MANIPAL INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Mandatory Disclosure- Architecture

I. NAME OF THE INSTITUTION MANIPAL INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY MANIPAL – 576104 KARNATAKA Ph.820-2571060 Fax: (91-820) 2571071 E mail: office.mit@manipal.edu II. NAME & ADDRESS OF THE DIRECTOR Brig (Dr) Somnath Mishra DIRECTOR Manipal Institute of Technology Manipal 576104 Ph: 0820-2572449 (O) Mobile Fax: (91-820) 2571071 E mail: III. NAME OF THE AFFILIATING UNIVERSITY MANIPAL UNIVERSITY. MANIPAL (Deemed University) IV. GOVERNANCE

Members of Board of Management of Manipal University
Name Dr Ramdas M Pai Nominee of Govt. of India Dr R K Chauhan Dr V A Pai Panandikar Mr T V R Shenoy Dr M V Kamath Mr T V Mohandas Pai Chancellor, Manipal University, Manipal Reply from GOI awaited Additional Secretary, UGC, Bahadurshah Zafar marg, New Delhi - 110 002 Panandikar Chambers, M L Furtado Road, Madgaon, Goa - 403601 A-35, South Extension Part II, New Delhi – 110049, New Delhi Q NO.234, KMC Quarters, Madhav Nagar, Manipal – 576104 Director, Human Resource, Infosys Technologies Ltd, Electronic City, Hosur Road, Bangalore 15, Ashok Road, New Delhi - 110 001, New Delhi CEO, MEMGII, Manipal Towers, 14,

Mr Suresh P Prabhu Dr Ranjan R Pai

Dr H S Ballal, Dr G K Prabhu Dr Sripathi Rao P Dr N Udupa Dr Ramnarayan Dr Rajasekharan P Warrier V.

Airport Road, HAL II stage, Kodihalli, Bangalore Pro Chancellor, Manipal University, Manipal – 576104 Registrar, Manipal University, Manipal Dean, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal Principal, MCOPS, Manipal Dean, MMMC, Manipal Vice Chancellor, Manipal University, Manipal

UNIVERSITY ACADEMIC SENATE MEMBERS

1. Pro Chancellor, MU, Manipal 2. Vice-Chancellor, MU, Manipal 3. Pro Vice-Chancellor, MU, Manipal 4. Registrar (IP) & Executive Director (P), MU, Manipal 5. Registrar, MU, Manipal 6. Dr S Ramanand Shetty, Vice-Chancellor, RGUHS, Bangalore 7. Dr (Mrs) Renu Batra, Joint Secretary, UGC, New Delhi 8. Dr B Suresh, President, Pharmacy Council of India, New Delhi 9. Mr M D Nalapat, U 26, C/8, DLF Qutab Enclave Phase – 3, Gurgaon – 122 002 10. Dr Vasanth Kumar S, Registrar, RGUHS, Bangalore 11. Dr G B Nair, Director, National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases, P-33, CIT Scheme XM, Beliaghata, Kolkata – 700 010 12. Dr S Ganesan, Scientific Officer, BARC, Trombay, Mumbai -400 085 13. Dr A K Sinha, Member Secretary, RCI, New Delhi – 110 016 14. Dr G K Rath, Prof & Head, Dr BRA Inst. of Rotary Cancer Hosp., AIIMS, N Delhi 15. Dr K Mohandas, Director, SCTIMST, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala – 695011 16. Dr Sandeep Sancheti, Director, NITK, Surathkal 17. Director, MAHE-Dubai Campus, Knowledge Village, Dubai 18. Dean, KMC, Manipal 19. Dean, KMC, Mangalore 20. Dean, MCODS, Manipal 21. Dean, MCODS, Mangalore 22. Dean, MCON, Manipal 23. Dean, MCOAHS, Manipal 24. Principal, MCOPS, Manipal 25. Director, MIC, Manipal 26. Director, MIM, Manipal 27. Dean, MMMC, Manipal 28. Offg, Director, MCIS, Manipal 29. Chief Administrator, WGSHA, Manipal 30. Director, MLSC, Manipal 31. Dean, KMC International Centre, Manipal 32. Director, ICAS, Manipal 33. Dr M Venkatraya Prabhu, Assoc Dean, KMC, Mangalore 34. Assoc Director (Academic), MIT, Manipal 35. Registrar - Evaluation, MU, Manipal

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36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43.

Dy. Registrar (HR & Compliance), MU, Manipal Dy. Registrar (Academics), MU, Manipal Dy. Registrar (Technical), MU, Manipal Sri Rajen Padukone, President, University programs, MUL, Bangalore Dean, MIRM, Bangalore Director, MIJM, Manipal Dean, MCON, Mangalore Dean, MCON, Bangalore

VI. FACULTY Permanent Faculty: 24
S.No. Name of Faculty

Designation

Qualification

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

Prof (Dr) Professor & Dean Chitrarekha Kabre Prof (Dr) R. P. Professor Deshmukh Prof (Dr) Dhananjay Professor Prof Yogishchandra Professor (Design Dhar Chair) Prof Nelson Pais Professor (Design Chair) Er RaghuPrem Assistant Professor Er Ramaswamy Assistant Professor Er P C Madhuraj Assistant Professor Dr Shantaram Patil Assistant Professor Ar Kailash Rao Lecturer (Selection Grade) Ar Sanghamitra Roy Lecturer (Selection Grade) Ar Nishant Lecturer Manapure (Selection Grade) Ar Tapas Mitra Ar Sheuli Mitra Ar Harish Hegde Ar Deepika Shetty Lecturer (Selection Grade) Lecturer (Selection Grade) Lecturer ((Senior Scale) Lecturer (Senior Scale)

B.Arch. M.B.E.M. Ph.D. (Australia) B.Arch., M.Arch., Ph.D. B.E., M.E., Ph.D. B.Arch., PGDP B.Arch., PGDP B.E., M.Tech. B.E., M.Tech. B.Tech. (Arch. Engg), PGDP B. E., M. Tech., Ph.D. B.Arch., M.Arch. B.Arch., M.C.P. (US) B.Arch., M. Arch. B.Arch., M.Arch. B.Arch., M.C.P. B.Arch. B.Arch., PGDP

Date of Joining 11.8.20 07 17.2.19 87 15.02.1 990 04.08.2 008 21.7. 2008 16.02.1 989 01.04.1 989 30.07.1 991 04.02.2 008 02.05.2 005 07.02.2 006 02.06.2 008 04.08.2 008 21.07.2 008 23.9.19 99 07.09.1 998

Mode of appointment

Permanent Permanent Permanent Contract Contract Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Contract Permanent

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17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24.

Ar Suboth Thomas

Lecturer Scale) Ar Lekha Hegde Lecturer Scale) Ar Ajai Chandran Lecturer Scale) Ar Mahalaxmi Lecturer Karnad Scale) Ar K.S.S. Sherigar Lecturer Ar Sri Kumar Menon Ar Sahana Ar Arjun Rajan Lecturer Lecturer Lecturer

(Senior B.Arch. M. 18.02.1 Planning 995 (Senior B.Arch. M.Arch. 31.08.1 998 (Senior B. Arch. MURP 11.04.2 005 (Senior B.Arch. M.L.A. 25.7.20 08 A.I.I.A 01.11.2 002 B.Arch. 09.04.1 999 B.Arch. M.Arch. 01.10.2 008 B. Arch. 19.07.2 008

Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Contract Permanent Permanent Permanent

Visiting Faculty: 8 S. No.
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Name of Faculty
Ar Danny W.L.Pinto Ar Laxminarayan Bhat Ar Amith Shenoy Ar. G. Manohar Ar. Prajosh Kumar
Ar. Mohammed Nissar

Qualification
B.Arch. B.Arch. B.Arch. B.Arch. B.Arch. B.Arch. G.D.Art
A.M.G.D

Mr Laxman Bhat Mr. K K Acharya

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VII

PROFILE OF DIRECTOR WITH QUALIFICATIONS, TOTAL EXPERIENCE, AGE AND DURATION OF
EMPLOYMENT AT THE INSTITUTE CONCERNED

Brig (Dr.) Somnath Mishra

(Retd)

Name

Address Designation Qualification & Experience STD Code Fax No Mobile No E-Mail Date of Birth Educational Qualification

Manipal Institute of Technology , Manipal. 576104. Karnataka DIRECTOR B.Sc Engineering (Mechanical), NIT Rourkela, MIE, M. Tech (Ind Engg and Ops Research), IIT Kharagpur, Ph. D (Techno Forecasting), IIT Delhi. 35 years 0820 0820- 2571071 9663308741 somnath.mishra@manipal.edu 19/03/1950 B.Sc., Engineering(Mechanical Engg), NIT Rourkela M Tech (Industrial l Engg & Operations Research, IIT Kharagpur Ph.D –IIT Delhi Phone No. (O) 2571079

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 Work
Experience

35 Years in various appointments in number of Organizations. Some of the salient appointments are:-

Director MIT, Manipal w.e.f. 08-06-2009

Director SMIT w.e.f. 01 Jul 06. To 07-06-2009 Head of Electronics & Mechanical Engineers of a Corps HQ. Director Operations Research and System Analysis group in Perspective Planning Directorate of Army HQs. Commandant of Corps Zone Workshop. General Manager Production/Personnel/ Works in Base Workshop. Professor and Head of Operations Management Faculty & Chief Consultant at Institute of Technology Management, Mussoorie. Asst. Professor, Faculty of Electrical & Mechanical at College of Military Engineering, Pune. Asst. Professor, Ops Management, Defence Institute of Work Study, Mussoorie. Executed 12 Management Consultancy projects in government and non government organizations.

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Faculty Profile 1. Name 2. Date of Birth 3. Educational Qualifications : Dr.Chitrarekha Kabre : 6th June 1963 : B.Arch., M.B.E.M., Ph D in Architecture 2008 (University of Queensland, Australia)

4. Work experience: • Teaching: 11 years • Research: 4 years • Industry: 5 years • Others: 5. Area of specialization: Project Management, Computer Aided Design, Energy Efficient Design. 6. Subjects taught at under graduate level: Architectural design, Building construction, Architectural Graphics, Climatology, Modern architecture, Research techniques Post graduate level: Architectural design of hospitals 7. Research Guidance: Masters: nil Ph.D: nil 8. Research publications: 03 + 14 = 17 9. No of papers published in National journals / International journals/ Conferences: 17 1. Kabre, C. & Baikoussi, D. (2009) Modern Architects of Greece, Architecture, Time, Space &
People, the magazine of the Council of Architecture, India, February, pp.20-30.

2. Kabre, Chitrarekha (2008) Computer Aided Design of Climate Responsive Dwelling (Roof) in 3. 4. 5.
the Climatic and Technological Contexts of India and Australia, abstract, in Recent doctoral dissertations and thesis, Architectural Science Review, June 2008, vol. 51.2, p.185. Kabre, Chitrarekha (2007) Climate Responsive Vernacular Subterranean Architecture of India, National Conference on Vernacular Architecture in India – Relevance for the 21 st Century, Faculty of Architecture, MIT, Manipal, 22-23 November. Kabre, Chitrarekha (2002) Brisbane, Australia’s Sunshine Capital, Woman’s era, March (first), New Delhi, India. Kabre, Chitrarekha (1999) Contemporary roofs in the warm-humid tropics of India, in Sustaining the Future, Energy-Ecology-Architecture, Proceedings of the 16th International Passive and Low Energy Architecture (PLEA) conference, 22-24th Sept 1999, Brisbane, PLEA International in assoc. with the Dept of Architecture, the University of Queensland, Brisbane, pp. 387-92. Chitrarekha & Ghoshal, T. (1999) St. John’s Anglican Cathedral, Brisbane, Architecture + Design (A + D), New Delhi, vol. XVI, no. 4, July-Aug., pp. 80-4. (Errata, A+D, vol. XVI, no. 6, Nov.-Dec., p. 14). Kabre, Chitraekha (1999) WINSHADE : A computer design tool for solar control, Building and Environment, vol. 34, no. 3, May, pp. 263-274. Chitrarekha and Ghoshal, T. (1999) A living tradition (Queensland housing), Indian Architect & Builder, vol. 12, No. 6, Feb, pp. 122-8, India. Kabre, Chitaerkha (1998) Trends in solar control in contemporary buildings, in Principles & Practice, Proceedings of 31st Annual Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Architectural Science Association (ANZAScA), 29th Sept-3rd Oct 1997, Brisbane, Pictorial Press Australia & Impress Media, Brisbane, pp. 19-26.

6. 7. 8. 9.

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10. Chitrarekha and Ghoshal, T. (1998) The Riverside Centre, Brisbane, Architecture and Design,
July-Aug, pp. 81-6, New Delhi.

11. Kabre, Chitrarekha (1996). Ray Bans in Contemporary Buildings, trends in Solar Control: India
& Singapore, Indian Architect & Builder, Vol. 9 No. 8, Apr, pp. 62. 12. Kabre, Chitrarekha (1995) Computer Applications in Climate Analysis, Lecture notes for the Refresher Course on Solar Passive Architecture & Building Systems 21-23 Dec, Dept of Architecture, IIT, Kharagpur. 13. Kabre, Chitrarekha (1995) Computer Software for Passive Solar Design of Fixed External Shading Devices, Indian Architect & Builder, Vol. 8 No. 11 July, pp72. 14. Kabre, Chitrarekha (1994) A Novel Approach for Designing Fixed External Shading Devices, Proceedings of the International Conference on Building Envelope Systems & Technology -7-8 Dec (ICBEST 94), Singapore, pp. 534-539. 15. Kabre, Chitrarekha (1990) Computer Methods in Architectural Education, Proceedings of the National Seminar on Quest for Excellence in Architectural Education - Issues & Strategies, 4-5 May, Dept. of Architecture, M I T , Manipal, INDIA. 16. Kabre, Chitrarekha (1990) Delay Management using Software, Proceedings of the National Seminar on Construction Project Management, Apr, Indian Concrete Institute and National Building Construction Corporation New Delhi, INDIA. 17. Kabre, Chitrarekha (1989). Delay Management in Construction Projects, Proceedings of the National seminar on Construction Project Management with particular reference to Post Contract Stage, 20-21 Dec, Institution of Surveyors, New Delhi, INDIA.

Attended 1. Workshop on the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award – Education Excellence organized 2. 3. 4.
by Innovation centre M.I.T. and Tata Consultancy Services, 10th September 2008. Workshop on City Technical Advisory Group constitution under the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewable Mission (JNNURM) for Raipur, the state capital of Chhattisgarh, 26th June 2008. 37th ISTE Annual Convention and National Seminar, 17-19 December 2007, Manipal Institute of Technology, Manipal, Indian Society for Technical Education, New Delhi. Short-term course on Instructional Multi media for environment & Energy engineering, University of Nova Scotia, Canada & I I T Kharagpur, 1996. French course, I I T Kharagpur, Excellent grade, 1992 Teachers’ orientation program, M I T Manipal, 1990. Short term course on Fortran computer programming (1st division), 1984

5. 6. 7. 10. Projects carried out: 1. Design and detailing of various hospitals, residential, industrial building of Bhilai Steel Plant. 2. Project Management consultancy for Kashmir University staff housing project, value of project
2 crores..

3. Prototype of eco-house for hot dry climate of India. 4. Design consultancy of residential and commercial buildings. 5. Design consultancy of new facilities for Vivekanand Ashram, Ramakrishna Mission, Raipur
like commercial, educational and residential.

6. Eminent Architectural Scientist and Architect nominated as member of City Technical
Advisory Group (Urban Engineering & Infra structure) for Raipur Municipal Corporation, Chhattisgarh, constituted by the Govt of India under the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission (JNNURM)

11. Patents: nil

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12. Technology transfer: nil 13. No of books published with details: nil

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1. Name : Prof.R.P.Deshmukh 2. Date of Birth : 20th October 1949. 3. Educational Qualifications : B. Arch., M. Arch., Ph.D. 4. Work experience: • Teaching: 28 years • Research: 1 year • Industry: 7 years • Others: nil 5. Area of specialization: Earthquake risk management 6. Subjects taught at under graduate level: Architectural design, Building construction, Modern architecture Post graduate level: Nil 7. Research Guidance: Masters: nil Ph.D.: nil 8. Research publications: No. of Publication: 20 + 5 = 25 9. No of papers published in National journals / International journals / Conferences: 1. Deshmukh RP (1975), Design Problems of Sugar Factory: Physical Aspect, Architects Trade
Journal, Bombay, Jan/Feb.

2. Deshmukh RP (1984), Project your Premises African Technical Review (incorporating
construction),London, March, pp 101-103 3. Deshmukh RP and Ajibola K (1984), Towards Appropriate Housing for the Rural Dwellers of Southern Sahara, Proceedings of International Conference on Low Cost Housing for Developing Countries, Central Building Research Institute, Roorkee, India, Nov.12-17, pp 725-34. 4. Deshmukh RP (1986), Catsplay with Architecture, Inside-Outside, The Indian Design Magazine, Bombay, April/May, p.128 5. Deshmukh RP (1989), Urban poor Housing in Afro-Asian Context, Inter-national Conference on Urbanisation, ARCASIA and Indian Institute of Architects, Bombay, Feb.1989 6. Deshmukh RP and Gupta Arti, Tropical Cyclones and Built Forms - A case study Architectural Science Review, Sydney, Australia, vol 39, pp 59-65 7. Ajibola K and Deshmukh RP (1992), A proposal for Upgrading Shanty Towns: The Example of Apese, Lagos, Nigeria, Open House International, New Castle Upon Tyne, Vol.17 No.1. pp 54-61. 8. Dr.K.S.Anantha Krishna, Prof.R.P.Deshmukh and Prof.K.P.Rewatkar (1992), Traditional Houses of South Kanara, International Conference on Heritage,ARCASIA, UIA and Indian Institute of Architects, Bombay, 4-7 Jan, pp 102-107 9. K.S.Anantha Krishna, RP Deshmukh and KP Rewatkar (1993), Manor Houses of South Kanara, Inside Outside: The Indian Design Magazine, Bombay, Jan., pp 148-162 10. Deshmukh RP (1990), Professional Development and Educational program in Architecture, National Seminar on Architectural Educationa, Manipal Institute of Technology, Manipal, 4-5 May, pp 56-58 11. Deshmukh RP (1992) (Rtn) Udupi Calling: Gateway to Manipal, Rotary News, Madras, Nov., pp 46-49. 12. Deshmukh RP (1988), Architectural Management: Behavioural Aspects, NASA Publication, Manipal, Jan. 13. Deshmukh RP (1975), A Happy University (Marathi Literature) Kirloskar Magazine (Monthly) Dec., Pune, pp 46-50. 14. Deshmukh RP, Vastupurush Kanvinde (1980) (Marathi Literature), Kirloskar Magazine (Monthly) July, Pune, pp 12-17.

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15. Anantha Krishna, Deshmukh, Rewatkar (1994) House Craft, The Times of India Saturday
Supplement, Bangalore, August 8, p.3.

16. Deshmukh RP, Vastupurusha (1994), MIT Technical Review, Manipal Institute of Technology,
Manipal, Vol.4, Dec., pp 80-82. 17. Deshmukh, Ravindra, (2004), Best Practices in Educational Institutions: A Road Map for Architecture Schools, The Journal of Indian Institute of Architects, Mumbai, pp 22-24. 18. Deshmukh, Ravindra (2007), “Let us Pledge for Safer Environment”, Architecture: Time, Space, People, Vol.7, Issue 10, Council of Architecture, pp 54-55 19. Deshmukh, R., Rodrigues, R. & Krishnamurthy, G. (2008), ‘Knowledge Management and Earthquake Risk’, Journal of Knowledge Management and Practice, Vol. 9, Issue 3, Sept 30. 20. Deshmukh, R. (2008), ‘Understanding Restless Planet in the Domain of Architectural Education’, Proceedings of the SAARCH 2008 – South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation of Architects Conference on Safe Built Environment in the Region, 12-14 March, New Delhi, pp. 33-7 21. Deshmukh, R. (2008), ‘Regulatory System and Earthquake Risk’, Safety Equipment Review, Vol. VIII, No. 2, March-April, pp. 42-51.

