipes of different diameter at right angles. Pattern development of
square/rectangular to round transition pieces. Oblique cones & cylinders, lobster-back pipe bend. Tube to cone
intersection, intersection formed by inclined tubes. Assessment 4: Manual Drawing Cam/Development

2. Assessment 4: Manual Drawing Cam/Development

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Boundy, AW. Engineering Drawing. 6th Edition, (2002) McGraw-Hill, Sydney, ISBN 0-07-471043-5. (Pg 2
260-287)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical prepartaion 2

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

63
Week 11: Project 1
1. Assembly drawing using Auto CAD

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Auto CAD Manual 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical prepartaion 2

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 12: Project 1 (continued)


1. Assembly drawing using Auto CAD

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Auto CAD Manual 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical prepartaion 2

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 13: Project 2


1. Solid modelling using solid work

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

64
Readings:
Solidworks Manual 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical prepartaion 2

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 14: Project 2 (continued)


1. Solid modelling using solid work

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Solidworks Manual 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 0
Practical prepartaion 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 4

4.0 Assessment
Component Weighting Minimum Level
Assignment 10% 50%
Practical Exercises 10% 50%
Project 1 15% 50%
Project 2 15% 50%
Class Test 1 25% 50%
Class Test 2 25% 50%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting
Assingnment 1 Week 3 2.5%

65
Assingnment 2 Week 7 2.5%
Assingnment 3 Week 9 2.5%
Assingnment 4 Week 11 2.5%
Practical Exercises During the term 10.0%
Project 1 Week 12 15%
Project 2 Week 14 15%
Class Test 1 Week 7 25%
Class Test 2 Week 14 25%

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary for students to get a
minimum attendence of 75% and pass the coursework with at least 50%. The following grading system will be
used:

Letter Grade Scale:


Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33-5.00
A 85-89 4.00-4.27
A- 80-84 3.73-3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33-3.60
B 70-74 3.00-3.27
B- 65-69 2.67-2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33-2.60
C 55-59 2.00-2.27
C- 50-54 1.67-1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33-1.60
D 40-44 1.00-1.27
D- 35-39 0.67-0.93
E Below 35 0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0
CT Credit Transfer 0
NV Null & Void for Dishonest Practice 0
I Results Withheld/Incompleste 0
Assessment
X Continuing course 0
DNC Did Not Complete 0
CP Compassionate Pass 0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0

66
PT Pass Teminating 0
P Pass 0
NP Not Passed 0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment


The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR).
All students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.

Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps
to get redress of their grievance.
Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and
reassessment. Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to
the HOD. The HOD will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your
work is found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In
more serious cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may
even lead to your expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagrism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing
service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and
adding proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly
your own work.
6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

67
Lecturer: TBA
Other Lecturers: TBA

BEN505 Semester : 1 Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Material Science Credit Points 12

LECTURES: Students are to attend 1 x 3 hours of lectures per week.


TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour of tutorial per week.
LABS: Students are to attend 1 x 2 hours of Labs per week.
SELF DIRECTED Students are to spend about 5 - 8 hours per week for this unit.
LEARNING
CONSULTATION TIME Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according to
the following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)

PREREQUISITE: The student must have passed Form 7 or Equivalent


E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the course shall be posted on Moodle, Class
shares and emails. Students are required to check emails regularly for communication
from the lecturer.

TOTAL LEARNING Contact Hours 84


HOURS:
Lectures 42
Tutorials 14
Labs/Workshops/Practicals 28
Field Trip(s) 0
Self Directed Learning (during term) 89
Self Directed Learing (MidTerm Break) 7
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks) 0
Total Recommended Learning Hours 180

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to this course and hope you will find it enriching and interesting.

1.1 Course Description


The aim of this unit is to familiarise students with nature and properties of material commonly used in civil, electrical
and mechanical engineering and to provide them with the methods of selecting appropriate materials.

1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes

68
On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
1.2.1 Analyse, compare and contrast the structure and properties of materials under various manufacturing
conditions
1.2.2 Establish the relationship between specific structure and properties of materials, failure and reliability in service
1.2.3 Examine the mechanical and thermal conditions of manufacturing processes which shape materials
1.2.4 Identify appropriate materials and manufacturing processes for a given product specification which includes
reliability and cost effectiveness

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1 S C Rangawala, Construction Materials (Material Science), 38th edition [2011]
2.1.2 Callister W. Jr. Materials Science and Engineering – An Introduction. 6th Ed. 2003. Wiley ISBN 0 471 13576 3
2.1.3 Ward-Harvey, K. Fundamental Building Materials, Sakoga. Pty Ltd
2.1.4 Knight, Bernard H. Builders Materials, Edward Arnold
2.1.5 Everett, Alan. Materials, Batsford, ASIN 0713405163.

2.2 Supplementary Materials


Supplementary notes will either be given during the lectures or placed on class share.

2.3 Class Shares


Notices & Announcements, Unit descriptor, Assessment and Assessment details, and supplementary notes (details)
will be provided.

3.0 Course Content and Reading References


Week 1: Structures of Materials
1. Atomic structures and interatomic bonding
2. Crystal structure, imperfections

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Callister W. Jr. Materials Science and Engineering – An Introduction. 6th Ed. 2003. Wiley ISBN 0 471 13576 3
3, pages 11-27, pages 32-90

Revision of lecture notes 1


Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

69
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

Week 2: Metallurgy
1. Introduction and terminology; sources of metal ores and extraction processes; Common Engineering metals
ferrous and non ferrous; properties and uses of metals;

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Callister W. Jr. Materials Science and Engineering – An Introduction. 6th Ed. 2003. Wiley ISBN 0 471 13576 2
3, pages 332-380

Revision of lecture notes 1


Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

Week 3: Metals
1. Classification of steels
2. Common alloys and their applications
3. Corrosion and its
prevention
4. Metal working processes, cold working and annealing

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Callister W. Jr. Materials Science and Engineering – An Introduction. 6th Ed. 2003. Wiley ISBN 0 471 13576 3
3 pages 111 - 140;
Revision of lecture notes 1
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 2

70
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 4: Diffusion
1. Diffusion mechanisms
2. Steady-state diffusion
3. Solidification of Metals and Alloys (brief)
4. Phase diagrams
5. Equilibrium & Non-equilibrium cooling
6. Solidification structures & defects

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Callister W. Jr. Materials Science and Engineering – An Introduction. 6th Ed. 2003. Wiley ISBN 0 471 13576 4
3, pages 91-109, pages 246-290
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 5: Heat treatment of Steels


1. Annealing
2. Normalising
3. Quenching and tempering
4. Case Hardening
No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Callister W. Jr. Materials Science and Engineering – An Introduction. 6th Ed. 2003. Wiley ISBN 0 471 13576 4
3 pages 192-224, pages 170-186
Revision of lecture notes 2

71
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 6: Plastics, Ceramics, Glass and Bonding materials


1. Introduction to the properties of plastics, ceramics, glass and bonding materials together with a review of possible
uses for these materials in Building and Civil Engineering

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Callister W. Jr. Materials Science and Engineering – An Introduction. 6th Ed. 2003. Wiley ISBN 0 471 13576 2
3, pages 383-450

Revision of lecture notes 2


Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 2

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 7: Cement
1. Type of cement and their characteristics.
2. Mixing setting, hardening process of cement including tests.
3. Properties of wet concrete, Slump and compaction test.
4. Types of admixtures including plasticers, renders and accelerators.
5. Factors affecting final strength of concrete the tube test
No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
S C Rangawala, Construction Materials (Material Science), 38th edition, pages 105-137 2
Revision of lecture notes 1
Solving Problems 1

72
Preparation of Laboratory Report 2

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 8: Concrete
1. Materials for concrete
2. Types of cement and their characteristics, types of aggregates,
3. Steel for reinforcement and prestressing, admixtures, curing methods and other materials.
4. Properties of concrete; workability (slump test), strength and elastic properties
5. Durability, fire resistance, permeability and obsorption, volume changes, thermal and acoustic properties.
No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
S C Rangawala, Construction Materials (Material Science), 38th edition, pages 183-227 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 2

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 9: Concrete (continued)


1. Proportioning mixes and testing
2. Compressive strength of Concrete
3. Lightweight concrete and heavy concrete.
4. Different Types of Curing Method
5. Hot and cold weather concreting.
No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
S C Rangawala, Construction Materials (Material Science), 38th edition, pages 183-227 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1

73
Preparation of Laboratory Report 2

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 10: Masonry


1. Advantages and disadvantages of masonry construction: Description of types including, concrete and clay based
blocks (bricks) hollow blocks, lightweight blocks and pre-cast concrete panels; Laying of masonry: Comparison of
un-reinforced and reinforced masonry construction: Compressive strenght of masonry walls:

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
S C Rangawala, Construction Materials (Material Science), 38th edition, pages 138-151 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 2

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 11: Aggregrates


1. Types of aggregate commonly use in Fiji and their physical properties: course and fine aggregates: Classification
and testing of aggregates: Batching processes.

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
S C Rangawala, Construction Materials (Material Science), 38th edition, pages 90-114 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

74
Week 12: Structure and Properties of Polymers
1. Molecular weight, shape and structure, Thermoplastic and thermosetting, Polymerization

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
S C Rangawala, Construction Materials (Material Science), 38th edition, pages 337-350 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 13: Timber


1. Timber, characteristics of hard and soft worrk, comparison of hard and soft wood as contruction materials,
commonly occurring defects fo moisture content and control seasoning and drying. Threats to timber, termites
fungaland insects. Preservation techniques.

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
S C Rangawala, Construction Materials (Material Science), 38th edition, pages 187-230 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 14: Paints and other Surface Finishers

75
1. Engineering applications of paints and finishes: Types, performance and manufacture: Surface preparation and
undercoating of different sufaces: Paint application methods single and multi-coat application: Discription of common
faults and failures in paintwork: Simple tests on paints;

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
S C Rangawala, Construction Materials (Material Science), 38th edition, pages 314-336 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 0
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 4

4.0 Assessment
Component Weighting Minimum Level
Assignment 5% 50%
Class Tests 30% 50%
Laboratory 15% 50%
Final Examination 50% 50%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting
Assignment Week 5 5%
Class Test 1 Week 7 15%
Class Test 2 Week 13 15%
Laboratary (x 8) During the semester 15%

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary for students get a minimum
attendence of 75% and score at least 50% (ie. 50/100) in the course work and final examination separately. The
following grading system will be used:

Letter Grade Scale:


Grade Marks Grade Point Average

76
A+ 90-100 4.33-5.00
A 85-89 4.00-4.27
A- 80-84 3.73-3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33-3.60
B 70-74 3.00-3.27
B- 65-69 2.67-2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33-2.60
C 55-59 2.00-2.27
C- 50-54 1.67-1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33-1.60
D 40-44 1.00-1.27
D- 35-39 0.67-0.93
E Below 35 0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0
CT Credit Transfer 0
NV Null & Void for Dishonest Practice 0
I Results Withheld/Incompleste 0
Assessment
X Continuing course 0
DNC Did Not Complete 0
CP Compassionate Pass 0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0
PT Pass Teminating 0
P Pass 0
NP Not Passed 0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment


The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR). All
students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.

Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps to
get redress of their grievance.

Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and reassessment.
Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to the HOD. The HOD
will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

77
Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations
Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your work is
found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In more serious
cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may even lead to
your expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagrism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and adding
proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly your
own work.
6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

78
Lecturer: TBA
Other Lecturers: TBA

BEN506 Semester : 2 Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Introduction to Electrical & 12


Electronics Engineering Credit Points

LECTURES: Students are to attend 3 x 1 hour of lectures per week.


TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour of tutorial per week.
LABS: Students are to attend 1 x 2 hours of Labs per week.
SELF DIRECTED Students are to spend about 6 - 8 hours per week for this unit.
LEARNING
CONSULTATION Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according to the
TIME following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)

PREREQUISITE: The student must have passed Fiji Seventh Form Exam with a pass in Physics or equivalent
E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the course shall be posted on Moodle, Class shares and
emails. Students are required to check emails regularly for communication from the lecturer.

TOTAL Contact Hours 84


LEARNING
HOURS:
Lectures 42
Tutorials 14
Labs/Workshops/Practicals 28
Field Trip(s) 0
Self Directed Learning (during term) 84
Self Directed Learing (MidTerm Break) 4
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks) 8
Total Recommended Learning Hours 180

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to this exciting unit which was designed to help you develop a solid foundation in
understanding DC and AC circuit functions and analysis, together with applications in both Analogue and
Digital Electronics.

1.1 Course Description

79
The purpose of this course is to provide a solid foundation in understanding DC and AC circuit functions
and analysis, with applications in Analogue Electronics and Digital Electronics, required by all electrical
engineering paraprofessionals, in all areas of specilisations. This course extends the skills in basic DC
circuit analysis in Electrical Principles and provides a foundation in DC and AC circuit analysis for use in
other units. In the delivery of this unit, emphasis will be placed on the integration of the ‘theoretical’ and
‘Practical’ aspects of digital electronics. In particular, this will involve an integrated approach to the
analytical and experimental evaluation of devices and circuits and the development of skills in the use of
instruments and measurement techniques.

1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes


On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
1.2.1 Describe circuit configurations, characteristics and performance, using standard terminology and computer
based circuit description languages
1.2.2 Apply network theorems and related analytical techniques to evaluate the steady state performance of DC and
AC circuits
1.2.3 Select and use the appropriate equation to determine the steady state and transient behavior of simple R-L &
R-C circuits, with a step input voltage
1.2.4 Sketch and interprets symbols and diagrams to represent devices and circuits within the scope of this subject
– using accepted standards
1.2.5 Select and apply appropriate analytical techniques, including computer based tools, to evaluate the
performance of both analog and digital electronic devices and circuits.
1.2.6 Use both Boolean Algebra and Karnaugh map for Boolean functions simplification
1.2.7 Report the performance and characteristics of electronic devices and circuits, using accepted
terminology and appropriate performance parameters
1.2.8 Explain, through examples and specific applications, the function of basic analog and digital electronic
devices and the operation of simple circuits and systems in which they are used

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1 BOYLESTAD, Robert, Introductory Circuit Analysis, 12th Edition [2006].
2.1.2 TOCCI, Ronald J, WIDMER, N. S., MOSS, G. L, Digital systems: Principles and Applications, 11th Edition.
2.1.3 FLOYD, Thomas L, Electronic Devices, 8th Edition
2.1.4 BOGART, Theodore F, Electronic Devices and Circuits, 3rd Edition or later

2.2 Supplementary Materials


2.2.1 GOODMAN, Hans. Circuit theory and techniques. New York: John Wiley and Sons, 1988 or later
2.2.2 FLOYD, Thomas L. Digital fundamentals, 4th Edition or later
Other supplementary notes will either be given during the lectures or placed on class share.
2.3 Class Shares
Notices & Announcements, Unit descriptor, Assessment and Assessment details, and supplementary notes (details)
will be provided.

80
3.0 Course Content and Reading References
Week 1: KIRCHHOFF’s LAWS
1. Voltage and Current laws
2. Power and Energy
3. Application of KVL & KCL to series and parallel resistor combinations;
4. Simplification and analysis of circuits involving series/parallel resistors.

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
BOYLESTAD, Robert. Introductory Circuit Analysis, 12th Edition, Chap 4 (p101-115), Chap 5 (p135-159), Chap 6 2
(p187-218)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 2: NODAL ANALYSIS


1. Concepts and terminology
2. Application of Kirchoff’s Laws and Nodal Analysis techniques to solution of simple resistive DC networks

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
BOYLESTAD, Robert. Introductory Circuit Analysis, 12th Edition, Chapter 8 (pages 304-315) 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

81
Week 3: THEVENIN’S AND NORTON’S THEOREMS
1. Solution of DC Networks using Thevenin’s Theorem and Norton's Theorem
2. Development and interpretation of equivalent circuits using Thevenin’s & Norton’s Theorems.

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
BOYLESTAD, Robert, Introductory Circuit Analysis, 12th Edition, Chapter 9 (pages 350-361, pages 361-365) 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 4: TRANSIENT ANALYSIS


1. Basic V-I relationships for Capacitors and Inductors
2. Application of KVL & KCL to R-C and R-L DC circuits
3. Step response of R-L & R-C circuits – application of equations to determine transient & steady state values
4. Writing, running and interpretation of PSPICE files for transient analysis.

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
BOYLESTAD, Robert, Introductory Circuit Analysis, 12th Edition, Chapter 10 (pages 413-426), Chapter 11 2
(pages 473-474)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 5: DIGITAL ELECTRONICS – BASIC PRINCIPLES, LOGIC FUNCTIONS AND GATES


1. Comparison & applications of analog and digital techniques

82
2. Logical concepts and terminology; Number systems and codes
3. Logic functions – NOT, BUFFER, AND, OR, NAND, NOR, Exclusive-OR; Truth table/Function table; Timing
Diagrams;
4. Switch/Relay equivalent circuits

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
TOCCI, Ronald J, WIDMER, N. S., MOSS, G. L, Digital systems: Principles and Applications, 11th Edition 2
Chapter 1 (pages 3-13, 14-20), Chapter 2 (pages 33-56), Chapter 3 (pages 65-86), Chapter 4 (pages 154-159)

Revision of lecture notes 2


Solving problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 6: BOOLEAN ALGEBRA


1. Terminology and symbols; basic identities and theorems; universal gates;
2. De Morgan’s Theorems
3. Functional simplification e,g Karnaugh maps (K-maps) to four (4) variables only

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
TOCCI, Ronald J, WIDMER, N. S., MOSS, G. L, Digital systems: Principles and Applications, 11th Edition 2
Chapter 3 (pages 86-90, 90-96), Chapter 4 (pages 129-136, 143-153)

Revision of lecture notes 2


Solving problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 7: COMBINATIONAL LOGIC CIRCUITS

83
1. Decision making circuits; translation between word problems, Boolean expressions and logic diagrams
2. Code conversion circuits
3. Design and analysis of combinational logic circuits to solve simple engineering problems

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
TOCCI, Ronald J, WIDMER, N. S., MOSS, G. L, Digital systems: Principles and Applications, 11th Edition, 2
Chapter 4 (pages 137-143)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 8: FLIP FLOPS AND SEQUENTIAL CIRCUITS


1. Flip Flop types, characteristics, performance parameters; simple registers
2. Simple asynchronous and synchronous counter circuits and applications
3. Interpretation and construction of timing diagrams for sequential circuits; interpretation of IC data sheets

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
TOCCI, Ronald J, WIDMER, N. S., MOSS, G. L, Digital systems: Principles and Applications, 11th Edition, 2
Chapter 5 (pages 219-243), Chapter 7 (pages 376-382, 376-391, 396-400).
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 9: LOGIC FAMILIES

84
1. TTL and MOS. Logic families – construction, comparison of operation and performance parameters,

applications;
2. Interpretation of IC data sheets

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
TOCCI, Ronald J, WIDMER, N. S., MOSS, G. L, Digital systems: Principles and Applications, 11th Edition, 2
Chapter 8 (pages 515-544, 546-559)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 10: DIGITAL- to- ANALOGUE (DAC) AND ANALOGUE- to-DIGITAL (ADC) CONVERSION
1. D/A and A/D conversion requirements, methods, performance parameters and applications;
2. Interpretation of IC data sheets

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
TOCCI, Ronald J, WIDMER, N. S., MOSS, G. L, Digital systems: Principles and Applications, 11th Edition, 2
Chapter 11 (pages 755-799)

Revision of lecture notes 2


Solving problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 11: DISPLAY DEVICES


1. LED’s, Liquid crystal displays (LCD’s) , seven segment displays

85
2. Applications
3. Interpretation of data sheets

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
TOCCI, Ronald J, WIDMER, N. S., MOSS, G. L, Digital systems: Principles and Applications, 11th Edition, 1
Chapter 9 (pages 614-618)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Reports 2

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 12: ANALOG ELECTRONICS -Simple Power Supplies


1. Capacitive filtering of single phase rectifier circuits;
2. Simple Zener diode shunt regulator;
3. IC voltage regulators; types, characteristics and performance parameters;
4. Basic power supply systems using IC regulators

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
BOGART, Theodore F, Electronic Devices & Circuits, 3rd Edition Chapter 16 (pages 777-788); FLOYD, Thomas 1
L, Electronic Devices - Conventional Current Version, 8th Edition, Chapter 17 (pages 845-856, 862-871)

Revision of lecture notes 2


Solving problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Reports 2

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 13: AMPLIFIER PRINCIPLES AND IC AMPLIFYING DEVICES


1. Basic principles of amplification- amplifier functions and applications. Characteristics, performance parameters,

86
equivalent circuits
2. IC operational amplifiers – basic concepts, characteristics, performer parameters, packaging, terminal functions,
manufacturers’ data;
3. IC operational amplifier as a universal amplifying device ;
4. Linear operational amplifier circuits, operation, performance characteristics and applications
5. Basic non-inverting circuit; Voltage follower circuit
6. Inverting summing amplifier circuit ; Differential amplifier circuit

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
FLOYD, Thomas L, Electronic Devices - Conventional Current Version, 8th Edition, Chapter 12 (pages 593- 629) 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 14: DISCRETE AMPLIFYING DEVICES AND CIRCUITS


1. BJT’s and FET’s - construction, characteristics, performance parameters, ratings, packaging;
2. BJT and FET amplifier configurations, operation, performance parameters and applications
3. Breadboard construction of circuits within the scope of this subject
4. Translation between circuit diagrams and breadboard & PCB implementations

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 2
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
FLOYD, Thomas L, Electronic Devices - Conventional Current Version, 8th Edition, Chapter 4 (pages 163- 2
185, 190-191, 216-239, 257-287), Chapter 8 (pages 368-407), Chaptter 9 (pages 436-453)

Revision of lecture notes 2


Solving problems 0
Preparation of Laboratory Reports 2

87
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

4.0 Assessment
Component Weighting Minimum Level
Assignment 5% 50%
Class Tests 30% 50%
Laboratory 15% 60%
Project N/A N/A
Final Examination 50% 50%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting
Assignment Week 5 5%
Class Test 1 Week 7 15%
Class Test 2 Week 13 15%
Laboratary (x7) During the semester 15%
Project N/A N/A

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary for students get a minimum
attendence of 75% and pass the coursework and score at least 50% (ie. 50/100) in the final examination. The
following grading system will be used:

Letter Grade Scale:


Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33-5.00
A 85-89 4.00-4.27
A- 80-84 3.73-3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33-3.60
B 70-74 3.00-3.27
B- 65-69 2.67-2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33-2.60
C 55-59 2.00-2.27
C- 50-54 1.67-1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33-1.60
D 40-44 1.00-1.27
D- 35-39 0.67-0.93
E Below 35 0

88
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0
CT Credit Transfer 0
NV Null & Void for Dishonest Practice 0
I Results Withheld/Incompleste Assessment 0
X Continuing course 0
DNC Did Not Complete 0
CP Compassionate Pass 0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0
PT Pass Teminating 0
P Pass 0
NP Not Passed 0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment


The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR). All
students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.
Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps to
get redress of their grievance.
Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and reassessment.
Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to the HOD. The HOD
will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your work is
found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In more serious
cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may even lead to
your expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagrism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and adding
proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly your
own work.
6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

89
Lecturer: TBA
Other Lecturers: TBA

BEN507 Semester : 2 Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Introduction to Computer


Programming Credit Points 12

LECTURES: Students are to attend 1 x 2 hours and 1 x 1 hour of lectures per week.
TUTORIALS: N/A
LABS: Students are to attend 1 x 3 hour of Labs per week.
SELF DIRECTED Students are to spend about 6 - 8 hours per week for this unit.
LEARNING
CONSULTATION Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according to the
TIME following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)
PREREQUISITE: Engineering Computation 1 (BEN502)
E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the course shall be posted on Moodle, Class shares and
emails. Students are required to check emails regularly for communication from the lecturer.

TOTAL LEARNING Contact Hours 84


HOURS:
Lectures 42
Tutorials 0
Labs/Workshops/Practicals 42
Field Trip(s) 0
Self Directed Learning (during term) 85
Self Directed Learing (MidTerm Break) 5
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks) 6
Total Recommended Learning Hours 180

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to this exciting unit which was designed to introduce students with a good understanding
of computer hardware and programming.

1.1 Course Description


The purpose of this unit is to give the student a good understanding of computer hardware and develop the
ability to formulate the logic for general problems and writing programs with syntax.

90
1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
1.2.1 Use and interpret terminology relevant to computer Hardware
1.2.2 Apply an efficient and systematic approach to problem definition and analysis
1.2.3 Use a high level language which encourages and reinforces the use of a systematic programming methodology
1.2.4 Write test and run computer programs for the solution of general engineering problems.
1.2.5 Getting familiarity in using Linux operating system
1.2.6 Writing C++ programs in Linux environment

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1 Dietel & Dietel: C++ How to Program, 7 Ed, Pearson

2.2 Supplementary Materials


Supplementary notes will either be given during the lectures or placed on class share.
2.2.1 Stephen Prata : C++ primer plus, 5 Ed, SAMS
2.2.2 Stephens, Diggins,Turkams, Coggwell : C++ Cookbook, O’Reilly
2.3 Class Shares
Notices & Announcements, Unit descriptor, Assessment and Assessment details, and supplementary notes (details)
will be provided.

3.0 Course Content and Reading References


Week 1: Introduction to computer system
1. Basic Concept
2. Building logic
3. Introduction of computers
4. Solving exercise for common engineering problems

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Reading supplementary materials provided by the lecturer 2
Revision of lecture notes 1
Writing programs using C++ 2

91
Preparation of Practical Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 2: System Software


1. Definition of a software
2. Examples of system softwares

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Reading supplementary materials provided by the lecturer 1
Revision of lecture notes 2
Writing programs using C++ 2
Preparation of Practical Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 3: System Software


1. Function of system softwares
2. Concepts of software engineering

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Reading supplementary materials provided by the lecturer 1
Revision of lecture notes 2
Writing programs using C++ 2
Preparation of Practical Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 4: Linux Fundamentals

92
1. Introduction to free software
2. Introduction to Linux operating system, Linux commands, Linux architecture/Linux kernel
3. Introduction to Ubuntu operating system

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Reading supplementary materials provided by the lecturer 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Writing programs using C++ 0
Preparation of Practical Report 2

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 5: Linux Fundamentals(cont.)


1. Introducing commands practical approach
2. Reviewing Ubuntu features
3. Installing Ubuntu, configuring and troubleshooting

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Reading supplementary materials provided by the lecturer 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Writing programs using C++ 0
Preparation of Practical Report 2

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 6: Data Types


1. Fundamental data types
2. Advanced data types
3. Memory size of data types

93
4. Coding using basic data types
5. C++ Operators

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Dietel & Dietel: C++ How to Program, 7 Ed, Pearson (Chapter 1 pages 40 - 55) 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Writing programs using C++ 2
Preparation of Practical Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 7: Control Structures


1. Syntax analysis of 'for loop'
2. Coding using 'for loop'
3. Syntax analysis of "while loop'
4. Coding using 'while loop'

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Dietel & Dietel: C++ How to Program, 7 Ed, Pearson (Chapter 1 pages 146 - 148, Chapter 5 2
pages 200 - 210)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Writing programs using C++ 1
Preparation of Practical Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 8: Control Structures(cont.)