Papers presented/published Disaster Management
1. Deshmukh Ravindra (1999), Vulnerability Analysis of Regions affected by Thunderstorms and Flash Floods, TCDC Workshop on Natural Disaster Reduction - Policy Issues and Strategies, Dec 21-22, SERC, Madras,India, pp II.16-21. 2. Deshmukh Ravindra (2001), "Thunderstorms and Flash Floods - anybody to care?", Architecture + Design, Vol.XVIII, No.2, March-April 2001, Media Transasia India Limited, K-35, Green Park, New Delhi, pp 48-50 3. Deshmukh, Ravindra, “A Risk Management Strategy for Evacuation as a means of Mitigating the Effects of a Disaster”, Conference on disaster Management, BITs, Pilani, March 5-7, 2001. 4. Deshmukh, Ravindra “Evacuation as a Means of Mitigation the Effects of a Disaster”, National Nursing Conference Theme: Disaster Management (August 25-27, 2001), Father Muller’s College of Nursing, Mangalore. 5. Deshmukh, Ravindra, Natural Disaster of Rapa Nui – A Lesson to Learn, Conference on Disaster Management, BITs, Pilani, Rajasthan, November 14, 2003. 6. Deshmukh Ravindra and Krishnamurthy GR(2006), Techno-legal Regime in Earthquake risk management’, Proceedings of the national Seminar on Diaster management, July 15-16, CITA, Neyveli, pp 23-28 7. Deshmukh Ravindra and Krishnamurthy GR(2006), ‘Role of Architects in Diaster Management’, Architecture-Time-Space and People, Vol6, Issue 10, Oct, Council of Architecture, New Delhi 8. Deshmukh Ravindra and Krishnamurthy GR(2006), ‘Human Development as important Catalyst in understanding Byelaws and Codes for earthquake Risk Management’, Proceedings of the First India Diaster Management Congress, Nov 29-30, National Institute of Disaster Management , New Delhi. 9. Deshmukh Ravindra and Krishnamurthy GR(2007), ‘ Earthquake Risk Management as an Emerging Specialty in Architecture Discipline’, Proceedings of the International Symposium on architecture for 21st century, Feb 21-23, Department of Architecture Louisiana State University, Baton-Rouge. 10. Deshmukh Ravindra (2007), “Earthquake Risk as an opportunity to generate architectural Form’ in Proceedings of International conference ‘Sources of Architectural Forms: Theory and Practice’ March 11th -13th by Department of Architecture, College of Petroleum and Engineering, Kuwait University, Kuwait, pp 587-594.

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11. Deshmukh Ravindra and Krishnamurthy GR, (2007), ‘Emergency Planning in a Disaster Event – Evacuation as a Significant Strategy’, Proceedings of the State Level Workshop on Disaster Preparedness and Management, March 25-27, Canara college of Nursing, Kundapur.

10. Projects carried out: nil 11. Patents: nil 12. Technology transfer: nil 13. No of books published with details: nil

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1. Name 2. Date of Birth

: Dr. H.R. Dhananjaya : 01.06.1963

3. Educational Qualification : B.E. (Civil), ME (Stru. PSC) Ph.D. (Structures) 4. Work Experience • Teaching : 21 years • Research : 16 years • Industry: one year • Others : nil 5. Area of Specializations : Structural Engg. 6. Subjects teaching at under Graduate Level : Prestressed concrete, Reinforced concrete, Steel structures, Structural Analysis, Engg. mechanics, Strength of Materials, Computer programming (C, Fortran, basic) Post Graduate Level: Solid Mechanics, Advanced design of structures, Plates and Shells, Computer Programming Lab., Structural Engg. Lab. 7. Research guidance : Master’s : 12 Ph.D. - Nil 8. Research Publications: 31 9. No. of Paper published in : - National Journals : 01 - International Journals : 04 - Conferences : 26 10. Projects carried out : No. of B.E. Projects guided - 10 No. of M.Tech. students guides - 12 11. Patents : NIL 12. Technology Transfer : NIL 13. No. of Books published with details : 1. Edited the proceedings of National Conference on Recent Developments in Structural Engg. (RDSE-2005) 2. Edited Souvenir of National Conference RDSE – 2005) 3. Edited the Proceedings of International conference on “Recent Developments in Structural Engineering” (RDSE-2007)

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1. Name 2. Date of Birth

: Yogish Chandra Dhara : 24.08.1966

3. Educational Qualification : B.Arch., Univ. of Bangalore 1990 P.G. Dip Planning (Housing), CEPT Ahmedabad, 1995. 4. Work Experience • Teaching : 15 years, Faculty member MIT, Manipal.1990-2005 • Research : nil • Industry: 4 years, 2005-to date: Full time Architectural Consultant at A.G.ASSOCIATES, Udupi • Others: Visiting Faculty, MIT Manipal 2005-08 Professor - Design Chair, MIT, Manipal. 2008-date 1993 – 2005: Architectural practice – Consultancy in the evening at AG Associates, Udupi as Partner. Approved Panel Architect for LIC, Syndicate Bank, Canara Bank, Corporation Bank, MRPL Approved Valuer, FIV – 15810 Registered Planner – ITPI – 97-50, Registered Architect. CA/93/16679 5. Area of Specializations : Architecture, Urban Planning 6. Subjects teaching at under Graduate Level : Architectural Design Studio for various semesters, All core subjects in architecture for various semester during 1990-2005 Post Graduate Level: Member of the Thesis guides’ panel 7. Research guidance : Master’s : Nil Ph.D. - Nil 8. Research Publications: Nil 9. No. of Paper published in : - National Journals : Nil - International Journals : Nil - Conferences : Nil 10. Projects carried out : Specialized in Hospital design of varying magnitude. Commercial Complexes, Residential apartment, Institutional structures, and Industrial Units, As many as more than 250 individual Bungalows. Plotted development of large area into residential plots under Semi government establishments such as MRPL, KHB, LIC, Syndicate\ate bank, Canara Bank etc. Total Approximate plinth area more than lakh sqm. 11. Patents : NIL 12. Technology Transfer : NIL 13. No. of Books published with details : 14

1. Name 2. Date of Birth

: Nelson Joe Vijai Pais : 01.04.1967 P.G. Dip Arch (Urban Design), CEPT Ahmedabad 1993

3. Educational Qualification : B.Arch., University of Mysore, 1990

4. Work Experience • Teaching : • Research : Best practices study for Dubai Municipality, 1998 • Industry: 15 years 2004 –to date: Architectural practice – Partner, 2PKM Architects, Mangalore 2001-to date: Urban Design Consultant – Infrastructure Development Foundation, Mangalore 1995-2001: Senior Planner/Urban Designer at Comprehensive Planning and Design Unit of Dubai Municipality 1994-1995: Urban Designer at Parsons-Harland Bartholomew Associates 1996-present: Urban Design and Architectural Consultant to several firms and organisations. • Others:7 years Visiting Faculty, MIT, Manipal. 2002-2008 Professor - Design Chair, MIT, Manipal. 2008-date 5. Area of Specializations : Architecture, Urban Design, Urban Planning 6. Subjects teaching at under Graduate Level : Architectural Design Studio for various semesters, Research Methods, Working Drawings, Building Construction, Interiors (elective) Post Graduate Level: Member of the Thesis guides’ panel 7. Research guidance : Master’s : 2 Ph.D. - Nil 8. Research Publications: Nil 9. No. of Paper published in : - National Journals : - International Journals : - Conferences : 10. Projects carried out : Retail Malls, Apartment blocks of several sizes, 60-acres of offices and commercial development, school, places of worship, single dwelling units – in all, exceeding 1,000,000 sqm 11. Patents : NIL 12. Technology Transfer : NIL

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13. No. of Books published with details :

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1. Name 2. Date of Birth

: Ramaswamy R.N. : 15th May 1964

3. Educational Qualifications : B.Tech., M.Tech. 4. Work experience: • Teaching: 21 years • Research: nil • Industry: 2 months • Others: nil 5. Area of specialization: Structures, CAD 6. Subjects taught at under graduate level: Architectural graphics, structures, computer applications in architecture Post graduate level: Advanced structures 7. Research Guidance: Masters: nil Ph.D: nil 8. Research publications: nil 9. No of papers published in: National journals / International journals/ Conferences: 1. Attended Summer School on Computer Aided Analysis and Design of Engineering Structures hosted by Civil Engineering Department, MIT, Manipal (16.8.1999 to 28.8.1999) 2. Attended Two days training on Architectural Desktop and 3D studio viz at Bangalore organized by Autodesk, Inc.1999 3. Was the resource person on 3D Modelling and Animation (for a day) at the short term course on computer aided Design held at SJCE Polytechnic for Physically handicapped (STTP for 15 days) held between 11th November to 23rd November 2002 4. Attended short term course on “Remote Sensing & GIS Applications for Resource Management, 3rd February to 15th February 2003 at NITK, Suratkal 5. Underwent training on GIS Package Arch GIS at NIIT, Bangalore for 5 days in August 2003 6. Conducted AICTE-ISTE-STTP on “Computer Aided 3D Modelling and Animation” between 15th March 2004 to 20th March 2004. 7. Resource person for National Programme for Capacity Buildings for Architects in Earthquake Risk Management, March 28th to 2nd April 2005 8. Resource person for National Programme for Capacity Buildings for Architects in Earthquake Risk Management, May 23rd to May 28th 2005 9. Organized a one day workshop on ‘Recent Architectural Software’ for Architects, Civil Engineers and others for region around on 8th August 2007 at Faculty of Architecture, MIT. 10. Attended a two days workshop on ‘Concrete for Coastal Envirnment’ on 7th & 8th October 2008, organized by NITK, Surathkal. 10. Projects carried out: nil 11. Patents: nil 12. Technology transfer: nil 13. No of books published with details: nil

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1. Name 2. Date of Birth 3. Educational Qualifications

: M.Raghuprem : 28.02.1962 : B. Tech., M.Tech.

4. Work experience: • Teaching: 20 years • Research: nil • Industry: 1 year • Others: nil 5. Area of specialization: Building Technology 6. Subjects taught at under graduate level: Building construction, structures, computer applications in Architecture, Building services Post graduate level: Architectural design 7. Research Guidance: Masters: nil Ph.D: nil 8. Research publications: 9. No of papers published in: National journals / International journals/ Conferences: 1. STC in Computer aided analysis and design of Civil Engineering Structures 2. STC on application of FEM techniques 3. Workshop on appropriate technology for buildings 4. Organizer – Workshop on Engineering systems and services for building, 2003 5. Member, Coordination Committee for workshops conducted by Faculty. 6. Attended National Conference on Green Lighting, Hyderabad, April, 2005 7. Attended QIP Programme Building Morphology & Space Design, JNTU, Hyderabad, May 2005 8. Undergone Training Programme on Internal Audit for ISO 9001:2000, August 2005 9. Internal Auditor, ISO 9001:2000 10. Resource person for National Programme for Capacity Buildings for Architects in Earthquake Risk Management, March 28th to 2nd April 2005 11. Resource person for National Programme for Capacity Buildings for Architects in Earthquake Risk Management, May 23rd to May 28th 2005 12. Participating to Department Seminar scheduled for August 8, 2007 13. Attending National Workshop on lighting scheduled for August 11, 2007 conducted by Department of Illumination Engineering, MIT. 10. Projects carried out: nil 11. Patents: nil 12. Technology transfer: nil 13. No of books published with details: nil

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1. Name 2. Date of Birth 3. Educational Qualifications

: Dr. Shantharama Patil : 15.02.1971 : B.E., M.Tech., Ph.D. (Structural Engg.)

4. Work experience: • Teaching: 5 years • Research: 6 months • Industry: 2 years • Others: nil 5. Area of specialization: Structures 6. Subjects taught at under graduate level: Surveying & levelling, structures, computer applications in architecture Post graduate level: nil 7. Research Guidance: Masters: nil Ph.D: nil 8. Research publications: 10 9. No of papers published in: National journals / International journals/ Conferences: Research Papers in Refereed International Journals: 1. Swaminathan, K. and Patil, S. S., “Higher Order Refined Computational Models for the Free Vibration Analysis of Antisymmetric Angle Ply Plates”, Journal of Reinforced Plastics and Composites, Sage, 27(5), 541-553, 2008. 2. Swaminathan, K. and Patil, S. S., “Analytical Solutions using a Higher Order Refined Computational Model with 12 Degrees of Freedom for the Free Vibration Analysis of Antisymmetric Angle Ply Plates”, Composite Structures, Elsevier, 82(2), 209-216, 2008. 3. Swaminathan, K. and Patil, S. S., “Higher Order Refined Computational Model with 12 Degrees of Freedom for the Stress Analysis of Antisymmetric Angle Ply Plates – Analytical Solutions”, Composite Structures, Elsevier, 80(4), 595-608, 2007. 4. Swaminathan, K., Patil, S. S., Nataraj, M. S. and Mahabaleswara, K. S., “Bending of Sandwich Plates with Antisymmetric Angle Ply Face Sheets – Analytical Evaluation of Higher Order Refined Computational Models”, Composite Structures, Elsevier, 75(1-4 ), 114-120, 2006 Research Papers in International Conferences / Proceedings: 1. Patil, S. S. “Assessment of Higher Order Refined Computational Models for the Static and Dynamic Analyses of Angle-Ply Composite Plates”, Proc. of the 7th Int. Conf. on Composite Science and Technology, ICCST-7, held at College of Engineering, American University of Sharja, United Arab Emirates, January 20-22, 2009. 2. Patil, S. S. “Analytical Evaluation of Higher Order Theories for Stress and Free Vibration Analyses”, Proc. of the 7th Int. Conf. on Composite Science and Technology, ICCST-7, held at College of Engineering, American University of Sharja, United Arab Emirates, January 20-22, 2009. 3. Patil, S. S. and Swaminathan, K. “Free Vibration of Antisymmetric Angle Ply\ Plates – Analytical Evaluation of Higher Order Refined Computational Models”, Proc. of the

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2nd Int. Conf. on Recent Advances in Composite Materials, ICRACM- 07, held at India Habitat Centre, New Delhi, India, February 20-23, 2007. 4. Patil, S. S., Swaminathan, K., and Arumugam, P. “Higher Order Model for the Transverse Stress Analysis of Antisymmetric Angle Ply Laminated Composite Plates – Analytical Solutions”, Proc. of the 51st Cong. of Indian Society of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, ( ISTAM-An International Meet ), held at College of Engineering, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam, India, December 18- 21, 2006. 5. Patil, S. S. and Swaminathan, K. “Higher Order Refined Computational Model for the Free Vibration Analysis of Antisymmetric Angle Ply Laminated Plates”, Proc. of the 2nd Int. Congress on Computational Mechanics and Simulation, ICCMS-06 held at I.I.T., Guwahati, Assam, India, December 8-10, 2006. 6. Patil, S. S., Swaminathan, K., Nataraj, M. S. and Mahabaleswara, K. S. “Bending of Sandwich Plates with Antisymmetric Angle Ply Face Sheets – Analytical Evaluation of Higher Order Refined Computational Models”, Proc. of the 13th Int. Conf. on Composite Structures, ICCS-13, held at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, November 14-16, 2005. 7. Patil, S. S., Swaminathan, K. and Dinesh Shetty. “Stress Analysis of Antisymmetric Angle Ply Laminated Plates – Analytical Solutions Using Higher Order Refined Computational Models”, Proc. of the 3rd Int. Conf. on Advances in Structural Engineering and Mechanics, ASEM-04, held at K.A.I.S.T., Seoul, South Korea, September 2 - 4, 2004. Research Papers in National Conferences / Proceedings and Symposia: 1. Patil, S. S. and Swaminathan, K. “Higher Order Refined Computational Model for the Free Vibration of Angle Ply Plates – Analytical Formulations and Solution Method”, Nat. Symp. on Mathematical Methods and Applications, NSMMA-2004 held at I.I.T., Madras, Chennai, India, December 22, 2004. 2. Patil, S. S. and Swaminathan, K. “Bending of Orthotropic Plates – Analytical Evaluation of Higher Order Refined Computational Models”, Proc. of the Nat. Conf. on Structural Engineering and Mechanics, SEM-04 held at BITS, Pilani, Rajasthan, September 24 - 25, 2004. 3. Patil, S. S. and Swaminathan, K. “Higher Order Refined Computational Model for the Stress Analysis of Angle Ply Plates – Analytical Formulations and Solution Method”, Nat. Symp. on Mathematical Methods and Applications, NSMMA-2003 held at I.I.T., Madras, Chennai, India, December 22, 2003. 10. Projects carried out: nil 11. Patents: nil 12. Technology transfer: nil 13. No of books published with details: nil

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1. Name: : P.C.Madhu Raj 2. Date of Birth :26th May 1969 3. Educational Qualifications: a. B.Tech. (Arch. Engg.) (Calicut University) b. P.G.Dip. Plng. (Urban & Regional Planning) (CEPT, Ahmedabad) c. PhD. – ongoing (NIT, Kozhikode) 4. Work Experience: b. Teaching: 14 years c. Research: 3 years d. Industry: 1 years e. Others: 5. Area of Specialization: Architectural Engineering, Urban Planning, Building Science 6. Subjects taught at Under Graduate Level : Building Construction, Building Science, Traditional Architecture, Building Services Post Graduate Level: Energy efficient Design of Buildings 7. Research Guidance: 1. Master’s: nil 2. Ph.D: nil 8. Research Publications: 02 9. No. of Papers published in: National Journals / International Journals / Conferences 1. 1.J.Sudhakumar and P.C.Madhuraj, Rational Procedure for Selection of Building Envelope Materials for Hot-Humid Regions, in Proc. of The National Conference on Recent Developments in Materials and Structures, REDEMAT-2004, NIT Calicut, Dec 2004, pp.285-288. 2. J.Sudhakumar and P.C.Madhuraj, Assessment of Transient Hygroscopic Properties of Envelope Materials and their Implications on Thermal Response of Buildings in Hot-Humid Regions, presented in the National Conference in Architectural Engineering by Institution of Engineers India, Thrissur, Nov 2006. 10. Projects carried out: nil 11. Patents: nil 12. Technology transfer: nil 13. No of books published with details: nil

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1.Name 2. Date of Birth 3. Educational Qualification

: Mrs Sanghamitra Roy : 8.12.1966 : B.Arch., M.C.P.

4. Work experience: • Teaching: 3 years • Research: nil • Industry: 13.5 years • Others: nil 5. Area of specialization: City Planning 6. Subjects taught at under graduate level: Architectural design, Working Drawing, Human Settlement, History of architecture Post graduate level: nil 7. Research Guidance: Masters: nil Ph.D: nil 8. Research publications: nil 9. No of papers published in: • National journals / International journals/ Conferences: 10. Projects carried out: nil 11. Patents: nil 12. Technology transfer: nil 13. No of books published with details: nil

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1. Name : Kailash Rao 2. Date of Birth : 29.09.1969 3. Educational Qualifications : B.Arch., M.Arch. 4. Work experience: • Teaching: 15 years • Research: nil • Industry: 3 years • Others: nil 5. Area of specialization: Architectural Conservation 6. Subjects taught at under graduate level: Architectural design, Building Construction, History of architecture Post graduate level: nil 7. Research Guidance: Masters: nil Ph.D: nil 8. Research publications: 9. No of papers published in: • National journals / International journals/ Conferences: Given invited talk on heritage management of Hampi @ Hampi 2007 Jan 10. Projects carried out: nil 11. Patents: nil 12. Technology transfer: nil 13. No of books published with details: nil

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1. Name 2. Date of Birth 3. Educational Qualifications 4. Work experience: • Teaching: 15 Years 3 Months • Research: n.a. • Industry: nil • Others: n.a.

: Nishant H. Manapure : 29.09.1967 : B.Arch., M. Arch.

5. Area of specialization: Urban Design 6. Subjects taught at under graduate level: Architectural Design, Basic Design, Urban Design,
Interior Design, Construction, Visual Arts, Building Services, Landscape Architecture, Thesis Guidance and Seminars

Post graduate level: nil 7. Research Guidance: Masters: nil Ph.D: nil 8. Research publications: nil 9. No of papers published in: National journals / International journals/ Conferences: 1. Presentation given on “THE ESSENCE OF DESIGN” at MIT, Manipal in April 2008. 2. Workshop on “EARTHQUAKE RESISTANT ARCHITECTURE” at PMCA, Cuttack in March
2008.

3. Workshop conducted on “ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY” at ZoNASA 05 at MIET
Gondia in July 2005. 4. Presentation given on “PASSENGER AND TRAFFIC CIRCULATION PATTERNS AT RAILWAY STATIONS”, for Local Government and Railway Officials at Raipur, in Feb. 2004. 5. Workshop on “CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT”, Jan 2001 at MIET Gondia. 6. Workshop on “MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION IN TEACHING”, July 2000 at Gondia, hosted by MIET Gondia. 7. QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMME for teachers in architecture, March 1999 at Bangalore, hosted by RVCE Bangalore. 8. Paper Presentation on “TEACHING AS A PROFESSION IN ARCHITECTURE” at IIA National Convention at Kolhapur in November 1995, with Prof. A.D.Shirodkar. 9. Seminar on “Building Services, October 1993 at Nagpur, hosted by IIA Nagpur Centre. 10. Conference on “ARCHITECTURE PROFESSION”, March 1991, hosted by IIA Mumbai Centre. 11. Seminar on “GROUP HOUSING”, January 1991, hosted by IIA Mumbai Centre.

10. Projects carried out: nil 11. Patents: nil 12. Technology transfer: nil 13. No of books published with details: nil

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1. Name : SHEULI MITRA 2. Date of Birth : 26.09.1973 3. Educational Qualifications : B. Arch., M C P 4. Work experience: • Teaching: 7 Years 9 months • Research: n.a • Industry: 3.5 years • Others: : n.a. 5. Area of specialization: Urban Planning 6. Subjects taught at under graduate level: Architectural Design, Basic Design, Architectural
Graphics, Building Services (HVAC), Landscape Architecture, Urban Planning, Computer Aided Design, Thesis Guidance.

Post graduate level: nil 7. Research Guidance: Masters: nil Ph.D: nil 8. Research publications: 9. No of papers published in: nil National journals / International journals/ Conferences: • Presented a paper on “Information Technology in the Planning Profession in Developing • • •

Countries”, at the International Conference on “Information Technology in the Built Environment” at IIT Kharagpur, Jan. 2002, published in proceeds. Presented a joint paper entitled “Dynamics of change in the urban pattern: a study in Calcutta”, at the International Conference on Humane Habitat, ICHH, Mumbai, Jan. 2003. Published in proceeds. A joint paper titled “An integrated approach to addressing issues in urban dynamics in the transforming city structure – the case of Kolkata” accepted for presentation at HSMI International workshop on urban renewal- HUDCO, New Delhi, Feb 2004. A joint paper titled “Integrated ‘grey’ zones in the city fabric – the case of Kolkata” accepted for presentation at the International Research Conference, University of Toronto, Centre for Urban and Community Studies, June 2004. The abstract is published in the book of conference proceeds. Published in proceeds and posted on web site. Key resource person and coordinator of the team involved in the publication “Challenges of Urbanisation – Role of New Town” by FICCI ERC, September 2006, as part of Consulting Team of Trammell Crow Meghraj Property Consultants Pvt. Ltd. who was the Knowledge Partner.

10. Projects carried out: nil 11. Patents: nil 12. Technology transfer: nil 13. No of books published with details: nil

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1. Name : TAPAS MITRA 2. Date of Birth : 09.05.1967 3. Educational Qualifications : B. Arch., M. Arch (Housing) 4. Work experience: • Teaching: 13 years • Research: n.a • Industry: 5 Years • Others: n.a 5. Area of specialization: Housing 6. Subjects taught at under graduate level: Architectural Design, Basic Design,
Architectural theory, History of Western architecture, Architectural acoustics, Art appreciation and Thesis Guidance.

Post graduate level: nil 7. Research Guidance: Masters: nil Ph.D: nil 8. Research publications: nil 9. No of papers published in: National journals / International journals/ Conferences: • Presented a joint paper titled “Dynamics of change in the urban pattern: a study in Calcutta”, at the International Conference on Humane Habitat, ICHH held at Rizvi College, Mumbai in Jan. 2003. • A joint paper titled “An integrated approach to addressing issues in urban dynamics in the transforming city structure – the case of Kolkata” was accepted for presentation at the HUDCO HSMI International workshop on urban renewal in New Delhi, Feb 2004. • Presented a paper titled “Traditions, Adaptations and interventions: an architectural collage from Tumkur” at the International Conference on Humane Habitat, ICHH held at Rizvi College, Mumbai in Feb. 2004. • A joint paper titled “Integrated ‘grey’ zones in the city fabric – the case of Kolkata” was accepted for presentation at the International Research Conference, University of Toronto, centre for urban and community studies, June 2004. The abstract was posted in the net and is published in the book of abstracts. 10. Projects carried out: nil 11. Patents: nil 12. Technology transfer: nil 13. No of books published with details: nil

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1. Name : Sri Suboth Thomas 2. Date of Birth : 02.02.1970 3. Educational Qualifications : B. Arch., M.Planning (Housing) 4. Work experience: • Teaching: 15 years • Research: nil • Industry: nil • Others: nil 5. Area of specialization: Architectural History, Visualization, Architecture, Housing. 6. Subjects taught at under graduate level: Architectural design, Building construction, architectural graphics Post graduate level: nil 7. Research Guidance: Masters: nil Ph.D: nil 8. Research publications: nil 9. No of papers published in: National journals / International journals/ Conferences: 1. Teacher Orientation Program 2. Seminar on Energy Conservation, MCE, Hassan 3. Disaster Mitigation, Preparedness and Management at College of Engineering Trivandrum – 2 week training program. 4. Attended Short Course on Architecture for earthquake resistance in building under the NPEEE programme organized by IIT Kanpur on 17th-21st 2005. 5. Attended and Presented a paper co- authored with Mrs. Deepika Shetty, entitled: “ Integrated development for sustainable housing in Udupi District” in the International Conference for Humane Habitat organized by Rizvi College of Architecture, Mumbai on 29th-31st 2005 6. Resource person for National Programme for Capacity Buildings for Architects in Earthquake Risk Management, March 28th to 2nd April 2005 7. Resource person for National Programme for Capacity Buildings for Architects in Earthquake Risk Management, May 23rd to May 28th 2005 8. Coordinator for National Programme for Capacity Buildings for Architects in Earthquake Risk Management, February 2006 9. Resource person for National Programme for Capacity Buildings for Architects in Earthquake Risk Management, February 2006 10. Thomas Suboth, (2007), ‘ Effects of disaster on people’, Proceedings of the State
level workshop on Disaster preparedness and Management, March 25-27, Canara College of Nursing, Kundapur, Karnataka

10. Projects carried out: nil 11. Patents: nil 12. Technology transfer: nil 13. No of books published with details: nil

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1. Name : Lekha Hegde 2. Date of Birth : 19th June 1974 3. Educational Qualifications : B. Arch., M.Arch. 4. Work experience: • Teaching: 9.5 years • Research: nil • Industry: nil • Others: nil 5. Area of specialization: History of architecture, design 6. Subjects taught at under graduate level: Architectural design, Building construction, History of architecture, working drawing Post graduate level: Architectural design 7. Research Guidance: Masters: nil Ph.D: nil 8. Research publications: 9. No of papers published in: National journals / International journals/ Conferences: 1. Attended a short term course in July 2003 on Advances in Building Services, RV College,
Bangalore 2. Orinetation Program for Teachers by MIT, Manipal 3. Workshop on “Creativity in Robust Design for the New Millennium” at MIT, Manipal 13th to 17th December 2004. 4. AICTE-ISTE-STTP course on ““Computer Aided 3D Modelling and Animation” held

between 15th March 2004 to 20th March 2004. 5. Resource person for National Programme for Capacity Buildings for Architects in Earthquake Risk Management, March 28th to 2nd April 2005 6. Resource person for National Programme for Capacity Buildings for Architects in Earthquake Risk Management, May 23rd to May 28th 2005 7. Attended QIP on ‘Innovative Design Techniques’ in March 2006 at R.V/College of Engineering, Bangalore. 8. Paper published in the journal of the Indian Institute of Architects July 2008 on “Indoor temperature in vernacular, conventional and alternative technology construction – a comparative investigation. 9. Presented the paper in National conference on vernacular architecture held at MIT, Manipal on 22nd November, 2007 10. Poster presentation at MU on 5th January, 2008. 11. Paper presented at international conference of UK- India –Sri Lanka Young Scientists Networking Conference towards sustainable energy technologies and low carbon buildings for climate change mitigation organized by Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, British council and IIT Delhi held at New Delhi from 6th to 8th February, 2008. 10. Projects carried out: nil 11. Patents: nil 12. Technology transfer: nil 13. No of books published with details: nil

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1. Name 2. Date of Birth 3. Educational Qualifications

: Deepika Shetty : 11.12.1975 : B. Arch, P.G Dip in Urban Design (CEPT).

4. Work Experience: • Teaching: 09 years • Research: nil • Industry: 6 months • Others: 5. Area of Specialization: Urban Design, Theory of Architecture 6. Subjects taught at Under Graduate Level : Architecture and Urban Design Studio I and II, principles of Architecture I and II, Design studio I, IV and VI, Building Costruction I and VI, Thesis Guidance Post Graduate Level: Urban Design Theory, Research Techniques. 7. Research Guidance: Master’s: nil Ph.D: nil 8. Research Publications: • three conference papers were published in MIT Technical Review 2005 and 2006 • Proceedings of conference ‘Sources of Architectural Forms: Theory and Practice’ Organised by Kuwait Univeristy from 10th to 13th March 2007 • ‘God’s own Urbanity’, published in Indian Architect and Builder, Vol. 20(12) August 2007, pg 75-79. 9. No. of Papers published in: • National Journals • International Journals • Conferences :

1. National Conference:- 02 1. Quality in Urban Governance’ in National Conference on ‘Quality in Service Sector and Managerial Challenges’, organized by Manipal Institute of Management at Manipal from 21-22 May 2005. 2. ‘Traditional town structure- a case study of Udupi District’, in the National Conference on Vernacular Architecture in India –Relevance for the 21st Century, held on 22nd Nov 2007, organized by Faculty of Architecture, MIT, Manipal. International Conference:- 03 3. ‘ Integrated development for sustainable housing for Udupi district ’co-authored by Suboth Thomas in 7th International Conference for Humane Habitat 2005 on the theme ‘ Enlightening Learning Environment: Education, Research and Practices for evolving Sustainable Humane Habitats’ organized by Rizvi College of Architecture with the support of Asia Link Programme of European Commission, Mumbai on 29th to 31st Jan 2005. 4. Sustainable work environment Sri Aurobindo Ashram and Pondicherry city’ coauthored by Madhurima Waghmare in 8th International Conference for Humane Habitat 2006 ‘ Shaping Sustainable Work communities and Humane Work Environment ‘

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organized by Rizvi College of Architecture with the support of Asia Link Programme of European Commission, Mumbai on 29th to 31st Jan 2006 5. Presented Paper “Exploring Indian Aesthetic Theory for Developing New Architectural Forms’ in International conference ‘Sources of Architectural Forms: Theory and Practice’ from March 10th -13th by Department of Architecture, College of Petroleum and Engineering, Kuwait University, Kuwait. Research: ‘ Morphological Study of small town- Barkur’ registered for Phd (Dec 2005-ongoing )

10. Projects Carried out :
• Urban Design consultant as part of CEPT team to review the town planning measures for Bhuj town immediately after earthquake April 2001 at Ahmedabad. • Consultant as Urban Designer for Comprehensive Development Plan of Udupi for the Udupi Development Authority 2005 at Udupi. 11. Patents - nil 12. Technology Transfer - nil 13. No. of Books published with details. -nil

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1. Name : Ajai Chandran C.K. 2. Date of Birth : 25.05.1977 3. Educational Qualifications : B.Arch., M.U.R.P. 4. Work experience: • Teaching: 4 years • Research: nil • Industry: 5 years • Others: nil 5. Area of specialization: Architectural Design, Urban Planning 6. Subjects taught at under graduate level: Architectural design, Building construction, Human settlements, working drawing Post graduate level: Architectural design 7. Research Guidance: Masters: nil Ph.D: nil 8. Research publications: 9. No of papers published in: • National journals / International journals/ Conferences: With Munish University, Australia, along with Dr.Maya Ranganathan * Did a documentary films (10 mins) for Manipal University along with MIC Management Action Plan for the properties owned by Urban Local Bodies Case Study – Manipal (A Research done combined with Faculty of Architecture, MIT and TAPMI, Manipal) Research ongoing with Manipal Institute of Communication, MIC, Manipal 10. Projects carried out:
1.. 2. 3. 4. Asare Building ; project cost: 1.2 crores; client asare trust/ Manipal University. – on going KMC Physiology Block; Project cost 1.2 crores (on going) client: KMC, MU. Redevelopment of KMC Campus; client: Manipal University – on going Canteen for KMC, Sonia Hostel, Cost of the Project 3.5 Lakhs (Completed).

11. Patents: nil 12. Technology transfer: nil 13. No of books published with details: nil

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1. Name : Harish Hegde 2. Date of Birth : 08.12.1952 3. Educational Qualifications : B.Arch. 4. Work experience: • Teaching: 14 years • Research: nil • Industry: 11 years • Others: nil 5. Area of specialization: Profession Practice, Architectural Design, Valuation Techniques 6. Subjects taught at under graduate level: Architectural design, Building construction, Valuation Techniques Post graduate level: nil 7. Research Guidance: Masters: nil Ph.D: nil 8. Research publications: 9. No of papers published in: • National journals / International journals/ Conferences: 1. Organized Conference on “Valuation Techniques” on 9th and 10th November 2001 2. Attended Housing and Urbanisation Seminar organized by CAA and IIA at Bangalore, January 2000 3. Participated in National Level Workshop on Architectural Education organized by Priyadarshini College of Engineering and Architecture and COA at Nagpur in October 2004. 10. Projects carried out: nil 11. Patents: nil 12. Technology transfer: nil 13. No of books published with details: nil

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1. Name : Mahalakshmi Karnad 2. Date of Birth : 27.12.1975 3. Educational Qualifications : B.Arch. M.L.A. 4. Work experience: • Teaching: 5.5 years • Research: nil • Industry: 2 years • Others: 5. Area of specialization: Landscape design 6. Subjects taught at under graduate level: Architectural Design, Basics of Landscape Architecture, Building Photography, Architectural Graphics, Building Construction Post graduate level: 7. Research Guidance: Masters: nil Ph.D: nil 8. Research publications: 9. No of papers published in: National journals / International journals/ Conferences: 1. Mahalakshmi,K. (2002) “ Regional Park Sites: Bangalore”, Journal of Landscape Architecture, New Delhi, Vol. 2, Spring, pp:3033. 2. GIS and Spatial Data mining” two day training program conducted by Department of Civil Engineering, B.M.S College of Engineering, Bangalore, September 2006 3. ‘Basics of Image Processing’ One week training program by ERDAS at Hyderabad, February 2006 4. “Remote sensing and GIS for mapping of Natural Resources” 21 days Training program organized by Karnataka State Remote Sensing Applications Center, Mysore, September 2005. 5. “FEEL Teacher Program” Facilitating Excellence in Effective Leadership, 4 days workshop conducted by AIM INSIGHTS, Bangalore, September 2005. 6. “Conservation through Adaptive Re-use” One-week program organized by INTACH - Bangalore Chapter, February 2004. 7. “Block laying of Compressed Earth Blocks” One week training conducted by Auroville Building Center, Auroville, July 1998. 8. Architectural training for 16 weeks under Ar.Andre Hababou, at Auromode, Auroville, April to August 1998 10. Projects carried out: nil 11. Patents: nil 12. Technology transfer: nil 13. No of books published with details: nil

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1. Name : Srikumar M.Menon 2. Date of Birth : 18.08.1970 3. Educational Qualifications : B.Arch. 4. Work experience: • Teaching: 10 years • Research: 2 years • Industry: 4 years • Others: nil 5. Area of specialization: Architectural Design, Climate response Architecture 6. Subjects taught at under graduate level: Architectural design, Building construction, climatology, Building services Post graduate level: nil 7. Research Guidance: Masters: nil Ph.D: nil 8. Research publications: 9. No of papers published in: • National journals / International journals/ Conferences: 1. Srikumar M. Menon, Anish Roshi D. and T. Rajendra Prasad, A search for the 53-MHz OH
line near G48.4-1.4 using the National MST Radar Facility, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 356, 958-962 (2005) 2. Das, H. K., Menon, S. M., Paranjpye, A. and Tandon, S. N., Site characterisation for the IUCAA telescope, Bull. Astr. Soc. India (1999) 27, 609-626. 3. Conference on “Green Building Congress”, 2001 at Hyderabad from 31st August to 1st September 2001 4. Short term course on “Green Architecture” held in JNTU, Hyderabad from 6th January to 13th January 2003. 5. Menon, S. M., Kannan, T. and Kannan, P., A brief study of dispersion due to the interstellar medium in our Galaxy, Report submitted to the Radio Astronomy Centre (TIFR), Ooty, 1991. 6. Menon, S. M., Enclosure design for the National Large Optical Telescope – a preliminary report, Internal Reports of the Inter University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune, 1994. 7. Menon, S. M., Dhara, Y. C., Providing Urban Infrastructure in Environmentally Sensitive Areas, National Conference on Urban Infrastructure and Quality of Life, MIM, Manipal, 15-16 May, 2004. 8. Menon, S. M., Dhara, Y. C., Service Quality in Architecture: the context of the environment, National Conference on Quality in Service Sector and Managerial Challenges, MIM, Manipal, 21-22 May, 2005. 9. Menon, S. M., Roshi, D. A., Rajendra Prasad, T., A search for 53MHz OH line toward Galactic plane using Indian MST radar facility, VII User Scientists’ Workshop, NMRF, Gadanki, 5-7 July, 2004. 10. Menon, S. M., Sustainable Design: effective daylight – artificial light integration, National Workshop on Innovative Trends in Energy Efficient Lighting, MIT, Manipal, 11 August, 2007.

10. Projects carried out: nil 11. Patents: nil 12. Technology transfer: nil 13. No of books published with details: nil

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1. Name : K.S.Sherigar 2. Date of Birth : 08.08.1947 3. Educational Qualifications : A.I.I.A. 4. Work experience: • Teaching: 7.5years • Research: nil • Industry: nil • Others: nil 5. Area of specialization: Fine arts, Visual Art 6. Subjects taught at under graduate level: Architectural design, Building construction, visual arts Post graduate level: nil 7. Research Guidance: Masters: nil Ph.D: nil 8. Research publications: 9. No of papers published in: • National journals / International journals/ Conferences: 1. Two clay modeling work in the Department 2. Resource Person – Mr.P.R.Acharya (2002 & 2003) 3. Mural Workshop – 2004 4. Resource person – Mr.Peter Lewis 5. President, Karnataka Lalithkala Academy 6. Lecture and slide show Temple Architecture – Dr.Choodamani Nandagopal. 7. Conducted the clay modeling workshop for the students of Faculty of Architecture, MIT, Manipal on 27th August 2005. Mr.P.R.Acharya Eminent painter/sculptor invited as the Resource person. 8. Conducted the clay modeling workshop for the students of Faculty of Architecture, MIT, Manipal on 31st march 2007, Mr.P.R.Acharya Eminent painter/sculptor invited as the Resource person. 9. Conducted the mural painting workshop for the students of Faculty of Architecture, MIT, Manipal on 28th April 2007, Mr.Peter Lewis, former chairman of Karnataka Lalith Kala Academy invited as the Resource person. 10. Projects carried out: nil 11. Patents: nil 12. Technology transfer: nil 13. No of books published with details: nil

35

1. Name : Ar.Arjun Rajan 2. Date of Birth : 29.04.1985 3. Educational Qualifications : B.Arch. 4. Work experience: • Teaching: 6 months • Research: • Industry: • Others: 5. Area of specialization: Architectural Design 6. Subjects taught at under graduate level: Architectural Design Post graduate level: nil 7. Research Guidance: Masters: nil Ph.D: nil 8. Research publications: 9. No of papers published in: • National journals / International journals/ Conferences: 1. Attended Presentation on Works of Inform Architects, Bangalore by Ar.Kiran Venktesh organized by BVB School of Architecture and IIA – Hubli-Darward Centre at Hubli, on Sept., 2008 2. Participated in National Seminar on Vernacular Architecture conducted on Nov.2007 at MIT, Manipal. 10. Projects carried out: nil 11. Patents: nil 12. Technology transfer: nil 13. No of books published with details: nil

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1. Name : Ar.Sahana 2. Date of Birth : 13.02.1981 3. Educational Qualifications : B. Arch., M. Arch. 4. Work experience: • Teaching: 1 year • Research: nil • Industry: 3 years • Others: nil 5. Area of specialization: Urban Design 6. Subjects taught at under graduate level: Architectural design, Building construction, Architectural graphics Post graduate level: nil 7. Research Guidance: Masters: nil Ph.D: nil 8. Research publications: 9. No of papers published in: • National journals / International journals/ Conferences: 10. Projects carried out: 1. Residence with Interiors at Korangrapady: project cost 45 lakhs (completed) Client: Mr.Alwyn D’Souza 2. Residence with Interiors at Udupi: project cost 35 lakhs (completed) Client: Dr.R.V.Nayak 3. Residence at Kunjibettu: project cost 25 lakhs (completed) Client: Mrs.PadmaPriyaKava 4. Residence at Kemmannu: project cost 12 lakhs (completed) Client: Mrs.Lalitha S.P 11. Patents: nil 12. Technology transfer: nil 13. No of books published with details: nil