1. Syntax analysis for 'do while - loop'
2. Coding using 'do while' structure

94
3. Syntax analysis of 'if else'
4. Coding using 'if else structure
5. Coding using break, go to, continue statement

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Dietel & Dietel: C++ How to Program, 7 Ed, Pearson (Chapter 4 pages 148 - 153, Chapter 5 2
pages 211 - 221)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Writing programs using C++ 1
Preparation of Practical Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 9: Arrays
1. Introduction of Arrays - one dimension
2. Coding using one dimension arrays
3. Introduction of Arrays - two dimension
4. Coding using two dimension arrays
5. Introduction of multi-dimension arrays
6. Coding using multi-dimension arrays

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Dietel & Dietel: C++ How to Program, 7 Ed, Pearson (Chapter 7 pages 318 - 332) 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Writing programs using C++ 1
Preparation of Practical Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

95
Week 10: Functions
1. Differentiate between inbuilt and user-defined functions
2. Coding using inbuilt and user defined functions
3. Functiions without parametere passing
4. Functions with parameter passing

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Dietel & Dietel: C++ How to Program, 7 Ed, Pearson (Chapter 6 pages 243 - 280) 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Writing programs using C++ 1
Preparation of Practical Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 11: Pointers


1. Pointer variable declarations and intialization
2. Pointer operators
3. Pass by reference with pointers
4. Coding using pointers

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Dietel & Dietel: C++ How to Program, 7 Ed, Pearson (Chapter 8 pages 381 - 389) 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Writing programs using C++ 1
Preparation of Practical Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 12: Structures & Unions

96
1. Syntax analysis of structures and unions
2. Applications of structures and unions
3. Coding using structures and unions

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Reading supplementary materials provided by the lecturer 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Writing programs using C++ 1
Preparation of Practical Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 13: Object-Oriented Programming - Basic


1. Difference between structured programming and object oriented programming
2. Defining classes for objects
3. Role of constructors
4. Coding using object oriented design

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Dietel & Dietel: C++ How to Program, 7 Ed, Pearson (Chapter 3 pages 104 - 122) 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Writing programs using C++ 1
Preparation of Practical Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 14: Object-Oriented Programming - Advanced


1. 'const objects and 'const' member functions
2. 'friend' functions and 'friend' classes

97
3. Using the 'this' pointer
4. Coding using 'const, friend, this'

No of Lectures 3
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Dietel & Dietel: C++ How to Program, 7 Ed, Pearson (Chapter 10 pages 466 - 488) 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Writing programs using C++ 1
Preparation of Practical Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

4.0 Assessment
Component Weighting Minimum Level
Assignment 10%
Practical Tests 20% 50%
Short Tests 20%
Final Examination 50% 50%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting
Assignment Week 5 10%
Class Test 1 Week 7 10%
Class Test 2 Week 13 10%
Practical Test Week 14 20%

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary for students get a minimum
attendence of 75% and pass the coursework and score at least 50% (ie. 50/100) in the final examination. The
following grading system will be used:

Letter Grade Scale:


Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33-5.00

98
A 85-89 4.00-4.27
A- 80-84 3.73-3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33-3.60
B 70-74 3.00-3.27
B- 65-69 2.67-2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33-2.60
C 55-59 2.00-2.27
C- 50-54 1.67-1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33-1.60
D 40-44 1.00-1.27
D- 35-39 0.67-0.93
E Below 35 0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0
CT Credit Transfer 0
NV Null & Void for Dishonest Practice 0
I Results Withheld/Incompleste 0
Assessment
X Continuing course 0
DNC Did Not Complete 0
CP Compassionate Pass 0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0
PT Pass Teminating 0
P Pass 0
NP Not Passed 0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment


The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR). All
students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.

Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps to
get redress of their grievance.
Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and reassessment.
Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to the HOD. The HOD
will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations

99
Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your work is
found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In more serious
cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may even lead to
your expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagrism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and adding
proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly your
own work.
6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

100
Lecturer: TBA
Other Lecturers: TBA

BEN508 Semester : 2 Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Engineering Mechanics 12


Credit Points

LECTURES: Students are to attend 2 x 2 hours of lectures.


TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour of tutorial.
LABS: Students are to attend 1 x 3 hours of Lab for week 10 only of the semester.
SELF DIRECTED Students are to spend about 6 - 8 hours per week for this unit.
LEARNING
CONSULTATION Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according to the
TIME following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)

PREREQUISITE: Engineering Physics (BEN503)


E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the course shall be posted on Moodle, Class shares and
emails. Students are required to check emails regularly for communication from the lecturer.

TOTAL LEARNING Contact Hours 73


HOURS:
Lectures 56
Tutorials 14
Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0
Self Directed Learning (during term) 93
Self Directed Learing (MidTerm Break) 7
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks) 7
Total Recommended Learning Hours 180

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to the Bachelor of Civil Engineering Programme and hope that you will find it enriching
and interesting. This unit will introduce the student, the basic theories, principles and solving problems of
different kinds of force system in engineering, effect of friction between contacting bodies, and torsion.

1.1 Course Description


The unit deals with the fundamental knowledge of engineering mechanics (statics). The syllabus of the unit
includes: scalars and vectors, dot and cross products, two dimensional force systems, forces, moments,
couples, resultants, free-body diagrams, equilibrium of forces , trusses, frames, beams, centroids, moment
of area, friction and torsion of shafts.

1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes


On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

101
1.2.1 Apply the principles of basic engineering mechanics.
1.2.2 Model and analyze static force systems using the principles of equilibrium.
1.2.3 Calculate the properties of plane cross sections including centroids and area moments of inertia.
1.2.4 Determine the forces in members of pin jointed structures.
1.2.5 Calculate shear and bending effects in simple beams.
1.2.6 Calculate the values of static and kinetic frictions between contacting bodies.
1.2.7 Determine simple stress and strain in direct and indirect loading applications.

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1. Statics and Mechanics of Materials, by William F. Riley, Leroy D. Sturges and Don H. Morris, 2nd Edition,ISBN
0-471-43446-9

2.2 Supplementary Materials


2.2.1 Engineering Mechanics by Ferdinand Singer, 3rd Edition
2.2.2 Strength of Materials by Ferdinand L. Singer and Andrew Pytel, 4th Edition, ISBN 0-06-046229-9
2.2.3 Merriam J.L. and Kraige L.G. Engineering Mechanics Statics, 5th Edition ,SI Version, Wiley, USA, (2003)
ISBN 0-471-26607-8
2.2.4 PP Benham, RJ Crawford & CG Armstrong, Mechanics of Engineering Materials, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall
(May 3, 1996), ISBN 10: 0582251648

2.3 Class Shares


Notices & Announcements, Unit descriptor, Assessment and Assessment details, lecture notes and manuals, and
supplementary notes (details) will be provided.

3.0 Course Content and Reading References


Week 1: Basic Static Concepts
Introduction, Fundamental Quantities of Mechanics, Newton's Laws, Mass and weight and units of measurement.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 0
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Introduction (pages 1-2 ); Fundamental Quantities of Mechanics (pages 2-3); Newton's Law (pages 2
3-5); Mass and weight (pages 5-6); Units of Measurement (pages 8-14). Textbook - Statics and
Mechanics 2nd Edition William F. Riley, Leroy D. Sturges and Don H. Morris

Revision of lecture notes 2


Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

102
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 2: Scalars and Vectors, Friction


What are forces, Classification and their Characteristics. Scalar Quantities and Vector quantities. Resultant of two or
more Concurrent Forces, Resolution of Forces, Laws of Sine and Cosine. What is friction, Angle of Internal Friction,
Kinetic and Static Friction.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 0
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Chapter 2 (pages 26-39, 188-192 ), Textbook : Statics & Mechanics, 2nd Edition William F. Riley, 2
Leroy D. Sturges and Don H. Morris. Chapter 5 (pages 114-122), Textbook: Engineering Mechanics
by Ferdinand Singer

Revision of lecture notes 3


Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 3: Finding Missing Forces by Matrix( Dot & Cross Products)


Matrix Inverse by using the Adjoint Method. (Dot & Cross Products)

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 0
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Chapter 2 (pages 46-47), Textbook: Statics & Mechanics, 2nd Edition William F. Riley, Leroy D. 1
Sturges and Don H. Morris.
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 4: Analysis of Beam Reactions by Analytical & Graphical Method

103
Types of supports, Types of Beams & Loadings, Free-body diagrams

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 0
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Chapter 3 (pages 65-87,) Textbook: Statics & Mechanics, 2nd Edition William F. Riley, Leroy D. 2
Sturges and Don H. Morris.
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 5: Determinate & Indeterminate Beams


Determination of Determinacy of Beams . Calculation of the shear force and bending moment in a statically
determinate beams, plotting the shear and moment diagrams.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 0
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
(pages 435-454) Textbook - Statics & Mechanics, 2nd Edition William F. Riley, Leroy D. Sturges 2
and Don H. Morris; and (pages 274-292) of textbook Engineering Mechanics, 6th Edition by J.L.
Meriam and L.G. Kraige.

Revision of lecture notes 2


Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 6:Analysis of Internal Forces in a Truss and Cable


What is truss, different types of truss. Analysis of Internal forces in a truss by joint method, method of section,
graphical method (bow's notation). Analysis of internal forces in a cable.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1

104
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 0
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Chapter 6 (page 299-316), Textbook: Statics & Mechanics, 2nd Edition William F. Riley, Leroy D. 2
Sturges and Don H. Morris.
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Laboratory Report 2
0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 7: Torsion of Shaft


Derivation of Torsion Formulas, Angle of Twist, Power transmitted by the shaft, Hollow and Solid Shaft.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 0
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Chapter 3 (pages 75- 95), Textbook: Strength of Materials, 3rd Edition by Ferdinand L. Singer and
Andrew Pytel and Chapter 5 (pages 201-224), Textbook: Statics & Mechanics, 2nd Edition William 1
F. Riley, Leroy D. Sturges and Don H. Morris.
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 8: Center of Gravity and Moment of Inertia


Finding center of gravity of regular and irregular figures.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 6 (page 299-316), Textbook: Statics & Mechanics, 2nd Edition William F. Riley, Leroy D. 2
Sturges and Don H. Morris.
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2

105
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 9: Stress
Normal, shear and bearing stresses; Second Moment of Area; Radius of gyration and Parallel-Axis theorem.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 0
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Chapter 4 ( pages 88-107) and Chapter 8 (pages 417-425),Textbook : Statics & Mechanics of
Materials by W. Riley, L. Sturges and D. Morris; and (pages 445 - 479), Textbook: Engineering
2
Mechanics Statics, 6th Edition by J.L. Meriam & L.G. Kraige

Revision of lecture notes 2


Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 10: Stress-Strain Diagram and Poisson's Ratio


Stress-Strain Diagrams, Strain Measurement, Generalized Hooke's Law, Different Concepts in the Stress-Strain
Curve. Poisson's Ratio (Uniaxial, Biaxial and Triaxial deformations).

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 3
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Chapter 4 (pages 114-124), Textbook: Statics & Mechanics of Materials by W. Riley, L. Sturges and 2
D. Morris
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 3

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 11: Flexural Bending Stress

106
Bending or flexure stress caused by bending moment expressed by the flexure formula. T-beam , I-beam and
rectangular beam .

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 0
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Chapter 8 (pages 414 - 416), Textbook: Statics & Mechanics of Materials by W. Riley, L. Sturges 1
and D. Morris

Revision of lecture notes 3


Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 12: Horizontal Shear Stress


Horizontal or vertical shear stress, statical moment of area

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 0
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Chapter 5 (pages 188 - 197), Textbook: Strength of Materials, 3rd Edition by Ferdinand L. 2
Singer/Andrew Pytel.
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 13:Columns
Types of Columns, Euler's Formula, Effects of Different End Conditions; Axially Loaded and Eccentrically Loaded
Columns; Combined Flexure Formula.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 0

107
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Chapter 11 (pages 651-678),Textbook: Statics & Mechanics of Materials by W. Riley, L. Sturges 2
and D. Morris

Revision of lecture notes 2


Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 14: Mohr's Circle


Computation of stresses analytically and by the use of Mohr's Circle.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 0
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Chapter 10 (pages 593 - 594), Textbook: Statics & Mechanics of Materials by W. Riley, L. Sturges 2
and D. Morris. Chapter 7, (pages 404 - 407) Textbook: Engineering Mechanics, Statics, by J.L.
Meriam and L.G. Kraige.

Revision of lecture notes 2


Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

4.0 Assessment
Component Weighting Minimum Level
Assignment 10%
Laboratory 10% 50%
Class Tests 30%
Final Examination 50% 50%
Attendance N/A 75%

Dates:

108
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting

Assignment 1 Week 8 5.0%


Assignment 2 Week 13 5.0%
Class Test 1 Week 7 15%
Class Test 2 Week 13 15%
Laboratory (Stress- Week 10 10%
Strain Relationship)

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary for students get a minimum
attendence of 75% and pass the coursework and score at least 50% (ie. 50/100) in the final examination. It is highly
recommended that students attend all tutorials/labs/workshops. The following grading system will be used:

Letter Grade Scale:


Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33-5.00
A 85-89 4.00-4.27
A- 80-84 3.73-3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33-3.60
B 70-74 3.00-3.27
B- 65-69 2.67-2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33-2.60
C 55-59 2.00-2.27
C- 50-54 1.67-1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33-1.60
D 40-44 1.00-1.27
D- 35-39 0.67-0.93
E Below 35 0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0
CT Credit Transfer 0
NV Null & Void for Dishonest Practice 0
I Results Withheld/Incompleste 0
Assessment
X Continuing course 0
DNC Did Not Complete 0
CP Compassionate Pass 0

109
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0
PT Pass Teminating 0
P Pass 0
NP Not Passed 0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment


The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR). All
students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.
Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps to
get redress of their grievance.
Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and reassessment.
Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to the HOD. The HOD
will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your work is
found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In more serious
cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may even lead to
your expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagiarism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and adding
proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly your
own work.
6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

110
Lecturer: TBA
Other Lecturers: TBA

BEN509 Semester : 2 Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Workshop Practice 12


Credit Points

LECTURES: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hours of lectures per week.


TUTORIALS: N/A
LABS/WORKSHOP Students are to attend 2 x 3 hours of Workshop practice per week.
PRACTICE:
SELF DIRECTED Students are to spend about 4 -5 hours per week for this unit.
LEARNING
CONSULTATION Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according to the
TIME following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)
PREREQUISITE: The student must have passed Form 7 Maths and Physics or Equivalent
E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the course shall be posted on Moodle, Class shares and
emails. Students are required to check emails regularly for communication from the lecturer.

TOTAL LEARNING Contact Hours 114


HOURS:
Lectures 14
Tutorials 0
Labs/Workshops/Practicals 84
Field Trip(s) 16
Self Directed Learning (during term) 66
Self Directed Learing (MidTerm Break)
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks)
Total Recommended Learning Hours 180

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to this unit and hope that you will find it enriching and interesting.

1.1 Course Description


This unit covers basic manufacturing technology and processes. Discussing advanced material properties and their
applications. Practical workshop sessions include lathe, milling machine, drilling machines, and welding/fabrication.
safety in manufacturing industry.

111
1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes
On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
1.2.1 Identify common manufacturing processes, machine tools and cutting processes
1.2.2 Operate basic machine tools, such as milling, shaping, lathes and drilling machines
1.2.3 Apply fabrication techniques such as welding, fitting, moulding and pattern making
1.2.4 Select appropriate manufacturing methods and materials for specified applications

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1 Kalpakjian S and Schmid S.R. Manufacturing Engineering and Technology. 4th Ed.
Prentice Hall, USA. 2001. ISBN 0-201-36131-0
2.1.2 Timmings R. L Manufacturing Technology Vol. 1 2nd edition Longman, London 1992
2.1.3 Budinski K. G. Engineering materials 6th edition Prentice Hall, USA 1999
2.1.4 Jennesson, J Electrical Principles 5th edition, McGraw-Hill 2003
2.1.5 Pethebridge, K and Nesson I, Electrical Wiring Practice Vol 1 and 2 5th edition McGraw-Hill 2000
2.1.6 Electrical Wiring Practice Vol. 1 7th Edition
2.1.7 AS/NZS 3000:2007

2.2 Supplementary Materials


2.2.1 Chapman W. A. J. Workshop Technology Vol 1, 2, 3 5th edition Edward Arnold. UK. 1985

2.3 Class Shares


Notices & Announcements, Unit descriptor, Assessment and Assessment details and supplementary notes (details)
will be provided.

3.0 Course Content and Reading References


Week 1: Introduction
1. Safety in the workshop, safety hazards, safe working environment, code of practice, First Aid, Removing a person
from contact with live conductors, treatment for electric shock
2. Responsibility of employers and employees under OSH (occupational safety and health act)
3. Responsibility of employers and employees under OSH and electrical regulations.
4. Engineering metrology and instrumentation, importance of tolerances, limits and fits.

No of Lectures 1
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 6
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:

112
Occupational safety and health act (This will be given by the OHS Lecturer) 1
Revision of lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical preparation 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 4

Week 2: Manufacturing
1. What is manufacturing?
2. Material removal processes and machines
3. Processes to produce round shapes (turning) machining processes to produce various shapes (milling), various
cutting tools. Work holding devices, machine structures, machining economics
No of Lectures 1
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 6
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Kalpakjian S and Schmid S.R. Manufacturing Engineering and Technology. 4th Ed. (pg1-34) 2
Prentice Hall, USA. 2001. ISBN 0-201-36131-0
Revision of lecture notes 1
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical preparation 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 4

Week 3: Fundamentals of cutting


1. Tool geometry and materials, power requirements, cutting speeds and feeds
2. Tool life, tool wear, cutting fluids, metal removal theory, geometric progression

No of Lectures 1
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 6
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Kalpakjian S and Schmid S.R. Manufacturing Engineering and Technology. 4th Ed. (pg556-583) 2
Prentice Hall, USA. 2001. ISBN 0-201-36131-0

113
Revision of lecture notes 1
Doing tutorial exercise 0
Practical preparation 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 4

Week 4: Machining Process


1. Abrasive machining and finishing operations, advanced machining processes
2. Gas and arc welding,TIG, MIG and plasma welding, resistance welding.

No of Lectures 1
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 6
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Kalpakjian S and Schmid S.R. Manufacturing Engineering and Technology. 4th Ed. (719-753, 865- 2
893)
Prentice Hall, USA. 2001. ISBN 0-201-36131-0
Revision of lecture notes 1
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical preparation 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

Week 5: Basic Craft Skills


1. Selection of cable for specific job; Stripping cable, connections of small conductors to terminals and wiring
accessories; Fitting plugs to flexible cords, fitting flexible cord couplers and amplifire sockets; Fix flexible cords to
appliances; Crimping terminations to small size conductors up 6 square millimeter, Fixing methods to include: Fixing
to masonary, provision of wood back boards to support light points, joint boxes and other outlets.

2. Using TPS cables to wire common lighting circuits and circuits servicing GPO's. Circuits to include: One light
controlled by one switch, one light by two, two way switches, radial. Ciruit serving a number of socket outlets, radial
circuit controlling fixed appliance.

No of Lectures 1
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 6
Field Trip(s) 4

114
Readings:
1. Electrical Wiring Practice Vol. 1 7th Edition 2
2. AS/NZS 3000:2007
Revision of lecture notes 1
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical preparation 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

Week 6: Conduit System


1. Perform excercises to investigate the basic skills required for the installation of conduit steel and PVC conduit
systems to include: Cuttting, jointing, connection to accessories, use of expansion couplings in PVC systems, Wire
simple circuit using conduit.

No of Lectures 1
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 6
Field Trip(s) 4

Readings:
1. Electrical Wiring Practice Vol. 1 7th Edition 2
2. AS/NZS 3000:2007
Revision of lecture notes 1
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical preparation 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

Week 7: Motors and Motor Controls


1. Wire a direct on line circuit to control a motor
2. Wire a star-delta circuit to control a motor
3. Add remote controls to circuits
4. Strip and rebuild a small motor

No of Lectures 1
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 6
Field Trip(s) 0

115
Readings:
1. Electrical Wiring Practice Vol. 1 7th Edition 2
2. AS/NZS 3000:2007
Revision of lecture notes 1
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical preparation 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

Week 8: Equipment Maintenance Management


1. Total Productive Maintenanace (TPM) - the six major TPM activities: elimination of losses, planned maintenance,
autonomous maintenance, preventive engineering, product design, education.
2. Take students on field trip to a repair/callibration center where any of the above services are carried out.

No of Lectures 1
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 6
Field Trip(s) 4

Readings:
1. Electrical Wiring Practice Vol. 1 7th Edition 2
2. AS/NZS 3000:2007
Revision of lecture notes 1
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical preparation 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

Week 9: Equipment Maintenance Management


1. Definition and explanation of MTTF, MTBF, MTTR and availibility of equipment and tools.
2. Examples on above.

No of Lectures 1
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 6
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:

116
1. Electrical Wiring Practice Vol. 1 7th Edition 2
2. AS/NZS 3000:2007
Revision of lecture notes 1
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical preparation 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

Week 10: History of manufacturing Materials


1. History of steel making, grain structure, annealing, normalising, Hot and cold working, cast iron, wrought iron,
crystal growth, re-crystallisation

No of Lectures 1
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 6
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Kalpakjian S and Schmid S.R. Manufacturing Engineering and Technology. 4th Ed. (pg40-55) 2
Prentice Hall, USA. 2001. ISBN 0-201-36131-0
Revision of lecture notes 1
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical preparation 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

Week 11: Properties of Materials


1. Hardness, toughness, brittleness, strength, malleability, ductility, elasticity, plasticity.

No of Lectures 1
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 6
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Kalpakjian S and Schmid S.R. Manufacturing Engineering and Technology. 4th Ed. (pg56- 2
82)Prentice Hall, USA. 2001. ISBN 0-201-36131-0
Revision of lecture notes 1

117
Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical preparation 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

Week 12: Heat Treatment


1. Heat treatment: annealing, normalising, oil and water quenching, tempering. Iron-carbon diagram, eutectic point,
iron-carbon diagram, alpha iron, gamma iron.

No of Lectures 1
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 6
Field Trip(s) 4

Readings:
Kalpakjian S and Schmid S.R. Manufacturing Engineering and Technology. 4th Ed. (100-125, 129- 2
145)Prentice Hall, USA. 2001. ISBN 0-201-36131-0

Revision of lecture notes 1


Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical preparation 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

Week 13: Metals


1. Non-ferrous metals and its alloys classification and applications.

No of Lectures 1
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 6
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Kalpakjian S and Schmid S.R. Manufacturing Engineering and Technology. 4th Ed. (151-160, 2
1040-1044)Prentice Hall, USA. 2001. ISBN 0-201-36131-0

Revision of lecture notes 1


Doing tutorial exercise 1
Practical preparation 1

118
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

Week 14: Alloys


1. Non destructive testing

No of Lectures 1
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 6
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Kalpakjian S and Schmid S.R. Manufacturing Engineering and Technology. 4th Ed. (161-167) 2
Prentice Hall, USA. 2001. ISBN 0-201-36131-0
Revision of lecture notes 2
Doing tutorial exercise 0
Practical preparation 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 4

4.0 Assessment
Component Weighting Minimum Level
Assignment 5%
Practical Tests 25% 50%
Short Tests 20%
Final Examination 50% 50%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting
Assignment Week 5 5%
Class Test 1 Week 7 10%
Class Test 2 Week 13 10%
Practical Test Week 14 25%

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary for students get a minimum
attendence of 75% and score at least 50% (ie. 50/100) in the course work and final examination separately. The
following grading system will be used:

119
Letter Grade Scale:
Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33-5.00
A 85-89 4.00-4.27
A- 80-84 3.73-3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33-3.60
B 70-74 3.00-3.27
B- 65-69 2.67-2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33-2.60
C 55-59 2.00-2.27
C- 50-54 1.67-1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33-1.60
D 40-44 1.00-1.27
D- 35-39 0.67-0.93
E Below 35 0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0
CT Credit Transfer 0
NV Null & Void for Dishonest Practice 0
I Results Withheld/Incompleste 0
Assessment
X Continuing course 0
DNC Did Not Complete 0
CP Compassionate Pass 0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0
PT Pass Teminating 0
P Pass 0
NP Not Passed 0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment


The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR). All
students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.
Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps to
get redress of their grievance.

120
Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and reassessment.
Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to the HOD. The HOD
will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your work is
found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In more serious
cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may even lead to
your expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagiarism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and adding
proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly your
own work.
6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

121
LECTURER: TBA

BEN601 Semester : 2 Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Engineering Computation 2 12


Credit Points

LECTURES: Students are to attend 2 x 2 hours of lectures per week.


TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 2 hour tutorial class per week.
LABS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour of Lab per week.
SELF DIRECTED LEARNING Students are to spend about 5 - 6 hours per week for this unit.
CONSULTATION TIME Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according
to the following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)

PREREQUISITE: Engineering Computation 1 (BEN502)


E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the unit shall be posted on Moodle or Class
shares. Students are required to check emails regularly for communication from
the lecturer.

TOTAL LEARNING HOURS: Contact Hours 98


Lectures 56
Tutorials 28
Labs/Workshops 14
Field Trip(s) 0
Self Directed Learning (during term) 82
Self Directed Learing (Mid-Term Break)
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks)
Total Recommended Learning Hours 180

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to this exciting unit which was designed to help you develop an understanding of
advanced calculus and the ability to formulate and solve models of complex engineering systems

1.1 Course Description


This paper develops an understanding of advanced calculus, and the ability to formulate and solve
problems of mathematical models of complex engineering systems

1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes


On successful completion of this course, students will be able to understand the following:
1. Apply vectors to solve problems in three-dimensional space.
2. Create models involving partial derivatives

122
3. Construct and calculate multiple integrals in a variety of settings.
4. Use vector field calculus over curved lines and surfaces.
5. Employ Laplace and Fourier transforms to analyze and solve application problems.

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition [2008]
Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,9th Edition

2.2 Supplementary Materials


Supplementary notes will either be given during the lectures or placed on class share.

2.3 Class Shares


Notices & Announcements, Unit descriptor, Assessment and Assessment details, and supplementary notes
(details) will be provided.

3.0 Course Content and Reading References


Week 1: Partial Derivatives
1. Functions of several variables
2. Limits & Continuity
3. Definition of Partial Derivatives

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 2
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition (Chapter 14 pages 855 - 891) 3
Revision of lecture notes 1
Solving Problems 1
Laboratory exercise using MatLab 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading 6


Time)

Week 2: Partial Derivatives


1. Tangent planes & linear approximations
2. Chain Rule
3. Directional derivatives & the gradient vector.

123
4. Maximum & Minimum Values

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition (Chapter 14 pages 892 - 933) 3
Revision of lecture notes 1
Solving Problems 1
Laboratory exercise using MatLab 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading 6


Time)

Week 3: Partial Derivatives & Multiple Integrals


1. Lagrange Multipliers
2. Double integrals over rectangles
3. Iterated integrals

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 2
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition (Chapter 14 pages 934- 940, Chapter 15 2
pages 951 - 964)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Laboratory exercise using MatLab 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading 6


Time)

Week 4: Multiple Integrals


1. Double integral over general regions
2. Double integrals in Polar coordinates
3. Applications of double integrals

124
4. Triple Integrals

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 2
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition (Chapter 15 pages 965 - 999) 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Laboratory exercise using MatLab 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading 6


Time)

Week 5: Multiple Integrals


1. Triple integrals in Cylindrical coordinates
2. Triple integrals in Spherical coordinates
3. Change of variables in Multiple integrals

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 2
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition (Chapter 15 pages 1000 - 1020) 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Laboratory exercise using MatLab 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 6: Vector Calculus


1. Vector fields
2. Line Integrals
3. Fundamental theorem for line integrals
4. Green's Theorem

125
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 2
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition (Chapter 16 pages 1027 - 1060) 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Laboratory exercise using MatLab 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 7: Vector Calculus


1. Curl & Divergence
2. Parametric surfaces & areas
3. Surface Integrals
4. Stroke's Theorem
5. Divergence Theorem

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 2
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
James Stewart, Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole ,6th Edition (Chapter 16 pages 1061 - 1104) 3
Revision of lecture notes 1
Solving Problems 1
Laboratory exercise using MatLab 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 8: Laplace Transform


1. Laplace Transform
2. Inverse Laplace Transform
3. Linearity & s- Shifting
4. Transform of derivatives & integrals

126
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 2
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,9th Edition (Chapter 6 2
pages 220 - 233)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Laboratory exercise using MatLab 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 9: Laplace Transform


1. Unit Step Functions: t- Shifting
2. Convolution
3. Integral Equations

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 2
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,9th Edition (Chapter 6 2
pages 233 - 255)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Laboratory exercise using MatLab 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 10: Laplace Transform


1. Differentiation of Transform
2. Integration of Transform
3. Systems of ODE's

127
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 2
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,9th Edition (Chapter 6 2
pages 256 - 263)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Laboratory exercise using MatLab 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 11: Fourier Series, Integrals & Transforms


1. Fourier Series
2. Functions of any period p = 2L

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 2
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,9th Edition (Chapter 2
11 pages 478 - 489)

Revision of lecture notes 2


Solving Problems 1
Laboratory exercise using MatLab 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 12: Fourier Series, Integrals & Transforms


1. Even & Odd Functions
2. Half Range Expansions
3. Forced Oscillations

No of Lectures 4

128
No. of Tutorials 2
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,9th Edition (Chapter 6 2
pages 490 - 501)

Revision of lecture notes 2


Solving Problems 1
Laboratory exercise using MatLab 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 13: Fourier Series, Integrals & Transforms


1. Approximation by Trigonometric Polynomials
2. Fourier Integral

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 2
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,9th Edition (Chapter 2
11 pages 502 - 512)

Revision of lecture notes 1


Solving Problems 1
Laboratory exercise using MatLab 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

Week 14: Fourier Series, Integrals & Transforms


1. Fourier Cosine & Sine Transforms
2. Fourier Transform : Discrete & Fast Fourier Transform

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 2
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1

129
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,9th Edition (Chapter 2
11 pages 513 - 528)
Revision of lecture notes 1
Solving Problems 1
Laboratory exercise using MatLab 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

4.0 Assessment
Component Weighting Minimum Level
Assignment 5%
Class Exercises/Quizes 10% 50%
Short Tests 35%
Final Examination 50% 50%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting
Assignment 1 Week 4 2.5%
Assignment 2 Week 9 2.5%
Class Test 1 Week 7 15%
Class Test 2 Week 13 20%
Quiz-1 Week 4 5%
Quiz-2 Week 9 5%

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary for students get a minimum
attendence of 75% and pass the coursework and score at least 50% (ie. 50/100) in the final examination. The
following grading system will be used:

Letter Grade Scale:


Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33-5.00
A 85-89 4.00-4.27
A- 80-84 3.73-3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33-3.60

130
B 70-74 3.00-3.27
B- 65-69 2.67-2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33-2.60
C 55-59 2.00-2.27
C- 50-54 1.67-1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33-1.60
D 40-44 1.00-1.27
D- 35-39 0.67-0.93
E Below 35 0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0
CT Credit Transfer 0
NV Null & Void for Dishonest Practice 0
I Results Withheld/Incompleste 0
Assessment
X Continuing course 0
DNC Did Not Complete 0
CP Compassionate Pass 0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0
PT Pass Teminating 0
P Pass 0
NP Not Passed 0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment


The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR).
All students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.
Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps to
get redress of their grievance.
Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and reassessment.
Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to the HOD. The HOD
will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your work
is found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In more
serious cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may even
lead to your expulsion from the university.