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Academic Calendar 2009-2010
Events
Orientation Commencement of Odd Semester First Test (Thursday, Friday, Saturday) Tech Fest – Tech -Tatva ‘09 Second Test (Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday) Third Test (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday) Last instructional day (Friday) Commencement of End Semester Examination (Monday) Last working day (Saturday) Commencement of Even Semester (Monday) First Test (Thursday, Friday, Saturday) Revels ‘2010 Second Test (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday) Utsav ‘2010 Third Test (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday) Last instructional day (Friday) Commencement of End Semester Examination (Monday) Last working day (Saturday) Orientation Commencement of Odd Sem. April 19 – 21, 2010 May 07, 2010 May 10, 2010 May 22, 2010 July 15, 2010 (Thursday) July 16, 2010 (Friday) April 19 – 21, 2010 May 07, 2010 May 10, 2010 May 22, 2010 July 19, 2010 (Monday) April 19 – 21, 2010 May 07, 2010 May 10, 2010 May 22, 2010 August 2, 2010 (Monday) August 3, 2010 (Tuesday) March 15 – 17, 2010 March 15 – 17, 2010 March 15 – 17, 2010 September 22 – 24, 2009 October 26 – 28, 2009 November 13, 2009 November 16, 2009 November 28, 2009 January 4, 2010 February 11 – 13, 2010 September 22 – 24, 2009 October 26 – 28, 2009 November 13, 2009 November 16, 2009 November 28, 2009 January 4, 2010 February 11 – 13, 2010 October 8 – 10, 2009 (Thursday, Friday, Saturday) November 12 - 14, 2009 (Thursday, Friday, Saturday) November 28, 2009 (Saturday) November 30, 2009 December 11, 2009 (Friday) January 4, 2010 February 11 – 13, 2010

I Semester
July 16, 2009 (Thursday) July 17, 2009(Friday) August 20 – 22, 2009

BE/B ARCH III, V, VII, IX Semesters& MCA III,V Sem.
July 20, 2009 (Monday) August 20 – 22, 2009

I Semester MTech/ M Arch/ MCA
August 3, 2009 (Monday) August 4, 2009 (Tuesday) September 3 – 5, 2009

Academic Year (2010 – 2011)

List of Holidays: 2009: August 15, September 21, October 2, 7 December 25.2010: January 26, April 2, and May

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Estimated cost of Boarding and Lodging in Hostels MIT HOSTELS, MANIPAL (SCHEDULE OF HOSTEL FACILITIES FEE/ CHARGES (Effective from 01.01.2008)
Type of Name of the Hostels BOYS :XII & Regency AC Hostel XII & Regency AC Hostel OJAS - II AC Hostel VII & X Block VII & IX Block (Two Sharing) VIII, IX & XI Block ( Four Sharing) XI Block V, VI & X Block X & K Block D – Block D - Block & D - Quarters X Block (small room) GIRLS :XIII Block AC XIII Block AC XIII Block NON-AC XIII Block NON-AC I, II, III & IV Block II, III & IV Block I, III & IV Block 4/6/8 Quarters ( Renovated) 4/6/8 Quarters ( Non Renovated) Single Attached Double Attached Single Attached Double Attached Triple Common Double Common Double Attached Double Common Double Common 63,000 36,900 53,400 31,800 11,400 14,400 21,900 12,900 7,800 30,000 15,000 25,000 15,000 7,500 7,500 7,500 7,500 7,5 00 9,000 25,000 20,000 9,000 9,000 9,000 9,000 9,000 9,000 16,000 16,000 16,000 16,000 16,000 16,000 16,000 16,000 16,00 0 134,000 87,900 103,400 71,800 43,900 46,900 54,400 45,400 40,300 Single Attached Double Attached Double Attached Single Attached Double Attached Double Attached Single Common Double Common Single Common Single Common Double Common Double Common 63,000 36,900 36,900 25,200 21,900 19,200 18,000 14,400 15,600 15,600 7,800 9,000 30,000 15,000 15,000 7,500 7,500 7,500 7,500 7,500 7,500 7,5 00 7,500 7,500 9,000 9,000 9,000 25,000 20,000 20,000 9,000 9,000 9,000 9,000 9,000 9,000 16,000 16,000 16,000 16,000 16,000 16,000 16,000 16,000 16,000 16,00 0 16,000 16,000 134,000 87,900 87,900 57,700 54,400 51,700 50,500 46,900 48,100 48,100 40,300 41,500 Accommodation Annual Hostel Facilities Fee per Student Deposit Annual Utility Charges Mess Advance Total

Boarding Charges Approximately Rs.1500/ per month

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Hostel Facilities in the Campus : • • • • • • • • • • • • • Hostel Library STD Booths Floodlit Basket Ball Court Table Tennis Gymnasium Swimming Pool Badminton Hall Cable TV Athletics, Football, Hockey, Volley Ball Washing Machine in Women’s Hostel Night Canteen for Women Internet Vegetarian / Non-Vegetarian Mess
Fee for BArch course: First Year Courses Fees Courses BArch Duration 5 Course Registration Caution Fees Fees Deposit 153000 10000 7500 Total 170500 Second Year Course Fees 156000 Fourth Fifth Year Year Total Course Course Course Fees Fees Fees 176000 186000 854500

Third Year Course Fees 166000

Fee for M Arch. Course: First Year Courses Fees Courses MTech/MArch Advance Design Duration Course Registration Caution Fees Fees Deposit 147000 10000 7500 Total Second Year Course Fees 118000 Third Year Course Fees -----Fourth Fifth Year Year Total Course Course Course Fees Fees Fees ------------282500

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164500

ADMISSION Number of seats sanctioned with the year of approval: 80 – 2008-09 Number of students admitted under various categories each year in the last three years
I Year of Approval by CoA/AICTE (Ref.No. & Date) CA/59/94 DT.2912-1994 2008-2009 Sancti Actual oned admissions intake Gen NRI . 80 51 13 2007-2008 Sancti Actual oned admissions intake Gen. NRI 80 74 6 2006-2007 Sancti Actual oned admissions intake Gen. NRI 80 51 9

Number of applications received during last two years for admission under Management Quota and number admitted Institute is not admitting any student under Management Quota

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IX

ADMISSION PROCEDURE • Mention the admission test being followed, name and address of the Test Agency and its URL (website) - Admissions are done on the basis of the marks obtained at the qualifying examination and an all India National Aptitute Test in Architecturrre (NATA) conducted by the Council of Architecture, a statutory body of Government of India regulating architectural education in India. NATA bulletin and application are available on www.nata.in. • Calender for admission against management/vacant seats - Last date for request for applications: 30.04.2009 - Last date for submission of application: 28.05.2009 - Dates for announcing final results: 06.06.2009 - Release of admission list (main list and waiting list should be announced on the same day): 06.06.2009 - Date of acceptance by the candidate (time given should in no case be less than 15 days): - Last date for closing of admission: 06.06.2009 - Starting of the Academic session: 16.07.2009 • The policy of refund of the fee, in case of withdrawal, should be clearly notified Generally no refund of fee is permitted on account of withdrawal/absence from college or other reasons once a student is admitted to any course of study. 1. A refund claim may, however, be admitted on merits after due consideration of the request by the University. If approved, the amount to be refunded shall be within the limits stated below: i. Anytime after admission, but before 10 days from the the date of commencement of classes General category: Total fees exclung registration fees of Rs 10000 & processing fees of Rs. 1000. Foreign/NRI category: Total fees excluding registration fees of USD 300 & processing fees of USD 200. ii. Anytime thereafter and within 30 days from the date of commencement of classes 50% of the first installment fees – Refund will be subject to the condition that the seats so vacated is filled up iii. After 30 days from the date of commencement of classes – No refund iv. ‘REGISTRATION FEES’ is not refundable under any circumstances 2. In all cases where the student has been admitted to the course after the commencement of classes through the waiting list or otherwise, the number of days specified above will be reckoned from the date of “commencement of classes” and not from the date of their actual admission. 3. Any student who withdraws from the course after the date of commencement of classes as mentioned in serial 1 (ii) & (iii) above will be required to remit to the University, in addition to the amount already forfeited, the course fee payable for the remaining period of course.

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In case of Foreign/NRI candidates, the refunds will be made in accordance with foreign exchange Regulations. 5. All refunds will be processed by the Student Finance Office of the University upon receiving the approval from the Registrar based on the recommendation from the Deputy Registrar, Admissions. Requests for withdrawals should be made in the prescribed application available at the Admissions Office. Refund will be made only after the candidate has surrendered the ID card, original fee receipt and the dues clearance certificate.
4.

X

CRITERIA AND WEIGHTAGES FOR ADMISSION
• Describe each criteria with its respective weightages i.e. Admission Test, marks in qualifying examination etc. Pass in 10+2 or 3 years diploma recognized by the central/state government or equivalent qualificatin from any Board. They should have secured not less than 50% marks in aggregate with Mathematics and English as one of the subjects and 40% marks in NATA. Admissions for all the seats are allotted on the basis of the 10+2/diploma marks and NATA score giving 50% weightage to both. Based on the marks obtained in 10+2 and NATA 09, Manipal University will declare a list of candidates in the order of merit on or before 06.06.2009. • Mention the minimum level of acceptance, if any a) Minimum qualification for admission to degree programmes in Architecture shall be a pass in the 10+2 examination with a minimum aggregate of 50% marks with Mathematics as one of the subjects of examination at 10+2. b) No lateral entry from diploma is permitted as per the Council of Architecture norms. c) Students seeking admission under NRI quota need to write NATA. • Mention the cut-off levels of percentage and percentile scores of the candidates in the admission test for the last three years. – na.

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APPLICATION FORM Downloadable application form, with online submission possibilities: http://admissions.manipal.edu/ Prospectus LIST OF APPLICANTS: NOT AVAILABLE YET

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RESULTS OF ADMISSION UNDER MANAGEMENT SEATS/VACANT SEATS Institute is not admitting any student under management category. XIV INFORMATION ON INFRASTRUCTURE AND OTHER RESOURCES AVAILABLE LIBRARY: List of Online international journals subscribed: IEL Online: 219 journals/magazines/conference proceedings and standards 1. IEEE Trans. on advanced packaging 2. IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Systems magazine 3. IEEE Trans. On Aerospace and Electronic Systems 4. IEEE Annals of the History of Computing 5. IEEE Antennas and Propagation magazine

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6. IEEE Trans. On Antennas and Propagation 7. IEEE Antennas and Wireless propagation letters 8. IEEE Trans. On Applied Superconductivity 9. IEEE Trans. On Audio, speech and language processing 10. IEEE Trans. On Automatic Control 11. IEEE Trans. On Automation Science and Engineering 12. IEEE Trans. On Biomedical Engineering 13. IEEE Trans. On broadcasting 14. IEEE Circuits and devices Magazine 15. IEEE Trans. On circuits and Systems for Video Technology 16. IEEE Trans. On Circuits and Systems Part I: regular papers 17. IEEE Trans. On Circuits and systems Part II: Express briefs 18. IEEE Circuits and Systems Magazine 19. IEEE Communications Magazine 20. IEEE Communications letters 21. IEEE Trans. On Communications 22. IEEE Trans. On Components and Packaging Technologies. 23. IEEE/ACM Trans.on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics 24. IEEE computational Intelligence Magazine 25. IEEE Computer Architecture Letters 26. IEEE Trans. On computer aided Design of Integrated Circuits and Systems 27. IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications magazine 28. IEEE Computer magazine 29. IEEE Trans. On Computers 30. IEEE Computing in Science and Engineering 31. IEEE Trans. On Consumer Electronics 32. IEEE Control Systems magazine 33. IEEE Trans. On Control Systems Technology 34. IEEE Trans. On Dependable and Secure Computing 35. IEEE Design and Test of Computers 36. IEEE Trans. On Device and Materials Reliability 37. IEEE trans.on Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation 38. IEEE/OSA journal of Display Technology 39. IEEE Distributed Systems 40. IEEE Trans. On Education 41. IEEE Electrical Insulation magazine 42. IEEE/ECS Electrochemical and solid state letters 43. IEEE Trans. On Electromagnetic Compatibility 44. IEEE Electron Device Letters 45. IEEE Trans. On Electron Devices 46. IEEE/TMS journal of Electronic materials 47. IEEE Trans. On Electronics Packaging Manufacturing 48. IEEE Trans. On Energy Conversion 49. IEEE Engineering in medicine and Biology 50. IEEE Engineering Management Review 51. IEEE Trans. On Engineering Management

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52. IEEE Trans. On Evolutionary Computation 53. IEEE Trans. On Fuzzy Systems 54. IEEE Geoscience and Remote sensing letters 55. IEEE Trans. On Geoscience and Remote sensing 56. IEEE Trans. On Image Processing 57. IEEE Trans. on Industrial Electronics 58. IEEE Trnas. On Industrial Informatics 59. IEEE industry applications Magazine 60. IEEE Trans. On Industry applications 61. IEEE Trans. On Information Forensics and security 62. IEEE Trans. On Information technology in Biomedicine 63. IEEE Trans. On Information Theory 64. IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Magazine 65. IEEE Trans. On Instrumentation and measurement 66. IEEE Intelligent systems Magazine 67. IEEE Trans. On Intelligent Transport Systems 68. IEEE Internet Computing Magazine 69. IEEE IT Professional magazine 70. IEEE Trans. On Knowledge and Data Engineering 71. IEEE/OSA journal of Lightwave Technology 72. IEEE Trans. On Magnetics 73. IEEE/ASME Trans. On Mechatronics 74. IEEE trans. On Medical imaging 75. IEEE Micro 76. IEEE/ASME Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems 77. IEEE Microwave and Wireless Components Letters 78. IEEE Microwave magazine 79. IEEE trans. On Microwave Theory and Techniques 80. IEEE Trans. On Mobile Computing 81. IEEE multimedia Magazine 82. IEEE Trans. On Multimedia 83. IEEE trans. On NanoBioscience 84. IEEE trans.on Nanotechnology 85. IEEE Network 86. IEEE/ACM Trans. On Networking 87. IEEE Trans. On Neural Networks 88. IEEE Trans. On Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering 89. IEEE Trans. On Nuclear Science 90. IEEE journal of Oceanic Engineering 91. IEEE Trans.on Parallel and Distributed Systems 92. IEEE Trans. On Pattern analysis and Distributed Systems 93. IEEE Pervasive Computing Magazine 94. IEEE Photonics Technology Letters 95. IEEE Trans.on Plasma Science 96. IEEE Potentials 97. IEEE trans on Power Delivery

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98. IEEE Trans. On Power Electronics 99. IEEE Power and Energy Magazine 100. IEEE Trans. On Power Systems 101. IEEE: Proceedings of the IEEE 102. IEEE journal on product Safety Engineering 103. IEEE Trans. On professional Communication 104. IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics 105. IEEE Trans. On reliability 106. IEEE Robotics and Automation mag. 107. IEEE Trans. On Robotics 108. IEEE Security and privacy mag. 109. IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communication 110. IEEE journal of Selected topics in Quantum Electronics 111. IEEE Trans. On Semiconductor manufacturing 112. IEEE Sensors Journal 113. IEEE Signal Processing letters 114. IEEE Signal Processing Mag. 115. IEEE Trans. On Signal Processing 116. IEEE Trans. On Software Engineering 117. IEEE Software mag. 118. IEEE Journal of solid state circuits 119. IEEE Spectrum 120. IEEE Trans. On Speech and Audio processing 121. IEEE Trans on Systems, man and Cybernetics: part A 122. IEEE Trans on Systems, man and Cybernetics: part B 123. IEEE Trans on Systems, man and Cybernetics: Part C 124. IEEE Technology and Society mag. 125. IEEE Trans on Ultrasonics, ferroelectrics and Frequency control 126. IEEE trans. On Vehicular Technology Magazine 127. IEEE Vehicular Technology magazine 128. IEEE Trans. On Very large Scale Integration Systems 129. IEEE trans. On Visualization and Computer Graphics 130. IEEE Wireless Communication mag. 131. IEEE Trans. On Wireless Communications 132. IEE Proceedings: Circuits, Devices and systems. 133. Communications Engineer 134. IEE proceedings: Communications 135. Computer Aided Engineering Journal 136. IEE Proceedings: Computers and digital Techniques 137. Computing and control engineering journal 138. IEE proceedings: Control Theory and Applications 139. IEE Proceedings: Electric power applications 140. Electronics and Communication Engineering Journal 141. Electronics Letters 142. Electronics systems and software 143. Engineering management journal

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144. Engineering science and Education Journal 145. IEE Proceedings: Generation, Transmission and Distribution 146. IEE Review 147. IEE Proceedings: Information Security 148. Intelligent Systems Engineering 149. IEE Proceedings: Intelligent Transport Systems 150. Manufacturing Engineer 151. IEE Proceedings: Microwaves, antennas and propagation 152. IEE Proceedings: NanoBiotechnology 153. IEE Proceedings: Optoelectonics 154. Power Engineer 155. IEE Proceedings: Radar, sonar and navigation 156. IEE Proceedings: Science, measurement and Technology 157. IEE Proceedings: Software 158. IEE Proceedings: Systems Biology 159. IEE proceedings: Vision, image and signal Processing IEEE/IEE Conference proceedings and Standards are also accessible. ASME DIGITAL LIBRARY: 1. Applied Mechanics Reviews 2. Journal of Applied Mechanics 3. Journal of Biomechanical Engineering 4. Journal of Computational and Nonlinear Dynamics 5. Journal of Computing and Information Science in Engineering 6. Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement and Control 7. Journal of Electronic Packaging 8. Journal of Energy Resources Technology 9. Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power 10. Journal of Engineering Materials and Technology 11.Journal of Fluids Engineering 12. Journal of Fuel Cell Science and Technology 13. Journal of Heat Transfer 14. Journal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering 15. Journal of Mechanical Design 16. Journal of Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering 17. Journal of Pressure Vessel Technology 18. Journal of Solar Energy Engineering 19. Journal of Tribology 20. Journal of Turbomachinery 21. Journal of Vibration and Acoustics

ACM Digital Library: 1. ACM Computing Surveys. 2. ACM Journal of Computer Documentation 46

3. ACM Journal on Emerging Technologies in computing systems 4. Journal of Experimental Algorithmics 5. Journal of the ACM 6. Journal on Educational Resources in computing 7. Communications of the ACM 8. ACM Letters on Programming Languages and Systems (LOPLAS) 9. ACM Transactions on Algorithms (TALG) 10. ACM Transactions on Applied Perception (TAP) 11. ACM Transactions on Architecture and Code Optimization (TACO) 12. ACM Transactions on Asian Language Information Processing (TALIP) 13. ACM Transactions on Computational Logic (TOCL) 14. ACM Transactions on Computer Systems (TOCS) 15. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (TOCHI) 16. ACM Transactions on Database Systems (TODS) 17. ACM Transactions on Design Automation of Electronic Systems (TODAES) 18. ACM Transactions on Embedded Computing Systems (TECS) 19. ACM Transactions on Graphics (TOG) 20. ACM Transactions on Information Systems (TOIS) 21.ACM Transactions on Information and System Security (TISSEC) 22. ACM Transactions on Internet Technology (TOIT) 23.ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software (TOMS) 24.ACM Transactions on Modeling and Computer Simulation (TOMACS) 25. ACM Transactions on Multimedia Computing, Communications, and Applications (TOMCCAP) 26. ACM Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems (TOPLAS) 27. ACM Transactions on Sensor Networks (TOSN) 28. ACM Transactions on Software Engineering and Methodology (TOSEM) 29. ACM Transactions on Speech and Language Processing (TSLP) 30. ACM Transactions on Storage (TOS) 31. IEEE/ACM Transactions on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics (TCBB) 32. IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking (TON) ASCE Digital Library: 1. International Journal of Geomechanics 2. Journal of Aerospace Engineering 3. Journal of Architectural Engineering 4. Journal of Bridge Engineering 5. Journal of cold regions engineering 6. Journal of composites for construction 7. Journal of Computing in Civil engineering 8. Journal of Construction Engineering and management 9. Journal of Energy Engineering 10. Journal of Engineering Mechanics 11. Journal of Environmental Engineering 12. Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering 13. Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 14. Journal of Hydrologic Engineering

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15. Journal of Infrastructure Systems 16. Journal of Irrigation and Drainage engineering 17. Journal of management in Engineering 18. Journal of materials in Civil Engineering 19. Journal of performance of constructed facilities 20. Journal of professional issues in engineering education and practice 21. Journal of Structural Engineering 22. Journal of surveying engineering 23. Journal of Transportation Engineering 24. Journal of urban planning and development 25. Journal of Water Resources planning and management 26. Journal of waterway, port, coastal and ocean engineering 27. Leadership and management in engineering 28. Natural hazards review 29. Practical periodical of Hazardous, toxic and radioactive waste management 30. Practice periodical on structural design and construction. E-Library facilities: MIT has become the member of INDEST consortium (Indian National Digital Library in Engineering Sciences and Technology). Through this consortium library has subscribed: 1. ACM digital library 2. ASME digital library 3. ASCE digital library 4. IEL online 5. BIS (Intranet version) 6. COMPENDEX Online All these resources can be accessed from internet machines located anywhere in the campus. Apart from these online databases/journals, library has a collection of 3000 CD’s, 500 floppies containing technical literature. LABORATORY For each Laboratory • List of Major Equipment/Facilities List of major Equipment/Facilities 1. Enlarger Black and white (1 no.) 2. Colour enlarger with lens (1 No.) 3. Enlarger (Easel) 4. Art Work Table 5. Flash Gun 6. Byron Aerometer 7. Pentax Camera K-1000 with accessories 8. Enlarger Lens (105 mm) 9. Globe thermometer 10. Lux meter 11. Sound Level meter (2 nos.) 12. Overhead Projector (2 nos.)