131
Actions that constitute plagiarism
1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing
service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and adding
proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly your
own work.
6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

132
LECTURER: TBA
OTHER LECTURERS: TBA

BEN602 Semester : 1 Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Surveying for Engineers 12


Credit Points

LECTURES: Students are to attend 2 x 2 hours of lectures.


TUTORIALS: N/A
WORKSHOPS: N/A
LABS: Students are to attend 1 x 3 hours of practical per week
SELF DIRECTED Students are to spend about 5 - 8 hours per week for this unit.
LEARNING
CONSULTATION TIME Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according
to the following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)
PREREQUISITE: Engineering Computation 2 (BEN601)
E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the unit shall be posted on Class
Shares. Students are required to check their emails regularly for
communication from the lecturer

TOTAL LEARNING HOURS: Contact Hours 98


Lectures 56
Tutorials 0
Labs/Workshops 42
Self Directed Learning (during term) 82
Self Directed Learning (Mid-Term Break)
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks)
Total Recommended Learning Hours 180

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to this course and hope that you will find it enriching and interesting.

1.1 Course Description


To introduce to the Civil Engineering students the importance of land survey in the construction of engineering
structures, whether horizontal or vertical construction.

1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes


On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
1.2.1. Determine the linear and angular units used in land surveying.
1.2.2. Explain the significance of scale in relation to mapping.
1.2.3. Produce a labelled sketch using a level and a theodolite in simplified form.

133
1.2.4. Carry out and plot a simple linear survey.
1.2.5. Carry out a close traverse.
1.2.6. Complete the reduction calculations including assessing the accuracy of the traverse.
1.2.7. Calculate Northing, Eastings.
1.2.8. Take and record readings using the level, theodolite and total station.
1.2.9. Carry out a leveling exercise to determine the difference in height between two points at least 1/2 kilometer
apart.
1.2.10. Carry out a detailed survey using theodolite and chain.
1.2.11. Carry out a Grid Levelling survey and plot contours for a building site.
1.2.12. Use surveying techniques to locate historical boundary pegs.

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1. Irvine, William,FRICS .(1998) Surveying for Construction, McGraw-Hill Book Company, ISBN 0-07-707998-1

2.2 Supplementary Materials


2.2.1. White, W.S. Revision Notes on Plane Surveying, Newnes-Butterworths, ISBN 0-408-000678
2.2.2. Bannister, S. Raymond, A. and Baker, R.W. (1998) Surveying (7th Edition), Longman, ISBN 0582302498
2.2.3. JcMcCormac, Surveying 5th Edition ISBN 0-471-23758-2

2.3 Class Shares


Lecture Notes and Laboratory Manual

3.0 Course Content and Reading References

Week 1: Introduction and Linear Measurement


Linear measurement, angular unit of measurement, scaled drawing in surveying, understanding of site plans, grid
lines, surface relief, gradients, national grid lines and grid references and surveying conventional lines.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3

Readings:
Chapter 1 and 2 (pages 1 - 25) Textbook: Irvine, William,FRICS . Surveying for Construction, 3
McGraw-Hill Book Company, ISBN 0-07-707998-2

Revision of lecture notes 1


Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Practical Reports 1
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

134
Week 2: Methods and Procedures of Surveying
Principles of Linear Surveying: Trilateration, lines at right angle (offsets). Linear Measurement Techniques:
Steel tapes; Instrumentation: Unit systems; Theory of operation: Consideration of Accuracy; Linear
Measurement Corrections including temperature, tension, sag, calibration, slope, curvature.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3

Readings:
Chapter 3, Linear Surveying (pages 26 - 58) Textbook: Irvine, William,FRICS . Surveying for 2
Construction, McGraw-Hill Book Company, ISBN 0-07-707998-2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Practical Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6


Week 3: Levelling
Levelling instruments; the surveying telescope, categories of levelling instruments, setting up dumpy level, tilting
level,
automatic level. Leveling procedure using the rise and fall method, flying levelling, closed circuit of levelling, the
method
of series levelling. Levelling procedure using the method of HPC (height of the collimation method), Reciprocal
Levelling.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3

Readings:
Chapter 4, Levelling (pages 58 - 96) Textbook: Irvine, William,FRICS . Surveying for Construction, 2
McGraw-Hill Book Company, ISBN 0-07-707998-2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Practical Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 4: Contouring
Contour characteristics, gradients. Methods of contouring; choice of vertical interval, setting out a point of known
level, direct
method of contouring, indirect method of contouring and interpolations.

No of Lectures 4

135
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Field Exercise 3
0
Readings:
Chapter 5, Contouring (pages 99 - 124) Textbook: Irvine, William,FRICS . Surveying for Construction, 2
McGraw-Hill Book Company, ISBN 0-07-707998-2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 5: Theodolites
Main components of theodolites: tripod, Trivet stage, Tribrach (levelling arrangement of tribrach (upper plate),
controls for
measuring horizontal angles, index marks, transit axis or trunnion axis, altitude spirit level, centering motion,
optical plummet.
Reading the circles: direct reading, direct scale reading, micrometer reading, double micrometer, optoelectronic,
setting up
the Theodolite: Plumb bob method, optical plumb method. Measuring horizontal angles: Reiteration Method,
Repitition Method.
Measuring angles in the vertical plane; Measurement of vertical and zenith angles. Errors affecting angular
measurement.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Field Exercise 3
0
Readings:
Chapter 7, Theodolites (pages 144 - 168) Textbook: Irvine, William,FRICS . Surveying for 2
Construction, McGraw-Hill Book Company, ISBN 0-07-707998-2
Revision of lecture notes 1
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Practical Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5


Week 6: Traverse Survey
Types of traverse: open traverse, closed traverse, traverse closed between two fixed points. Four basic principles
of traversing,
plotting a traverse.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3

136
0
Readings:
Chapter 8, Traverse Survey (pages 169 - 185) Textbook: Irvine, William,FRICS . Surveying for 2
Construction, McGraw-Hill Book Company, ISBN 0-07-707998-2
Revision of lecture notes 1
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Practical Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5


Week 7: Traverse Survey Computation
Magnetic bearings, true bearings, grid bearings, magnetic declination, assumed bearings, forward and back
bearings,
quadrant bearings, conversion of angles to bearings in open traverse and closed traverse. Obtaining bearings
directly using
theodolite, rectangular coordinates, coordinates calculation, calculation of a closed traverse (adjustments by
Bowditch Rule).

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Field Exercise 3

Readings:
Chapter 9, Traverse Survey Computation (pages 187 - 216) Textbook: Irvine, William,FRICS . 3
Surveying for Construction, McGraw-Hill Book Company, ISBN 0-07-707998-2

Revision of lecture notes 1


Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Practical Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6


Week 8: Stadia Tacheometry
Stadia Tacheometry: basic concept, stadia tacheometry (horizontal sights, inclined sigths). Use of Stadia
Tacheometry.
Electro-magnetic Distance Measurements (EDM), types of EDM instrument: Theodolite and EDM Electronic Field
Book.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Field Exercise 3
0
Readings:
Chapter 10, Tacheometry (pages 217 - 242) Textbook: Irvine, William,FRICS . Surveying for 2
Construction, McGraw-Hill Book Company, ISBN 0-07-707998-2
Revision of lecture notes 1

137
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Practical Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

Week 9: Recording, Processing and Plotting of data/information


Use of the surveyor's field book: Methods of recording and processing of field data: Plotting of information to
produce site and
area plans: use of standard symbols for detailing: methods for contouring site plans: Computation of Northings and
Eastings
correction by the Bowditch Method.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Field Exercise 3

Readings:
Chapter 8, pages 197 - 213; Textbook: Surveying for Engineers by J. Uren and W.F. Price, 2nd 2
Edition
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

Week 10: Photogrammetry & GPS Surveys


Introduction to photogrammetry,central perspertive, flight line, focal length, fiducial points, photoscale, types of
distortion, photo interpretation, basic factors of recognition, orthophoto, stereo pair, stereoscope. GPS,
componants, principle of determining position by GPS, accuracies of survey data using GPS.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3

Readings:
Chapter 1, pages 1-9, Chapter 6, pages 133-146, Chapter 7 pages 149 - 170; Textbook: Moffit 4
Francis H. and Mikhail Edward M. Photogrammetry (3rd Ed), Harper & Row Publishers, New York,
ISBN 0-0-700-22517-X
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Practical Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

138
Week 11: Mensuration - areas
Calculation of plane areas, areas with straight line enclosures, irregular areas, etc: area calculations
for long and cross
sections: Area calculation by use of coordinates: Area measurement using the Planimeter.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0
Readings:
Chapter 14, Mensuration-Areas (pages 325 - 339) Textbook: Irvine, William,FRICS . Surveying for 2
Construction, McGraw-Hill Book Company, ISBN 0-07-707998-2

Revision of lecture notes 2


Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Practical Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 12: Mensuration - volumes


General rule for calculating volume, calculation of earthwork volume by simpson's 1/3 rule, calculation
of volume by
prismoidal rule, calculation of volumes of large scale earthworks (by spot levels or by contours) .

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0
Readings:
Chapter 15, Mensuration-Volume (pages 340 - 356) Textbook: Irvine, William,FRICS . Surveying for 2
Construction, McGraw-Hill Book Company, ISBN 0-07-707998-2
Revision of lecture notes 1
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Practical Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

Week 13: Survey of existing buildings


Classification of drawings, principles of measuring an existing building , conducting survey of buildings, plotting
survey
of existing buildings.
No of Lectures 4

139
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0
Readings:
Chapter 16, Survey of existing buildings (pages 357 - 364) Textbook: Irvine, William,FRICS . 2
Surveying for Construction, McGraw-Hill Book Company, ISBN 0-07-707998-2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Practical Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 14: Setting out


An introduction to setting out , definition of setting out, personnel involve in setting out and construction , plans and
drawings
associated with setting out, the principles of setting out, setting out procedures, horizontal control techniques,
reference grids,
vertical control techniques, coordinate positioning techniques.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3

Readings:
Chapter 11 Setting out (pages 462 - 504) Surveying for Engineers by John Uren and Bill Price, 5th 2
Edition
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Practical Reports 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

4.0 Assessment
Component Weighting Minimum Level
Assignment 10%
Class Tests 30% 50%
Laboratory 10% 50%
Final Examination 50% 50%
Attendance N/A 75%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:

140
Assessment Date Weighting
Assignment 1 Week 8 5%
Assignment 2 Week 13 5%
Class Test 1 Week 7 15%
Class Test 2 Week 13 15%
Laboratory Week 10 10%

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary to score at least 50% (ie.
50/100) in the final examination. It is highly recommended that students attend all tutorials/labs.

Letter Grade Scale: The following grading scales would be used


Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33 - 5.00
A 85-89 4.00 - 4.27
A- 80-84 3.73 - 3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33 - 3.60
B 70-74 3.00 - 3.27
B- 65-69 2.67 - 2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33 - 2.60
C 55-59 2.00 - 2.27
C- 50-54 1.67 - 1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33 - 1.60
D- 35-39 0.67 - 0.93
E Below 35 0.0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0.0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0.0
CT Credit Transfer 0.0
NV Null & Void for dishonest practice 0.0
Result Withheld/Incomplete
I Assessment 0.0
X Continuing course 0.0
DNC Did not complete 0.0
CP Compassionate Pass 0.0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0.0
PT Pass Terminating 0.0
P Pass 0.0
NP Not Pass 0.0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment

141
The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR).
All students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.
Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps
to get redress of their grievance.

Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and
reassessment. Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to the
HOD. The HOD will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your work
is found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In more
serious cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may even
lead to your expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagiarism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing
service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and
adding proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly your
own work.
6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

142
LECTURER: TBA
OTHER
LECTURERS: TBA

BEC603 Semester : I Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Geomechanics


Credit Points 12

LECTURES: Students are to attend 2 x 2 hours of lectures.


TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour of tutorial.
WORKSHOPS: N/A
LABS: Students are to attend 1 x 3 hours lab for Weeks 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 for the Semester
SELF Students are to spend about 5 -9 hours per week for this unit.
DIRECTED
LEARNING
CONSULTATION Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according to the
TIME following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)

PREREQUISITE: Engineering Mechanics (BEN508)


E- All pertinent information relating to the unit shall be posted on Class Shares. Students are
INFORMATION: required to check their emails regularly for communication from the lecturer

TOTAL Contact Hours


LEARNING
HOURS: 91
Lectures 56
Tutorials 14
Labs/Workshops 21
Self Directed Learning (during term) 87
Self Directed Learning (Mid-Term Break)
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks)
Total Recommended Learning Hours 178

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to the Bachelor of Civil Engineering Programme and hope that you will find it enriching and
interesting. This course will introduce to you the theories and principles of soil mechanics to prepare you to learn
the fundamentals necessary in the design of engineering foundation structures (strip footing, pad footing, mat
foundation, footing on piles ) based on the safe bearing capacity of soil foundation.

1.1 Course Description


This unit will make the student to understand the principle and theories of soil mechanics for preparation of
designing
engineering foundation structures.

143
1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes
On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
1.2.1. Calculate water content, density, unit weight & specific density of soil.
1.2.2. Calculate void ratio, porosity & degree of saturation of soil.
1.2.3. Determine the index properties of soil like particle size distribution, consistency limits, in-situ
density & density index to identify & classify the soil.
1.2.4. Classify the soil under different system to find the suitability in construction of dams, highways, etc.
1.2.5. Determine the seepage of water through the body of earth dams and stability of slopes.
1.2.6. Determine the rate of settlement of a saturated compressible soil.
1.2.7. Calculate uplift pressure under hydraulic structures and against piping.
1.2.8. Calculate ground water flow towards wells and drainage of soil.
1.2.9. Determine the magnitude of vertical stress, effective vertical stress and pore water pressure.
1.2.10. Determine the effect of capillary rise on soil that affect engineering structures.
1.2.11. Calculate the coefficient of compressibility, coefficient of consolidation & degree of consolidation.
1.2.12. Calculate time factor and time of settlement of soil due to compressive load of structures.
1.2.13. Calculate thrust on wall due to backfill & due to uniformly distributed load over backfill.
1.2.14. Calculate bearing capacity, ultimate bearing capacity, maximum safe bearing capacity of soil.
1.2.15. Calculate the shear strength of cohesive and cohesionless soils.

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1. Smith, G.N. Elements of Soil Mechanics (1996)(3rd Edition), Crosby, Lockwood.
Staples, ASIN 0258969490.
2.2.2. Craig, Robert F (1995), Soil Mechanics (5th Edition), Rutledge (also E & FN. Spoon). ISBN 0412395908.

2.2 Supplementary Materials


2.2.1. Soil Mechanics by M.J. Smith, 4th Edition, ISBN 0-582-03380-2
2.2.2. Alison, I.S. and Patmer, D.F., Geology, the science of the changing Earth, McGraw-Hill Inc., New York.

2.3 Class Shares


Lecture Notes and Laboratory Manual

3.0 Course Content and Reading References

Week 1: Basic characteristics of soil


The importance of soil as an engineering material. A brief history of the development of Soil Mechanics.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Chapter 1 ( pages 1-6) of Soil Mechanics by R.F. Craig ISBN 0-419-22450-5, 6th Edition. 2

144
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5
Week 2: Basic characteristics of soil
Description of particle size distribution in soil samples. The triangular classification system for soil types. Some
engineering applications of particle size distribution curves. Methods of determining particle size distribution by
sieve analysis & hydrometer analysis.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 1 pages 6-37 of Soil Mechanics by R.F. Craig ISBN 0-419-22450-5, 6th Edition. 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6


Week 3: Different properties of soil
The Nature of Soil. Phases of Soil. Definitions of void ratio, Degree of Saturation, Mass Density, Specific Gravity,
etc.
Properties of Soil.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
The Nature of Soils (Chapter 1.1 pages 1-6); Particle Size Analysis (Chapter 1.2 pages 6-8); Plasticity 2
of Fine-Grained Soils (Chapter 1.3 pages 8-10); Soil description & classification (Chapter 1.4 pages 10-
24); Phase relationships (Chapter 1.5 pages 24-28); Soil compaction (Chapter 1.6 pages 28-36)Soil
Mechanics by R.F. Craig ISBN 0-419-22450-5, 6th Edition.

Soil Properties (Chapter 1.7 pages 22-23); Void ratio and porosity (Chapter 1.7.1 page 23); Degree of 2
Saturation (Chapter 1.7.2 pages 23-24); Particle Specific Gravity (Chapter 1.7.3 pages 24-25); Density
and Unit weight (Chapter 1.7.4 pages 26-30); Relative Density (Chapter 1.7.5 page 30); Soil physical
relations (Chapter 1.8 pages 30-31) of Elements of Soil Mechanics, 7th Edition by G.N.Smith an Ian
G.N. Smith ISBN 0-632-04126-9
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

145
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7
Week 4: Consistency limits
Indices of Plasticity: Definition of Liquid Limit: Plastic Limit and Shrinkage Limit. Apparatus and methods for
determining the values of the plasticity indices. Use of the cone penetrometer and the Casagrande apparatus.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Liquid Limit and plastic limit; plasticity index; liquidity index; shrinkage limit; (Chapter 1.4 pages 10-12) 2
Determination of liquid & plastic limits using Cone Penetrometer Method (definitive method), One-point
cone penetrometer method and method using the casagrande apparatus ( Chapter 1.4 pages 12-14); of
Elements of Soil Mechanics, 7th Edition by G.N.Smith an Ian G.N. Smith ISBN 0-632-04126-9

Revision of lecture notes 2


Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6


Week 5:Soil classification system
Total classification systems. Field methods for soil classification. The unified classification system.
Plasticity charts. The British System of Soil classification. Engineering Characteristics of Soils.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Soil Classification in the field (Chapter 1.4.1 page 6) Soil classification in the Laboratory ( Chapter 1.4.2 1
pages 6-7); Soil classification system: The British Soil Classification System (BSCS) (Chapter 1.6.1
pages 15-21) of Elements of Soil Mechanics, 7th Edition by G.N.Smith an Ian G.N. Smith ISBN 0-632-
04126-9
The British Soil Classification System(Chapter 1 pages 14-18); The Unified Classification System 1
(Chapter 1 pages 18-22) of Soil Mechanics by R.F. Craig ISBN 0-419-22450-5, 6th Edition.
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5


Week 6: Soil permeability

146
Types of water retained in soils. Aquifers & aquacultures. Water tables and the capillary fringe. Salt water
intrusion and
the circular island model. Permeability of Soils. Darcy's Law and soil permeability. Definition of the Coefficient of
Permeability K. Permeability testing by the constant and falling head methods. One Dimensional Groundwater
Movement. Well tests. Typical K values for soils. Effects of temperature.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0
Readings:
Soil Water, Permeability & Flow (Chapter 2 pages 34-81) of Elements of Soil Mechanics, 7th Edition by 3
G.N.Smith an Ian G.N. Smith ISBN 0-632-04126-9

Revision of lecture notes 2


Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7


Week 7:Pore water pressure
Mass and weight of soils. Effects of pore water pressure on soil skeleton strength.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0
Readings:
Effective Stress (Chapter 3 pages 81-100) of Soil Mechanics by R.F. Craig ISBN 0-419-22450-5, 6th 2
Edition.
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 8: Effective stress in soil


The effective stress concept. Calculations and Mohr's circle representation.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0

147
Readings:
Shear Strength (Chapter 4 pages 103-151) of Soil Mechanics by R.F. Craig ISBN 0-419-22450-5, 6th 5
Edition.
Shear Strength of Soil (Chapter 3 pages 82-130) of Elements of Soil Mechanics, 7th Edition by
G.N.Smith an Ian G.N. Smith ISBN 0-632-04126-9

Revision of lecture notes 2


Solving Problems 0
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8


Week 9: Phreatic line of Earth Dam
Determination of discharge through an Earth Dam using Flow net. The phreatic line of flow in an Earth Dam by
Casagrande Method.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3

Readings:
Lateral Earth Pressure (Chapter 6 pages 179-246) of Soil Mechanics by R.F. Craig ISBN 0-419-22450- 3
5, 6th Edition.
Lateral Earth Pressure (Chapter 6 pages 196-238) of Elements of Soil Mechanics, 7th Edition by 2
G.N.Smith an Ian G.N. Smith ISBN 0-632-04126-9

Revision of lecture notes 0


Solving Problems 0
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6


Week 10: Soil consolidation
Description of consolidation of a soil. Theoritical models of consolidation. Settlement. Oedometer test.
Pre-consolidation and its effects on subsequent performance. Measurement related to consolidation.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3

Readings:
Consolidation Theory (Chapter 7 pages 248-299) of Soil Mechanics by R.F. Craig ISBN 0-419-22450- 3
5, 6th Edition.
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1

148
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7


Week 11: Bearing capacity of shallow foundation
Determination of ultimate bearing capacity, allowable bearing capacity of shallow foundation.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0
Readings:
Bearing Capacity (Chapter 8 pages 302-372) of Soil Mechanics by R.F. Craig ISBN 0-419-22450-5, 3
6th Edition.
Bearing Capacity of Soil (Chapter 8 pages 269-310) of Elements of Soil Mechanics, 7th Edition by 2
G.N.Smith an Ian G.N. Smith ISBN 0-632-04126-9
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 9


Week 12 : Shear strength of soil
Shear strength parameters of soil, the angle of internal friction of coarse grained soil, cohesion and angle of
internal
friction of fine grained soil.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0
Readings:
Chapter 4 (pages 103 - 151) of Soil Mechanics by R.F. Craig , 5th Edition 2
Revision of lecture notes 1
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5


Week 13: Triaxial apparatus
The triaxial apparatus for testing the shear strength of cohesionless and cohesive soils.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

149
0
Readings:
Chapter 4 (pages 103 - 151) of Soil Mechanics by R.F. Craig , 5th Edition 3
Revision of lecture notes 1
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5


Week 14. Stability of slopes
Stability of slopes of roadway embankment by ordinary method of slices.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Stability of Slopes (Chapter 9 pages 376-401) of Soil Mechanics by R.F. Craig ISBN 0-419-22450-5,
6th Edition.
Stability of Slopes (Chapter 5 pages 151-185) of Elements of Soil Mechanics, 7th Edition by G.N.Smith
an Ian G.N. Smith ISBN 0-632-04126-9

Revision of lecture notes 3


Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

4.0 Assessment
Minimum
Component Weighting Level
Assignment 15%
Class Tests 25% 50%
Laboratory 10% 50%
Final
50%
Examination 50%
Attendance N/A 75%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting
Assignment 1 Week 8 7.5%
Assignment 2 Week 13 7.5%

150
Class Test 1 Week 7 13%
Class Test 2 Week 13 12%
Laboratary (x7) Week 13 10%

Title of Laboratory Experiments: Date to be


performed
a)Sieve Analysis Week 6
b)Moisture Content Week 7
c) Attenberg Limits Week 9
d) Liquid Limit Week 10
f) Constant & Falling Head Permeability Test Week 11
f) Consolidation Test Week 12
g)Undrained Triaxial Test Week 13

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary to score at least 50% (ie.
50/100) in the final examination. It is highly recommended that students attend all tutorials/labs also.

Letter Grade Scale: The following grading scales would be used


Marks Grade
Point
Grade Average
A+ 90-100 4.33 - 5.00
A 85-89 4.00 - 4.27
A- 80-84 3.73 - 3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33 - 3.60
B 70-74 3.00 - 3.27
B- 65-69 2.67 - 2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33 - 2.60
C 55-59 2.00 - 2.27
C- 50-54 1.67 - 1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33 - 1.60
D- 35-39 0.67 - 0.93
E Below 35 0.0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0.0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0.0
CT Credit Transfer 0.0
NV Null & Void for dishonest practice 0.0
I Result Withheld/Incomplete Assessment 0.0
X Continuing course 0.0
DNC Did not complete 0.0
CP Compassionate Pass 0.0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0.0

151
PT Pass Terminating 0.0
P Pass 0.0
NP Not Pass 0.0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment


The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR).
All students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.

Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps
to get redress of their grievance.
Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and
reassessment. Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to
the HOD. The HOD will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your
work is found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In
more serious cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may
even lead to your expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagiarism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing
service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and
adding proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly your
own work.

6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

152
LECTURER: TBA
OTHER
LECTURERS: TBA

BEC604 Semester : I Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Hydraulics 1


Credit Points 12

LECTURES: Students are to attend 2 x 2 hours of lectures.


TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour of tutorial.
WORKSHOPS: N/A
LABS: Students are to attend 1 x 3 hours lab for Weeks 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11 of the semester
SELF Students are to spend about 5 - 8 hours per week for this unit.
DIRECTED
LEARNING
CONSULTATION Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according to the
TIME following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)
PREREQUISITE: Engineering Computation 2 (BEN601)
E- All pertinent information relating to the unit shall be posted on Class Shares. Students are
INFORMATION: required to check their emails regularly for communication from the lecturer

TOTAL Contact Hours


LEARNING
HOURS: 91
Lectures 56
Tutorials 14
Labs/Workshops 21
Self Directed Learning (during term) 89
Self Directed Learning (Mid-Term Break)
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks)
Total Recommended Learning Hours 180

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to the Bachelor of Civil Engineering Programme and hope that you will find it enriching and
interesting. This course will introduce the student the basic theories and principles of fluid at rest and fluid in
motion including the study of the principles of dimensional analysis and hydraulic similitude in preparation for
him/her to design different water engineering structures.

1.1 Course Description

153
This unit deals with the application of fluid at rest, fluid in motion and the dynamic effects of forces created by the
moving liquid. The syllabus of the unit are: study of total hydrostatic pressure in plane and curved surface,
bouyant force, stability of floating bodies, dimensional analysis and hydraulic similitude Buckingham Pi Theorem,
application of different hydraulic model laws (Reynold Model Law, Weber Model Law, Mach Model Law), pipeline
system analysis including minor losses in pipe friction losses in pipes, pipe in series, pipes in parallel, pipe
network analysis by Hardy Cross Method and Linearization Method; analysis of net positive suction head (NPSH)
and pump selection; steady open channel flow including analysis of best economic trapezoidal section critical
depth of flow , rapidly varying flow, hydraulic jump, gradually varying flow, classification of surface profile, and
analysis of backwater profile by direct step and numerical integration methods.