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13. Manual Slide Projector 14. Plan filing cabinets 15. Slide Projector (3 nos.) 16. LCD Projector (6 nos) 17. Solar Heliodon 18. Mud Block Machine 19. Shaila Brand Potter Wheel 20. Philips Television 21. Akai Audio Surround Speaker 22. V.C.R. - BPL 23. Adjustable Trolley 24. Electro colour timer 25. Direct Projector 26. Telescope 27. Wind Tunnel 28. Digital Camera Sony 29. Sony VCD Player 30. Sony DVD player List of Experimental setup: State-of-the-art facilities in Design Studios for creative pursuits, Climatology laboratory, Visual Arts Studio, model making workshop and Photographic laboratory COMPUTING FACILITIES: (especially in architecture) Number and configuration of Systems Number and Configuration of systems 1. Computer Pentium III – 1 no. 2. Computer HP 4000 Xeon workstation with 1 HP Dat Drive – 2 nos. 3. Computers - server with Wipro 15" colour monitor – 1 no. 4. Computers - Intel pentium 4 – 10 nos. 5. Computers IBM Zeon II CPU – 10 nos. 6. Computer with colour monitor – 1 no. 7. Del-India Computers - 20 nos. 8. Compaq laptop V4103AP (AICTE account) 9. Laptop HPDV1376 (NPCBAERM Account) • • • • Total number of systems connected by LAN: 43 computers Total number of systems connected to WAN: 6 computers Internet brandwidth 2 mbps Major software packages available 1. Softwares for computer Arch GIS 2. Acrobat Reader (software) 2. Ecotect (software)

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4. CAD 8.0 University 50 User License 5. ERDAS software 6. Computer Softwares - RPC Env. 7. Computer Softwares - RPC Lib. 8. Software Struct SCADD - 5 User Licenses • Special purpose facilities available Games and sports facilities 1. Football, Hockey, Cricket Grounds 2. Basket Ball court 2 Nos. 3. Shuttle Ball badminton court 4. Table Tennis 5. Indoor games 6. Gymnasium 7. Swimming pool Extra Curriculum Activities Soft Skill Development Facilities • Number of Classrooms and size of each: 74 Nos/Size ranging between 720 sqft.to 1600 sqft. • Number of Tutorial rooms and size of each: 61 Nos. 850 sqft.each • Number of laboratories and size of each: All the depts. Have Labs/Total area 17935 sqm. • Number of drawing halls and size of each: 8 Nos/ 2100 sqft each • Number of Computer Centers with capacity of each: There is one Central computing Centre with capacity for 196 students Along with this all the Departments have their own computer centers at an average of 35 computers each • Central Examination Facility, Number of rooms and capacity of each: 74 Lecture halls can be used for examination with capacity of 30 each Teaching Learning Process • Curricula and syllabi for each of the programmes as approved by the University: attached • Academic Calendar of the University • Academic Time Table • Teaching Load of each Faculty
• Between January to May 2009 • Prof.(Dr.)Chitrarekha Kabre, Dean – 15 hours/week • Prof.(Dr.) R.P.Deshmukh – Professor – 16 hours/week • Ar. Nelson Pais – Professor (Desin chair)- 9 hours/week • Ar. Yogishchandra Dhar – Professor(Design chair) – 9 hours/week • Sri Raghuprem M. – Reader –15 hours/week 5 • Sri Ramaswamy R.N. – Reader – 15 hours/week • Sri P.C. Madhuraj – Reader –16 hours/week • Dr. Shantaram Patil-Reader- 11 hours/week • Ar. Kailash Rao –Senir Assistant Professor– 21 hours/week • Ar. Sanghamithra Roy –Senior Assistant Professor– 21 hours/week • Ar. Nishant Manapure – Senior Assistant Professor – 21 hours/week

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• Ar. Tapas Mitra – Senior Assistant Professor – 21 hours/week • Ar. Sheuli Mitra –Senior Assistant Professor – 21 hours/week • Ar. Suboth Thomas –Assistant Professor– 13 hours/week • Ar.Lekha Hegde –Assistant Professor– 21 hours/week • Ar. Deepika Shetty –– Assistant Professor- 21 hours/week • Ar. Ajai Chandran C.K. Assistant Professor –– 16 hours/week • Ar. Harish Hegde – Assistant Professor – 18 hours/week • Ar. Mahalakshmi Karnad– Assistant Professor – 22 hours/week • Ar. Srikumar M.Menon – Lecturer – 22 hours/week
• Ar. K.S.Sherigar – Lecturer – 17 hours/week • Ar. Arjun Rajan – Lecturer – 9 hours/week • Ar. Sahana - Lecturer – 16 hours/week

T – Theory; D- Drawing; P- Practical, Thesis – Thesis, S - Seminar • Internal Continuous Evaluation System and place: Yes • Students’ assessment of Faculty, System in Place: Yes The Institute adopts a student feed back practice. In this practice each faculty is evaluated by each student at the end of each semester. The faculty is evaluated through 10 questionnaires each carrying 5 points each. Thus the total point is 50. The questions are framed to judge the teaching, knowledge, punctuality, sincerity, and leadership skills. The points obtained by each faculty is made known to the faculty and this gives an opportunity to every faculty to improve the area in which he is week as judged by the student. The student feedback is also used as one of the criteria for promotion of a faculty. The Institute has recently started the student feed back system through on line to maintain Confidentiality. Curricula and syllabi of the programme as approved by the University UG and PG Programme:

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SCHEME OF EXAMINATION AND SYLLABUS OF BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE
(AS PRESCRIBED BY THE MANIPAL UNIVERSITY)

APPLICABLE FROM THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2007

FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE MANIPAL INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY MANIPAL UNIVERSITY, MANIPAL JULY 2008

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DETAILED SYLLABUS FOR FIRST SEMESTER B.ARCHITECTURE ARC 101 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN I [6-0-0-6] The objective of this course is to make student understand about appreciation of visual form, grammar of visual language, appreciation of art, vocabulary of design, principles of composition, appreciation of massing and study of anthropometrics. Course contents: Principles of Visual perception, the grammar of visual language, principles of composition and relationship between the human activities and anthropometrics: learning about taking independent decisions or analyse their observations with a sound background of basic principles of visual perception and the principles of composition: continuous exposure of the student to the hypothetical as well as the real situations in which students are expected to work: individual discussion about the project of work with students and on application of the principles in process of design; instilling attitude of exploring different dimensions of composition without any restrictions and limitations; understanding single user space. References 1. Broomer F.Gerald, (174), Elements of Design: Space, Davis Publications Inc., Worcester, Massachusets 2. Wong Wucius, (1977), Principles of three dimensional Design, Van Nostrand Reinhold, NY 3. Wrong Wucius, (1977), Principles of two dimensional Design Van Nostrand Reinhold, NY 4. Maier Manfired, (1977), Basic Principles of Design, Vol.1, 2, 3 & 4, Van Nostrand Reinhold, NY 5. Sausmarez Maurice De, (1987), Basic Design – The dynamics of Visual Design Herbert Press, London 6. Item Johanes, (1973), the art of Colour, Van Nostrand Reinhold, Ny 7. Gordon, Bob and Gordon Maggic (2002), Complete Guide to Digital Graphic Design, Thames and Hudon, London 8. Watson, Donald and Crosbie, Michael, (2004), Time Saver Standards for Architectural Design (CDROM), McGraw Hill, New York. ARC 103 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION I [2-0-3-3] The objective of this course is to study different construction materials; understanding and drafting of various construction details with emphasis 53

on improving the drafting skills; introduction to the understanding of plan, elevation and section; conventional representation; masonry work of brick/stone/laterite; introduction to basic building components like foundation, floor, lintel/arches and roof. Course contents: Study of building components; understanding various conventions to be adopted for drawing plans, elevations and sections; building components and their pictorial representations; brick & stone masonry in walls, arches, brick masonry bonds – English, Flemish, decorative bonds, Rat trap bond; learning about stone masonry – coursed, random rubble, ashlar, etc. brick and stone arches; construction methods – lintels, Simple foundations in masonry, plastering, pointing. Materials: Study of basic building materials like brick, stone, lime, cement, sand, tile and other day products – their properties, manufacturing, various quality tests; specification of mortars including cement, lime, surkhi, etc. References: 1. McKay, G.B. (1972), Building Construction (Metric), Longman, London 2. Foster, Stroud, (1963), Mitchell’s Advanced Building Construction, Allied Publishers Private Limited, Bombay 3. Gurucharan Singh, (1981), Building Construction Engineering, Standard Book House, New Delhi 4. Dr.T.S.Balagopal Prabhu (1987), Building Drawing and Detailing, Spades Publishers Pvt. Ltd., Calicut. ARC 105 HISTORY OF ART AND CULTURE [2-1-0-3] The objective of this course is to understand historical aspects of Art and culture with respect to the socio-economic conditions, social beliefs and the then architecture. Course contents: Chronological examination of art and artistic developments; their critical appraisal in the appropriate cultural context; India – the numerous facets of culture; Concepts in culture studies; Relation between culture and architecture; Various Case studies; Crafts of India textile, traditional paintings, stone sculpture, pottery, terracotta and puppets; Appreciation of Art, including collecting and preserving of painting; Art criticism; literature and architecture; Art, Sculpture, relief work & modern ideologies; Overview of world architecture in Egypt, Greece, Rome and during Renaissance; Asian Architecture and aesthetics; Indian Architecture including Dravidian, Indo-Aryan, Buddhist, Jain and Islamic influences; special focus on Indian paintings and painters; awareness of perspective and depth; Music, dance, dramas, photography and films and its appreciation.

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References: 1. Nath R. (1976), History of Decorative Art in Mughal Architecture, Motilal Banarasidas, Delhi 2. Urevbee, Andrew O, (1997), Culture and Technology, UNESCO, Paris 3. Bayer, Patricia (1990), Art Deco Interiors, Thames and Hudson, Delhi 4. Hartt, Frederiak, (1989), Art: History of Painting, Sculpture, Architecture, Vol.2, ed.3, Prentice Hall, NJ 5. Sivaramamurthy (Colambur), (1997), Art of India, Marry N.Abrams NY 6. Nath R. (1980), Art of Khajuraho, Abhinav Publications, Delhi 7. Anand, Mulk Raj, (1991), Indian Art Arnod Publications, Delhi ARC 107 ARCHITECTURAL GRAPHICS I [3-0-0-3] The objective of this course is to understand the basics of plane and solid geometry through graphical exercises of increasing complexity. Course contents: Communication through graphic language; Getting acquainted to geometrical constructions; lettering; Scales and their uses and construction; conic section and their properties and construction; orthographic representation of lines, planes, solids; pictorial representation techniques such as isometric projection and axonometric views. References: 1. Bhat, N. D. Engineering Drawing, Charotar Publishing House, Anand, India 2. Gopalkrishna, K.R., Engineering Drawing, Vol.I & II, Subhas Publications, Bangalore, India 3. Morris, I.H., Geometrical drawing for Arts Students, Orient Longman Limited, Calcutta. ARC 109 VISUAL ART STUDIO I [3-0-0-3] The objective of this course is to develop in student the skills in Free hand drawing and sketching in various media like pencil, charcoal and color. Importance is given to landscapes, sketching of human form in different activity postures. Course contents: various exercises in free hand drawings, sketching and colouring in different media like pencil, charcol, pen and ink; study of arranged objects (still life) in pencil, charcol and pen and ink to highlight the texture and contrast; Introduction to colour theory – colour wheel, primary colours, secondary colours and tertiary colours; understanding complimentary colours; study of human proportion; understanding the skill of sketching different postures of human figures with light and shade; Emphasis is on architecturally interesting buildings such as tiled roof, flat roof with suitable background and foregroundl; light and shade in various 55

media like pencil, ink and colour; study of textures in materials like pencil ink and colour (Exterior and interior building surfaces) such as walls, floors, window and doors, curtains, furnitures etc. References: 1. Robert W.Gill, (1984), Manual of Rendering in pen and ink, Thames and Hudson, London 2. Hayashi Studio, (1994), Water Colour Rendering, Graphic-Sha Publishing Co., Ltd. 3. Ray Smith, (1995), Water Colour Landscape, Dorling Kindersley, London 4. Theodore D.Walker, (1989), Perspective Sketches, Van Nonstrand Reinhold, New York 5. Richard Rochan & Herald Linton, (1989), colour in Architectural Illustration, Van Nonstrand Reinhold 6. Fredrick Harh, Art A History Painting and Sculpture – Architecture 7. Bruce D.Kurty, (1987), Visual imagination – An introduction of Art, Prentice Hall, New Jersy. 8. The Encyclopedia of Visual Arts Vol.1 to Vol.5, Encyclopedia Britanica, London. 9. Haft Pauler Staften, (1991), Architectural Illustration in Water Colour, Whitney Library, NY 10. Watson, Gupthill (1989), Water Colour – painting better Landscapes, NY MEE 111 WORKSHOP PRACTICE [1-0-3-2] The objective of this course is to train students in the practice of wood working through understanding of joinery and model making and also to learn the technical aspects. Course contents: Introduction to various hand tools by performing various operations of carpentry and by preparing 5 models of various joints and its uses; Application of welding and other joints in architectural field; Demonstration of wood carving. References: 1. Burbank, Nelson, (1986), House Carpentry Simplified, McGraw Hill Publications, NY 2. Krendlise L.N., (1984), Wood working, MIR Publications, Moscow 3. Sheldon Roger, (1993), Opportunities in carpentry career, UBA. VGM Career horizon, NY 4. Williams JJ (1981), Basic Carpentry Techniques, Ortho Books 5. Readers Digest, (1983), (1990), Readers digest complete guide to home improvements 6. Workshop practice Vol.1, Hejra Choudhary

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ARC 113 STRUCTURES I [1-2-0-3] Objective : Understanding structures relevance to architectural design in built environment and

Course contents: Introduction to fundamentals of structures for Buildings; Classification; Natural structures; Building loads; Effects on Buildings; Forces Systems, Conditions for Equilibrium; Elementary Analysis of Structural Response; Study of Geometric Properties of Structural Sections. References: 1. Mariam and Craige (1987), Statics John Wiley, New York 2. Salvadori Mario and Heller Robert, Structure in Architecture – the building of buildings, Prentice hall, New Jersey. 3. Ramamrutham, Applied Mechanics, Dhanpat Rai & Sons 4. Prasad I.B., Applied Mechanics, Khanna Publishers, Delhi ARC 115 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES [2-1-0-3] The objective of this coruse is to create attentiveness to issues related to environmental problem, ecological security, human well being and future sustainability. Course content: Introduction to fundamentals of environmental studies, definitions and need for public awareness – types of natural resources and associated problems – means of conserving various resources – role of an individual in conserving natural resources. Introduction to concept and components of ecosystem – food chains, food webs and ecological pyramids – types of various ecosystems – biodiversity and need for its conservation – types of environmental pollutions – cause, effects and controlling measures – associated global climatic problems – role of individual in prevention of pollution – natural hazardous including landslides, cyclone, floods, earthquake. Introduction to concepts of sustainable development – equitable use of resources for sustainable lifestyles – various urban problems – population growth and associated problems – environment and human health – different environment protections acts – environmental ethics. References: 1. Text book for environmental studies for undergraduate courses by Erach Barucha for University Grants Commission (available online at UGC website) 2. Environmental Pollution analysis by Khopkar S.M. 3. Dying Wisdom by Aggarwal Anil 57

4. 5. 6. 7.

Environmental Pollution analysis by Khopkar S.M. Dying Wisdom by Agarwal Anil; Narain Sunita Ed Agarwal Anil Environmental Pollution by Manivasakam N Handbook of Environmental Health and Safety by Koren Herman, Bisesi Michael 8. Forest Policy by Nair Sathis Chandran; Jayan N D 9. Crisis of the upper Damoder Valley by India International Center. 10. Ecology and sustainable development by Ramakrishnan PS 11. Environmental Pollution by Hedges Laurent 12. Health aspects of environmental pollution control by WHO 13. Urban Environmental management planning for pollution control by Berry Brian JL; Horton Frank E 14. Man and Environment by Macabe RH; Mines RE 15. Environmental Impact assessment by Clark and others 16. Environment management in India by Sapru RK 17. Environmental Analysis by Saxena MM 18. Urban environment issues by TERI

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DETAILED SYLLABUS FOR SECOND SEMESTER B.ARCHITECTURE ARC 102 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II [6-0-0-6] Objective: The objectives of this course is to understand the process of appreciating and designing built forms, understanding the concept of shelter, study of user circulation, the measure of space, designing simple building typologies in a presentable form. Course contents: Extension of the compositional principles already taught in the earlier design studio; ideal design methodology; Understanding user circulation and space requirements; Taking up design of small uncomplicated spaces using the ideal-design methodology; Exploration of various methods of presentation; including the construction of 3dimensional scaled models; Emphasis on visual design. References: 1. Sausmarez Maurice De, (1987), Basic Design – The dynamics of Visual Design, Herbert Press, London 2. Rochon Richard and Linton Herald, (1991), Colour in Architectural Illustration, Van Nostrand Reinhold, NY 3. Itten Johanes, (1973), The art of colour, Van Nostrand Reinhold, NY 4. Hillyer VM, Huey EG, (1996), Story of Sculpture, Nelson, Meredith Publishing Company, NY 5. Wagenknecht Kay, Herte, (1989), Site+Sculpture – A collaborated design Process, Van Nostrand Reinhold, NY 6. Burden Ernest, (1987), Design Communication, McGrawHill, USA ARC 104 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION II [2-0-3-3] Objective: The objective of the course is to understand about sloping roofs, doors and windows, and acquire understanding of wood, ceramic and glass in building construction. Course contents: Roofs, classification, pitched roof, types of pitched roofs, roof coverings for pitched roofs, ventilators in pitched roofs. Trusses in timber, use of Mangalore tile, AC sheet for roof covering; Doors and windows: Technical terms, types of doors, types of windows, ventilators, doors and windows in timber fixtures; Carpentry and joinery details for roofs, doors and windows. Materials: Wood and wood products, classification of trees, understanding of timber, its structure, characteristics, seasoning methods, defects, preservation, fire resistance, various tests, suitability for various uses;

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properties of wood products; Ceramics-various types; glass as a building material-various types, properties and uses. References: 1. McKay, G.B. (1972), Building Construction (Metric), Longman, London 2. Foster, Stroud, (1963), Mitchell’s Advanced Building Construction, Allied Publishers Private Limited, Bombay 3. Gurucharan Singh, (1981), Building Construction Engineering, Standard Book House, New Delhi 4. Dr.T.S.Balagopal Prabhu (1987), Building Drawing and Detailing, Spades Publishers Pvt. Ltd., Calicut. 5. Sushil Kumar, (1991), Building Construction, Standard Publishers and Distributors, New Delhi 6. Garg, N. K. (2007). Use of Glass in Buildings, New Age International (P) Limited, Publishers, 4835/24 Ansari Road, Daryaganj, New Delhi – 110002. ISBN: 81-224-2065-6. ARC 106 BASICS OF LANDSCAPE DESIGN [3-0-0-3] Objective of the course is to appreciate landscapes through learning various forces that shaping them, in order to understand the basics of landscape design. Course content: Introduction to evaluation of various landscape features – forces that shapes them including manmade forces, climatic forces, fluvial forces, etc. man-nature relationship from prehistoric periods – man become the designer of landscape – landscapes of men – evolution of landscape design – components of landscape design – principles of landscape design – study of landscape design aspects such as site. Orientation, plant materials – site analysis and site planning – hard and soft landscapes – water features in the landscape – various types of landscape design – landscape is the means to shape the outdoor norms. References: 1. Introduction to landscape architecture by Laurie M 2. The landscape of man by Geoffrey and Susan Jellicoe 3. Landscape by design by Aldous Tony; Clouston Brian 4. Relating architecture to landscape by Birlested Jan 5. Landscape Design in Chinese Gardens by Tsu Frances Ya Sing 6. Contemporary Japanse landscape by Birlested Jan 7. Contemporary landscapes in the world by Miyagi Shunsaku; Yokohari Makoto 8. Residential Landscape Architecture by Booth Norman K; Hiss James E 9. Time Saver Standards for Landscape Architecture by Harris Charles Ward Dines Nicholas T