1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes


On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
1.2.1. Describe the fluid state and define the properties of fluid.
1.2.2. Calculate intensity of pressures, total hydrostatic pressure and centers of pressure in plane and curved
surface.
1.2.3. Apply Archimedes principle in analysis of floating bodies.
1.2.4. Calculate the location of the metacentric height of simple floating body.
1.2.5. Choose a suitable control volume and apply the control volume equation.
1.2.6. Distinguish between laminar and turbulent pipe flows.
1.2.7. Calculate the discharge in orifice, venturi meter and pitot tube.
1.2.8. Use the Barr formula to calculate coefficient of friction for head loss computation in pipes.
1.2.9. Use the Darcy and Weisbach equation in calculation of friction loss in pipeline.
1.2.10. Use the Colebrook-White equation for design of uniform pipeline.
1.2.11. Apply the three fundamental laws (conservation of mass, conservation of energy and conservation of
momentum in analysis of pipe law problems)

1.2.12. Apply Bernoulli's equation to a wide range of fluid problems.


1.2.13. Draw the graphical interpretation of total energy in pipeline. (Energy gradeline and hydraulic gradeline)
1.2.14. Calculate distribution of discharge in pipes in parallel, pipes in series and three reservoir problem.
1.2.15. Apply the principle of Hardy Cross method in pipe network analysis.
1.2.16. Apply the forces of impact of jets to the flat and curved surfaces.
1.2.17. Derive and understand the significance of the dimensional analysis and hydraulic similitude.
1.2.18. Use results from hydraulic models to predict prototype behaviour.
1.2.19. Estimate skin friction and form drag forces on solid bodies.
1.2.20. Calculate normal and critical depths in prismatic channels.
1.2.21. Apply the principle of hydraulic jump analysis in design of water engineering structures.
1.2.22. Sketch and identify the open channel flow surface profiles.
1.2.23. Sketch surface profiles for combinations of channels and hydraulic controls.
1.2.24. Compute surface profiles for simple situations including location of jumps.
1.2.25. Describe different types of pumps and turbine and briefly describe their operation.
1.2.26. Select a pump for a duty and check for the possibility of cavitation.

2.0 Resources

154
2.1 Text
2.1.1 Hydraulics in Civil and Environmental Engineering, 4th Edition [2004] by Andrew Chadwick and Martin
Borthwick , ISBN 0-415-306094
2.1.2 Solving Problems in Fluid Mechanics, 3rd Edition, Volume 1 by Douglas, Gasiorek and Swaffield, Prentice
Hall, ISBN 0-582-41476-8

2.1.3 Civil Engineering Hydraulics by C. Nalluri &n R.E. Featherstone, 4th Edition,ISBN 13:978-0-632-055514-2

2.2 Supplementary Materials


2.2.1. Hydraulics by Horace W. King, Chester O. Wisler and James G. Woodburn, 5th Edition, John Wiley & Sons
Incorporated.
2.2.2 .Understanding Hydraulics by Les Hamill, 2nd Edition, ISBN 13 978-0- 333-77906 -4

2.3 Class Shares


Lecture Notes and Laboratory Manual

3.0 Course Content and Reading References

Week 1: Description of Fluid State


Liquids and gases. Properties of fluids. Density, Viscosity, Bulk Modulus, Surface Tension. Units and dimensions
of fluid properties. Study of the principle of dimensional homogeneity.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Introduction (pages 1-8 ) Textbook - Solving Problems in Fluid Mechanics (Volume 1) 3rd Edition 2
J.F. Douglas and R.D. Matthews.
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

Week 2 : Intensity of Pressure


Intensity of pressure , variation of pressure with depth of fluid , Pascal Law.
Pressure measurement using manometers and the capillary effects of fluid.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:

155
Chapter 1- (pages 9-26 ) Textbook - Solving Problems in Fluid Mechanics (Volume 1) 3rd Edition 3
J.F. Douglas and R.D. Matthews. (Textbook can be found at FNU Samabula Library)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 3: Hydrostatic Pressure on Surfaces


Total pressure on Plane surfaces . Location of position of center of pressure with respect to center of gravity.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 3 (pages 41 - 50) Textbook - Hydraulics by Horace W. King, Chester O. Wisler and 1
James G. woodburn, 5th Edition , John Wiley and Sons(Textbook not in FNU Library).

Chapter 2 (pages28-40); Textbook - Solving Problems in Fluid Mechanics, Volume 1 3rd Edition by 2
J.F. Douglas and R.D. Matthews

Revision of lecture notes 2


Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 4: Hydrostatic Pressure on Curved Surfaces


Curved Surfaces and Parabolic Surfaces
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0
Readings:
Chapter 2 (pages40-50); Textbook - Solving Problems in Fluid Mechanics, Volume 1 3rd Edition by 1
J.F. Douglas and R.D. Matthews
Chapter 3 (pages 51 - 54) Textbook - Hydraulics by Horace W. King, Chester O. Wisler and 1
James G. woodburn, 5th Edition , John Wiley and Sons.
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

156
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 5: Bouyancy and Stability of Floating Bodies


Principle of Archimedes; stability and metacenter, stability of floating cone.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0
Readings:
Chapter 3 (pages 51 -58); Textbook - Solving Problems in Fluid Mechanics, Volume 1 3rd Edition 1
by J.F. Douglas and R.D. Matthews
Chapter 3 (pages 66 - 75) Textbook - Hydraulics by Horace W. King, Chester O. Wisler and 1
James G. woodburn, 5th Edition , John Wiley and Sons
Revision of lecture notes 1
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

Week 6: Dams
Determination of different forces acting dams, hydraulic analysis of the stability of dams

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0

Readings:
Chapter 3 (pages 57- 61) Textbook - Hydraulics by Horace W. King, Chester O. Wisler and James 1
G. woodburn, 5th Edition , John Wiley and Sons
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5

Week 7: Flow in Pipes and Closed Conduit and Flow of Incompressible in Pipeline
Theory of Laminar and Turbulent flow in pipes including internal shear stress and velocity distribution.
Definition of the hydraulic gradeline. The Hagen-Poiseuille equation. Friction factor and the Darcy-Weisbach
equation. Osborne Reynold's number. Minor and major losses in pipes; the Bernoulli's equation.
Resistance in circular pipeline flowing full;Design of uniform pipeline, pipes in series and pipes in parallel.

157
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0
Readings:
Chapter 4(pages 91- 121) Textbook - Hydraulics in Civil and environmental engineering by A. 2
Chadwick, J. Morfettand M. Borthwick, 4th Edition. Textbook in FNU Library.
Chapter 4 (pages 91-120) Civil Engineering Hydraulics by C. Nalluri and R.E. Featherstone, 4th 2
Edition. (Textbook in FNU Library)
Revision of lecture notes 1
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 8: Pump-pipeline System Analysis and Design


Hydraulic gradient in pump- pipeline systems, multiple pump systems, suction lift limitations.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0
Readings:
Chapter 6 (pages 154 - 176) Civil Engineering Hydraulics by C. Nalluri and R.E. Featherstone, 4th 2
Edition.
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 9: Pipe Network Analysis


Analysis of pipe network by Hardy Cross method and by Linear theory method
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3

Readings:
Chapter 5 (pages 121 - 153) Civil Engineering Hydraulics by C. Nalluri &n R.E. Featherstone, 4th 3
Edition.
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

158
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 10: Open Channel Flow


Natural and artificial channel and their properties,Laminar and turbulent flow in open channel, uniform flow and
compound channel.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 5 (pages 122 - 136) Textbook - Hydraulics in Civil and environmental engineering by A. 2
Chadwick, J. Morfettand M. Borthwick, 4th Edition.
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 11: Non Uniform Flow in Open Channel


Rapidly varied flow : alternate stages of flow in open channel , critical depth and specific energy , hydraulic jump,
derivation of the conjugate depth equation, the venturi flume. Analysis of gradually varied flow.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0
Readings:
Chapter 5(pages 138- 184) Textbook - Hydraulics in Civil and environmental engineering by A. 3
Chadwick, J. Morfettand M. Borthwick, 4th Edition.
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 12. The Law of Conservation of Momentum


Application of the control volume equation to problems involving momentum. Calculation of force due to an
impinging jet, deflector vanes, expansions, contractions and bends. Other applications of the momentum
equation.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1

159
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 2(pages 36- 42) Textbook - Hydraulics in Civil and environmental engineering by A. 2
Chadwick, J. Morfettand M. Borthwick, 4th Edition.
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 13: Turbo machinery (Centrifugal Pump and Pelton Turbine)


Determination of radial, tangential and peripheral velocity of the pump impeller. The exit angle of the impeller
blade of the pump. The principle of net positive suction head. Pump and pipeline analysis to determine the
operating point of the pump. The principle of cavitation in pump.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Chapter 7 (pages 202 - 210) Textbook - Hydraulics in Civil and environmental engineering by A. 2
Chadwick, J. Morfettand M. Borthwick, 4th Edition.
Revision of lecture notes 1
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Laboratory Report 1

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

14. Dimensional Analysis and hydraulic similitude


Dimensional analysis using the principle of Pi- Buckingham theorem. Application of Reynold's model law, Froude
model law, Weber model law and Euler's model law in hydraulic similitude between the model and the
prototype.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 11(pages 371- 397) Textbook - Hydraulics in Civil and environmental engineering by A. 4
Chadwick, J. Morfettand M. Borthwick, 4th Edition.
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Laboratory Report 0

160
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 10

4.0 Assessment
Minimum
Component Weighting Level
Assignment 15%
Class Tests 25% 50%
Laboratory 10% 50%
Final
50%
Examination 50%
Attendance N/A 75%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting
Assignment 1 Week 8 7.5%
Assignment 2 Week 13 7.5%
Class Test 1 Week 7 13%
Class Test 2 Week 13 12%
Laboratary (x7) Week 13 10%

Title of Laboratory Experiments: Date to be


performed
a) Bourdon gauge calibration Week 4
b)Total Hydrostatic pressure on plane surfaces Week 5
c) Stability of floating Bodies Week 6
d) Fluid friction in pipes Week 7
e) Venturi and Orifice meter Week 8
f) Thin plate weirs Week 9
g)Hydraulic jump Week 10

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary to score at least 50% (ie.
50/100) in the final examination. It is highly recommended that students attend all tutorials/labs also.

Letter Grade Scale: The following grading scales would be used


Marks Grade Point
Grade Average
A+ 90-100 4.33 - 5.00
A 85-89 4.00 - 4.27
A- 80-84 3.73 - 3.93

161
B+ 75-79 3.33 - 3.60
B 70-74 3.00 - 3.27
B- 65-69 2.67 - 2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33 - 2.60
C 55-59 2.00 - 2.27
C- 50-54 1.67 - 1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33 - 1.60
D- 35-39 0.67 - 0.93
E Below 35 0.0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0.0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0.0
CT Credit Transfer 0.0
NV Null & Void for dishonest practice 0.0
I Result Withheld/Incomplete Assessment 0.0
X Continuing course 0.0
DNC Did not complete 0.0
CP Compassionate Pass 0.0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0.0
PT Pass Terminating 0.0
P Pass 0.0
NP Not Pass 0.0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment


The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR).
All students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.

Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps
to get redress of their grievance.
Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and
reassessment. Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to
the HOD. The HOD will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your
work is found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In
more serious cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may
even lead to your expulsion from the university.

162
Actions that constitute plagiarism
1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing
service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and
adding proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly
your own work.
6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

163
LECTURER: TBA
OTHER
LECTURERS: TBA

BEC605 Semester : I Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Structural Mechanics for


Engineers Credit Points 12

LECTURES: Students are to attend 2 x 2 hours of lectures.


TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour of tutorial.
WORKSHOPS: N/A
LABS: N/A
SELF Students are to spend about 6- 9 hours per week for this unit.
DIRECTED
LEARNING
CONSULTATIO Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according to the
N TIME following day and time; (Day & Time: TBA)
PREREQUISITE: Engineering Mechanics (BEN508)
E- All pertinent information relating to the unit shall be posted on Class Shares.
INFORMATION: Students are required to check their emails regularly for communication from the
lecturer

TOTAL Contact Hours


LEARNING
HOURS: 70
Lectures 56
Tutorials 14
Labs/Workshops 0
Self Directed Learning (during term) 110
Self Directed Learning (Mid-Term Break)
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks)
Total Recommended Learning Hours 180

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to the Bachelor of Civil Engineering Programme and hope that you will find it enriching and
interesting. This unit will introduce the student the necessary solid mechanics and principles for preparation in the
design of engineering structures

1.1 Course Description


This unit will introduce the student the necessary solid mechanics theories and principles for preparation in the
design of engineering structures.

1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes


On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:

164
1.2.1. Mastery of plotting the shear and moment diagrams of statically determinate and
indeterminate beams and frames.
1.2.2. Sketch beam deflection diagrams for a wide range of loading and support conditions.
1.2.3. Calculate deflection by double integration method.
1.2.4. Prove the Moment Area Theorems and apply to simple cases.
1.2.5. Calculate deflections using Virtual Work Method.
1.2.6. Analyze statically indeterminate members using three moment equation.
1.2.7. Analyze statically indeterminate members using the method of moment distribution.
1.2.8. Analyze statically indeterminate members using the principle of Slope Deflection Equation.
1.2.9. Analyze statically indeterminate members using the method of consistent deformation.
1.2.10. Explain the concept of the "Rolling Load" and the term "Influence Line"
1.2.11. Calculate values and draw an influence line diagram.

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1. Strength of Materials by Ferdinand L. Singer & Andrew Pytel, 3rd Edition [1982], ISBN 0-06-046229-9
2.2.2 Structural Analysis by R.C. Hibbeler, 6th Edition, ISBN 978-81-317-2141-4
2.2.3. Structural Mechanics by Hassan Al Nageim, F. Durka, W. Morgan., & D. Williams , 7th Edition

2.2 Supplementary Materials


2.2.1. Durka, Frank:Morgan, W:Williams, D.T. (1980). Structural Mechanics (ELBS Edition),
Longman Group, Ltd. London.
2.2.2. Structural Analysis by Harold Laursen, 3rd Edition.

2.3 Class Shares


Lecture Notes

3.0 Course Content and Reading References

Week 1: Introduction
Introduction to the study of Structural mechanics. Idealisation of structures. Decomposition and the free-body
diagram approach,
review of calculation of reactions, shear force and bending moment in beams. Shear Foce and Bending Moment
Diagrams.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Introduction to Structural Mechanics (Chapter 1 page 3 ); Beam reactions (Chapter 5 pages 80-89); 1
Shear Force & Bending Moment & shear force & bending moment diagrams (Chapter 8 pages 144 3
- 165)

165
of Structural Mechanics by Hassan Al Nageim, F. Durka, W. Morgan., & D. Williams , 7th Edition.
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 2: Deflections
Deflection Diagrams/Elastic Curves

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Deflection (Chapter 8, pages 270 - 272), Textbook: Structural Analysis by R.C. Hibbeler, 5th Edition 1
ISBN 0-13-098460-4
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 3: Double Integration Method


Finding deflection of simply supported beams by Double Integration Method. Derivation of formula and principle of
Double
Integration Method. Method of finding beam deflection.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Double Integration Method (Chapter 8, pages 298 - 303), Textbook: Structural Analysis by R.C. Hibbeler 2
ISBN 978-81-317-2141-4
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 9

Week 4: Area Moment Method

166
Finding deflection of simply supported beams by area moment method. Derivation of formula and principle of Area
Moment
Method. Method of finding beam deflection.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Area Moment Method (Chapter 8, pages 304 - 313), Textbook: Structural Analysis by R.C. Hibbeler 3
ISBN 978-81-317-2141-4
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 9

Week 5: Conjugate Beam Method


Determining the displacement/deflection and slope at a point on the elastic curve of a beam using Conjugate
Beam Method.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Conjugate Beam Method (Chapter 8,pages 289-296) of Structural Analysis by R.C. Hibbeler ISBN 2
978-81-317-2141-4, 5th Edition.
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 6: Virtual Work Method


Finding deflection of beams and trussess by Virtual Work Method. Examples of Deflections calculations for beams
and frames.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:

167
Principle of Virtual Work (Chapter 9, pages 334-336); Method of Virtual Work: Trussess (Chapter 9, 2
pages 336-342); Method of Virtual Work: Beams & Frames (Chapter 9, pages 343-354) of
Structural Analysis by R.C. Hibbeler ISBN 978-81-317-2141-4, 6th Edition.

Revision of lecture notes 3


Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 7: Three-Moment Equation


Introduction to the Three Moment Equation Method. Outline of the general principle including definitions.
Application of the
Three Moment Equation Method to analysis of statically indeterminate beams. Mid Semestral Test.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Determinacy & Stability (Chapter 2, page 47);Statically Indeterminate Structures (Chapter 10, page 1
383) of Structural Analysis by R.C. Hibbeler ISBN 978-81-317-2141-4, 6th Edition.

Revision of lecture notes 4


Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 8: Slope Deflection Method


Finding Fixed-End-Moments by Slope Deflection Method. Derivation of the governing equations. Application to the
Analysis of Beams
and Frames.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Displacement Method of Analysis: Slope Deflection Equations (Chapter 11 page 433);Displacement 2
Method of Analysis: General Procedures (Chapter 11,page 433-435); Slope Deflection Equations
(Chapter 11, pages 435-440); Analysis of Beams (Chapter 11, pages 441-447); Analysis of Frames:
No Sideways (Chapter 11, pages 449-453) of Structural Analysis by R.C. Hibbeler ISBN 978-81-
317-2141-4, 6th Edition.

168
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 9: Moment Distribution Method


Introduction to the Moment Distribution Method. Outline of the general principle including definitions. Application of
the
moment distribution method to indeterminate beams and frames.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Displacement Method of Analysis: Moment Distribution (Chapter 12 page 469);General Principles & 3
Definition (Chapter 12, page 469-472); Moment Distribution for Beams (Chapter 12, pages 473-
481); Stiffness Factor Modifications (Chapter 12, pages 482-487);Moment Distribution for Frames:
No Sideways (Chapter 12, pages 488-489) of Structural Analysis by R.C. Hibbeler ISBN 978-81-
317-2141-4, 6th Edition.

Reading lecture notes 3


Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 9

Week 10: Method of Consitent Deformation


Analyzing indeterminate structures using Method of Consistent Deformation. Derivation of the governing
equations.
Application to the Analysis of Beams.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:

169
Analysis of Statically Indeterminate Structures by the Foce Method (Chapter 10 page 383);Statically 2
Indeterminate Structures; Advantages & Disadvantages; Method of Analysis; Force Method;
Displacement Method (Chapter 10, pages 383-385); Force Method of Analysis: General Procedure;
Procedure for Analysis (Chapter 10, pages 386-389); Maxwell's Theorem of Reciprocal
Displacements: Betti's Law (Chapter 10, pages 390-391);Force Method of Analysis: Beams:
(Chapter 10, pages 391-399); Force Method of Analysis: Frames (Chapter 10, pages 400-403);
Force Method of Analysis: Trussess (Chapter 10, pages 404-406) of Structural Analysis by R.C.
Hibbeler ISBN 978-81-317-2141-4, 6th Edition.

Revision of lecture notes 3


Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 11: Influence Lines


Define the term Influence Line. Work through examples of the generation of influence line diagrams for statically
determinate structures. Determine maximum influence at a point for complex combined loading conditions.
Determination
of absolute maximum moment caused by moving loads passing a highway bridge.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Influence Lines: (Chapter 6, pages 203-209);Influence Lines for Beams (Chapter 6, pages 211-213); 2
Maximum influence at a point due to a series of concentrated loads (Chapter 6, pages 230-239); Absolute
Maximum Shear & Moment (Chapter 6, pages 240-243) of Structural Analysis by R.C. Hibbeler ISBN 978-81-
317-2141-4, 6th Edition.
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 12: Archs and Cables


Cables & Arches. Basic structural analysis of suspended cables and two & three hinged arch.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0

170
Readings:
Cables and Arches: (Chapter 5 page 179); Cables (Chapter 5, pages 179-180); Cable Subjected to 2
concentrated loads (Chapter 5, pages 180-181); Cable subjected to a uniform distributed load
(Chapter 5, pages 182-187); Arches (Chapter 5, page 188); Three-hinged Arch (Chapter 5 pages
189-193) of Structural Analysis by R.C. Hibbeler ISBN 978-81-317-2141-4, 6th Edition.

Revision of lecture notes 2


Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 13: Retaining Wall


Basic stability analysis of Retaining Wall.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Retaining Walls:Introduction (Chapter 8, pages 353-354); Gravity & Cantilever Walls: Proportioning 3
Retaining Walls (Chapter 8, page 355); Application of Lateral Earth Pressure Theories to Design
(Chapter 8, pages 356-357); Stability of Retaining Walls (Chapter 8, pages 358-359); Check for
Overturning (Chapter 8, pages 359-361); Check for Sliding along the base (Chapter 8, pages 361-
363); Check for Bearing Capacity failure (Chapter 8, pages 364-374); Lateral Earth Pressure:
Introduction( Chapter 7, pages 308-309) Lateral Pressure at rest (Chapter 7, pages 309-311);
Rankine Active Earth Pressure (Chapter 7, pages 312-315); A General Case for Rankine Active
Pressure: Granular Backfill; Granular backfill with vertical back face (Chapter 7, pages 315-
322);Passive Pressure: Rankine Passive Earth Pressure (Chapter 7, pages 338-344) Rankine
Passive Earth Pressure: Inclined Backfill (Chapter 7, pages 344-345) of Principles of Foundation
Engineering by Braja M. Das ISBN -13: 978-0-495-08246-0, 6th Edition.

Revision of lecture notes 3


Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 9

Week 14: Dams

171
Analysis of Stability of Dams
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Solution to Problems in Hydraulics (pages 65 - 86) by Venancio I. Besavilla 2
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

4.0 Assessment
Component Weighting Minimum Level
Assignment 20%
Class Tests 30% 50%
Final
50%
Examination 50%
Attendance N/A 75%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting
Assignment 1 Week 7 10%
Assignment 2 Week 15 10%
Class Test 1 Week 7 15%
Class Test 2 Week 15 15%

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary to score at least 50% (ie.
50/100) in the final examination. It is highly recommended that students attend all tutorials/labs also.

Letter Grade Scale: The following grading scales would be used


Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33 - 5.00
A 85-89 4.00 - 4.27
A- 80-84 3.73 - 3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33 - 3.60
B 70-74 3.00 - 3.27
B- 65-69 2.67 - 2.93

172
C+ 60-64 2.33 - 2.60
C 55-59 2.00 - 2.27
C- 50-54 1.67 - 1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33 - 1.60
D- 35-39 0.67 - 0.93
E Below 35 0.0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0.0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0.0
CT Credit Transfer 0.0
NV Null & Void for dishonest practice 0.0
I Result Withheld/Incomplete Assessment 0.0
X Continuing course 0.0
DNC Did not complete 0.0
CP Compassionate Pass 0.0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0.0
PT Pass Terminating 0.0
P Pass 0.0
NP Not Pass 0.0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment


The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR).
All students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.
Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps
to get redress of their grievance.

Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and
reassessment. Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to the
HOD. The HOD will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your work
is found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In more
serious cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may even
lead to your expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagiarism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing
service.

173
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and
adding proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly your
own work.
6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

174
LECTURER: TBA
OTHER
LECTURERS: TBA

BEC606 Semester : I Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Engineering


Geology Credit Points 12

LECTURES: Students are to attend 2 x 2 hours of lectures.


TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour of tutorial.
WORKSHOPS: N/A
LABS: N/A
SELF DIRECTED Students are to spend about 4- 8 hours per week for this unit.
LEARNING
CONSULTATION Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according to the
TIME following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)
PREREQUISITE: Engineering Computation 2 (BEN601)
E- All pertinent information relating to the course shall be posted on Class Shares. Students are
INFORMATION: required to check their emails regularly for communication from the lecturer

TOTAL Contact Hours


LEARNING
HOURS: 82
Lectures 56
Tutorials 14
Labs/Workshops 0
Field Trips 12
Self Directed Learning (during term) 87
Self Directed Learning (Mid-Term Break) 5
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks) 6
Total Recommended Learning Hours 180

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to the Bachelor of Civil Engineering Programme and hope that you will find it enriching and
interesting. This unit will introduce to you the scientific theory of origin of the earth, plate tectonic, earthquake,
volcanic eruptions, tsunami, tropical depressions, minerals, groundwater and other scientific geological
principles needed in the study of Civil Engineering.

1.1 Course Description


This unit will introduce to the student the scientific theory of origin of the earth, earthquake, volcanic eruptions,
tsunami, tropical depressions, minerals, groundwater and other scientific principle needed in the study of

175
Civil Engineering.

1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes


As a result of successfully completing this unit, students will be able to:
1.2.1. Explain the roll of geology and the geologist in Civil Engineering work.
1.2.2. Explain the scientific formation of the Earth 4.5 billion years ago.
1.2.3. Explain the principle of continental drift and Plate Tectonics.
1.2.4. Explain the characteristics of Earth Interior.
1.2.5. Explain the causes of Earthquakes.
1.2.6. Describe how a volcano is formed.
1.2.7. Explain plate boundary motion and its relation to volcanic activity.
1.2.8. Explain what a site investigation is intend to achieve.
1.2.9. Discuss exploration methods for underground water, oil, gas, etc.
1.2.10. Discuss topics in structural geology e.g. types of fold etc.
1.2.11. Relate geology to engineering works such as dams, buildings, bridges, etc.
1.2.12. Assess and select sites for dams, roads, bridges, buildings; and conservation of soil, water
energy and other earth resources.
1.2.13. Evaluate the hazards that exist naturally and those that are caused by human activities.
1.2.14. List the main mineral types and indicate their uses.
1.2.15. Describe a range of minerals and their exploration techniques.
1.2.16. Describe how igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks are formed.
1.2.17. Discuss the chemistry of rocks.
1.2.18. Discuss the movement of groundwater.
1.2.19. Describe geomorphologic actions of water, wind and ice and explain how they affect
landforms.
1.2.20. Different alternative sources of renewable energy known by man.

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1 Fundamentals of Geology , 2nd Edition [1993] by Carla Montgomery,ISBN 0-697 -09806-0

2.2 Supplementary Materials


2.2.1. Alison, I.S. and Patmer, D.F., Geology, the science of the changing Earth, McGraw-Hill Inc.,
New York
2.2.2. Geology, An Introduction to principles of Physical and Historical Geology (3rd Edition) by
Richard M. Pearl, Barnes and Noble, Inc., New York
2.2.3. Physical Geology (Exploring the Earth) 6th Edition by James S. Monroe, Reed Wicander and
Richard W. Hazlett: ISBN-13:978-0-495-01148-5
2.3 Class Shares

176
3.0 Course Content and Reading References
Week 1: Introduction
Geology as a discipline, the Earth within the universe, the early solar system, early atmosphere and oceans

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Chapter 1: An Invitation to Geology, pages 3 - 7
Textbook: Fundamentals of Geology , 2nd Edition by Carla Montgomery 2
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6


Week 2: Scientific Formation of the Earth
Discussion of the scientific formation of the Earth 4.5 billion years ago.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 1: An Invitation to Geology, pages 8 - 13
Textbook: Fundamentals of Geology , 2nd Edition by Carla Montgomery 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6


Week 3: Plate Tectonic
Principle of continental drift and Plate Tectonics and the characteristics of Earth Interior.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0

177
Readings:
Plate Tectonics (Chapter 9 pages 121-128) 2
Textbook: Fundamentals of Geology , 2nd Edition by Carla Montgomery
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6


Week 4: Earthquakes and Tsunami
Causes of Earthquakes and Tsunami.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Earthquakes (Chapter 10 pages 137-153) 2
Textbook: Fundamentals of Geology , 2nd Edition by Carla Montgomery
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6


Week 5: Volcano
Volcano and its danger to environment.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Volcanoes (Chapter 4 pages 50-68) of Fundamentals of Geology by Carla W. Montgomery, 2nd Edition, 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6


Week 6: Plate Tectonic Boundary
Three kinds of plate tectonic boundary and its relation to volcanic activity.

178
4
No of Lectures 1
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Plate Tectonics (Chapter 9 pages 129-134) 2

Textbook: Fundamentals of Geology , 2nd Edition by Carla Montgomery


Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 0
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 5


Week 7: Natural Hazards
Natural hazards in the earth caused by human activities.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Mass Movements, Mass Wasting (Chapter 19 pages 271-283) 2
Textbook: Fundamentals of Geology , 2nd Edition by Carla Montgomery
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 8: Minerals
Main mineral types; various tests to determine the kind of minerals; their uses in the industry and chemistry rocks.
Different kinds of renewable energy resources

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
Field Trips

179
Readings:
Mineral Resources(Chapter 20 pages 286-312) 2
Textbook: Fundamentals of Geology 2nd Edition by Carla Montgomery
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6


Week 9: Different Types of Rocks
Formation of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Chapters 3, 6 and 7, pages 33-47; pages 83-96; pages 97-107 2
Textbook: Fundamentals of Geology 2nd Edition by Carla Montgomery
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6


Week 10: Groundwater and water resources
Subsurface water, aquifer geometry,consequences of ground water withdrawal

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
Field Trips

Readings:
Groundwater and Water Resources, Chapter 15, (pages214 - 227) 2
Textbook: Fundamentals of Geology 2nd Edition by Carla Montgomery
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

180
Week 11: Streams
Hydrologic Cycle, Dflooding.rainage Basins & Size of Streams, Streams as Agents of Erosion, Sediment Transport
and Deposition, Stream Channels and Equilibrium and Flooding.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Streams, Chapter 14, (pages pages 195-211) 2
Textbook: Fundamentals of Geology 2nd Edition by Carla Montgomery
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6


Week 12: Glaciers
Ice and Hydrologic Cycle, Glacier Formation, Glacial Erosion, Glaciers and Lakes.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Glaciers, Chapter 17, (pages 243-255) 3
Textbook: Fundamentals of Geology 2nd Edition by Carla Montgomery
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 13: Wind and Deserts


The Origin of Wind, Wind Erosion and Sediment Transport, Desert.
No of Lectures 4

181
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Wind and Deserts, Chapter 18, (pages 260-268) 2
Textbook: Fundamentals of Geology 2nd Edition by Carla Montgomery
Revision of lecture notes 6
Solving Problems 0
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 14. Coastal Zones and Processes


Waves and Tides, Beaches and Coastal Features, Coastal Erosion and Hazards.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Coastal Zones and Processes, Chapter 16, (pages 230-240) 2
Textbook: Fundamentals of Geology 2nd Edition by Carla Montgomery
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 0
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

4.0 Assessment
Component Weighting Minimum Level
Assignment 25%
Class Tests 25% 50%
Final Examination 50% 50%
Attendance N/A 75%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting

182
Assignment 1 Week 8 13%
Assignment 2 Week 13 12%
Class Test 1 Week 7 13%
Class Test 2 Week 13 12%

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary to score at least 50% (ie.
50/100) in the final examination.

Letter Grade Scale: The following grading scales would be used


Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33 - 5.00
A 85-89 4.00 - 4.27
A- 80-84 3.73 - 3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33 - 3.60
B 70-74 3.00 - 3.27
B- 65-69 2.67 - 2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33 - 2.60
C 55-59 2.00 - 2.27
C- 50-54 1.67 - 1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33 - 1.60
D- 35-39 0.67 - 0.93
E Below 35 0.0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0.0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0.0
CT Credit Transfer 0.0
NV Null & Void for dishonest practice 0.0
I Result Withheld/Incomplete Assessment 0.0
X Continuing course 0.0
DNC Did not complete 0.0
CP Compassionate Pass 0.0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0.0
PT Pass Terminating 0.0
P Pass 0.0
NP Not Pass 0.0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment

183
The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR). All
students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all academic
matters.

Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps to
get redress of their grievance.
Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and reassessment.
Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to the HOD. The HOD
will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your work is
found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In more serious
cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may even lead to your
expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagiarism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and adding
proper citation.

3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.


4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly your
own work.
6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

184
LECTURER: TBA
OTHER
LECTURERS: TBA

BEC607 Semester : 2 Venue: Derrick Title: Engineering Analysis & Problem Solving
Credit Points 14

LECTURES: Students are to attend 1 x 2 hours of lectures.


TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour of tutorial.
WORKSHOPS: N/A
LABS: Students are to attend 1 x 3 hours lab
SELF DIRECTED Students are to spend about 4 -8 hours per week for this unit.
LEARNING
CONSULTATION Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according to the
TIME following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)
PREREQUISITE: Introduction to Computer Programming (BEN507)
E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the course shall be posted on Class Shares.
Students are required to check their emails regularly for communication from the
lecturer
TOTAL Contact Hours
LEARNING
HOURS: 84
Lectures 28
Tutorials 14
Labs/Workshops 42
Self Directed Learning (during term) 99
Self Directed Learning (Mid-Term Break) 7
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks) 20
Total Recommended Learning Hours 210

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to the Bachelor of Civil Engineering Programme and hope that you will find it enriching and
interesting. This unit will introduce the student the importance of MATLAB in engineering problem solving.

1.1 Course Description


To introduce to the student the importance of Mat Lab in engineering problem solving.

1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes


Upon completion of this paper, students should be able to:

185
1.2.1. Use of the MATLAB and its capabilities
1.2.2. Discuss numbers ,vectors & Vector space
1.2.3. Discuss Mathematical Operations using Arrays.
1.2.4. Creating and saving a script file.
1.2.5. Plotting of given data.
1.2.6. Creating a function file.
1.2.7. Apply Programming in MATLAB.

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1 Thomas Harman, James Dabney, Norman Richert , Advanced Engineering Mathematics with MATLAB (2nd
Edition - 2000) , Brooks/Cole

2.2 Supplementary Materials


Supplementary notes will either be given during the lectures or placed on class share.

2.3 Class Shares


Notices & Announcements, Unit descriptor, Assessment and Assessment details, and supplementary notes (details)
will be provided.

3.0 Course Content and Reading References


Week 1: Introduction to MATLAB
1. MATLAB Command Window
2. MATLAB Commands for Display and Plotting

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3

Readings:
Thomas Harman, James Dabney, Norman Richert , Advanced Engineering Mathematics with 3
MATLAB(2nd Edition) , Brooks/Cole , Chapter 1 (pages 3 - 21)
Reading lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7
Week 2 : Introduction to MATLAB (continued)
1. Creating MATLAB Programs
2. MATLAB Programming Language
3. Reinforcement Exercises and Exploration Problems

186
No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0
Readings:
Thomas Harman, James Dabney, Norman Richert , Advanced Engineering Mathematics with 3
MATLAB(2nd Edition) , Brooks/Cole , Chapter 1 (pages 22 - 42)
Reading lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7


Week 3: Numbers and Vectors
1. Properties of Real Numbers
2. Complex Numbers
3. Vectors in two dimensions and three dimensions

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0
Readings:
Thomas Harman, James Dabney, Norman Richert , Advanced Engineering Mathematics with 3
MATLAB(2nd Edition) , Brooks/Cole , Chapter 2 (pages 46 - 69)

Reading lecture notes 3


Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8


Week 4 : Numbers and Vectors (continued)
1. Vectors in Higher Dimensions
2. MATLAB Vectors
3. Properties of Vectors

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0

187
Readings:
Thomas Harman, James Dabney, Norman Richert , Advanced Engineering Mathematics with 3
MATLAB(2nd Edition) , Brooks/Cole , Chapter 2 (pages 70 - 76)

Reading lecture notes 2


Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7


Week 5 : Matrices
1. Basic properties of Matrices
2. MATLAB Matrix operations
3. MATLAB Matrix Inverse
4. MATLAB Solution of Linear Systems

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0
Readings:
Thomas Harman, James Dabney, Norman Richert , Advanced Engineering Mathematics with 3
MATLAB(2nd Edition) , Brooks/Cole , Chapter 3 (pages 102 - 135)

Reading lecture notes 2


Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7


Week 6 : Matrices (continued)
1. Linear Transformation
2. MATLAB Homogeneous Transformation

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0

Readings:
Thomas Harman, James Dabney, Norman Richert , Advanced Engineering Mathematics with 3
MATLAB(2nd Edition) , Brooks/Cole , Chapter 3 (pages 139 - 153)

188
Reading lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7


Week 7 : Eigen values and Eigen vectors
1. Eigen Values and Eigen Vectors
2. Matrix Eigen value theorem
3. Complex Vectors and Matrices

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0
Readings:
Thomas Harman, James Dabney, Norman Richert , Advanced Engineering Mathematics with 3
MATLAB(2nd Edition) , Brooks/Cole , Chapter 4 (pages 162 - 173)
Reading lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7


Week 8 : Eigen Values and Eigen Vectors (continued)
1. MATLAB Commands for Eigen Vectors
2. Matrix Calculus
3. Similar and diagonalizable matrices

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0
Readings:
Thomas Harman, James Dabney, Norman Richert , Advanced Engineering Mathematics with 3
MATLAB(2nd Edition) , Brooks/Cole , Chapter 4 (pages 174 - 187)
Reading lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

189
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7
Week 9 : Eigen Values and Eigen Vectors (continued)
1. Application to differential equations
2. Reinforcement exercises and Exploration problems

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0
Readings:
Thomas Harman, James Dabney, Norman Richert , Advanced Engineering Mathematics with 3
MATLAB(2nd Edition) , Brooks/Cole , Chapter 4 (pages 194 - 200)
Reading lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7


Week 10 : Linear Differential Equations
1. Classification of Differential Equations
2. Linear Differential Equations
3. Higher order Differential Equations

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3

Readings:
Thomas Harman, James Dabney, Norman Richert , Advanced Engineering Mathematics with 3
MATLAB(2nd Edition) , Brooks/Cole , Chapter 4 (pages 203 - 219)
Reading lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7


Week 11 : Linear Differential Equations (continued)
1. Second order differential equations
2. Particular solutions of differential equations
3. MATLAB solutions of differential equations

190
No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3

Readings:
Thomas Harman, James Dabney, Norman Richert , Advanced Engineering Mathematics with 3
MATLAB(2nd Edition) , Brooks/Cole , Chapter 5 (pages 220 - 242)
Reading lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7


Week 12 : Linear Differential Equations (continued)
1. Transforming Differential Equations
2. MATLAB solution of couple second order equations

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0
Readings:
Thomas Harman, James Dabney, Norman Richert , Advanced Engineering Mathematics with 3
MATLAB(2nd Edition) , Brooks/Cole , Chapter 5 (pages 250 - 270)
Reading lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7


Week 13 : Approximation of Functions
1. Polynomial Interpolation
2. Interpolation by spline functions

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0
Readings:
Thomas Harman, James Dabney, Norman Richert , Advanced Engineering Mathematics with 3
MATLAB(2nd Edition) , Brooks/Cole , Chapter 7 (pages 349 - 355)

191
Reading lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7


Week 14 : Approximation of Functions (continued)
1. Least Squares curve fitting
2. Orthogonal Functions

No of Lectures 2
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 3
0
Readings:
Thomas Harman, James Dabney, Norman Richert , Advanced Engineering Mathematics with 3
MATLAB(2nd Edition) , Brooks/Cole , Chapter 7 (pages 356 - 365)
Reading lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7


4.0 Assessment
Component Weighting Minimum Level
Assignment 15% 50%
Class Tests 25% 50%
Laboratory 10% 50%
Final Examination 50% 50%
Attendance N/A 75%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting
Assignment 1 Week 8 7.5%
Assignment 2 Week 13 7.5%
Class Test 1 Week 7 13.0%
Class Test 2 Week 13 12.0%

192
(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary to score at least 50% (ie.
50/100) in the final examination. It is highly recommended that students attend all tutorials/labs also.

Letter Grade Scale: The following grading scales would be used


Marks Grade Point
Grade Average
A+ 90-100 4.33 - 5.00
A 85-89 4.00 - 4.27
A- 80-84 3.73 - 3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33 - 3.60
B 70-74 3.00 - 3.27
B- 65-69 2.67 - 2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33 - 2.60
C 55-59 2.00 - 2.27
C- 50-54 1.67 - 1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33 - 1.60
D- 35-39 0.67 - 0.93
E Below 35 0.0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0.0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0.0
CT Credit Transfer 0.0
NV Null & Void for dishonest practice 0.0
I Result Withheld/Incomplete Assessment 0.0
X Continuing course 0.0
DNC Did not complete 0.0
CP Compassionate Pass 0.0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0.0
PT Pass Terminating 0.0
P Pass 0.0
NP Not Pass 0.0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment


The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR). All
students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all academic
matters.
Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps to
get redress of their grievance.

193
Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and reassessment.
Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to the HOD. The HOD
will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your work is
found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In more serious
cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may even lead to your
expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagiarism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and adding
proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly your
own work.
6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

194
LECTURER: TBA
OTHER LECTURERS: TBA

BEC608 Semester : 2 Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Earthworks, Curves & Credit
Hydrographic Survey Points 16

LECTURES: Students are to attend 2 x 2 hours of lectures.


TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour of tutorial.
WORKSHOPS: N/A
LABS: N/A
SELF DIRECTED Students are to spend about 8 - 12 hours per week for this unit.
LEARNING
CONSULTATION TIME Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according to
the following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)
PREREQUISITE: Surveying for Engineers (BEN602)
E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the course shall be posted on Class
Shares. Students are required to check their emails regularly for
communication from the lecturer
TOTAL LEARNING HOURS: Contact Hours 70
Lectures 56
Tutorials 14
Labs/Workshops 0
Self Directed Learning (during term) 137
Self Directed Learning (Mid-Term Break) 16
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks) 17
Total Recommended Learning Hours 240

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to the Bachelor of Civil Engineering Programme and hope that you will find it enriching and
interesting.
interesting. This course will introduce to you the importance of study of roadway geometric curves necessary
to have a complete understanding of roadway design and construction.

1.1 Course Description


To prepare the student the necessary mastery of the theories and principles of geometric curves needed in
design or roadway alignment. The syllabus of the unit are: the study of horizontal alignment and vertical
alignment of roadway and also includes study of Mass Diagram Analysis and survey of land under water
(hydrographic survey).

195
1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes
Upon completion of this paper, students should be able to:
1.2.1. Calculate the geometric properties of plain horizontal curves, compound curves, and reversed curves.
To layout in the field the horizontal curves by method of deflection angles.
1.2.2. Calculate the geometric properties of symmetrical and unsymmetrical vertical parabolic curves. To
layout in the field the horizontal curves by offset from tangents.
1.2.3. Calculate the geometric properties of spiral easement curves. The purpose of spiral easement curves
in design of geometric horizontal alignment of roadway. The basic principles of super elevation in
treatment of the spiral easement curves.
1.2.4. Measure the discharge of the river by using the slope area method.
1.2.5. Determine the discharge of a river by Price Current Meter or by Floats.
1.2.6. Apply the principle of mass diagrams in roadway project construction and supervision with respect to
earthwork movement and utilization of roadway heavy equipment such as Dozer, loader dump truck
and road roller.
1.2.7. Apply the engineering principle of hydrographic survey to secure information concerning the water
areas and the adjacent coast for the preparation and compilation of nautical charts for purpose of
navigation and flood control.

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1. Surveying for Engineers by J. Uren and W.F. Price, 4th Edition [2006].
2.1.2. Jack McCormac(2004). Surveying (5th Edition), ISBN 0 -471 -23758 - 2

2.2 Supplementary Materials


2.1.1. Irvine, William (1980). Surveying for Construction (4th Edition), McGraw-Hill, ASIN 0070846359
2.3 Class Shares

3.0 Course Content and Reading References

Week 1: Review of Surveying Procedures


Leveling, measuring both horizontal and vertical angles using the
theodolite; open traverse and closed traverse, area computation by Double Meridian Distance
Method (DMD) and double parallel distance method (DPD)

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

196
Readings:
Chapter 12 Traverse Adjustment and Area Computation (pages 213 - 234) 3
Text: Jack McCormac(2004). Surveying (5th Edition), ISBN 0 -471 -23758 - 2
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 2: Simple Curves and Compound Curves


Analysis of the geometric properties of plain horizontal curves and compound curves.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 12, Circular Curves ( pages 585 - 623) 4
Textbook: Surveying for Engineers by J. Uren and W.F. Price, 4th Edition, ISBN -13:978 -1 -4039 -2054 -6
Chapter 22, Horizontal Curves(pages 383 - 396)
Textbook:Jack McCormac(2004). Surveying (5th Edition), ISBN 0 -471 -23758 - 2 2
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 3: Reversed Curves


Analysis of the geometric properties of reversed curves.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 12, Circular Curves ( pages 585 - 623) 2
Textbook: Surveying for Engineers by J. Uren and W.F. Price, 4th Edition, ISBN -13:978 -1 -4039 -2054 -6
Revision of lecture notes 4

197
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 4: Symmetrical Vertical Parabolic Curves


Analysis of the geometric properties of symmetrical vertical parabolic curves.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 14, Vertical Curves ( pages 693 - 727) 4
Textbook: Surveying for Engineers by J. Uren and W.F. Price, 4th Edition, ISBN -13:978 -1 -4039 -2054 -6
Chapter 23, Vertical Curves (pages 407 - 412) 2
Textbook:Jack McCormac(2004). Surveying (5th Edition), ISBN 0 -471 -23758 - 2
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 5: Unsymmetrical Vertical Parabolic Curves


Analysis of the geometric properties of unsymmetrical vertical parabolic curves.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 14, Vertical Curves ( pages 693 - 727)
Textbook: Surveying for Engineers by J. Uren and W.F. Price, 4th Edition, ISBN -13:978 -1 -4039 -2054 -6 4
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

198
Week 6: Spiral Easement Curves
Analysis of the geometric properties of spiral easement curves. The purpose of spiral easement curves in
design of geometric horizontal alignment of roadway. The basic principles of super elevation in treatment
of the spiral easement curves.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0

Readings:
Chapter 14,The geometry of transition curves ( pages 647 - 692) 4
Textbook: Surveying for Engineers by J. Uren and W.F. Price, 4th Edition, ISBN -13:978 -1 -4039 -2054 -6
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

Week 7: Spiral Easement Curves (Continued)


Analysis of the geometric properties of spiral easement curves. The purpose of spiral easement curves in
design of geometric horizontal alignment of roadway. The basic principles of super elevation in treatment
of the spiral easement curves.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 14,The geometry of transition curves ( pages 647 - 692) 2
Textbook: Surveying for Engineers by J. Uren and W.F. Price, 4th Edition, ISBN -13:978 -1 -4039 -2054 -6
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 10

Week 8: Earthworks and Mass Diagram


Earthwork and mass diagram.

199
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Chapter 15,Earthwork quantities( pages 729- 796) 4
Textbook: Surveying for Engineers by J. Uren and W.F. Price, 4th Edition, ISBN -13:978 -1 -4039 -2054 -6
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

Week 9: Discharge of a River by Slope Area Method


Slope Area Method: the three basic factors that are to be determined in measuring the discharge of the river by
using the slope area method

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Problem 16A (pages 199- 212) Field Manual in Higher Surveying, A Committee on Surveying
by Filipino Educators Inc.,1975 2
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 9

Week 10: Discharge of a River by Price Current Meter or by Floats


Measurement of Discharge of a river by Price Current Meter or by Floats: The kind of support in crossing the
stream, by wading; by cableway; by bridge or by boat; measurement of depth; measurement of velocity either by
vertical velocity curve method, two-point method, six tenths depth method.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0

200
Readings:
Problem 16B (pages 213-242) Field Manual in Higher Surveying, A Committee on Surveying 3
by Filipino Educators Inc.,1975
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 10

Week 11: Hydrographic Surveying


Basic principle of hydrographic surveying: The different purposes of Hydrographic Survey.
The principle of sounding , use of echosounder survey equipment in conducting hydrographic survey.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0

Readings:
Problem 18 (pages 242-260) Field Manual in Higher Surveying, A Committee on Surveying 3
by Filipino Educators Inc.,1975
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
9
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time)

Week 12: Hydrographic Surveying (Continued)


Sounding , use of echosounder survey equipment in conducting hydrographic survey

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0

Readings:
Problem 18 (pages 261-280) Field Manual in Higher Surveying, A Committee on Surveying 2
by Filipino Educators Inc.,1975
Revision of lecture notes 4

201
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
9
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time)

Week 13: Geometric Design of Railway Track


Necessity of Geometric design of a Railway Tra-Gradient-Gradientck. Gradient and Grade Compensation-Ruling
gradient-Momentum gradient-Pusher gradient-Gradient in station yards-Grade compensation on curves. Speed of
the train-Speed on curves. Radius or degree of curvature.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 13 (pages 153-162) , Textbook: Railway Engineering, 5th Edition by Subhash C. Saxena and 2
Satyapal Arora
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 14: Geometric Design of Railway Track (Continued)


Super elevation or cant-Objects of providing super elevation-Relationship of super elevation, gauge, speed, speed
and radius of the curve-Average speed-Limits of super elevation, cant deficiency-Negative super elevation.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0

Readings:
Chapter 13 (pages 162-177) , Textbook: Railway Engineering, 5th Edition by Subhash C. Saxena and 2
Satyapal Arora
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

202
9
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time)

4.0 Assessment
Component Weighting Minimum Level
Assignment 10%
Class Tests 30% 50%
Field Exercise 10% 50%
Final Examination 50% 50%
Attendance N/A 75%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting
Assignment 1 Week 8 5%
Assignment 2 Week 13 5%
Class Test 1 Week 7 15%
Class Test 2 Week 13 15%
Field Exercise (3) Week 7 - 13 10%

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary to score at least 50% (ie.
50/100) in the final examination. It is highly recommended that students attend all tutorials/labs also.

Letter Grade Scale: The following grading scales would be used


Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33 - 5.00
A 85-89 4.00 - 4.27
A- 80-84 3.73 - 3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33 - 3.60
B 70-74 3.00 - 3.27
B- 65-69 2.67 - 2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33 - 2.60
C 55-59 2.00 - 2.27
C- 50-54 1.67 - 1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33 - 1.60
D- 35-39 0.67 - 0.93
E Below 35 0.0

203
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0.0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0.0
CT Credit Transfer 0.0
NV Null & Void for dishonest practice 0.0
I Result Withheld/Incomplete Assessment 0.0
X Continuing course 0.0
DNC Did not complete 0.0
CP Compassionate Pass 0.0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0.0
PT Pass Terminating 0.0
P Pass 0.0
NP Not Pass 0.0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment


The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR). All
students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.

Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps to
get redress of their grievance.

Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and reassessment.
Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to the HOD. The HOD
will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your work
is found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In more
serious cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may even
lead to your expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagiarism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and adding
proper citation.

204
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly your
own work.
6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

205
LECTURER: TBA
OTHER LECTURERS: TBA

BEC609 Semester : 2 Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Hydraulics 2 Credit Points 16

LECTURES: Students are to attend 2 x 2 hours of lectures.


TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour of tutorial.
WORKSHOPS: N/A
LABS: N/A
SELF DIRECTED Students are to spend about 9 - 12 hours per week for this unit.
LEARNING
CONSULTATION TIME Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according
to the following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)

PREREQUISITE: Hydraulics 1 (BEC604)


E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the course shall be posted on Class
Shares. Students are required to check their emails regularly for
communication from the lecturer

TOTAL LEARNING HOURS: Contact Hours 70


Lectures 56
Tutorials 14
Labs/Workshops 0
Self Directed Learning (during term) 162
Self Directed Learning (Mid-Term Break) 4
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks) 4
Total Recommended Learning Hours 240

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to the Bachelor of Civil Engineering Programme and hope that you will find it enriching and
interesting. This course will introduce to you the basic theories and principles of fluid in motion(unsteady flow)
including review of steady open channel flow.

1.1 Course Description


To prepare the students to have a complete mastery of theories and principles of hydraulics necessary in the
design of water engineering structures.

206
1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes
Upon completion of this paper, students should be able to:
1.2.1. Mastery of theories involved in analysis of steady flow in open channel.
1.2.2. Calculation of propagation of positive and negative surge waves due to unsteady flow in open channel
1.2.3. Design of erodible trapezoidal channel using the principle of tractive force ratio.
1.2.4. Pipe network analysis using Hardy Cross method and Linearization method.
1.2.5. Analysis of Pump-Pipeline to determine the necessary horsepower capacity of the pump needed to be
installed in the system.
1.2.6. Analysis of variation of velocity and water level in a surge tank due to sudden closure of pipe valve near
the inlet of water turbine.
1.2.7. Analysis of the effect of water hammer in the pipeline due to partial or full closure of the pipe valve.
1.2.8. Hydraulic analysis of water regulating structures.
1.2.9. Hydraulic analysis of pipe and box culvert.

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1. Hydraulics in Civil and Environmental Engineering, 4th Edition [2004] by Andrew Chadwick and
Martin Borthwick ISBN 0-415-30609-4
2.1.2. Civil Engineering Hydraulics by C. Nalluri & R.E. Featherstone, 5th Edition
ISBN 978-1-4051-6195-4

2.2 Supplementary Materials


2.2.1. Douglas, Gasiorek and Swaffield, Fluid Mechanics (4th Edition), Prentice Hall, ISBN 0-582-41476-8
2.2.2. Hydraulics by Horace W. King, Chester O. Wisler and James G. Woodburn, 5th Edition,
John Wiley & Sons Incorporated.

2.3 Class Shares

3.0 Course Content and Reading References

Week 1: Open Channel Flow,Steady flow


Three fundamental laws as applied to problem solving in hydraulics (Conservation of mass,
conservation of energy and conservation of momentum). Analysis of Steady Uniform Flow;
The Chezy and Manning Equations. The critical depth meters and thin plate weirs.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

207
Readings:
Chapter 5, Open Channel flow (pages 122-129) 3
Textbook : Hydraulics in Civil and Environmental Engineering, 4th Edition by Andrew Chadwick
and Martin Borthwick ISBN 0-415-30609-4
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 9

Week 2: Open Channel Flow, Steady Flow (Continued)


Rapidly varied flow (steady flow); the hydraulic jump; Classification of non-uniform flows
in open channels and gradually varied flow (i.e., determination of backwater profile).

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 5, Open Channel flow,Steady flow (pages 138-144) 1
Textbook : Hydraulics in Civil and Environmental Engineering, 4th Edition by Andrew Chadwick
and Martin Borthwick ISBN 0-415-30609-4
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 9

Week 3: Unsteady Flow in Channels


Hydraulic Analysis of propagation of solitary wave and surges in open channels, positive surge waves, negative
surge waves, and dam break.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 13, Unsteady Flow in Open Channels (pages 316 - 326) 3
Textbook: Civil Engineering Hydraulics by C. Nalluri & R.E. Featherstone, 5th Edition
ISBN 978-1-4051-6195-4
Revision of lecture notes 6
Solving Problems 3

208
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 4: Gradually Varied Flow, Unsteady Flow


Derivation of the two equations of motions governing gradually varied unsteady flow in open channel
(known as the St. Venant equations). Applications of the St. Venant equations to solution of hydraulic
problems involving calculations of runoff due to rainfall incident on plane surface. Numerical solution
of the St. Venant equations.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 5 (pages 81 - 94) Kinematic Hydrology and Modelling, Elsevier Amsterdam 3
Textbook: Kinematic Hydrology and Modelling, Elsevier Amsterdam by Stephenson and Meadows
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 5: Sediment Transport


Threshold of movement of sediments in channel, mechanics of sediment transport, sediment transport equations,
bed load transport, suspended load transport.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 9, Sediment Transport (pages 283 -306) 3
Textbook : Hydraulics in Civil and Environmental Engineering, 4th Edition by Andrew Chadwick
and Martin Borthwick ISBN 0-415-30609-4
Revision of lecture notes 6
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 6: Best Efficient Section


Design of stable alluvial channel (trapezoidal channel using shear force method).

209
Design of most efficient section of trapezoidal channel.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Section 15.4, Design of stable alluvial channel(pages 498 -501) 1
Textbook : Hydraulics in Civil and Environmental Engineering, 4th Edition by Andrew Chadwick
and Martin Borthwick ISBN 0-415-30609-4
Section 8.5.2.1, Critical Tractive Force Theory (pages 188 - 189) 1
Textbook: Civil Engineering Hydraulics by C. Nalluri & R.E. Featherstone, 5th Edition
ISBN 978-1-4051-6195-4
Revision of lecture notes 6
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 7: Simple Pipeline


Hydraulic analysis of simple pipeline. Pipe flow formulas (the Chezy equation, Manning's formula).
Pipe Flow formula in turbulent flow (Darcy-Weisbach formula, White-Colebrook Equation, Barr Formula).