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ARC 108 ARCHITECTURAL GRAPHICS II [3-0-0-3] The objective of this course is to understand the solid geometry through graphic exercises of increasing complexity. Course contents: Exercises to enhance graphic skills, section planes, auxiliary views and true shapes; Development of surfaces, model making techniques, parallel and radial line developments, Interpenetration of solids, intersection lines with solids of different kinds, pictorial representation by perspective view, The principles of perspective drawing and its relevance in the architectural design presentation. References: 1. Bhat, Engineering Drawing, Charotar Publishing House, Anand, India 2. Gopalkrishna, K.R., Engineering Drawing, Vol.I & II, Subhas Publications, Bangalore, India 3. Morris, I.H., Geometrical drawing for Arts Students, Orient Longman Limited, Calcutta 5. Rolf, Jank, (1978), Architectural Models, Academy Editions, London 6. J.B.Bakema, Thoughts about Architecture, Academy Editions, St.Martin’s Press ARC 110 VISUAL ART STUDIO II [3-0-0-3] The objective of this course is skill development in various rendering media; understanding, appreciation and hands on experience of sculpture, model making and murals. Course Contents: Skill development exercises in drawing and painting to enhance the technique in presentation; drawing exercises in pencil, pen and ink and colour; Highlighting the importance of free hand drawing in interior and exterior perspective drawings; developing students skill in proportion, selection of object, water bodies, human figures, street furnitures, automobiles, colour, contrast and texture; training in model making using plaster of paris, mount board, thermocol, metal, wire etc; Exercises on pencil and colour rendering on the building elevation, plan, site plan, etc.; Introduction to mural painting – key sketch preparation of the base, texture and colour application using suitable materials. References: 1. Robert W.Gill, (1984), Manual of Rendering in pen and ink, Thames and Hudson, London 2. Hayashi Studio, (1994), Water Colour Rendering, Graphic-Sha Publishing Co., Ltd. 3. Ray Smith, (1995), Water Colour Landscape, Dorling Kindersley, London 61

4. Theodore D.Walker, (1989), Perspective Sketches, Van Nonstrand Reinhold, New York 5. Richard Rochan & Herald Linton, (1989), colour in Architectural Illustration, Van Nonstrand Reinhold 6. Fredrick Harh, Art A History Painting and Sculpture – Architecture 7. Bruce D.Kurty, (1987), Visual imagination – An introduction of Art, Prentice Hall, New Jersy. 8. The Encyclopedia of Visual Arts Vol.1 to Vol.5, Encyclopedia Britanica, London. ARC 112 HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE I [2-1-0-3] The objective of this course is to study architectural developments during prehistoric period, Early and classical Greece, ancient valley civilizations of the world during the period 5000 B.C. to 500 B.C. Course Contents: Detailed study and analysis of architectural character, development, influences; Construction techniques prevailing at that time and the solutions sought by the society to create the master pieces in Egypt and West Asia. Understanding the technical constraints of the materials used; The study of noted buildings such as temple, palaces, residences and civic buildings; Indus valley civilization development of city of Mohenjodaro, Harappa and various other river valley civilizations the world over. The emphasis will be on civic and town planning systems, construction techniques and development of architectural character.study of development of architecture in early and classical Greek period. The emphasis will be on the development of orders, greek sense of perfection, building typologies and city planning. References: 1. Fletcher, Sir Bannister, (1986), A History of Architecture, The Athalone Press, U.K. 2. Tadgell, Christopher, (1990), History of Architecture in India, Delhi, Viking 3. Brown Percy (1976), Indian Architecture – Buddhist and Hindu Period, Taraporevala Sons and Co., Mumbai 4. Grower Satish, (1980), Architecture of India, Buddhist and Hindu, Uttar Pradesh, Vikas Publications House 5. Walsh Margaret, (1971), The colour Source Book, Thames and Hudson, London 6. Albert O.Halse (1998), Architectural Rendering, NY ARC 114 STRUCTURES - II [1-2-0-3] The objective of this course is to study of structural response of structural elements in buildings.

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Course contents: Study of stress and strain in building materials – structural behaviour of beams, shear force, bending moment – theory of simple bending, elementary stress analysis for bending and shear, concept of flitched beam and analysis of deflections in beam. References: 1. Ramamrutham, S. (1981), Strength of Materials, Dhanpat Rai and Sons, Delhi 2. Basavarajaiah, B.S. and Mahadeveappa, P. (1990), Strength of Materials, CBS Publishers, New Delhi. ARC 116 COMMUNICATIONS SKILLS [2-0-2-3] Writing, public speaking and group discussion skills. Essay: Thesis statement-structure of the opening-concluding paragraphs-body of the essay-types of essays. Grammar: sentence structure-transformation of sentences-active, passive, direct – indirect. Reading comprehension Idiomatic expressions. Vocabulary: Synonyms – antonyms-one word substitution-confused pairs of words. Expansion of an idea (150-200 words). Business correspondence: letter writing formal-drafting. Report writingformal drafting Communication/Public speaking, group discussions.

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DETAILED SYLLABUS FOR THIRD SEMESTER B.ARCHITECTURE ARC 201 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN III [6-0-0-6] The objective of this course is to train student in design development of moderate complexity through understanding and appreciation of space and functional requirements such as circulation, facilitation and area analysis, with particular stress on techniques of graphic representation as an integrated process in architectural design. Basics of technical drawings are to be adhered strictly. Course contents: Introduction of exercises interconnecting basic design and architectural design, understanding the arrangement of solids for aesthetic consideration to foster basic architectural qualities in design like composition and other human considerations like, privacy, convenience, comfort, etc.; understanding the significance of the factors in creating ideal environment; learning the design process; Critical appraisal of spaces to which students are frequently exposed to like library, classroom, hostel residence, clinic, etc. Factors like aesthetics – colour, texture, arrangement and profile of forms, circulation pattern, furniture arrangement, etc. A small design exercise with critical appraisal of various spaces as first assignment; other design problems involving activities for two to twenty persons. Reference: 1. Cohen Uriel, McMurtry Ruth, (1985), Museum and Children, Design Guide, The School of Urban Planning and Architecture, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee 2. Mary Julliet, (1984), Designing room for children, Little Brown and Company, London 3. Helper Donald, Paul Wallach, (1987), Architecture Drafting and Design, Mc-Graw Hill Company, NY 4. Neufert, Ernst (1970), Ernst Neufert – Architect’s Data, Crosby Lockwood and Sons, London 5. Ching, Francies, D.K. (1979), Architecture Form, Space and Order, Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., NY 6. Chiara, J.D. (1984), Time Saver Standard for Site Planning, McGraw Hill Book Co., NY ARC 203 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION III [2-0-3-3] The objective of this course is to understand complexities of designing stairs, floors and trusses as a roof form.

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Course Contents: Construction methods of timber, metal/RCC/masonry stairs; Timber floor-hollow clay tiles floor, jack arch flooring; Types of steel trusses – tubular/angle iron truss with roof covering of AC/GI sheets, Mangalore tiles; north light truss. Stairs- components, geometrical planning, Types Wooden stairs- Types, construction details, support systems, baluster and handrail fixing Metal stairs- Types and construction details of steel stairs RCC stairs- types and construction details of RCC cast-in situ stairs- precast steps, fixing of handrails Stone and masonry stairs- types, support systems, construction details Steel trusses-Steel angle and tubular trusses for various spans- fabrication and erection details North-light truss- roofing with A.C./ GI sheets Floors- timber floor- single, double joist floors- framed floors- strutting Jack arch floors- strutting Types of flooring- mosaic, marble, stone etc. Material: Ferrous and non-ferrous metals-iron, steel, alloys, various forms and their applications in buildings- aluminium, copper, zinc, lead,tin Polymeric materials- rubbers, plastics Asbestos products Reference: 1.W.B.Mckay, Building Construction Vol. I,II and III 2.T.S. Balagopal Prabhu Building Design and Civil Engineering Drawing 3.Rangwala, Building Construction 4. Rangwala, Engineering Materials 5.Relevant IS codes ARC 205 ARCHITECTURAL GRAPHICS III [3-0-0-3] The objective of this course is understanding of shades and shadows on two and three dimensional graphic composition. Course Contents: study and analysis of character of light and its effect on three dimensional graphic composition through study; Training of light on plan and elevations. Appreciation of effect of light on simple built forms. Graphical methods of drawing the following (1)The Sciography of simple geometrical forms on vertical, horizontal and inclined planes (2)Sciography of curved shaped objects on horizontal, vertical and inclined planes. 65

Exercises with the emphasis on the application of sciography techniques on Architectural Elevation, Plan as part of the presentation NOTE: Suitable presentation and rendering techniques should be taught along with landscape features. Reference: 1. Mulik Shankar (1994), Perspective and Sciography, Allied Publishers Limited, Bombay 2. Michael E.Helms (1990), Perspective Drawing, A step-by-step handbook, Prentice Hall, Eagle Wood Cliff, New Jersy 3. Halse, Albert, (1988), Architectural Rendering, McGraw Hill Book Co., NY ARC 207 HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE II [2-1-0-3] The objective this course is to understand the indigenous architecture developed in India under the influence of Buddhism and Hinduism, Roman empire, early Christian and Byzantine period, development of imperial Chinese architecture, development of architecture in the Americas, middle east , Japan and China during the period of 501 B.C- 1000 A.D Course Contents: indigenous architecture developed in India under the influence of Buddhism and Hinduism by stressing on the rules guiding the design of religious architecture and their ornamental detailing. Rise of Buddhist Architecture in India  Establishment of Buddhist school its significance and contribution  Study of various methods employed by the early Buddhism to institute a permanent record of the establishment of Buddhist faith through architectural forms such as stupas, emblems, paintings, sculptures, rockcut temples, chaitya halls and Vihara.  Study of the influx of hellenic architecture into the architectural scenario of Buddhism in India  A brief study of various parts of India where Buddhist architecture prevailed Study of Hinayana and Mahayana Buddhist sect in India • Introduction to Hinayana and Mahayana Buddhist sect through examples • To study the construction principles, planning concepts and ornamental detailing employed in Chaitya Halls, Stupas, Viharas, Stambhas ease architecture, etc. • Study of the materials used in Buddhist construction

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Hinduism in India • Study of evolution of temple and emphasizing on the architectural features such as Vimana, Sikhara, Garbhagriha, Mandapa, etc. • Study of construction methods and planning under various dynasties in the South like the Chalukyas, Pallavas, Cholas, Pandyas, Hoysalas, etc. • Study of construction methods and planning of temples in Northern India with the Khajurahi group, Central India, Gujarath and Rajasthan. Reference: 1. Fletcher, Sir Banister, (1986), A History of Architecture, The Athalone Press, UK 2. Brown, Percy (1976), Indian Architecture of Buddhist and Hindu Period, Taraporevala Sons and Co., Mumbai 3. Grover Satish, (1980), Architecture of India, Buddhist and Hindu, Uttarpradesh Vikas Publication House 4. Ananthalwar M.A., (1980), Indian Architecture, Indian Book Gallery, New Delhi, India. ARC 209 STRUCTURES III [1-2-0-3] The objective of this course is to understanding of column behaviour design of columns and structural connections. Course contents: Short columns, behaviour under axial and eccentric loads, Euler’s and Rankine’s method for lay columns. Design of steel columns by IS code method, built up columns. Design of compression and tension members in trusses. Structural connections, riveted and welded connections, analyse and design. Reference: 1. S.Ramamrutham, Strength of Materials, Dhanpat Rai Publishing Company Pvt.Ltd., New Delhi 2. Ramachandra Rao, Design of Steel structures, Standard Book House, Delhi 3. Vazirani & Ratwani, Design of Steel structures, Dhanpat Rai Publishing Company Pvt.Ltd., New Delhi 4. IS 800- IS code for steel design ARC 211 COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN [1-0-3-2] The objective of this course is to impart training in the use of computer aided design and drafting techniques in Architectural design and detailing. Course contents: 67

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Introduction to computer fundamentals, file management Overview of CAD in Architecture – Introduction to various CAD software for architectural application Getting started with AutoCAD – Drawing setup – units, limits, precision Drawing simple objects – sign convention, point, line arc, circle, polyline, polygon, use of other draw commands – spline, block, hatch, text Dimensioning Modify commands – editing of objects such as erase, copy, mirror, scale, move, rotate etc. Formatting – concept of layer, layer management, color, text style, line type, dimensioning style, multiline Surface modeling Concept of 3D modeling – primitives, boolean techniques View ports, 3D view point preset views, isometric views, model space, paper space Commands for printing – page set up, print preview, print Architecture related exercises such as drawing plan, elevation, sections of buildings

Reference: 1. AutoCAD reference manual 2. Omur George, (1999), Mastering AutoCAD, BPB Publications 3. Architectural Desktop reference manual. ARC 213 PRINCIPLES OF ARCHITECTURE I [2-1-0-3] The objective of this course is Introduction to evolution of design thinking, process and methodology, principles of Architectural composition, critical appraisal of buildings and design for the design philosophy and aesthetic principles involved. Course contents: Origin and development of architecture. Different types of arts and their philosophical relationships with societies in history. Art and their principles of composition from various eras and societies which defines their relationship of their philosophies of aesthetics common to all art forms including architecture and understanding them through analysis of paintings, sculpture, furniture, photography, etc.; for example: Greek, Vedic Indian, Bauhaus, etc. Observation and rational analysis: Graphics of analysis and designing process. Discussion on aspects of creative thinking. Definition of art, artist, engineer, craftsmen, designer and where does architect fit. Design process experiments in history, and chart of design methodologies followed by various architects and designers. Formal aesthetics related to volume, space: Perception of space, various definitions of space in history and its implication in the aspects of design. 68

Elements of design like color, texture, light and shade, pattern in design, geometry of various shapes and their meaning in design. Tools of composition like unity, mass and form, contrast, harmony, symmetry and asymmetry, positive and negative spaces, scale and proportions, which could be understood by analyzing Indian and foreign buildings in history and its comprehensive analysis. Finally understanding the relationship of philosophy, design process, design methodology, and application of elements and tools of composition by studying various forms of design. References: 1. Robertson, H & Arkinson, R (1924), The Principles of Architectural Composition, The Architectural Press, London 2. V.S.Parmar, (1990), Design Fundamentals, Somaiya Publications Private Limited, New Delhi 3. John Lang, (1987), Creating Architectural Theory, Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, New York 4. Christian Norberg – Schulz, (1971), Existence, Space and Architecture, Studio Vista Limited, London 5. Simon Unwin, (1997), Analysing Architecture, Routledge London & New York 6. Francis D.K.Ching, (1979), Architecture-Form, Space and Order, Litton Educational Publishing Inc., Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, London 7. Richard Padoram, E & FNSPON, (1999), Proportion, Science Philosophy Architecture, Taylor and Francis Group, Routledge, New York and London 8. Baker, Geoffrey, (1989), Design Strategies in Architecture an approach to the analysis of Form, E & FN spon, N.Y. 9. Iengar, Keshavram M (1996), Composing Architecture, Academy of Art and Architecture, Mysore. 10. Johnson PaulAlan (1994), Theory of Architecture, John Wiley and Sons, New York. 11. Jencks Charles ;Kropf Karl, (2003), Theories and manifestoes of contemporary architecture, New York 12. Frampton Kenneth; Glusberg Jorge (2000), World Architecture 19002000, Springer Wien, New York 13. Ballantyne Andrew, (2002), What is Architecture? New York 14. Unwin Simon, (2000), Architecture Note Book, Routledge, London 15. Pandya Yatin, (2007), Elements of Space Making, Mapin Publications, Ahmedabad 16. Pandya Yatin, (2005), Concepts of Space in Traditional Indian Architecture, Mapin Publications, Ahmedabad. ARC 215 BUILDING ACOUSTICS (2-1-0-3) The objective of this course is to understand the behavior of sound in an enclosed space and remedial measures for controlling unwanted noise.

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Course contents: Study of behaviour of sound in an enclosed space, Acoustical design of halls and auditoria, constructional measures of noise and sound insulation, Introduction to the study of Acoustic, Basic Terminology, sound and distance – inverse square law. Behavior of sound in enclosed spaces. Absorption of sound, sound absorption co-efficient. Reverberation time, sabines formula, various sound absorbing materials. Acoustical design for halls used for Drama, music, speech, cinema theatres and open air theatres. Noise and its types – outdoor and indoor noise, air born noise, structure borne noise, impact noise, sound insulation. Constructional measures of noise control, insulation of machinery, sound insulation. Noise control at neighbourhood and city level. References: 1. Knudson, Vern (1950), “Acoustical Designing in Architecture”, John Wiley, N.Y. 2. Parich, Peter (1979), “Acoustics: Noise and Buildings”, Faber and Faber, London 3. Kinsleter, Lawrence E. and Frey Austin R., (1989), “Fundamentals of Acoustics (ed.2)”, Wiley Eastern Ltd., New Delhi 4. David Egan (1988), “Architectural Acoustics”, McGraw Hill Book Co., NY 5. Templeton and Saunders (1987), “Acoustic Design”, Architectural Press, London 6. Narasimhan V., (1974), “Introduction to Building Physics”, Central Building Research Institute, Roorkee.

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DETAILED SYLLABUS FOR FOURH SEMESTER B.ARCHITECTURE ARC 202 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN IV [6-0-0-6] The objective of this course is to understand the nature and interdependency of multi function spaces and their effect on visual, aesthetic and structural elements. Course contents: Volumetric study of built forms, various building materials & their application in architectural design; critical appraisal of both internal and external spaces, evaluation of contemporary architectural works as warm up exercises; Design problems of relatively complex nature to be worked out with exposure to case study and literature study; design exercises for various climatic zones; a short study tour of two to four days to study the built forms in various regions; the design exercise is to address undulating nature of site (urban/rural); study of contours and related challenges; three dimensional presentation (in perspective model on computer graphics) is advised. Reference: 1. Neufert Ernst, (1970), Architect’s Data, Crosby Lockwood and Sons, London 2. Chiera JD and Calender, (1983), Time Savers Standards for Building Types, McGraw Hill Book Company, New York 3. Chiera JD, (1984), Time Savers Standards for Site Planning, McGraw Hill Book company, New York 4. Ching Francis, (1979), Architecture Form, Space and Order, Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, New York. 5. The National Building Code (2000), IS Publications, India. 6. IS Code Reference Manual for the Building Design for Physically Handicapped. ARC 204 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION IV [2-0-3-3] The objective of this course is to understand various foundation types, flooring and related aspects, roof and weather proofing, paving and various types of doors and windows including skylight. Course contents: Pile foundation types and methods of construction, concrete flooring, skirting, dadoing with various finishes; Roof finishes (over concrete slabs) with weather proofing details. Concrete paving, steel windows door detailing, PVC doors and windows; Provision of skylights in timber and steel roof; Timbering of trenches, shoring, underpinning, scaffolding, form-work for RCC columns, beams, slabs, walls and stairs; Simple foundation (masonry), spread footing, RCC foundation, shallow 71

foundation, Principles, isolated – combined and grillage footing. Deep Foundation – Pile foundation – types – methods of construction and bearing – friction – sheet piles. Timbering for trenches – shoring – underpinning – scaffolding form-work for RCC column and beam, slab, stairs; Steel casement windows – PVC doors – roof finishes for weather proofing and thermal insulation over RCC roof. Materials: Concrete: Introduction, classification, constituent materials, preparation, curing, compaction, water cement ratio, strength, workability, durability, defects, physical properties, proportioning, admixtures, reinforced cement concrete; Tar, bitumen, asphalt, gypsum; Paints, types, application, properties. Reference: 1.W.B.Mckay, Building Construction Vol. I,II and III 2.T.S. Balagopal Prabhu Building Design and Civil Engineering Drawing 3.Rangwala, Building Construction 4. Rangwala, Engineering Materials 5.Relevant IS codes ARC 206 ARCHITECTURAL GRAPHICS IV [3-0-0-3] The aim of the course is to make students understand why anything and everything we see is a perspective view of the same, and how do we represent that view on a piece of paper. The objective of the course is to teach them the fundamental of perspective views, to draw one point and two point perspectives and to draw the sciography for one and two point perspectives. Course contents: Crticial study of 2D drawings and their graphic importance in perspective making; Integration of the effect of light on buildings and perspective drawing. Exercises of varied complexity will be handled from interiors to exteriors. Reference: 1. Mulik Shankar (1994), Perspective and Sciography, Allied Publishers Limited, Bombay 2. Michael E.Helms (1990), Perspective Drawing, A step-by-step handbook, Prentice Hall, Eagle Wood Cliff, New Jersy 3. Halse, Albert, (1988), Architectural Rendering, McGraw Hill Book Co., NY ARC 208 HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE III [2-1-0-3] The objective of this course is to focus on the architectural development in the Western World starting from the classical period i.e. Greek and Roman 72

to the Medieval Period to Renaissance touching upon Early Christian, Byzantine, Romanesque and Gothic Architecture. Course contents: • Architectural Development during Classical period: - Study of various influences that shape architecture in Greek and Roman Empire - General characteristics of classical architecture with the development of orders, construction techniques, etc. • Architectural development during Byzantine era and the advent of Christianity - Study of Early Christian churches and other buildings - Study of the Development of new construction techniques and proportioning systems introduced during Byzantine period and Early christian phase. • Study of architectural trends during Romanesque period and their influences along with basic characteristics in construction techniques • The advent of Gothic Architecture and the influences on its development - Study of the regional development and characteristics in Gothic architecture in Britain, France and Italy with development in other parts of Europe in general. - Study of structural, constructional and planning innovations in Gothic Architecture. • Birth of Renaissance Architecture and its characteristics - Study of the Regional characteristics and development in France, Britain and Italy - Study on the contributions made by some influential architects in shaping Renaissance movement and their projects. - Study on the structural construction and planning theory in buildings during Renaissance period. Reference: 1. Fletcher, Sir Bannister (1987), A History of Architecture, 19th Edition, Butterworth Heiinemann 2. Allsopp, Bruce, (1955), A General History of Architecture, Sir Isaac Pitman and Sons Limited, Londong 3. Citham, Robert (1987), The Classical Orders of Architecture, Rizolli, New York. 4. Kubale, Hans Erich, (1972), Romanesque Architecture, Harry N.Abraham, Inc. ARC 210 STRUCTURES IV [1-2-0-3] The objective of this course indeterminate structures. is to understand the behaviour of