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 5 (pages 116 - 140) 3
Textbook: Civil Engineering Hydraulics by C. Nalluri & R.E. Featherstone, 5th Edition
ISBN 978-1-4051-6195-4
Revision of lecture notes 6
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
of uniform pipeline
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 8: Design of Pipeline, Pipes in Series and Pipes in Parallel


Design of uniform pipeline, pipes in series and pipes in parallel.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

210
Readings
Chapter 4: Flow of Incompressible Fluid in pipelines (pages 87 - 115) 3
Textbook: Civil Engineering Hydraulics by C. Nalluri & R.E. Featherstone, 5th Edition
ISBN 978-1-4051-6195-4
Revision of lecture notes 6
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 9: Pump Pipeline System


Pump - pipeline system analysis and design

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Chapter 6: Pump- pipeline system analysis and design (pages 145 - 164) 3
Textbook: Civil Engineering Hydraulics by C. Nalluri & R.E. Featherstone, 5th Edition
ISBN 978-1-4051-6195-4
Revision of lecture notes 6
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 10: Pipe Network Analysis


Pipe Network analysis using the Hardy cross method and the Linear Theory Method .

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Chapter 5 (pages 116 - 140) 3
Textbook: Civil Engineering Hydraulics by C. Nalluri & R.E. Featherstone, 5th Edition
ISBN 978-1-4051-6195-4
Revision of lecture notes 6
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

211
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 11: Surge Tank


The principle of transient pressure/surge pressure in an incompressible fluid in a
pipeline/valve system: Variation of flow in Surge Tank: unsteady compressible flow in
a rigid pipeline: unsteady compressible flow in an elastic pipeline.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 6, Pressure surge in pipelines(pages 185-201) 3
Textbook : Hydraulics in Civil and Environmental Engineering, 4th Edition by Andrew Chadwick
and Martin Borthwick ISBN 0-415-30609-4
Chapter 12: Mass oscillations and pressure transient in pipeline (pages 298 -315) 3
Textbook: Civil Engineering Hydraulics by C. Nalluri & R.E. Featherstone, 5th Edition
ISBN 978-1-4051-6195-4
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 12: Hydraulic Structures


Descriptive treatment of Dams: Spillways, Stilling basins, Gates, Weirs, Headworks,
Hydraulic Analysis of pipe and box culvert, venturi flume and weir.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 15 Hydraulic structures (pages 361 - 380) 4
Textbook: Civil Engineering Hydraulics by C. Nalluri & R.E. Featherstone, 5th Edition
ISBN 978-1-4051-6195-4
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 13: Wave Theory

212
Wave motion, linear wave theory, surf zone processes ,wave prediction from wind records

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 8 Wave Theory (pages 216 -274) 4
Textbook : Hydraulics in Civil and Environmental Engineering, 4th Edition by Andrew Chadwick
and Martin Borthwick ISBN 0-415-30609-4
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 14: Dimensional Analysis and Theory of Physical Model


Dimensional analysis using indicial method, Pi Buckingham theorem and Matrix method, Hydraulic model.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter11 : Dimensional analysis and theory of physical models(pages371 -397)
Textbook : Hydraulics in Civil and Environmental Engineering, 4th Edition by Andrew Chadwick
and Martin Borthwick ISBN 0-415-30609-4
Revision of lecture notes 7
Solving Problems 5
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

4.0 Assessment
Component Weighting Minimum Level
Assignment
Class Tests 25% 50%
Computer Programme Exercises 25% 50%
Final Examination 50% 50%

213
Attendance N/A 75%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting
Computer Exercise 1 Week 3 - 7 10%
i) Computer program( using any programming language or spreadsheet ) for an explicit numerical solution of the
St. Venant equations
Computer Exercise 2 Week 9 - 10 5%
ii) Computer program (using any programming language or spreadsheet ) for the preparation of tailwater
rating curve of a vertical sluice gate of an irrigation scheme
Computer Exercise 3 Week 11 - 12 5%
iii) Computer program (using any programming language or spreadsheet ) for the numerical solution
of pipeline network analysis using Linearization method
Computer Exercise 4 Week 13 - 14 5%
iv) Computer program (using any programming language or spreadsheet ) for the numerical solution
of variation of velocity and water level in a Surge Tank
Class Test 1 Week 7 13%
Class Test 2 Week 13 12%

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary to score at least 50%
(ie. 50/100) in the final examination.

Letter Grade Scale: The following grading scales would be used


Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33 - 5.00
A 85-89 4.00 - 4.27
A- 80-84 3.73 - 3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33 - 3.60
B 70-74 3.00 - 3.27
B- 65-69 2.67 - 2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33 - 2.60
C 55-59 2.00 - 2.27
C- 50-54 1.67 - 1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33 - 1.60
D- 35-39 0.67 - 0.93
E Below 35 0.0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0.0

214
W Withdrawn from Unit 0.0
CT Credit Transfer 0.0
NV Null & Void for dishonest practice 0.0
I Result Withheld/Incomplete Assessment 0.0
X Continuing course 0.0
DNC Did not complete 0.0
CP Compassionate Pass 0.0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0.0
PT Pass Terminating 0.0
P Pass 0.0
NP Not Pass 0.0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment


The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR).
All students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.

Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps to
get redress of their grievance.

Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and reassessment.
Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to the HOD. The HOD
will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your work
is found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In more
serious cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may even
lead to your expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagiarism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing
service.

2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and adding
proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.

215
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly your
own work.
6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

216
LECTURER: TBA
OTHER LECTURERS: TBA

BEC610 Semester : 2 Venue: Derrick Title: ODEs & Numerical Analysis Credit Points 14

LECTURES: Students are to attend 2x2 hours of lectures per week.


TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour tutorial class per week.
LABS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour of Labs per week.
SELF DIRECTED LEARNING Students are to spend about 7 - 9 hours per week for this unit.
CONSULTATION TIME Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit
according to the following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)
PREREQUISITE: Engineering Computation 2 (BEN601)
E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the unit shall be posted on Moodle or
Class shares. Students are required to check emails regularly for
communication from the lecturer.

TOTAL LEARNING HOURS: Contact Hours 84


Lectures 56
Tutorials 14
Labs/Workshops 14
Field Trip(s) 0
Self Directed Learning (during term) 106
Self Directed Learing (Mid-Term Break) 10
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks) 10
Total Recommended Learning Hours 210

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to this course and hope that you will find it enriching and interesting.

1.1 Course Description


Numerical Analysis plays an indispensable role in solving real life mathematical, physical and engineering
problems. Numerical computations have been in use for centuries even before digital computers appeared on the
scene. Great Mathematicians like Gauss, Newton, Lagrange, Fourier and many others developed numerical
techniques. Numerical analysis is an approach to solving complex mathematical problems using simple
approximating operations and carrying out an analysis on the resulting errors. Major topics in numerical analysis
include interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration.

217
1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes
Upon completion of this paper, students should be able to:
1.2.1 Evaluate first order ODEs
1.2.2 Evaluate second order ODEs
1.2.3 Apply Numeric methods for solving equations using MATLAB
1.2.4 Evaluate using various techniques of numerical integration.
1.2.5 Solving linear systems of equations
1.2.6 Apply numeric methods for fitting straight lines or parabolas and for matrix eigen value problems
1.2.7 Apply basic methods for numeric solution of ODEs
1.2.8 Apply basic methods for numeric solution of PDEs.

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text

2.1.1. Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,10th Edition [2011]

2.2 Supplementary Materials


Supplementary notes will either be given during the lectures or placed on class share.

2.3 Class Shares


Notices & Announcements, Unit descriptor, Assessment and Assessment details, and supplementary notes
(details) will be provided.

3.0 Course Content and Reading References


Week 1: First Order Ordinary Differential Equations
1. Basic Concepts : Modelling
2. Initial Value Problems

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,9th Edition (Chapter 1 2
pages 2 - 8)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

218
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 2: First Order Ordinary Differential Equations (continued)


1. Direction Fields
2. Separable ODE's modeling
3. Exact ODE's : Integrating Factors

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,9th Edition (Chapter 1 3
pages 9 - 25)
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 3: First Order Ordinary Differential Equations (Continued)


1. Linear ODE's : Bernoulli's Equation
2. Population Dynamics
3. Existence and Uniqueness of Solutions

No of Lectures 4

No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,9th Edition (Chapter 1 3
pages 26 - 41)
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

219
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 4: Second Order Ordinary Differential Equations


1. Homogeneous linear ODE's of second order
2. Homogeneous linear ODE's with Constant coefficients

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,9th Edition (Chapter 2 3
pages 45 - 58)
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 5: Second Order Ordinary Differential Equations (continued)


1. Modelling: Free Oscillations (Mass - Spring System)
2. Euler - Cauchy Equations
3. Existence and Uniqueness of Solutions

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1

Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,9th Edition (Chapter 2 3
pages 61 - 77)
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

220
Week 6: Second Order Ordinary Differential Equations (continued)
1. Non - Homogeneous ODE's
2. Modeling: Forced Oscillations, Resonance

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1

No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,9th Edition (Chapter 2 3
pages 78 - 90)
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 7: Numerics in General


1. Solution of Equations by Iteration
2. Interpolation

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1

No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,9th Edition (Chapter 19 3
pages 787 - 809)
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 8: Numerics in General (continued)

221
1. Spline Interpolation
2. Numeric Integration
3. Numeric Differentiation

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1

No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,9th Edition (Chapter 19 3
pages 810 - 829)

Revision of lecture notes 3

Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 9: Numeric Linear Algebra


1. Linear Systems: Gauss Elimination
2. Linear Systems: LU- Factorization, Matrix Inversion
3. Linear Systems: Solution by Iteration

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1

No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,9th Edition (Chapter 20 3
pages 833 - 850)
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

222
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 10: Numeric Linear Algebra (continued)


1. Linear Systems: ill conditioning, Norms
2. Least Squares Method
3. Inclusion of Matrix Eigen values

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,9th Edition (Chapter 20 3
pages 851 - 871)
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 11: Numeric Linear Algebra (continued)


1. Power method for Eigen values
2. Tridiagonalization and QR- Factorization

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,9th Edition (Chapter 20 3
pages 872 - 882 )
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

223
Week 12: Numerics for ODEs and PDEs
1. Methods for First Order ODEs
2. Multi step Methods

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1

No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,9th Edition (Chapter 21 3
pages 886 - 901)
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 13: Numerics for ODEs and PDEs (continued)


1. Methods for systems and Higher order ODEs
2. Methods for Elliptic PDEs

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1

No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,9th Edition (Chapter 21 2
pages 902 - 916)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

224
Week 14: Numerics for ODEs and PDEs (continued)
1. Methods for Parabolic PDEs
2. Methods for Hyperbolic PDEs

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1

No of Labs/Workshops/Practicals 1
Field Trip(s) 0

Readings:
Erwin Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley International Edition,9th Edition (Chapter 21 2
pages 922 - 929)
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2

Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

4.0 Assessment
Component Weighting Minimum Level
Assignment 5%
Class Exercises/Quizes 10% 50%
Short Tests 35%
Final Examination 50% 50%
Attendance N/A 75%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting
Assignment 1 Week 4 2.5%
Assignment 2 Week 9 2.5%
Class Test 1 Week 7 15%
Class Test 2 Week 13 20%
Quiz-1 Week 3 5%
Quiz-2 Week 11 5%

225
(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary for students get a
minimum attendence of 75% and pass the coursework and score at least 50% (ie. 50/100) in the final
examination. It is highly recommended that students attend all tutorials/labs/workshops. The following grading
system will be used:

Letter Grade Scale:


Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33-5.00
A 85-89 4.00-4.27
A- 80-84 3.73-3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33-3.60
B 70-74 3.00-3.27
B- 65-69 2.67-2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33-2.60
C 55-59 2.00-2.27
C- 50-54 1.67-1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33-1.60
D 40-44 1.00-1.27
D- 35-39 0.67-0.93
E Below 35 0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0
CT Credit Transfer 0
NV Null & Void for Dishonest Practice 0
I Results Withheld/Incompleste 0
Assessment
X Continuing course 0
DNC Did Not Complete 0
CP Compassionate Pass 0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0
PT Pass Teminating 0
P Pass 0
NP Not Passed 0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment


The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR).
All students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.

226
Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps
to get redress of their grievance.
Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and
reassessment. Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to
the HOD. The HOD will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.
Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your
work is found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In
more serious cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may
even lead to your expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagrism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing
service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and
adding proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly
your own work.
6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

227
LECTURER: TBA
OTHER LECTURERS: TBA

BEC701 Semester : 1 Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Design & Analysis of Credit Points 14
Timber Structures

LECTURES: Students are to attend 2 x 2 hours of lectures.


TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour of tutorial.
WORKSHOPS: N/A
LABS: N/A
SELF DIRECTED Students are to spend about 6 - 8 hours per week for this unit.
LEARNING
CONSULTATION TIME Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according
to the following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)

PREREQUISITE: Structural Mechanics for Engineers (BEC605)


E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the course shall be posted on Class
Shares.
TOTAL LEARNING HOURS: Contact Hours 82
Lectures 56
Tutorials 14
Labs/Workshops 0
Field Trips 12
Self Directed Learning (during term) 101
Self Directed Learning (Mid-Term Break) 12
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks) 15
Total Recommended Learning Hours 210

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to this course and hope that you will find it enriching and interesting.

1.1 Course Description


To introduce to the students the necessary knowledge for the design of timber structures.

1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes


Upon completion of this paper, students should be able to:
1.2.1. Abstract information from codes of practice as required for the design process.
1.2.2. Make appropriate use of structural design codes of New Zealand or Australia.

228
1.2.3. Describe the basic methods of design used in the Design Codes.
1.2.4. Discuss the load types and indicate reasonable value range for each.
1.2.5. Explore different loading combinations and determine worst load conditions.
1.2.6. Apply the ultimate limit design method to a simple timber structure.
1.2.7. Comment on the relationship between design methodology and serviceability.
1.2.8. Estimate wind loading on a structure in Fiji in accordande with New Zealand or
Australian Standards.
1.2.9. Calculate design live loads in accordance with the appropriate code of practice.
1.2.10. List the timber characteristics and correctly identify the characteristics of a timber sample.
1.2.11. Select an appropriate grade of timber required for a given duty.
1.2.12. Provide designs for common structural elements made of timber.
1.2.13. Analyse the elements and use the results to suggest suitable sizes for the members.
1.2.14. Analyse tension and compression members, design stringers and struts.
1.2.15. Analyse transversely loaded members; design cantilever and simply supported beams.
1.2.16. Describe the various methods for connecting members of a timber frame.

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1. Timber Design Guide by Dr. Andrew Buchanan, New Zealand Timber Industry Federation, Inc.,( 2007)

2.2 Supplementary Materials


2.2.1. Code of Practice for Light Timber Buildings not requiring specific design
2.2.2. Fiji National Building Code
2.2.3. Australian and New Zealand Standards

2.3 Class Shares

3.0 Course Content and Reading References


Week 1: Introduction
Review of the Design Timber Standard (NZS 4203 and 3603 and AS3600:2003), Serviceability and
Ultimate Limit State.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:

229
Sections 1.5 to 1.10, pages 270-280 of AS3600:2003 HB2.2-2003, and Section 5.4.3, page 66 of NZS 2
4203:1992
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7


Week 2: Wind Load
Wind Load analysis.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Sections 2.1 to 3.4.7, pages 9-28 of AS1170.2:1989 3
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 9


Week 3: Wind Load (Continued)
Wind Load analysis.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Sections 3.4.8 to 4.4.6 of AS1170.2:1989 3
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

230
Week 4: Floor Framing Plan
Computation of Dead Load and Live Load

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Sections 3.1.1 to 3.4.2.1, pages 25 - 29 of NZS 4203.2:1992 1
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 5: Floor Framing Plan (Continued)


Designing of the floor framing plan of a two (2) storey residential house.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
Field Trip 6
Readings:

Chapter 16 (pages 191-197) of Timber Design Guide by Dr. Andrew Buchanan 2


Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 6: Investigation of the Structural Stability


Structural Design of transversely loaded elements. The design included the determination of Flexural Strength,
Vertical Shear Strength, End Bearing Strength Strength, Actual Defelction of the beam (Beam Design includes
Floor Joist and Bearer).

No of Lectures 4

231
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:

Chapters 10 (pages 101-110), 11 (pages 117-123) and 16 (pages 191-197)of Timber Design Guide by 1
Dr. Andrew Buchanan

Sections 2.1.1 to 2.4.7 (pages 281-298) of AS3600:2003 Design Properties of Structural Timber 2
Elements
Sections 3.2.1 to 3.2.8 (pages 299-307) of AS3600:2003 Beam Design 1
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 7: Trusses
Structural Design Analysis of Timber trusses by Graphical and Analytical solution.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
Field Trip
6
Readings:
Chapter 18 (pages 207-213) of Timber Design Guide by Dr. Andrew Buchanan 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 8: Columns
Structural Design of Compression Members: Axially loaded columns.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:

232
Chapter 12 (pages 137-141) of Timber Design Guide by Dr. Andrew Buchanan 2
Sections 3.3 to 3.6.2 (pages 307-313) of AS3600:2003 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 9: Columns (Continued)


Structural Design of eccentrically loaded column , in one direction and in both directions.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 12 (pages 137-141) of Timber Design Guide by Dr. Andrew Buchanan 1
Sections 3.3 to 3.6.2 (pages 307-313) of AS3600:2003 1
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 10: Stresses in Inclined Plane


The Hankinson formulas for inclined stress in jointed connection.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Sections 4.4.1 to 4.4.6 (pages 331-344) of AS3600:2003 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7


Week 11: Top Chord

233
Structural Design of Top Chord of a Timber truss, Pure Compression Member or Compression Member
combined with bending.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Sections 10 (pages 87-115), and 11 (pages 117-122) of The Code of Practice for Light Timber Buildings 3
not Requiring Specific Design
Chapter 18 (pages 207-213) of Timber Design Guide by Dr. Andrew Buchanan 1
Sections 3.5 to 3.6 (pages 39-40) of NZS3603:1993 1
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8


Week 12: Bottom Chord
Structural Design of Bottom Chord of a Timber Truss.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc
0
0
Readings:
Chapter 18 (pages 207-213) of Timber Design Guide by Dr. Andrew Buchanan 2
Sections 3.4 to 3.6 (pages 39 - 40) of NZS3603:1993
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 13: Purlins


Design of Timber Roof Purlins.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

234
0
Readings:
Chapters 10, 11 , 15 (pages 181-189) of Timber Design Guide by Dr. Andrew Buchanan 1
Sections 2.1.1 to 2.4.7 (pages 281-298) of AS3600:2003 Design Properties of Structural Timber 1
Elements
Sections 3.2.1 to 3.2.8 (pages 299-307) of AS3600:2003 Beam Design 1
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6


Week 14: Purlins (Continued)
Design of Timber Roof Purlins.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapters 10, 11 , 15 (pages 181-189) of Timber Design Guide by Dr. Andrew Buchanan 3
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

4.0 Assessment
Minim
um
Component Weighting Level
Assignment 15%
Class Tests 35% 50%
Final Examination 50% 50%
Attendance N/A 75%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Weigh
Assessment Date
ting

235
Assignment 1 Week 7 7.5%
Assignment 2 Week 15 7.5%
Class Test 1 Week 7 17.5%
Class Test 2 Week 15 17.5%

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary to score at least 50% (ie.
50/100) in the final examination.

Letter Grade Scale: The following grading scales would be used


Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33 - 5.00
A 85-89 4.00 - 4.27
A- 80-84 3.73 - 3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33 - 3.60
B 70-74 3.00 - 3.27
B- 65-69 2.67 - 2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33 - 2.60
C 55-59 2.00 - 2.27
C- 50-54 1.67 - 1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33 - 1.60
D- 35-39 0.67 - 0.93
E Below 35 0.0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0.0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0.0
CT Credit Transfer 0.0
NV Null & Void for dishonest practice 0.0
I Result Withheld/Incomplete Assessment 0.0
X Continuing course 0.0
DNC Did not complete 0.0
CP Compassionate Pass 0.0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0.0
PT Pass Terminating 0.0
P Pass 0.0
NP Not Pass 0.0

236
Dissatisfaction with Assessment

The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR).
All students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.

Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps to
get redress of their grievance.
Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and reassessment.
Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to the HOD. The HOD
will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your work
is found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In more
serious cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may even
lead to your expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagiarism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing
service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and adding
proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly your
own work.

6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

237
LECTURER: TBA
OTHER LECTURERS: TBA

BEC702 Semester : 1 Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Design & Analysis of Credit
Steel Structures Points 14

LECTURES: Students are to attend 2 x 2 hours of lectures.


TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour of tutorial.
WORKSHOPS: N/A
LABS: N/A
SELF DIRECTED Students are to spend about 6 - 8 hours per week for this unit.
LEARNING
CONSULTATION TIME Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according to
the following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)

PREREQUISITE: Structural Mechanics for Engineers (BEC605)


E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the course shall be posted on
Class Shares. Students are required to check their emails regularly
for communication from the lecturer

TOTAL LEARNING Contact Hours


HOURS: 82
Lectures 56
Tutorials 14
Labs/Workshops 0
Field Trips 12
Self Directed Learning (during term) 99
Self Directed Learning (Mid-Term Break) 14
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks) 15
Total Recommended Learning Hours 210

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to this course and hope that you will find it enriching and interesting.

1.1 Course Description


To introduce to students the design construction and use of hot rolled and cold formed structural
steel as an alternative construction materials in design and construction of vertical structures ,
like completion of structural design leading to the construction of residential houses and buildings.

238
1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes
Upon completion of this paper, students will be able to:
1.2.1. Explain the general principles of structural steel design;
1.2.2. Explain the chemical composition of structural steel as a construction materials
1.2.3. Describe the basic methods of design used in the Design Codes (Australia or
New Zealand Standard).
1.2.4. Discuss the load types and indicate reasonable value range for each loading.
and explore different loading combinations to determine worse load conditions.
1.2.5. Apply the principle of Limit state design principle to a simple structure.
1.2.6. Explain the methods of structural analysis of steel structures.
1.2.7. Design structural steel members subject to bending
1.2.8. Design structural steel members subject to axial compression.
1.2.9. Design structural steel members subject to axial tension
1.2.10. Design structural steel members subject to combined actions.
1.2.11. Design a suitable steel connection for a particular duty using either bolts or welds.

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1. Design of steel structures , 2nd Edition [2009] by Boris Presler, T.Y. Lin and John B. Scalzi
2.1.2.Structural steelwork Design, 2nd Edition by L.J Morris and D.R. Plum, ISBN 0 -582 23088 -8
2.1.3. Australian Standard 3600 (HB 2.2 - 2003)

2.2 Supplementary Materials

2.2.1. Structural Steelwork (Design to Limit state Theory) by Dennis Lam , Thien Cheong Ang and
Sing-Ping Chiew ISBN 0 7506 59122
2.2.2.Steel Designers' Manual 6th Edition, The Steel Construction Institute , Edited by Buick Davison and
Graham Owens Blackwell Science
2.2.3. Fiji National Building Code
2.2.4. Australian and New Zealand Standards
2.2.5. Structural Steel Design 5th Edition by Jack C. McCormac

2.3 Class Shares

3.0 Course Content and Reading References

Week 1: Steel as Construction Materials


General principles of structural steel design ; which includes classification of steel
structures, connections, fabrication, erection, fire proofing, corrosion protection,

239
safety of structures and structural failures.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Chapter 1 pages 1-26 , Textbook - Design of Steel Structures by Boris Bresler, T.Y. Lin & John B. 3
Scalzi
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time)


6

Week 2: Properties of Steel


Materials of structural steel and brittle fracture and fatigue; mechanical properties, effect of
temperature, light gauge steel, wires and cables castings,bolt steel filler metal for welding.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
Readings:
Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 , pages 32 - 77 , Textbook - Design of Steel Structures by Boris Bresler, 3
T.Y. Lin & John B. Scalzi

Revision of lecture notes 3


Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 3: Theory of Beam Design Using Structural Steel


Structural steel beams in building, including design of members subject to bending ( with full
lateral restraint and beams without full lateral restraint)

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

240
0
Readings:
Section 5, AS 3600 (HB 2.2 -2003), pages 173 - 201 3
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 4: Procedural Step of Structural Steel Beam Design


Structural Design of transversely loaded elements. The design includes the determination of
Flexural strength (Nominal Section Capacity) , Vertical Shear Strength (Nominal Web Member
Capacity), beam crippling and finding actual beam deflection.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Section 5, AS 3600 (HB 2.2 -2003), pages 173 to 201 4
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 5: Portal Frame


Elastic Design, plastic design, serviceability check for eaves deflection

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 9 , Portal Frames , page 246 - 282 , Structural Steelwork (Design to Limit State Theory) 3
by Dennis Lam , Thien Cheong Ang and Sing -Ping Chiew, ISBN 0 7506 59122
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

241
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 6: Pure Compression Member


Structural Design of pure compression members

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0

Readings:
Section 6, AS 3600 (HB 2.2 -2003), pages 202 to 211 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 7: Pure Tension Members


Structural Design of pure tension members

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
Field Trip 6
Readings:
Section 7, AS 3600 (HB 2.2 -2003), pages 212 to 214 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 8: Beams Subject to Combined Action


Structural Design of steel members subject to combined action

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1

242
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Section 8, AS 3600 (HB 2.2 -2003), pages 215 to 221 2
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 9: Connections
Connections and details of structural steel members

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
Field Trip
Readings:
Section 9, AS 3600 (HB 2.2 -2003), pages 223 to 242 3
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 10:Erection and Fabrication


Erection and Fabrication of different parts of structural steel building

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Section 14 and 15, AS 3600 (HB 2.2 -2003), pages 243 to 258 3
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

243
Week 11: Crane Girders
Analysis and design of Crane Girders

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 5 , pages 52 - 64 Textbook: Structural steelwork Design, 2nd Edition by L.J Morris and 2
D.R. Plum

Revision of lecture notes 2


Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 12: Construction of Portal Frame


Single storey building - Portal Frame construction

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 13 , pages 226 - 279 Textbook: Structural steelwork Design, 2nd Edition by L.J Morris 3
and D.R. Plum

Revision of lecture notes 3


Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 13: Construction of Portal Frame (Continued)


Single storey building - Portal Frame construction

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1

244
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 13 , pages 226 - 279 Textbook: Structural steelwork Design, 2nd Edition by L.J Morris 3
and D.R. Plum
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 14: Steelwork Detailing


Drawings, general recommendations, steel sections, bolts welds trusses and lattice girders

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 12 , Sttelwork detailing, page338-349 , Structural Steelwork (Design to Limit State 2
Theory)
by Dennis Lam , Thien Cheong Ang and Sing -Ping Chiew, ISBN 0 7506 59122
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

4.0 Assessment
Component Weighting Minimum Level
Assignment 20%
Class Tests 30% 50%
Workshops N/A
Final Examination 50% 50%
Attendance N/A 75%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:

245
Assessment Date Weighting
Assignment 1 Week 8 10%
Assignment 2 Week 13 10%
Class Test 1 Week 7 15%
Class Test 2 Week 13 15%

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary to score at least 50% (ie.
50/100) in the final examination.

Letter Grade Scale: The following grading scales would be used


Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33 - 5.00
A 85-89 4.00 - 4.27
A- 80-84 3.73 - 3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33 - 3.60
B 70-74 3.00 - 3.27
B- 65-69 2.67 - 2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33 - 2.60
C 55-59 2.00 - 2.27
C- 50-54 1.67 - 1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33 - 1.60
D- 35-39 0.67 - 0.93
E Below 35 0.0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0.0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0.0
CT Credit Transfer 0.0
NV Null & Void for dishonest practice 0.0
I Result Withheld/Incomplete Assessment 0.0
X Continuing course 0.0
DNC Did not complete 0.0
CP Compassionate Pass 0.0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0.0
PT Pass Terminating 0.0
P Pass 0.0
NP Not Pass 0.0

246
Dissatisfaction with Assessment
The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR).
All students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.

Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps to
get redress of their grievance.

Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and reassessment.
Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to the HOD. The HOD
will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your work
is found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In more
serious cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may even
lead to your expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagiarism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing
service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and adding
proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly your
own work.

6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

247
LECTURER: TBA
OTHER LECTURERS: TBA

BEC703 Semester : 1 Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Geotechnical Engineering Credit Points 16

LECTURES: Students are to attend 2 x 2 hours of lectures.


TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour of tutorial.
WORKSHOPS: N/A
LABS: N/A
SELF DIRECTED Students are to spend about 6 - 10 hours per week for this unit.
LEARNING
CONSULTATION TIME Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according
to the following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)

PREREQUISITE: Geomechanics (BEC603)


E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the course shall be posted on Class
Shares. Students are required to check their emails regularly for
communication from the lecturer
TOTAL LEARNING HOURS: Contact Hours 82
Lectures 56
Tutorials 14
Labs/Workshops 0
Field Trips 12
Self Directed Learning (during term) 115
Self Directed Learning (Mid-Term Break) 20
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks) 23
Total Recommended Learning Hours 240

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to this course and hope that you will find it enriching and interesting.

1.1 Course Description


The unit deals the importance of soil exploration in determining the properties and behaviour
of soil subjected to self weight and external load of vertical engineering structure. It also includes
design and analysis of bearing capacity of soil foundation, lateral earth pressure exerted by soil
on retaining walls, design and analysis of cantilever and anchored sheet pile wall, axial capacity of
single pile and group of piles used as foundation, and bearing capacity of rock foundation.

248
1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes
Upon completion of this paper, students will be able to:
1.2.1. Calculate shear strength of cohesive and cohesionless soil (graphical and analytical solution).
1.2.2. Analyze bearing capacity of shallow foundation using Terzaghi principle.
1.2.3. Analyze bearing capacity of shallow foundation using Meyerhof principle.
1.2.4. Calculate lateral earth pressure on retaining wall by Rankine Theory.
1.2.5. Calculate lateral earth pressure on retaining wall by Coulomb Wedge Theory.
1.2.6. Design and proportioning of concrete retaining Walls.
1.2.7. Design a Cantilevered Sheet Pile Wall.
1.2.8. Design an Anchored Sheet Pile Wall.
1.2.9. Analyze slope stability of road embankment by Swedish/ordinary method of slices.
1.2.10. Analyze slope stability of road embankment by Bishop's simplified method of slices.
1.2.11. Pile Driving formulas; Engineering News formula and Danish formula
1.2.12. Calculate axial capacity of single pile and group of piles foundations.
1.2.13. Calculate bearing capacity of rock foundations.

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1. Principles of Foundation Engineering by Braja M. Das, 6th Edition [2007], ISBN-13: 978 - 0 - 495 - 08246 - 0

2.2 Supplementary Materials


2.2.1. Foundation Design by Wayne C. Teng; ISBN-0-87692-033

2.3 Class Shares

3.0 Course Content and Reading References

Week 1: Sub Surface Exploration


Purpose and importance of subsurface exploration; preparation of boring logs.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Chapter 2, pages 60 - 120 ;Principles of Foundation Engineering by Braja M. Das 6th Edition 5
Revision of lecture notes 3

249
Solving Problems 0
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 2: Shear Strength of Soil


Shear strength of cohesive and cohesionless soil (graphical and analytical solution).

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 1, Section 1.15 -Section 1.19 pages 43 - 53 ;Principles of Foundation Engineering by Braja M. Das 2
6th Edition

Revision of lecture notes 3


Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 3: Terzaghi's Bearing Capacity Theory


Shallow foundations: Ultimate Bearing Capacity using Terzaghi's bearing capacity theory.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 3, Section 3.1 - Section 3.5 pages 121 - 130 ;Principles of Foundation Engineering by Braja M. Das 2
6th Edition
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 9

Week 4: Meyerhof's Bearing Capacity Theory


Shallow foundations: Ultimate Bearing Capacity using Meyerhof's bearing capacity theory.

No of Lectures 4

250
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 3, Section 3.6 - Section 3.9 pages 131 - 140 ;Principles of Foundation Engineering by Braja M. 2
Das 6th Edition
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 5: Rankine Theory


Calculation of Lateral earth pressure on retaining wall by Rankine Theory.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 7, pages 308 - 352;Principles of Foundation Engineering by Braja M. Das 6th Edition 4
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 10

Week 6: Coulomb Wedge Theory


Calculation of lateral earth pressure on retaining wall by Coulomb Wedge Theory.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
Field Trip 6
Readings:
Chapter 7, pages 308 - 352;Principles of Foundation Engineering by Braja M. Das 6th Edition 2
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

251
Week 7: Retaining Wall
Proportioning and structural stability of retaining walls.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 8, pages 353 - 407;Principles of Foundation Engineering by Braja M. Das 6th Edition 4
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 10

Week 8: Cantilevered Sheet Pile Wall


Design and analysis of Cantilevered Sheet Pile Wall.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 9, pages 409 - 464;Principles of Foundation Engineering by Braja M. Das 6th Edition 5
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 10

Week 9: Anchored Sheet Pile Wall


Design and analysis of Anchored Sheet Pile Wall.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
Field Trip 6
Readings:
Chapter 9, pages 409 - 464;Principles of Foundation Engineering by Braja M. Das 6th Edition 2
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 3

252
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 10: Slope Stability of Road Embankment


Analysis of slope stability by Swedish/ordinary method of slices.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings
Chapter 9, Stability of slopes (pages366 -370), Textbook: Soil Mechanics, 5th Edition by R.F. Craig 1
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 6

Week 11: Slope Stability of Road Embankment (Continued)


Analysis of slope stability by Bishop's simplified method of slices.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Slope stability - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki , slope stability 3
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

Week 12: Foundation on Piles


Pile Driving formulas ,axial capacity of single Pile foundations and Group Piles

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0

253
Readings:
Pile Driving formulas - Section 11.19, Chapter 11, pages 562 - 568 , Principles of Foundation 1
Engineering by Braja M. Das, 6th Edition
Single Pile - Section 11.6 , pages 509 - 561, Principles of Foundation Engineering by Braja M. Das 4
Group Piles - Section 11.22 ,pages 573 -581, Principles of Foundation Engineering by Braja M. Das 1
Revision of lecture notes 1
Solving Problems 1
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8
Week 13: Applications of Rock Mechanics to Foundation Engineering
Rock foundations, stresses and deflections in rock under footings, deep foundations in rock,
subsiding and swelling rocks.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 9 (pqges341 -383) 4
Introduction to Rock Mechanics 2nd Edition by Richard Goodman ISBN 0-471 -81200-5
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 14: Applications of Rock Mechanics to Foundation Engineering (Continued)


Allowable bearing pressures on footings on rock.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 9 (pqges341 -383) 2
Introduction to Rock Mechanics 2nd Edition by Richard Goodman ISBN 0-471 -81200-5
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 7

254
4.0 Assessment
Component Weighting Minimum Level
Assignment 20%
Class Tests 30% 50%
Final Examination 50% 50%
Attendance N/A 75%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting
Assignment 1 Week 3 3%
Assignment 2 Week 5 3%
Assignment 3 Week 7 4%
Assignment 4 Week 10 4%
Assignment 5 Week 12 3%
Assignment 6 Week 13 3%
Class Test 1 Week 7 15%
Class Test 2 Week 13 15%

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary to score at least 50% (ie.
50/100) in the final examination.
Letter Grade Scale: The following grading scales would be used
Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33 - 5.00
A 85-89 4.00 - 4.27
A- 80-84 3.73 - 3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33 - 3.60
B 70-74 3.00 - 3.27
B- 65-69 2.67 - 2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33 - 2.60
C 55-59 2.00 - 2.27
C- 50-54 1.67 - 1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33 - 1.60
D- 35-39 0.67 - 0.93
E Below 35 0.0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0.0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0.0

255
CT Credit Transfer 0.0
NV Null & Void for dishonest practice 0.0
I Result Withheld/Incomplete Assessment 0.0
X Continuing course 0.0
DNC Did not complete 0.0
CP Compassionate Pass 0.0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0.0
PT Pass Terminating 0.0
P Pass 0.0
NP Not Pass 0.0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment


The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR).
All students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.

Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps to
get redress of their grievance.
Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and reassessment.
Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to the HOD. The HOD
will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your work
is found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In more
serious cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may even
lead to your expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagiarism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing
service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and adding
proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly your
own work.

6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

256
LECTURER: TBA
OTHER LECTURERS: TBA

BEC704 Semester : 1 Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Engineering Hydrology Credit Points 16

LECTURES: Students are to attend 2 x 2 hours of lectures.


TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour of tutorial.
WORKSHOPS: N/A
LABS: N/A
SELF DIRECTED Students are to spend about 8 - 12 hours per week for this unit.
LEARNING
CONSULTATION TIME Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according to
the following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)
PREREQUISITE: Hydraulics 2 (BEC607)
E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the course shall be posted on Class
Shares. Students are required to check their emails regularly for
communication from the lecturer

TOTAL LEARNING HOURS: Contact Hours 70


Lectures 56
Tutorials 14
Labs/Workshops 0
Self Directed Learning (during term) 157
Self Directed Learning (Mid-Term Break) 6
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks) 7
Total Recommended Learning Hours 240

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to the Bachelor of Civil Engineering Programme and hope that you will find it enriching and
interesting. This course will introduce to you the scientific principles of determining the flood design discharge
of rivers for purposes of water engineering structures design.

1.1 Course Description


To introduce to the students the scientific principles of calculating design discharge "Q" of a river for
design purposes of water engineering structures ( i.e, dam, spillway, culverts bridges and others).

1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes


Upon completion of this unit, students will be able to:

257
1.2.1. Explain the Hydrologic cycle; uses of engineering hydrology; surface runoff, flood hydrology and catchment
scale; basic hydrologic principles, precipitation, temporal and spatial variation of precipitation and storm
analysis
1.2.2. Explain the composition of the atmosphere; vertical divisions of the atmosphere; heat exchange
processes in the atmosphere; air temperature; atmospheric pressure.
1.2.3. Explain the meaning of Hydrologic abstractions and estimate the amount of infiltration , evapotranspiration,
and percolation capacity of soil.
1.2.4. Explain the hydrologic instruments used in measurement of precipitation, evaporation and
evapotranspiration, infiltration and soil moisture measurements
1.2.5. Determine design dischage of a river using Log Pearson III probabilistic analysis (Annual series &
partial series) based on Australian Rainfall and Runoff, Volume 1 and Volume 2.
1.2.6. Determine design dischage of a river by Probabilistic Rational Method using the Intensity Frequency
Duration Curve (IFD Curve) for a return period of 1,2,5,10,20,50 or 100 years .
1.2.7. Determine design dischage of a river by Probabilistic Rational Method using the Unit hydrograph.
1.2.8. The Unit Hydrograph method of estimating design discharge of a river
1.2.9. Determine design dischage of a river using runoff routing equation.

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1. Engineering Hydrology by Victor Miguel Ponce – Internet [2007]
2.1.2 Australian Rainfall and Runoff - Volume 1 and Volume 2
2.1.3 Water and Wastewater Technology , 6th Edition Mark J. Hammer and Mark J. Hammer Jr.
ISBN 0-13- 17452 -5
2.1.4 Manual of Meterology, Department of the Environment and Heritage, Bureau of Meteorology, Australia

2.2 Supplementary Materials


2.2.1 Hydrology and the Management of Watersheds by Kenneth B rooks, Peter F. Ffolliot, Hans M. Gregersen and
Leonard F. Debano, ISBN 0-8138 - 2985 -2
2.2.2 Holman J.P. Heat Transfer, 8th Edition, McGraw-Hill, 1997.
2.2.3 Incropera F.P. & De Witt D.P. Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer, 5th Ed. Wiley, 2001
2.2.4 Sayers A. Fluid Mechanics 2nd Edition, McGraw-Hill, 2002
2.2.5 Engineering Hydrology by E.M. Wilson ISBN 333-17443-7
2.2.6 Applied Hydrology by Ven Te Chow, David R. Maidment & Larry W. Mays, McGraw-Hill Book Company,
ISBN 0-07-100174-4

2.3 Class Shares

3.0 Course Content and Reading References

258
Week 1:Introduction
Definition of Hydrology and engineering hydrology; the Hydrologic cycle; uses of engineering hydrology;
surface runoff, flood hydrology and catchment scale; basic hydrologic principles, precipitation, temporal
and spatial variation of precipitation and storm analysis.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Chapters 1 & 2 (pages 1- 32), Engineering Hydrology, Principles and Practices by Victor Miguel Ponce 4
Revision of lecture notes 2
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 2: Atmosphere
The composition of the atmosphere; vertical divisions of the atmosphere; heat exchange processes in the
atmosphere; air temperature; atmospheric pressure

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapters 1 to 5(pages 1 - 18), Manual of Meterology, Department of the Environment and Heritage, 7
Bureau of Meteorology, Australia
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 0
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

Week 3: Basic Hydrologic Principles


Hydrologic abstractions ; infiltration formulas and indexes ,evaporation, percolation, evapotranspiration
catchment properties and surface runoff, stream types and baseflow and river stages.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1

259
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 2 (pages 33 - 76), Engineering Hydrology, Principles and Practices by Victor Miguel Ponce 4
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

Week 4: Basic Hydrologic principles (Continued)


Flow rating curves; their determination, adjustment and extension; duration of run off; catchments
characteristics and their effects on run off, climatic factors, rainfall, run off correlation.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 2 (pages 77 - 83), Engineering Hydrology, Principles and Practices by Victor Miguel Ponce 2
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

Week 5: Hydrologic Measurements


Explain the hydrologic instruments used in measurement of precipitation, evaporation and
evapotranspiration, infiltration and soil moisture measurements

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 3 (pages 94 - 114) , Engineering Hydrology, Principles and Practices by Victor Miguel Ponce 3
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

260
Week 6: Frequency Analysis
Determination of design discharge of a river using Log Pearson III Probabilistic Analysis
(Annual series and partial series) for an Annual Exceedance Probability (design period) of 1,2 5, 10 ,20,50 and 100
years; Treatment of flood outliers based on Australian standard (ARR Vol 1 and Vol 2).

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 6 (pages 217 - 223), Engineering Hydrology, Principles and Practices by Victor Miguel Ponce 1
Section 2, Book 4 ( pages 25 -page 64) Australian Rainfall and Runoff - Volume 1 5
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 7: Hydrology of Small Catchments


Hydrology of small catchments : determination of design discharge of a river by Probabilistic Rational Method
or deterministic method using the Intensity Frequency Duration (IFD) curve.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 4 (pages 118 - 132), Engineering Hydrology, Principles and Practices by Victor Miguel Ponce 2
Section 1.3.2, Book 4 ( pages 3 - 21) Australian Rainfall and Runoff - Volume 1 3
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

Week 8: Hydrology of Midsize Catchments


Hydrology of midsize catchments; determination of design discharge of a river using unit hydrograph analysis.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

261
0
Readings:
Section 5.2 Chapter 5 (pages 167-189), Engineering Hydrology, Principles and Practices
by Victor Miguel Ponce 3
Section 2, Book 5 ( pages 25 -page 47) Australian Rainfall and Runoff - Volume 1 3
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 9: Hydrology of Midsize Catchments (Continued)


Continuation of determination of design discharge of a river using unit hydrograph analysis including change of
unit hydrograph by method of superposition, S-Hydrograph Method. Derivation of composite flood hydrograph
based on unit hydrograph using Hydrograph convolution
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
Readings:
Section 5.2 Chapter 5 (pages 167 - 189), Engineering Hydrology, Principles and Practices by
Victor Miguel Ponce 2
Section 2, Book 5 ( pages 25 -page 47) Australian Rainfall and Runoff - Volume 1 2
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

Week 10: Reservoir Routing


Determination of design discharge of a river using runoff routing equation(Puls Equation).

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Chapter 8 (pages 252 - 301), Engineering Hydrology, Principles and Practices by Victor Miguel Ponce 4
Section 1, Book 5 ( pages 1-page 24) Australian Rainfall and Runoff - Volume 1 3
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

262
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 11: Reservoir Routing (continued)


Determination of design discharge of a river through a channel using Level Pool routing
equation and by Muskingum routing equation
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 8 (pages 252 - 301), Engineering Hydrology, Principles and Practices by Victor Miguel Ponce 2
Section 1, Book 5 ( pages 1-page 24) Australian Rainfall and Runoff - Volume 1 2
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

Week 12: Ground Water Hydrology


Ground Water : Introduction, basic concept, storage and movement of Groundwater

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 5, pages 107 - 150 : Hydrology and the Management of Watersheds by Kenneth B rooks, 4
Peter F. Ffolliot, Hans M. Gregersen and Leonard F. Debano, ISBN 0-8138 - 2985 -2
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11
Week 13: Ground Water Hydrology
Analysis of hydraulic conductivity of multiple bores for confined & unconfined aquifer

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:

263
Chapter 4 (pages 126 - 131)Water and Wastewater Technology , 6th Edition Mark J. Hammer and Mark J.
Hammer Jr., ISBN 0-13- 17452 -5
Revision of lecture notes 7
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 14: Ground Water Hydrology (continued)


Analysis of hydraulic conductivity of multiple bores for confined & unconfined aquifer

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 4 (pages 126 - 131)Water and Wastewater Technology , 6th Edition Mark J. Hammer and Mark J.
Hammer Jr., ISBN 0-13- 17452 -5
Revision of lecture notes 12
Solving Problems 0
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

4.0 Assessment
Component Weighting Minimum Level
Assignment 25%
Class Tests 25% 50%
Final Examination 50% 50%
Attendance N/A 75%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting
Assignment 1 Week 8 10%
i) Computer Exercises - Preparation of flood frequency analysis(Annual series and partial series), using
Log Pearson 3 Probabilistic Analysis using stream flow record of a river with at least 50 years of record
Assignment 2 Week 10 5%
ii) Computer Exercises - Preparation of Intensity Frequency Duration Curve , using ARR Volume 1 and Volume
2

264
iii) Computer exercises - Calculation of Design Discharge of a river with a return period of 1,2,5,10,20,50 and
100 years
Assignment No.3 Week 13 10%
iv) Computer exercises : Calculation of design discharge of a river using Runoff routing method(Puls equation,
Muskingum Method and level pool routing method
Class Test 1 Week 7 13%
Class Test 2 Week 13 12%

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary to score at least 50% (ie.
50/100) in the final examination.

Letter Grade Scale: The following grading scales would be used


Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33 - 5.00
A 85-89 4.00 - 4.27
A- 80-84 3.73 - 3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33 - 3.60
B 70-74 3.00 - 3.27
B- 65-69 2.67 - 2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33 - 2.60
C 55-59 2.00 - 2.27
C- 50-54 1.67 - 1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33 - 1.60
D- 35-39 0.67 - 0.93
E Below 35 0.0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0.0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0.0
CT Credit Transfer 0.0
NV Null & Void for dishonest practice 0.0
I Result Withheld/Incomplete Assessment 0.0
X Continuing course 0.0
DNC Did not complete 0.0
CP Compassionate Pass 0.0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0.0
PT Pass Terminating 0.0
P Pass 0.0
NP Not Pass 0.0

265
Dissatisfaction with Assessment
The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR). All
students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.

Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps to
get redress of their grievance.

Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and reassessment.
Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to the HOD. The HOD
will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your work is
found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In more serious
cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may even lead to
your expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagiarism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and adding
proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly your
own work.
6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

266
LECTURER: TBA
OTHER LECTURERS: TBA

BEC705 Semester : 2 Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Reinforced Concrete Structures Credit Points 16

LECTURES: Students are to attend 2 x 2 hours of lectures.


TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour of tutorial.
WORKSHOPS: N/A
LABS: N/A
SELF DIRECTED Students are to spend about 10 - 12 hours per week for this unit.
LEARNING
CONSULTATION TIME Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according to
the following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)

PREREQUISITE: Structural Mechanics for Engineers (BEC605)


E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the course shall be posted on Class
Shares. Students are required to check their emails regularly for
communication from the lecturer

TOTAL LEARNING HOURS: Contact Hours 70


Lectures 56
Tutorials 14
Labs/Workshops 0
Self Directed Learning (during term) 158
Self Directed Learning (Mid-Term Break) 6
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks) 6
Total Recommended Learning Hours 240

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to this course and hope that you will find it enriching and interesting.

1.1 Course Description


To introduce to the students the theoretical principles and theories of design of reinforced
concrete structures, which includes strength design principles of reinforced concrete beams,
suspended floor slab and concrete column using the design criteria of AS3600. It also
encompasses the study of theories and principle of design of prestressed concrete beams
and slabs.

267
1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes
Upon completion of this unit, students will be able to:
1.2.1. Have a broad knowledge of reinforced concrete design principles and theories and the proper
construction materials specifications of reinforced to construct a durable reinforced concrete structures.
1.2.2. Describe standard test for determining the compressive strength of concrete (fc') and
workability of fresh concrete in the form.
1.2.3. Describe the determination of concrete steel cover based on durability, exposure
classifications and fire resistance capacity of concrete structures.
1.2.4. Design and investigate the strength capacity of reinforced concrete rectangular beams,
T Beams , L - beams , continuous beams whether singly or doubly reinforced .
1.2.5. Design a rectangular concrete beam based on the combined effect of shear, bending moment and torsion.
1.2.6. Design a suspended reinforced concrete slab whether one way, two way or a flat slab or a flat plate slab.
1.2.7. Design a short & slender reinforced concrete column.
1.2.8. Design a prestressed reinforced concrete beam and floor slab.

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1. Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes [1998], ISBN 0 582 80247 4
2.1.2. Reinforced Concrete Basics - Analysis and Design of Reinfroced Concrete Structures,
R.J. Warner, S.J. Foster and Kilpatrick, ISBN 978 0 7339 8869 1
2.1.3. Australian Standards on Concrete Structures AS 3600, New Zealand Standards on Concrete Structures
2.1.4.New Zealand Standards on Concrete Structures, NZS 3101

2.2 Supplementary Materials


2.2.1 Reinforced Concrete Structures , Analysis and Design by David Fanella
ISBN 978 -0-07 -163834 -0

2.3 Class Shares

3.0 Course Content and Reading References

Week 1: Concrete an Overview


Reinforced concrete, an overview: cement and concrete, reinforcing steel bars load paths, prestressed
concrete and structural concrete, construction methods, loads and actions, example of layout of a
reinforced concrete building.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1

268
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Chapter 1, (pages 1 - 27) Reinforced Concrete Basics - Analysis and Design of Reinfroced Concrete 4
Structures, R.J. Warner , S.J. Foster and Kilpatrick
Reading lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

Week 2: Concrete Technology


Methods of analysis and design of reinforced concrete structures .

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 2, (pages 29 - 58) Reinforced Concrete Basics - Analysis and Design of Reinfroced Concrete 3
Structures, R.J. Warner , S.J. Foster and Kilpatrick
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

Week 3: Reinforced Concrete Beams


Reinforced concrete beams in bending: behaviour in flexure, analysis of flexural behaviour, Elastic Analysis
of
cracked sections, moment curvature relations at overload , failure criteria , effect of sustained load;
creep and shrinkage.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 5 ( pages 79 - 110)Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes 4
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

269
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 4: Moment Capacity of Reinforced Concrete Beams


Moment capacity of reinforced concrete beams: Concrete compressive stress block, Rectangular stress block,
balanced section, moment capacity for beams with compressive reinforcement.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 7 ( pages 150 - 166)Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes 3
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

Week 5: Strength and Ductility


Strength and ductility of reinforced concrete beams: proportioning a section for strength and ductility
proportioning of doubly reinforced beams.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 7( pages 166 - 175)Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes 2
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

Week 6: Design of Statically Determinate Beams


Design of statically determinate beams: Design steps for non prestressed beams
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

270
0
Readings:
Chapter 15 ( pages 441 - 445)Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes 1
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 10

Week 7: Continuous Beams


Design of continuous beams
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 16 (pages 474 - 479)Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes 1
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 10

Week 8: Effect of Torsion in Beam Design


Design of reinforced concrete beams ( combined bending , shear and torsion - design according to AS3600.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 13 (page 356 - page 377)Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes 3
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

Week 9: Suspended Floor Slabs


Slabs and Floor system Methods of analysis for slabs and floor system, design of reinforced concrete slab
and floor system( one way slab, two slab , flat slab, flat plate slab)
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1

271
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Chapters 17,18,19 (pages 517 - 551) Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes 4
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 10: Concrete Columns


Concrete Columns : Strength and design of short columns, slenderness effects in isolated colums and
building frames
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Chapter 22 (pages 664 - 700) Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes 5
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 11: Concrete Columns (continued)


Concrete Columns : slenderness effects in isolated columns and building frames
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 23 (pages 707 - 747) Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes 5
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 12: Prestressed Beams


Flexure in beams with prestressed: effect of prestressed on beam behaviour, behaviour of uncracked beam
Equivalent load concept, load balancing, post cracking behaviour in flexure.

272
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 6 (pages 112 - 142) Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes 5
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 13: Prestressed Beams (Continued)


Design of prestressed beams according to AS3600
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 15 (pages 445 - 461) Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes 3
Revision of lecture notes 6
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 14: Prestressed Beams (continued)


Design of prestressed slab according to AS3600

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 15 (pages 445 - 461) Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes 2
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

273
Note: Design of reinforced member shall be done using AS3600.

4.0 Assessment
Component Weighting Minimum Level
Assignment 20% 50%
Class Tests 30% 50%
Final Examination 50% 50%
Attendance N/A 75%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting
Assignment 1 Week 8 10.0%
Complete design of continuous beam ( load analysis, proportioning of size of the beam using maximum
moment,
shear analysis, check beam deflections, structural details showing bar details at each span of the beam
Assignment 2 Week 13 10.0%
Complete design of two way slab, column, and prestressed beam
Class Test 1 Week 7 15%
Class Test 2 Week 13 15%

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary to score at least 50% (ie.
50/100) in the final examination.
Letter Grade Scale: The following grading scales would be used
Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33 - 5.00
A 85-89 4.00 - 4.27
A- 80-84 3.73 - 3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33 - 3.60
B 70-74 3.00 - 3.27
B- 65-69 2.67 - 2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33 - 2.60
C 55-59 2.00 - 2.27
C- 50-54 1.67 - 1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33 - 1.60
D- 35-39 0.67 - 0.93
E Below 35 0.0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0.0

274
W Withdrawn from Unit 0.0
CT Credit Transfer 0.0
NV Null & Void for dishonest practice 0.0
I Result Withheld/Incomplete Assessment 0.0
X Continuing course 0.0
DNC Did not complete 0.0
CP Compassionate Pass 0.0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0.0
PT Pass Terminating 0.0
P Pass 0.0
NP Not Pass 0.0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment


The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR). All
students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.

Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps to
get redress of their grievance.
Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and reassessment.
Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to the HOD. The HOD
will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your work is
found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In more serious
cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may even lead to
your expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagiarism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and adding
proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly your
own work.
6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

275
LECTURER: TBA
OTHER LECTURERS: TBA

BEC706 Semester : 2 Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Foundation Engineering Credit Points 14

LECTURES: Students are to attend 2 x 2 hours of lectures.


TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour of tutorial.
WORKSHOPS: N/A
LABS: N/A
SELF DIRECTED Students are to spend about 9 - 10 hours per week for this unit.
LEARNING
CONSULTATION TIME Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according to
the following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)
PREREQUISITE: Structural Mechanics for Engineers (BEN605)
E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the course shall be posted on Class
Shares. Students are required to check their emails regularly for
communication from the lecturer
TOTAL LEARNING HOURS: Contact Hours 70
Lectures 56
Tutorials 14
Labs/Workshops 0
Self Directed Learning (during term) 131
Self Directed Learning (Mid-Term Break) 4
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks) 5
Total Recommended Learning Hours 210

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to this course and hope that you will find it enriching and interesting.

1.1 Course Description


The aim of the unit is to teach the students the design principle of proportioning and designing
different kinds of foundation structures used to carry the structural loads of vertical engineering
structures. The syllabus includes the design of block wall footing, independent square pad footing ,
rectangular and combined footings, continuous footing, mat foundation, footing on piles and
concrete design analysis of gravity retaining wall.

1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes


Upon completion of this unit, students will be able to:

276
1.2.1. Perform design analysis and calculation of block wall footing;
1.2.2. Design and proportion square, rectangular and circular spread/pad footing;
1.2.3. Design and proportion combined footing;
1.2.4. Design and proportion continuous footing;
1.2.5. Design footing on piles;
1.2.6. Analyze and design Raft/Mat foundations
1.2.7. Design and proportion concrete gravity retaining wall.