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Course contents: Introduction to indeterminate structures, analysis of fixed, continuous beams, clapeyron’s theorem of three moments, application to continuous beams, drawing shear force and bending moment diagrams. Moment distribution method of analysing indeterminate structures, application to solve continuous beams, single bay single storey portal frames. Reference: 1. C.K.Wang, Indeterminate Structural Analysis, McGraw Hill Book Company 2. R.S.Khurmi, Theory of Structures, S.Chand and Company Limited, New Delhi 3. Ramamrutham, Theory of Structures, Dhanpat Rai and Sons, Delhi ARC 212 BUILDING SERVICES I [2-1-0-3] The objective of this course is to understand water supply and sanitation systems in building and their relevance in architectural design. Course contents: Study of water supply and sanitation systems and their relevance in architectural design studio. Study of fire fighting services. Water Supply: General ideas of sources of water supply, qualitative and quantitative aspects, impurities, hard and soft water treatment and distribution systems. Domestic water supply systems, sump, overhead tank, pipe sizes, pipe fittings – their technical names viz. coupling, tee, elbow, bend, gate valve, non return valve and latest fittings in the market. Cold water and hot water supply for multistoried buildings, types of taps, types of valves, etc. provision for fire fighting and code requirements. Sanitation: Importance, refuse, types collection and disposal. Basic principles of sanitation and disposal of waste water from buildings, urban and rural drainage and sanitation, different collection and disposal fittings. A brief on sewage treatment, septic tanks, oxidation ponds, soak pits, aquaprivy, manholes, inspection chambers, intercepting chambers, cast iron manholes, self-learning velocity, drains on sloping sites, sub-soil drainage, garage drainage and lay-out of simple drainage systems and testing of drains. Sewers, materials, workmanship, laying and testing of sewers, clearing of sewers, surface drains, ventilation of sewers, storm water drainage system, recycling of water. Site Visits: Water treatment plant, sewage treatment plant, and multistoried apartments, for studying water supply and sanitary arrangements. References: 1. Water, Sanitary & waste Services for Building, Wine, Alan, F.E. & Swaffield, J.A., 5th Edition 74

2. Birdie J.S., Birdie G.S., (1998), Water Supply and Sanitary Engineering, Dhanpathray Publishing Company, New Delhi 3. Orthobooks, Basic Plumbing Techniques, Chevron Chemical Company, San Ramon, Cananda 4. Hussain S.K., Water Supply and Sanitary Engineering, Dhanpatray and Sons, New Delhi 5. Stein/Raynolds, Mc Guinnes, Mechanical and Electrical Equipment for Buildings, Vol.I, John Wiley and Sons, NY 6. Dagostino FR, Mechanical and Electrical Systems in Construction in Architecture, Reston Publishing Company, Prentice Hill Co., Virgenia. 7. Rangwala SC, Fundamentals of Water Supply and Sanitary Engineering, Charotar Publishing Company, Anand ARC 214 PRINCIPLES OF ARCHITECTURE II [2-1-0-3] The objective of this course is to understand various terminology, philosophy, styles involved in architectural composition, critical study of various architectural design theories, understanding architectural criticism. Course contents: Definition of Space and Concept in Design: Change in design methods due to changing definitions of space- from planer to third dimension, Euclidean to Einstein’s relativity, Cartesians coordinates to psychological interpretations of space definition, perspectives in Renaissance to 3-d modeling in computers. Character definition of design through concepts and interpretation of the concept in terms of composition methods and space modulation. Discuss with examples in history. Relationship of function in expression of design like, expression of climate and topography, expression of culture and regional characters, expression of circulation and function of building, expression of structure and technology in design. Styles in Architecture: Determinants of style are region, climate, sociology, politics, scientific inventions, materials and technology. Discussion of these influences in development of styles in history. Understanding styles as symbols. Theories in architecture: Discussion on aesthetic theories, proxemic theories, theories related to environment and behavioral analysis and its application in design. Architectural Criticism: Importance of criticism in architecture, its role and ethics involved. Types of criticism like- normative, interpretive, and descriptive. Settings for criticism in present context and in history. Critical analysis of important buildings and issues related to both Indian and foreign context. Reference: 1. V.S.Parmar, (1990), Design Funcamentals, Somaiya Publications Private Limited, New Delhi

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2. John Lang, (1987), Creating Architectural Theory, Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, New York 3. Christian Norberg – Schulz, (1971), Existence, Space and Architecture, Studio Vista Limited, London 4. Simon Unwin, (1997), Analysing Architecture, Routledge London & New York 5. Francis D.K.Ching, (1979), Architecture-Form, Space and Order, Litton Educational Publishing Inc., Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, London 6. Richard Padoram, E & FNSPON, (1999), Proportion, Science Philosophy Architecture, Taylor and Francis Group, Routledge, New York and London 7. Wilson, Colin St.John (1992), Architectural Reflections Butterworth Architecture, Oxford 8. Hubbard, William (1980), Complicity and Conviction: Steps Towards an Architecture of Convention, The MIT Press, Mass 9. Baker, Geoffrey, (1989), Design Strategies in Architecture an approach to the analysis of Form, E & FN spon, N.Y. 10. Frampton Kenneth; Glusberg Jorge (2000), World Architecture 19002000, Springer Wien, New York 11. Bellantyne Andrew (2002), What is Architecture? New York 12. Unwin Simon, (2000), Architecture note book, Routedge, London 13. Pandya Yatin, (2007), Elements of Space Making, Mapin Publications, Ahmedabad. 14. Pandya Yatin, (2005), Concepts of Space in traidional Indian Architecture, Mapin Publications, Ahmedabad 15. Swaback Vemon D (2003), Creative Community Designing for Life, Images Publishing Group, Melbourne 16. Havell E.B. (2000), Encyclopedia of Architecture in the Indian Subcontinent, Aryan Books International, New Delhi. ARC 216 SURVEYING AND LEVELLING [2-0-2-3] The objective of this course is to understand the principles of surveying, classification, types of surveys and their applications. Course contents: Introduction to chain survey, principles, classification, instruments used, ranging, reciprocal ranging, chaining on sloping ground, errors in chaining, tape corrections, obstacles to chaining and ranging, problems in chaining, cross staff survey, chain triangulation. Plane table survey, advantages and disadvantages, types of plane table survey, radiation, intersection, traversing and resection, errors in plane table survey.

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Levelling, methods of levelling, booking and reduction of levels, longitudinal levelling, cross sectioning, errors in levelling, problems in levelling, contouring. Theodolite survey, measurement of horizontal and vertical angles, problems tackled like centre line of building, setting out angles, etc. Study of instruments. Total Station Reference: 1. Punmia B.C., (2005), Surveying, Laxmi Publications Private Limited 2. DE Alak, (2002), Plane Surveying, S.Chand & Company 3. T.P.Kanetkar, S.V.Kulkarni, (1989), Surveying and Levelling Vol.I, Pune Vidyarthi Griha Prakashan, Pune 4. Venakataramaiah, (1996), Text Book of Surveying, University Press 5. Arora, K.R., (1991), Surveying Vol.I, Standard Book, New Delhi

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DETAILED SYLLABUS FOR FIFTH SEMESTER B.ARCHITECTURE ARC 301 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN V [9-0-0-9] The objective of this course is to undertake design development with climate as a critical consideration and sustainability is an important aspect. Course contents: Analysis of form from the point of view of well known architectural principles and critical study of climatic elements and their influence on design development. Design problems involving different user group; Institutional, commercial typologies with special stress on sustainability. Understanding climate as a precursor to design. Integrating climatic requirements with design decisions. Design for varied user groups like Institutional, commercial etc. such that a more sustainable environment can be achieved which will satisfy certain basic comfort conditions. References: 1. Neufert, Ernst (1970), Ernst Neufert, “Architects Data, Cros” by Lockoowd and Sons, London 2. Chiara, J.D., and Callender, John (ed.), (1983), “Time Saver Standards for Building Types”, McGraw Hill Book Co., NY 3. Ching, Francies, D.K. (1979), “Architecture Form, Space and Order”, Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., NY 4. Chiara, J.D. (1984), “Time Saver Standard for Site Planning”, McGraw Hill Book Co., N.Y. 5. Jencks Charles, (1984), “The Language of Post Modern Architecture”, Academy Editions, London 6. Collin Rowe, (1987), “Sterling James – Building Projects”, Rizzoli, New York 7. Charles Jencks, (1979), “Bizare Architecture”, Academy Editions, London 8. Burden, (1984), “Design Presentation”, McGraw Hill, London ARC 303 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION V [2-0-3-3] The objective of this course is to understand the RCC structural members and specialized doors. Course contents: Construction practices/detailing of RCC elements, light partition – wood, metal. Doors fully glazed sliding and sliding folding, collapsible shutters, rolling shutter, fire resistance steel doors. Materials of sound insulation, thermo insulation, weather proofing, damp proofing from basements and water retaining structures.

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RCC construction practices – detailing. Framed structures – characteristics – components – advantages study of column grid. Light partition – wood – metal – glass. Special doors – sliding – folding – collapsible – rolling shutters fire resistant steel doors. Materials: Materials and methods for file proofing – thermal insulation, sound insulation – damp properties of basements and water retaining structure. References: 1. Balagopal T.S.Prabhu, “Building Design and Civil Engineering Drawing”, Spades Publishers, Calicut 2. R.Chudley, “Construction Technology”, Vol.3, 4, 5, ELBS, Longman group 3. McKay, W.B., (1972), “Building Construction (Metric)”, Longman, London 4. Foster, Stroud (1963), “Mitchell’s Advanced Building Construction”, Allied Publishers Pvt.Ltd., Bombay 5. Gyala, Sabestyen, (1977), “Light Weight Building Construction”, George Godwin Limited, London ARC 305 HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE IV [2-1-0-3] comparative study of Islamic architecture in India and elsewhere with respect to constructional features, building forms and various provincial influences. An overview of world Islamic architecture from 600 AD to 1000 AD. Study of Islamic architecture in India from 1000 AD to the end of Mughal period. The rise of imperial style in Delhi and architectural development under various dynasties. Study of the evolution of mosque, tomb, fort and palaces. Study of various building elements and structures such as dome, minarets, squinches, arches, etc. Provincial style with respect to architectural character and its influences in Deccan, Bengal, Gujarath and Jaunpur. Study of various building types and methods of construction. The rise of historic development of Mughal architecture in Delhi and tracing the evolution of style under various rulers. Study on architectural proportion of noted monuments, fort planning principles. Study of palaces, garden development and civic planning. References: 1. Sir Banister Fletcher, (1986), “A History of Architecture”, the Athalone Press, U.K. 2. Grover Satish, (1981), Architecture of India – Islamic, the Delhi Vikas Publications 3. Percy Brown, (1981), Indian Architecture – Islamic Period, Taraporevala Sons and Company, Mumbai. 79

4. Christopher Tadgel, History of Indian Architecture ARC 307 CLIMATOLOGY [2-1-0-3] The objective of this coruse to study climate on global, regional and local levels and relating climate to design and human thermal comfort, including day lighting studies to understand the lighting of Indoor spaces. Course contents: Study of climate on a global scale-origins of climate. Influence of various factors at regional and local scales – micro climate. Study of parameters that influence human thermal comfort, comfort scales. Understanding the thermal environment and design as a means of furthering thermal comfort. Passive and low energy approaches to the achievement of thermal comfort. The visual environment – study of day lighting as a means of providing light within built spaces. Day light prediction tools. “Green” Architecture – its elements. References: 1. Boutet, T.S., (1987), Controlling Air Movement, McGraw Hill Book Co. 2. Carson, R., (1950), The Sea Around Us, Paladin Books 3. Crtchfield, H.J., (1983), General Climatology, Prentice Hall of India 4. Givoni, B., (1994), Passive and Low Energy Cooling of Buildings, Van Nostrand Reinhold Co. 5. Gribbin, J., and Gribbin, M.1997)., Watching the Weather, Universities Press 6. Koeningsberger, et.el. (1974), “Manual of Tropical Housing and Building (Part-II)”, Climate Design, Longman, London 7. Mather, J.R., Climatology: Fundamentals and Applications, McGraw Hill Book Co. 8. Menon, P.A., (1989), Our Weather, National Book Trust, India 9. Nayak J.K. et.al, (1999), Manual on Solar Passive Architecture, Solar Energy Center, Ministry of Non-Conventional Energy Sources, Government of India, New Delhi 10. Pal, S.K., (1998), Physical Geography of India a study in regional earth sciences, Orient Longman 11. Robbins, C.L., (1986), Daylighting: Design and Analysis, Van Nostrand Reinhold Co. ARC 309 Structures V [1-2-0-3] The objective of the course is study of concrete and RCC Structures, structural mechanisms, design and detailing of RCC elements. Course contents: Concrete as viable material for Building Construction, history of concrete making, components, stage of concreting of works, 80

introduction to RCC, Analysis and design of slabs, beams, column using working stress method. References: 1. Vazirani & Ratwani, “Concrete Structures” Khanna Publishers, New Delhi 2. Indian Standard Cost: IS 456 (2000) 3. Shah H.J., “Reinforced Concrete” Vol.1, Charotar Publicity House, Anand, India 4. Krishna Raju, (2003), “Reinforced Concrete Design, New Age Publications 5. A.M.Neville and J.J.Brooks, “Concrete Technology” Addison Wiskey ARC 311 BUILDING SPECIFICATIONS [1-2-0-3] The objective of this course is to understand the language and vocabulary of specification writing, develop skills of specification writing for various building materials and building works. Course contents: Definition, types, importance of outline and detailed specification in construction practice, method of writing specifications. Detailed specification writing for materials and works: Brick, stone, sand, lime, timber, cement, AC sheets, GI sheets, steel reinforcement, paints and varnishes, floor, glass, tiles, ceramic and terrazzo burnt clay tiles, materials for partition framing and cladding, plywood, hardboard, PVC flooring materials for false ceiling, poly esterene (thermocole), pvc sheeting, metafolis, steel structures. Earth work in different soils, masonry work, flooring, roofing, concrete structures, water proofing works (basement, roofs), false ceiling, carpentry works, painting and finishing. Class work shall also include training to write specification for works designed for special situation like non conventional use of conventional materials, etc. References: 1. Ranwala, S.C. “Estimating and Costing” Charotar Publishing Co., Anand 2. Relevant IS code for Materials specification 3. CWD (1987), Schedule of Rates, Government of India Publications, New Delhi 4. Dutta S., “Estimation and Costing”, S.D.Dutta and Co., Lucknow. ARC 313 BUILDING SERVICES II [2-0-0-2] The objective of the course is to understand electrical system in domestic and multistoreyed buildings including lighting, fixtures and fittings, and cabling, airconditioning of interiors, various air-conditioning systems; study of elevators and conveyers and understanding of vertical transportation.

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Course contents: Introduction to engineering services for buildings. Electrical Services – sources of electrical energy supplied to buildings – requirements of electrical materials such as conductors, insulators, types and requirements of electrical cables, control equipments such as switch gear, safety devices to be used in electrical layouts – rules and regulations regarding electrification of buildings as approrpiate with relevant standards – Types of electrical wiring system – Earthing, scope and requirements. Airconditioning: Definition and classification, Thermal Comfort criteria, principles of psychrometry, use of psychrometric chart for thermal evalution. Refrigeration cycles – thermal properties of built elements, evaluation of heat flow, system classification – principles and guidelines for AC ducting – provisions for fire safety. Energey Conservation techniques. Vertical Transportation system – Concept, study of lifts and escalators, design guidelines. References: 1. Blue Star, (1996), The Blue Star Guide to Comfort Air Conditioning, Blue Star Packaged Air Conditioner Devision 2. Egan, M.David, (1983), Concepts in Architectural Lighting, McGraw Hill Book Company 3. Flynn, J.E. et. Al (1992), Architectural Interior Systems: Lighting, Acoustics and Air conditioning, Van Nostrand Reinhold Co. 4. Jones, W.P., (1985), Air Conditioning Engineering, ELBS (Edward Arnold) 5. Lang, “Hand book for Building Engineers”, NBO New Delhi 6. Tricomi, E., ABC’s of Air Conditioning, D.B. Taraporewala Sons & Co. ARC 317 SOCIO-ECONOMIC STUDIES [3-0-0-3] The objective of this course is to understand issues related to society and economics and study them with relevance to built environment. Course contents: a) Introduction to sociology and its relationship with architecture, essential elements of society, social problems, rural and urban communities, tribal society, Indian caste system, cultural diffusion, urbanization in India, problems of slum, migration, problems related to public health, communication reforms and housing, principles of social research. Study of social problems in urban and rural context, bio-social and socio-cultural systems, understanding urban issues such as slums, migration; Basics of social research. b) Introduction to Building Economics, nature and scope of the subject of building economics, utility to architects, economic problems. Economic Organization of the Society, Indian Living Standard and its comparison with other countries. Laws and Returns and its applicability in architecture, Opportunity Costs, Methods of Financing and Valuation, Basics of Estimating and Cost Accounting, elements of 82

Book-keeping and Accounts. Factors of production, Inflation and Building Cost, wages and incentives. Energy Crisis and building construction, a critical review, economic development and its effects on environmental quality, depreciation, brief idea on the forms of business organizations and professional firms. References: 1. Maclver, R.M. and Page, Charles, (1974), “Society: An introductory Analysis”, McMillan India Limited, Delhi 2. Mangalore University, (1991), “Perspectives of Dakshina Kannada and Kodagu, Mangalagangothri, Mangalore 3. Madhan G.R., (1981), “Indian Social Problems, Vol.1”, Allied Publishers, New Delhi 4. Shankar Rao C.N., “Sociology”. Tara Chand, (1993), “Engineering Economics”, Nem Chand and Bros., Roorkee (U.P.) 5. Ghan P.T., (1985), “Engineering Economics”, Pune Vidyarthi Griha Prakashan, (Pune) 6. Dewett K.K., (1991), “Economic Theory” 7. Namavati (1991), “Professional Practice and Methods of Valuation”, Mumbai 8. Baidynath, Saraswati (2000), Nature of Man and Culture, Aryan Books International, Delhi 9. Pannerselvan, R (2005), Engineering Economics, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi 10. Lester, Thurow (2003), Fortune Favours the Bold, Harper Business, New York.