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1. Reinforced Concrete Structures, Analysis and Design by David A. Fanella [2011]
2.1.2. Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes [1998], ISBN 0 582 80247 4
2.1.3. Design standard AS 3600 , 2003

2.2 Supplementary Materials


2.2.1 Principle of Foundation Engineering, 5th Edition by Braja M. Das ISBN -534-40752-8

2.3 Class Shares

3.0 Course Content and Reading References

Week 1: Foundations
Different kinds of shallow foundations and deep foundations
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Chapter 10, ( pages 521 - 528) Reinforced Concrete Structures, Analysis and Design by David A. Fanella 1
Chapter 28(pages 844 - 846)Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes 1
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 9

Week 2: Design Strength Parameters of Foundations


Concrete cover, spacing of reinforcing steel bars , compressive strength of concrete.
No of Lectures 4

277
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Section 3 (pages 632 -658) AS300-2003
Revision of lecture notes 6
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 9

Week 3: Allowable Bearing Capacity of Soil Foundation


Loads and reactions, sizing the base area, soil pressure distribution, general design procedure
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 10, ( pages 528 - 534 Reinforced Concrete Structures, Analysis and Design by David A. Fanella 1
Chapter 28 (pages 847 - 852) Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes 1
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 9

Week 4: Strip Footing


Design of strip footing (Block wall footing)
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 28 (pages 853 - 854) Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes
5
Revision of lecture notes
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 9

Week 5: Isolated Square Footing


Design analysis of isolated column square footing (eccentrically loaded).

278
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 28 (pages 852 - 853) Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes 1
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 9

Week 6: Rectangular Footing


Design analysis of isolated column rectangular footing (eccentrically loaded).
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 28 (pages 852 - 853) Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes 1
Supplemental Lecture notes on design of rectangular footing using AS3600 shall be provided by the unit
lecturer.

Revision of lecture notes 4


Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 9

Week 7: Circular Footing


Design analysis of isolated column circular footing (eccentrically loaded).
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 28 (pages 852 - 853) Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes 1
Supplemental Lecture notes on design of circular footing using AS3600 shall be provided by the unit lecturer.
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0

279
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 9

Week 8: Combined Rectangular Footing


Design analysis of Combined rectangular combined footing (axially loaded and eccentrically loaded)
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 10, ( pages 533 - 551) Reinforced Concrete Structures, Analysis and Design by David A. Fanella 3
Chapter 28 (pages 854 - 858)Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes 1
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 0
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 9

Week 9: Combined Trapezoidal Footing


Design analysis of Combined Trapezoidal footing(eccentrically loaded)
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
Readings:
Chapter 10, ( pages 533 - 551) Reinforced Concrete Structures, Analysis and Design by David A. Fanella 2
Chapter 28 (pages 854 - 858)Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes 1
Supplemental Lecture notes on design of combined trapezoidal footing using AS3600 shall be provided by
the unit Lecturer.

Revision of lecture notes 3


Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 9

Week 10: Footing on Piles


Design analysis of footing on piles
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:

280
Chapter 10, ( pages 587 - 596) Reinforced Concrete Structures, Analysis and Design by David A. Fanella 1
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 10

Week 11: Mat Foundation


Design analysis of mat/raft foundations
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 10, (pages 578- 587) Reinforced Concrete Structures, Analysis and Design by David A. Fanella 1
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 10

Week 12: Retaining Wall


Design analysis of concrete cantilever retaining wall
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 28 (pages 858 - 868) Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes 2
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 10

Week 13: Counterfort Retaining Wall


Design analysis of concrete counterfort retaining wall
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:

281
Chapter 28 (pages 858 - 868) Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes 1
Supplemental Lecture notes on design of concrete counterfort retaining wall shall be provided by the unit 2
lecturer.
Revision of lecture notes 3
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 10

Week 14: Counterfort Retaining Wall (continued)


Design analysis of concrete counterfort retaining wall

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Chapter 28 (pages 858 - 868) Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes 1
Supplemental Lecture notes on design of concrete counterfort retaining wall shall be provided by the unit
lecturer.

Revision of lecture notes 5


Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 10

4.0 Assessment
Component Weighting Minimum Level
Assignment 20% 50%
Class Tests 30% 50%
Final Examination 50% 50%
Attendance N/A 75%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting
Assignment 1 Week 8 10%
Complete design of isolated footing, combined footings, footing on piles, mat foundation
Assignment 2 Week 13 10%

282
Complete design of concrete cantilever retaining wall and counterfort wall
Class Test 1 Week 7 15%
Class Test 2 Week 13 15%

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary to score at least 50% (ie.
50/100) in the final examination.

Letter Grade Scale: The following grading scales would be used


Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33 - 5.00
A 85-89 4.00 - 4.27
A- 80-84 3.73 - 3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33 - 3.60
B 70-74 3.00 - 3.27
B- 65-69 2.67 - 2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33 - 2.60
C 55-59 2.00 - 2.27
C- 50-54 1.67 - 1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33 - 1.60
D- 35-39 0.67 - 0.93
E Below 35 0.0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0.0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0.0
CT Credit Transfer 0.0
NV Null & Void for dishonest practice 0.0
I Result Withheld/Incomplete Assessment 0.0
X Continuing course 0.0
DNC Did not complete 0.0
CP Compassionate Pass 0.0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0.0
PT Pass Terminating 0.0
P Pass 0.0
NP Not Pass 0.0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment


The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR). All
students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.

283
Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps to
get redress of their grievance.
Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and reassessment.
Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to the HOD. The HOD
will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your work is
found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In more serious
cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may even lead to
your expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagiarism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and adding
proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly your
own work.
6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

284
LECTURER: TBA
OTHER LECTURERS: TBA

BEC707 Semester : 2 Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Civil Measurement & Tendering Credit Points 16

LECTURES: Students are to attend 2 x 2 hours of lectures.


TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour of tutorial.
WORKSHOPS: N/A
LABS: N/A
SELF DIRECTED Students are to spend about 8 - 12 hours per week for this unit.
LEARNING
CONSULTATION TIME Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according to
the following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)
PREREQUISITE: Design & Analysis of Steel Structures (BEC702)
E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the course shall be posted on Class Shares.
Students are required to check their emails regularly for communication from the
lecturer

TOTAL LEARNING HOURS: Contact Hours 70


Lectures 56
Tutorials 14
Labs/Workshops 0
Self Directed Learning (during term) 152
Self Directed Learning (Mid-Term Break) 9
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks) 9
Total Recommended Learning Hours 240

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to this course and hope that you will find it enriching and interesting.

1.1 Course Description


To prepare the students the necessary knowledge and determination of the quantity of
construction materials, unit costing and preparation of tender of contrat works.

1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes


Upon completion of this unit, students will be able to:
1.2.1. Describe the standard methods of measurement of civil engineering works.

285
1.2.2. Discuss the processes and requirements of internationally accepted engineering standards of
civil measurements.
1.2.3. Discuss the purpose of the schedule of quantities of civil engineering works.
1.2.4. Name, define and describe the various trades as featured in the schedule of quantities of
civil engineering works, methods of schedule preparation, identification of working sections.
1.2.5. Describe the standard layout (format) for schedules of quantities.
1.2.6. Discuss the order of taking off quantities.
1.2.7. Explain the need for uniformity in measurement and the number of units involved, how to
handle "extra over" items and miscellaneous items such as query sheets preamble.
1.2.8. To measure earthworks, concrete works, reinforcing steel, structural steel, block work,
masonry, tanking, piling, roads and paving, pipeworks, shafts and tunnels.
1.2.9. To prepare and check tender documents, fluctuation cost, pre tender planning, liaison,
construction method, site layout, program and organization.

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1. Basic Building Measurement, 2nd Edition by Paul Marsden
2.1.2. Estimating for Builders and Surveyors, 2nd Edition by Ross D. Buchan, F. W. Eric Fleming and Fiona E.K.
Grant

2.1.3. New Zealand Standard, Code of Practice for Measurement of Civil Engineering Quantities,
NZS 4224:1983
2.1.4. Estimating and Tendering of Civil Engineering Works - 2nd Edition by Baldwin, Andrew .N. , ISBN 0-632-
02952-8
2.1.5. New Zealand Standard, Standard method of measurement of building works, NZS 4202:1995

2.2 Supplementary Materials


2.2.1. The Quantity Surveyors Handbook, New Zealand Institute of Quantity Surveyors, NZ,
Hall D. Elements of Estimating
2.2.2. Puerifoy R., Estimating & Cost Contract.
2.2.3. Wood R. Rd. Wood on Principles of Estimating.
2.2.4. Rawlinson's Price Guide.
2.2.5. Fiji Standard Form of Building Contract (without quantities)

2.3 Class Shares

3.0 Course Content and Reading References

Week 1: Measurement and Procedures

286
Description of the standard methods of measurement of civil engineering works: Discussion of the processes
and requirements of internationally accepted engineering standards of civil measurements.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
The Measurement Process, (pages 11 - 19) Textbook: Basic Building Measurement, 2nd Edition by Paul 2
Marsden
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

Week 2: Civil Measurement


Discussion of the purpose of the schedules of quantities of civil engineering works: Names, definitions
and descriptions of the various trades as featured in the schedule of quantities of civil engineering works:
Methods of schedule preparation: Identification of working sections: The standard layout (format) for
schedules of quantities.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Scope and General, pages 7 - 10, NZS 4224 : 1983 Code of Practice for Measurement of Civil Engineering 1
Quantities
Revision of lecture notes 6
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

Week 3: Practical on Standards


Establishment of a uniform basis for measurement of work, discussion of elements of "good measurement
practice", Descriptions of work activities.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:

287
Preliminaries, pages 13 - 15, NZS 4224 : 1983 Code of Practice for Measurement of Civil Engineering 1
Quantities
1
Revision of lecture notes 6
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 4: Civil Trade Measurement


Review of rules of measurement:Important considerations when measuring works including accuracy,
precision, quantity and quality of work measured .
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Bill of Quantities, (pages 5 - 10) Textbook: Basic Building Measurement, 2nd Edition by Paul Marsden 1
Revision of lecture notes 6
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

Week 5: Take off


Setting out of take off sheets including spacing items; use of waste columns: order of dimensions; grouping
of dimensions and deductions.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
The Billing Procedures, (pages 20 - 22) Textbook: Basic Building Measurement, 2nd Edition by Paul 1
Marsden

Revision of lecture notes 6


Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

Week 6: Entering on the Take Off Paper

288
Discussion of the order of taking off of quantities: How to adjust for openings and voids; Order and form of
wording in description of work; review of the need for uniformity in measurement and the number of units
involved; how to handle "extra over" items. Miscellaneous items such as query sheets preambles;
prime cost (PC) items and provisional sums.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Section 38, NZS 4202 : 1995 Standard Method of Measurement of Building Works 1
Revision of lecture notes 6
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

Week 7: Earthworks
Measurement of earthworks, concrete works, reinforcing steel, structural steel, block work, masonry,
tanking, piling, roads and paving, pipeworks, shafts and tunnels.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Section 3-12, pages 16 - 63, NZS 4224 : 1983 Code of Practice for Measurement of Civil Engineering 4
Quantities
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 3
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

Week 8: Bill of Quantities


Working on Bill of Quantities, summaries and cost analysis.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
The Measurement Process, (pages 166 - 169) Textbook: Basic Building Measurement, 2nd Edition by Paul 1
Marsden

289
Revision of lecture notes 6
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

Week 9: Tender Documents


Preparation and checking tender documents, fluctuation, site visits, consultant visits, pre-tender planning,
liaison, construction method, site layout, programme, organization.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Estimating and Bill of Quantities, pages 248 - 268 , Textbook: Estimating and Tendering of Civil Engineering 2
Works - 2nd Edition by Baldwin, Andrew .N. , ISBN 0-632-02952-8
Revision of lecture notes 5
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 11

Week 10: Comparing Element and Trade Estimating


Working on various elements involved in estimating: Cost elements. Materials element-Unit Cost,
quantities, unloading, storage and protection of material. Plant element-acquisition of plant, hire rates,
plant cost.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:
Trades Built up, pages 73 - 259; Textbook: Estimating for Builders and Surveyors, 2nd Edition by Ross D. 4
Buchan, F. W. Eric Fleming and Fiona E.K. Grant
Revision of lecture notes 4
Solving Problems 0
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 11: Bill of Labour


Labour element - statutory requirements, industrial agreements; Incentives and bonuses to workers.

290
Output standards, control of Contractor. Direct and Indirect unit rate.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0

Readings:

Trades Built up, pages 16 - 43; Textbook: Estimating for Builders and Surveyors, 2nd Edition by Ross D. 2
Buchan, F. W. Eric Fleming and Fiona E.K. Grant
Revision of lecture notes 6
Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 10

Week 12: Tender Selection


Company Profile, their turnover, contracts executed financial background. Budget -
Overheads, contract finance, risk involved, profit, tender margin. Bond and project insurances.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Analogous Rates, pages 249 -249; Textbook: Estimating for Builders and Surveyors, 2nd Edition by Ross D. 2
Buchan, F. W. Eric Fleming and Fiona E.K. Grant
Revision of lecture notes 6
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 13: Data Collection


Firm price addition, VAT, adjudication meeting. Summary, submission, price bills, reconciliation.
No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Estimating and Tendering Process within contractor's organization, pages 10 - 36 , Textbook: Estimating and 2
Tendering of Civil Engineering Works - 2nd Edition by Baldwin, Andrew .N. , ISBN 0-632-02952-8

Revision of lecture notes 6

291
Solving Problems 4
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 12

Week 14: Data Collection (Continued)


Firm price addition, VAT, adjudication meeting. Summary, submission, price bills, reconciliation.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops etc 0
0
Readings:
Estimating and Tendering Process within contractor's organization, pages 10 - 36 , Textbook: Estimating and 2
Tendering of Civil Engineering Works - 2nd Edition by Baldwin, Andrew .N. , ISBN 0-632-02952-8

Revision of lecture notes 6


Solving Problems 2
Preparation of Practical Reports 0
Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 10

4.0 Assessment
Component Weighting Minimum Level
Assignment 20%
Class Tests 30% 50%
Final Examination 50% 50%
Attendance N/A 75%

Dates:
(a) Short Test and Other assessment will be as follows:
Assessment Date Weighting
Assignment 1 Week 8 10%
Assignment 2 Week 13 10%
Class Test 1 Week 7 15%
Class Test 2 Week 13 15%

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary to score at least 50% (ie.
50/100) in the final examination.

292
Letter Grade Scale: The following grading scales would be used
Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33 - 5.00
A 85-89 4.00 - 4.27
A- 80-84 3.73 - 3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33 - 3.60
B 70-74 3.00 - 3.27
B- 65-69 2.67 - 2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33 - 2.60
C 55-59 2.00 - 2.27
C- 50-54 1.67 - 1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33 - 1.60
D- 35-39 0.67 - 0.93
E Below 35 0.0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0.0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0.0
CT Credit Transfer 0.0
NV Null & Void for dishonest practice 0.0
I Result Withheld/Incomplete Assessment 0.0
X Continuing course 0.0
DNC Did not complete 0.0
CP Compassionate Pass 0.0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0.0
PT Pass Terminating 0.0
P Pass 0.0
NP Not Pass 0.0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment


The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR). All
students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.

Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps to
get redress of their grievance.
Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and reassessment.
Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to the HOD. The HOD
will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

293
Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your work is
found to have been plagiarised, it is likely that you will be assigned a mark of '0' for that assignment. In more serious
cases, it may be necessary for you to repeat the course completely. In some cases, plagiarism may even lead to
your expulsion from the university.

Actions that constitute plagiarism


1. Downloading and turning in a paper from the Web including a Web page or a paper from an essay writing service.
2. Copying and pasting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs into your paper without showing a quotation and adding
proper citation.
3. Paraphrasing or summarising a source’s words or ideas without proper citation.
4. Including a graph, table or picture from a source without proper citation.
5. Getting so much help from a tutor or writing helper that the paper or part of the paper is no longer honestly your
own work.

6. Turning in previously written work when that practice is prohibited by your instructor.

294
LECTURER: TBA
OTHER LECTURERS: TBA

BEC708 Semester : 2 Venue: Derrick Campus Title: Design of Masonry Structures (Project)
Credit Points 14

LECTURES: Students are to attend 2 x 2 hours of lectures for 12 weeks of the semester.
TUTORIALS: Students are to attend 1 x 1 hour of tutorial for 12 weeks of the semester.
WORKSHOPS: N/A
LABS: N/A
SELF DIRECTED LEARNING Students are to spend about 8 - 10 hours per week for this unit.
CONSULTATION TIME Students can consult the Lecturer to discuss issues relating to the unit according
to the following day and time; (Day & Time: To be advised)

PREREQUISITE: Structural Mechanics for Engineers (BEC605)


E-INFORMATION: All pertinent information relating to the course shall be posted on Class Shares.
Students are required to check their emails regularly for communication from the
lecturer

TOTAL LEARNING HOURS: Contact Hours 98


Lectures 48
Tutorials 12
Project/Laboratory works to complete the project 38
Self Directed Learning (during term) 112
Self Directed Learning (Mid-Term Break)
Self Directed Learning (Study & Exam Weeks)
Total Recommended Learning Hours 210

1.0 Welcome
We welcome you to this course and hope that you will find it enriching and interesting.

1.1 Course Description


The aim of the unit is to expose the student to learn structural design and analysis of three (3) storey
reinforced concrete building. The design includes the preparation of one complete set of architectural,
structural, plumbing and electrical plans needed to construct a three storey concrete building.

1.2 Learning Targets/Outcomes


Upon completion of this unit, students will be able to:

295
1.2.1 Do the complete actual structural and architectural design of a three (3) storey reinforced concrete building.

2.0 Resources
2.1 Text
2.1.1. Reinforced Concrete Structures, Analysis and Design by David A. Fanella [2011]
2.1.2. Concrete Structures by Warner, Rangan, Hall & Faulkes [1998], ISBN 0 582 80247 4
2.1.3. Design standard AS 3600 , 2003
[No text are required in this unit but the student will be guided by the unit lecturer on the proper
design steps and procedures to complete the design of a three-storey building according to AS 3600.]

2.2 Supplementary Materials


Research materials
Appropriate Journal papers/Literature from Books/Reports/Standards/Conference proceedings
2.3 Class Shares

3.0 Guidelines of the Design Project


To be given by the Lecturer
3.1 Teaching/Learning Method

The unit is a full time class-based unit; it can be conducted 4 hours every lecture week with the
unit lecturer supervising, encouraging and guiding the student using the individual tutorial
technique on the things that should be done to complete the design. In this teaching method the student
is required to defend his structural design analysis pursuant to the internationally accepted Code of
Engineering practice. The tutorial sessions will serve as an actual training for the students to experience
the inter-personal relationships he will encounter in the construction industry. The series of tutorial
sessions culminates in the design presentation which should be done in front of the Design Panel. The
student should convince the Design Panel on the accuracy and structural reliability of his design analysis.
To do this the student need not only to show the soundness of his solution but must also prove that
his/her design analysis satisfy the requirement of Service Limit State and Strength Limit State of the
Engineering Design Code he/she adopted. The student must also identify the beneficiaries of the
proposed works. These beneficiaries may be private individuals, groups, or commercial enterprises or
any government owned or controlled corporations. Whichever is the case the benefits must be clearly
stated and the object of the benefit clearly identified.

3.2 Design Analysis Timetable


The Civil design practice is scheduled on year4 semester 2 of the programme, and the student
might experience time constraint problem in completing the design. To overcome the time constraint
problem, students who have been able to get employment in the industry/work attachment are
encouraged to seek and discuss their design with their line manager/supervising engineer.

296
3.3 Scope of Design of Masonry Structures

Design of Three (3) Storey Reinforced Concrete Building (Ultimate Strength Design)

A. Academic Requirements for Presentation of Design Analysis

1. Nature of the Project: Three Storey Reinforced Concrete Bldg.

2. Purpose and Objective of the Design Project

3. List of Resource person, text books and references

4. Design Standard used

5. Clear pictures of the location of the project site

6. Structural design calculations:

a) Roof Beams
b) Columns
c) Suspended concrete floor slab
d) Foundations concrete footings

7. Architectural and structural plans:

a) Architectural Plans

i) Location Plan with perspective view of the Project


ii) Rear, Side and Front elevation of the project

b) Structural Plans

i) Roof Framing Plan showing truss connection details and truss diagrams,
roof beam layout with beam sections and bar details

ii) Floor Framing Plan showing beam layout with beam sections and bar details

iii) Foundation Plan showing columns and footing layout with columns and footing

297
details

8. Electrical Plans

9. Sanitary and Plumbing Layout

B. Structural Design Analysis and Sizing of Beams, Slabs and Columns

The structural design analysis should be done using manual computation and not by the use of any
software computer program. It is deemed important that the student learn first the manual and
conventional means of computing deflection, moment, shear and torsion requirement before use of any
software computer program. This will give him/her first hand information and sufficient theoretical
knowledge needed in the mastery of structural analysis. Structural analysis and computation of reactions,
shear and moment shall be done by Frame analysis using either the Moment Distribution, Slope
Deflection Method or any elastic analysis learned by the students during his/her previous academic
period. The results should be checked and compared with the result of the structural analysis by using
computer software program.

1. Moment, shear and torsion - requirements

In the analysis of moment, shear and torsion, the building layout should
properly indicate the two main directions of the building as North- South and East-West (N-S and E-
W).The building should be arranged on a regular grid of columns .The grid lines in the N-S direction
should be labeled A, B, C, D and E and 1,2,3,4 and 5 in the E-W direction. The location of the stairwells,
lifts, service shafts and toilets should also be properly indicated in the floor plan.

2. Material Properties - requirements

a) Appropriate concrete grade and steel cover for beams, slabs, columns and footings
shall be done pursuant to durability and fire resistance requirement of the Service Limit State of the
provisions of the Design Code adopted by the student.

b) Bar detailing requirement shall be based on the Design code adopted by the student.

c) Strength reduction factor for beam, slab and column shall be based from the
design Code adopted by the student.

d) Superimposed dead load and live load for beams and column shall be based on the
minimum requirement pursuant to the Design Code the students had adopted.

298
3. Method of analysis

Before designing the foundation footings, the student should gather complete
information on shear strength parameters of the foundation soil for the whole building. This is necessary
to determine the safe allowable bearing capacity of the foundation. The shear strength of the foundation
shall determine whether the foundation will be designed as footings on pile, independent strip footings or
as mat foundation.

The rectangular concrete beams, concrete column and foundation footings


shall be designed one by one. The section and reinforcing steel bar details shall be shown on the
structural plans for each beam column and footing.

4.0. Oral Presentation


The student shall personally present his structural design project for marking purposes and physical oral
presentation is a compulsory process. Failure of the student to present his work on the scheduled time or
any time extension granted to him, shall be deemed as implied withdrawal from the unit and the student
shall be required to re- enrol again the unit.

Two (2) Copies of the Design Project Report should be submitted, one for the copy of the Lecturer,
another for the reference of the candidate for his use during Final presentation.

Upon completion of the project presentation by the student, there will be question and answer session
with the unit lecturer acting as chief examiner. The aim is to determine first that the project is the student
own work and secondly that the student has a broad understanding of what has been done and why. To
achieve this, the examiner can select randomly from the project report and ask the student to explain a
passage or drawing or justify a value or an assumption. In this way the examiner will soon gain an
impression of how well versed the student is in the contents of the project report.

5.0 Course Content and Reading References

Week 1: Architectural Design Scheme


Preparation of Architectural design scheme of the proposed three storey reinforced concrete building.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Project work etc 3

299
Readings:

Research Works 10

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 10

Week 2: Wind Load


Design calculation of wind load of the building using the New Zealand Standard or Australian Standard.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Project work etc 4
0
Readings:

Research Works 10

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 10


Week 3: Architectural and Structural Plans
Preparation of the architectural plan, roof framing plan, floor framing plan, ground floor plan,
foundation plan and perspective of the proposed three storey concrete building.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Project work etc 4
0
Readings:

Research Works 10

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time)


10

Week 4: Geotechnical Gathering and Design Information


Gathering of structural information and geotechnical data of the site where the building will be constructed.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Project work etc 3

300
0
Readings:

Research Works 10

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 10

Week 5: Load Computation


Computation and analysis of dead load, live load and wind load per floor of the three storey building

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Project work etc 3
0
Readings:

Research Works 10

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 10

Week 6: Roof Truss Design


Structural Design analysis of Roof Trusses

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Project work etc 3
0
Readings:

Research Works 10

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 10

Week 7: Roof Beams


Structural Design analysis of Roof Beams

No of Lectures 4

301
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Project work etc 3
0
Readings:

Research Works 10

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 10

Week 8: Floor Beams


Structural Design analysis of Floor Beams

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Project work etc 3
0
Readings:

Research Works 10

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 10


Week 9: Floor Slabs
Structural Design analysis of Floor Slabs

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Project work etc 3
0
Readings:

Research Works 8

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 10: Columns


Structural Design analysis of Columns

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1

302
No of Labs/Workshops/Project work etc 3

Readings:

Research Works 8

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 11: Footings


Structural Design analysis of Foundation Footings.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Project work etc 3

Readings:

Research Works 8

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8

Week 12: Bar Details of Beams, Slabs and Columns


Design and analysis of structural bar details of beams, slabs and columns.

No of Lectures 4
No. of Tutorials 1
No of Labs/Workshops/Project work etc 3
0
Readings:

Research Works 8

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 8


Week 13: Oral Presentation
Oral presentation of the design of the three storey building.

No of Lectures 0
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Project work etc 0

303
Oral Presentation 20
Readings:

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 0


Week 14: Oral Presentation
Oral presentation of the design of the three storey building.

No of Lectures 0
No. of Tutorials 0
No of Labs/Workshops/Project work etc 0
Oral Presentation 20
Readings:

Recommended Self Learning Hours (Including Reading Time) 0

6.0 Assessment

Assessment Date Weighting


1. Gathering of design strength prameters to be used
in design analysis of building, i.e. geotechnical report
for allowable bearing capacity of foundation soil, dead Week 2 10%
load and live load

1.Preparation & calculation of


Bldg. loads from roof to Week 4 10%
Foundation Footing
2. Structural Analysis Week 6 10%
3. Design of roof ,beams,slabs
Week 9 10%
column & foundation footing
4. Preparation of RSB details
of beams,slabs,column & Week 11 10%
foundation footing
5. Preparation of architectural
structural,plumbing and Week 13 10%
electrical plan

304
Oral Presentation Week 14 & 15 40%
Attendance N/A 75%

(b) In order to pass the course, that is, to obtain a grade of C- or better, it is necessary to score at least 50% (ie.
50/100) in the above-mentioned assessment. It is highly recommended that students attend all tutorials.

Letter Grade Scale: The following grading scales would be used


Grade Marks Grade Point Average
A+ 90-100 4.33 - 5.00
A 85-89 4.00 - 4.27
A- 80-84 3.73 - 3.93
B+ 75-79 3.33 - 3.60
B 70-74 3.00 - 3.27
B- 65-69 2.67 - 2.93
C+ 60-64 2.33 - 2.60
C 55-59 2.00 - 2.27
C- 50-54 1.67 - 1.93
D+ 45-49 1.33 - 1.60
D- 35-39 0.67 - 0.93
E Below 35 0.0
DNQ Did Not Qualify 0.0
W Withdrawn from Unit 0.0
CT Credit Transfer 0.0
NV Null & Void for dishonest practice 0.0
I Result Withheld/Incomplete Assessment 0.0
X Continuing course 0.0
DNC Did not complete 0.0
CP Compassionate Pass 0.0
AEG Aegrotat Pass 0.0
PT Pass Terminating 0.0
P Pass 0.0
NP Not Pass 0.0

Dissatisfaction with Assessment


The academic conduct of the students is governed by the University Academic and Students Regulation (UASR).
All students must obtain a copy of the UASR from the FNU academic office and familiarize themselves with all
academic matters.

305
Should a student be dissatisfied with either the internal or external assessment, they can take the following steps to
get redress of their grievance.
Internal Assessment: The student can refer the work back to the unit coordinator for checking and reassessment.
Following this reassessment, if the student is still dissatisfied, the student may refer the work to the HOD. The HOD
will then appoint another lecturer to examine the work and result will then stand.

Final Exam: The student can apply for re-check of the grade as per the procedures laid down in the UASR.

Plagiarism and Dishonest Practice Regulations


Plagiarism is taking another person's words or ideas and using them as if they were your own. It can be either
deliberate or accidental. Plagiarism is taken very seriously in higher education. If even a small section of your work
is found to h