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DETAILED SYLLABUS FOR SIXTH SEMESTER B.ARCHITECTURE ARC 302 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN VI [9-0-0-9] The objective of this course is critical analysis and understanding of structures and/or design program of complex nature and integrating design with climate socio economic issues, building services and architectural principles. Course contents: Investigation of complex structural and/or programme forms for buildings. Thinking of building as an entity where services play an intrinsic role in design and their integration add to the efficiency of design along with services. The other main objective will be to satisfy socio-economic issues in building. References: 1. Neufert, Ernst (1970), Ernst Neufert, “Architects Data, Cros” by Lockoowd and Sons, London 2. Chiara, J.D., and Callender, John (ed.), (1983), “Time Saver Standards for Building Types”, McGraw Hill Book Co., NY 3. Ching, Francies, D.K. (1979), “Architecture Form, Space and Order”, Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., NY 4. Chiara, J.D. (1984), “Time Saver Standard for Site Planning”, McGraw Hill Book Co., N.Y. ARC 304 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION VI [2-0-3-3] The aim of this course is to impart knowledge about walling and roofing systems involving specialized structures like curtain walls, shell roofs, folded plates as wella s structures involving newer materials and technologies like stabilized mud blocks, fly ash, ferrocement, hollow concrete blocks, gypsum blocks, etc. The objectives of this course are • To understand in detail curtain wall systems, their applications and fixing details • To understand various types of wall claddings like stone veneers, cement concrete, tiles and mosaics and their respective construction details • To understand specialized roofing systems like shell roof, folded plates, and space frames and their construction details • To understand cost-effective construction methods put forward by institutions like CBRI, HUDCO, and Nirmiti Kendra.

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At the end of the course the student will have the appropriate knowledge about specialized structures and structures using non-conventional materials and technologies. This will allow them to make appropriate decisions while undertaking design projects in future. References: 1. R.Chudley, “Construction Technology”, Vol.4 2. Mckay WB, “Building Construction” 3. Madhava Rao and Others, “Appropriate Technologies for Low-Cost Housing” (Oxford 1BH) 4. Relevant IS Codes, BIS 5. Handbook on Concrete Reinforcement and Detailing, BIS 6. Construction of Buildings, R.Barry, 1999 7. www.portafab.com;www.wbdg.org;www.earth-auroville.com ARC 306 Structures VI [1-2-0-3] The objective of this course is to provide exposure to soil building relationships, seismic response of built form, elementary study of structures for large spans. Course contents: Soil classification, soil properties, foundation requirements, building foundations, classification, design consideration for masonry and RCC foundations, study of steel plate girders and space frames as structural forms for large spans. References: 1. Vazirani and Ratwani, (1983), “Reinforced concrete Structures”, Dhanpat Rai and Sons, Delhi 2. NICEE Publications 3. Punmia B.C., “Soil Mechanics and Foundation”, Standard Book House, New Delhi 4. Dr.N.Subramanian, “Principles of Space Structures”, Wheeler and Company Limited, Allahabad. Arc 310 Modern Architecture [2-1-0-3] Study of Architectural styles and forms from industrial revolution until preindependence period of India. Effects of Renaissance Architecture continued through industrial revolution, modernistic concepts and the spread of post modernism. Studies of various buildings belonging to the renaissance style. The Industrial revolution – Development of cities, evolution of bridges, railway stations, exhibition buildings, civic buildings. Development of skyscrapers – the Chicago school. Development of architectural theories – cubism, De Stijli, Ecole-beaux-des-Arts, brutalism, structuralism, futurism, 85

constructivism, Art Noveau, Arts and Crafts expressionism. Works of Architects like Le-Corbuzier, Mies van der Rohe, Frank Lloyd Wright, Alvar Alto. Works of other Architects of the same period. References: 1. Vikram Bhatt & Peter Scriver, (1990), After the Master, Mapin Publishing 2. T.S.Randhwa, (1999), the Indian Courtyard House, Prakash Books 3. Das & Joglekar, Contemporary Indian Architects 4. Contemporary Architects 5. Fafuri (Manfredo) & Co., (Francisco Dal) 1986 “Modern Architecture” Vol. 1 & 2, Electrical Rizzoli, New York 6. Robert Venuri, Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture 7. Curtis, William JR (2003), Modern Architecture since 1990, Phaidon Press, London 8. Avewry, Derek, (2003), Modern, Architecture, Chaucer Press, London. ARC 312 WORKING DRAWING [4-0-0-4] The objective of this course is to develop the skills and techniques of preparation of production drawings by taking an already self designed project of earlier semester and imparting training of the drafting of working drawing details. Course contents: Exposure to the production drawing techniques used in the office environment. The preparation of drawings with standard practised notations, symbols to convey the architectural design and details for the execution purpose. The preparation of drawings for load bearing structures and also to the framed structures separately right from the excavation drawing, foundation details, wall marking details, structural drawing details, roof details, door and window opening schedule and details. The preparation of checklists for drawing numbers, cross verification of drawing, extracting the quantities for estimates. The portfolio should contain all detailed execution drawing of the project completely. Output: The student would know the type of work he would be exposed to in an architects office just before the commencement of the professional training. References: 1. Waktia, Osamu and Linde, Richard, (1977), “The Professional Practice of Architectural Detailing”, John Wiley and Sons, N.Y. 2. Thomas, Marvin, (1978), “Architectural Working Drawings: A Professional Technique”, McGraw Hill Book Co., N.Y.

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3. The Professional Practice of Architectural Working Drawings by Osamu, A, Watila & Richard M.Linde, ISBN-10:0471395404, ISBN-13:9780471395409. ARC 314 QUANTITY SURVEYING [2-1-0-3] The objective of this course is to impart training in taking out quantities of building elements, rate analysis and preparation of estimates. Course contents: Need for quantity surveying, measurement of items of construction work. Taking out quantities of work items, long wall – short wall method, centre line method. Preparation of abstract of estimated quantities. Rate analysis of different work items, factors affecting rate of an item. Preparation of project estimate; types of estimates. Contract, types of contracts, tender, tender documents, earnest money. References: 1. Rangawala S.C., (1984),”Estimating and Costing”, Charotar Publishing Co 2. Dutta S., (1989), “Estimating and Costing (ed.20)”, S.Dutta and Co., Lucknow 3. Relevant I.S. Codes for Material Specifications” ARC 316 ELECTIVE [2-1-0-3] ARC 316.1 Introduction to Heritage Conservation The objective of the course is to understand the need of conservation as a tool for sustainable development. Course Contents: Definition of heritage, concepts of conservation, prevailing practices world over, approach for Indian context, role of conservation architect, special skill sets needed for heritage management.

References: 1. "Historical and Philosophical Issues in the Conservation of Cultural Heritage" edited by Nicholas S.Price, M.Kirby Talley Jr. and Alessandra Melucco Vaccaro, published by Getty Conservation Institute, Los Angeles 1996. 2. . "Conservation on Archaeological Excavations", edited by Nicholas S.Price, published by ICCROM Conservation of Historic Buildings by Bernard M Fieldon by Architectural Press Third edition 2003

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3. Recording Historic Structures edited by John A Burns National park Service second edition 2004 by John Wiley & Sons Inc. Hoboken new jersey 4. Agnew, Neville and Demas, Martha, editors. Principles for the Conservation of Heritage Sites in China. Los Angeles: The Getty Conservation Institute, 2002. 5. English Heritage. Conservation Area Practice: English Heritage guidance on the management of Conservation Areas. London: October 1995. 6. Feilden, Bernard M. and Jokilehto, Jukka. Management Guidelines for World Cultural Heritage Sites. Rome: ICCROM, 1998. 7. Tandon, Rajeshwari, editor. A Case for National Policy for Heritage Conservation & Management. New Delhi: INTACH, August 2002 8. Feilden, Bernard. Guidelines for Conservation: A Technical Manual. New Delhi: Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage (INTACH), 1989. 9. Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage (INTACH), Architectural Heritage Division, New Delhi. Conserving the Heritage of Our Historic Cities: Pre Seminar Working Document. New Delhi: INTACH, 1999. ARC 316.2 Disaster Management The objective of this course is to increase understanding about various disasters as an interdisciplinary knowledge acquisition effort and what role an architect can play for community with this added knowledge of the subject. Disaster – a world view; Disaster – the Indian Perspective; Typology of disasters and increased understanding. Preparedness and mitigation; Community health and casualty management; Disaster Management – role of various agencies; Relief measures; Reconstruction and Rehabilitation. References 1. V.K. Sharma (1995 ) Disaster management, Indian Institute of Public Administration, New Delhi, United Press, new Delhi 2. Carter, W.N ( 1990 ) Disaster Management- a disaster manager’s handbook, Asian Development Bank, Manila. 3. UNCHS ( 1996 ) Habitat II Agenda, Disaster management Unit, Nairobi, Kenya. 4. United Nations (1986 ) Disaster Prevention & Mitigation, United Nations Disaster Relief Organization.

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5. Farrington, Karen (1999) Natural Disasters – The terrifying forces of nature, Grammery Books, London. 6. Zebrowski, Ernest (1993) Perils of a Restless Planet, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. 7. Hewitt (1983) Interpretation of Calamity, Allen & Unwin Inc., London. 8. Arnold C. and Reitherman R (1982 ) Building Configuration and Seismic Design, John Wiley and Sons. 9. Lagorio, H.J (1990) Earthquakes: An Architect’s Guide to non structural and Seismic hazards, John Wiley and Sons. 10. Reddy, L.R (2001) The pain and Horror of Gujarat Earthquake, APH Publishing Corporation, New Delhi. 11. Maharashtra emergency, Earthquake rehabilitation Programme (1998) Maharashtra Disaster Management Plan, Risk assessment and vulnerability analysis, Government of Maharashtra, Mumbai. 12. Mukhopadhyay, Asim Kumar, (2005), Crisis and Disaster Management Turbulance and Aftermath, New age International Private Limited, New Delhi 13. Singh, RB (2000), Disaster Management, Rawat Publication, Jaipur. ARC 316.3 Advanced Computer Applications The objective of this course is to train students in one critical area of digital Architecture and instill skills in them relative to market demands. • Exposure to Building Information Modelling (BIM) Software – Autodesk Revit/AutoCAD Creating buildings using intelligent/parametric objects like walls, door, windows, slabs, roofs Generating sections, elevations, scheduling, tags, etc. • Exposure to Presentation software; 3D studio max/Artlantis Importing models from CAD software, Creation of primitives, compound objects, Modifiers Creation of materials, lights, cameras, etc., Rendering, Creating walkthroughs, panoramic views, VRML Reference Books: Autodesk Revit/Archi-CAD Manual, 3D studio-max manual. ARC 316.4 Hydrogeology The objective of this course is to study physical geology for various ground stata, hydrological processes and water conservation including rain water harvesting. Course contents: Rocks and minerals, weathering of rocks, soil formations, classification, sources of fresh water and hydrologic cycle. Surface and ground water, river system-urbanisation. Importance of ground water

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resources-urban hydrology, source of water pollution-preventive measures, ground water exploitation-selection of site for sinking a well-man in the ground water eco system-water management-conjective use-water conservation-artificial recharge-traditional water harvesting structures. Physical Geology: Weathering of rocks, kinds of weathering, agencies, causes and products of weathering. Soil formation, soil profile, classification of soil, erosion and conservation. Petrology: Sources of rocksminerals-definition, physical proportion of important rock forming and ore minerals. Rock as building material-rock cycle. Classification of rock into igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic. Texture and structures in rocks. Identification and description of the following minerals with uses and distribution in India. Rock forming minerals: Quartz group-rock crystal, Amethyst, Rose Crystal, agate, flint, Jasper, Orthoclase Microcline, Plagioclase, Muscovite, biotete, Koaline, calcite, meganesite, dolomite, hornblende, gypsum, olivine, corundum, garnet, talk, asbestos, chlorite. Ore minerals: hematite, magnite, limonite, chromite, chalcopyrite, pyrite, galena, azurite, malacite. Megascopic study of the following rocks with their composition, texture, structure, and engineering importance. Granite, garbo, dunite, pegmatite, dolomite, basalt, obsidianpumice, conglomerate, breccia, standstone, limestone, shale, laterite, gneiss, slate, quarzite and marble. Hydrological Processes: Definition and scope, practical applications of hydrology, Hydrological cycle, Hydrological data and their sources. Precipitation: definition, formation of precipitation, forms of precipitation, types of precipitation, measurement of precipitation. Infiltration: Definition, infiltration capacity, infiltration capacity curve, factors affecting infiltration, measurement of infiltration. Evaporation and transpiration: Definition process, factors affecting evaporation and transpiration, measure and control of Evaporation. Run-off: Definition components, runoff process, factors affecting run-off, stream flow measurement, flow duration curves. Ground water Hydrology: occurrence of ground water, types of aquifers, Geohydrological zones in India. Ground water development in India. Aquifer parameters: porosity, permiability, specific yield, storage coefficient etc. and theirs determination. Types of wells, ground water explorationselection for well sites, application of geological and geophysical methods – electrical resistivity method, seismic refraction, gravity and magnetic. Water conservation: Traditional method, artificial recharge of groundwater. Rainwater harvesting. ARC 316.5 Building photography The objective of this course to introduce the student to the world of photograpghy with accent on building photography and interconnecting the techniques of architectural composition with the techniques of building photography. 90

Course contents: Introduction to the basic technical, observational and compositional skills and knowledge required for study of architecture through the photography media. Prerequisite: Needs own suitable camera and basic design abilities. History of Photography, understanding of optics, digital camera parts, types of cameras and their uses, understanding of shutter speed, aperture, depth of field, ISO speed and their combined effect, Image processing in the computer, understanding composition, basics of building and daylight photography, suitable lenses, testing through field assignments and computer work. References: 1. Dilwali, Ashok (2002), All about Photography, National Book Trust, New Delhi 2. Child, John, (2005), Studio Photography, Elsevier, London ARC 316.6 Use of Glass in Buildings The objective of the course is to expose the students about the various types of glasses with different properties and to enable them to select appropriate glass for application in buildings. Course contents: More and more glass is being used in buildings. It is no longer considered a fragile material. It is recyclable and affordable. Glass is available in a wide range of architectural, structural, optical and acoustical properties to address the varying requirements of buildings. Knowledge about the use of glass in buildings along scientific lines is covered: • • • • • • • Evolution of glass to the present state Glass types with their properties and uses Selection of glass for specific applications and uses Determination of thickness of glass used in exteriors of buildings Safe use of glass in interiors Prevalent glazing systems ‘Do’s and ‘Don’ts about use of glass in buildings

Reference: Garg, N. K. (2007). Use of Glass in Buildings, New Age International (P) Limited, Publishers, 4835/24 Ansari Road, Daryaganj, New Delhi – 110002. ISBN: 81-224-2065-6.

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DETAILED SYLLABUS FOR SEVENTH SEMESTER B.ARCHITECTURE ARC 401 PRACTICE SCHOOL (PROFESSIONAL TRAINING) [0-0-0-20] The objective of this course is to offer students an opportunity to work in an architect’s office and get acquainted with the demands of the profession, including carrying out independent critical study of a building of architectural importance, study of an innovative building material and study of observed and drafted details. Course contents: The professional training shall be for duration of four months in various aspects of architectural practice. During this period, the candidate shall produce four reports viz., Training Report, Building Study, Building Material Study and Detailing study. The Training Report shall consist of the various drawings, observations, technical graphic data, etc. obtained during the process of training and shall carry a weightage of 80 marks. The building study shall be a critical appraisal of one of the noted buildings designed and supervised by the firm in which the candidate has taken the training. This shall carry 40 marks. The Building Material Study shall include pertinent data, characteristics and applications of a contemporary building material. This should have 40 marks as weightage. The detailing study shall deal with the various aspects of an interesting detail done by the firm, where the candidate has done the training or any other project of interest – 40 marks shall be assigned for this study. Professional training will be carried out as per the professional training rules as prescribed.

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DETAILED SYLLABUS FOR EIGTH SEMESTER B.ARCHITECTURE ARC 402 ARCHITECTURAL & URBAN DESIGN STUDIO I [9-0-0-9] The objective of the course is to create an opportunity for the coordinated group work in conducting physical, socio-economic and traffic analysis: data collection, analysis and presentation as a prerequisite to the main design issues, including intervention into specialized aspects of landscaping, town planning and urban design through architectural design exercises. Course contents: Correlation of design issues to land and surrounding areas, influences of neighbouring areas on the design development; Consideration of issues such as socio-economics, environment, technology in relation to urban design. (Prerequisites: ARC 101, ARC 102, ARC 201, ARC 202, ARC 301, ARC 302) The basic aim of the studio is to relate the building/buildings, complexes, streets, public places and spaces, etc., to the urban or regional context for which the change in the scale would imply change in the complexity of design, change in the user profiles, change in the issues addressed and involvement of public in design. The large scale design would require variation in all stages of design. Aspects in Design: Introduction to historical development of urban design, various theories in modern times, aspects of planning, and cultural contribution in definition of spaces. Studies in urban design like behavioral studies and physical expression of socio-cultural aspects, morphology and typology in city structure, townscape and image ability of public spaces, communication systems, infrastructure development and network of open spaces, etc., are understood through examples or book reviews Interpretive techniques and analyzing methods like visual analysis, questionnaire techniques, recording devises, mapping and vantage points, are reviewed and chosen. Observation, Methods of public participation in design are also planned. Design proposal should consider all possibilities to achieve the aims and objectives of design. The class should provide a master-plan which would have design in the form of guidelines, bye-laws, phasing of design, prototype, design, or detailed design References:

1. Gallion Arthur B ; Eisner Simon, (1963)Urban pattern city planning and design, Van nostrand 2. School of Architecture(CEPT),( 1988), Typology and Mapping of Housing Zones, Ministry of Urban Development; NBO 3. Cullen Gordon, (1968), Townscape, Architectural Press 4. Caminos Horacio; Goethert Reinhard, (1983), Urbanization Primer, M I T Press 5. Frey Hildebrand;(1999), Designing the city, E and F N Spon

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6. Spreiregen P D(1965), Architecture of towns and cities, McGraw Hill 7. Chiara, J.D., and Callender, John (ed.), (1983), “Time Saver Standards for Building Types”, McGraw Hill Book Co., NY 8. Chiara, J.D. (1984), “Time Saver Standard for Site Planning”, McGraw Hill Book Co., N.Y. 9. Krier Rob, (1984) Urban Space, Academy editions 10. Christopher Alexander,(1977), Pattern Language, Oxford University Press 11. Sanoff Henry, (1991), Visual research methods in Design, Van Nostrand Reinhold 12. Spiro Kostof, (1992), City Assembled, Thames and Hudson

13. Banargee Tridib Southworth Michael, (1990), City Sense and City Design, M I T Press 14. Zeisel John, (1995), Inquiry by design, Cambridge University press 15. Ameen Farooq, (1997), Contemporary architecture and city form, Marg Publishers 16. Catanese Anthony J ; Snyder James C;(1979), Introduction to urban planning, McGraw Hill 17. Institute for landscape visual impact assessment(2002), Guideline for landscape and visual impact assessment, Spon, London 18. Watson Donald;others,(2003) Time saver standards for urban design, McGraw Hill, NY 19. Paddison Ronan Ed, (2001), Handbook of urban studies, Sage Publications, London 20. Broadbent Geoffrey, (1990), Emerging concepts in urban space design, Van Nostrand Reinhold, London. 21. Hillier Bill ;Hanson Julienne, (1990), Social logic of space, Cambridge University press, NY ARC 404 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION VII [2-0-3-3] The objective of this course is to expose students to the designing and detailing of Interior constructional elements and decorative features construction techniques, including preparation of schematic drawings, production drawings and costing. Course contents: Visualization of interior spaces with respect to light colour and functional aspects. Use of materials in specific conditions of restaurants, cinema, auditorium, planetarium, to condition light and acoustic level working details, collection of materials and market study and case study quality materials and workmanship. References: 1. Jain, Shashi, (1994), “Creative Interiors”, Management Publishing Company, New Delhi

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2. Ching, Frnacies, D.K. (1987), “Interior Design Illustrated”, Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York 3. Korn, Ahmed A., (1992), “Interior Design”, Iquara Publication Limited, Bombay 4. De Chiara, Joseph (1992), “Time Savers Standard for Interior Design and Space Planning”, McGraw Hill Publishing Company. ARC 406 STRUCTURES VII [1-2-0-3] The objective of this course is to understanding of reinforced concrete design by limit state method and prestressed concrete structures. Course contents: Introduction to limit state method of design of RCC Structures, design of various building components such as beams, slabs, columns, etc. Use of SP 16 and SP34. Concept of prestressed concrete, pretensioning, posttensioning, analysis and design of prestressed concrete members. References: 1. Lin, I.Y. (1975), “Design of Prestressed Concrete”, John Wiley, N.Y. 2. Ramamrutham, S.Design of Reinforced Concrete structures 3. Ashok Kumar Gupta, Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures 4. N.Krishna Raju, Prestressed Concrete 5. IS 456:2000, Concrete Code ARC 408 HUMAN SETTLEMENTS I [2-1-0-3] The objective of this course is to have a overview of Human Settlement in the World and in India through various time frames, to familiarize the students of Architecture with the basic principles and techniques of Town and Country Planning, Concept of Town Planning in Europe before, Town planning in India pre and post independence in both urban and rural settings. Course contents: Aim-objectives of planning, Evolution of Human Settlements, significant landmarks and development, Types of human settlements – systems approach. Definition of Region – types – Regional planning. Rural planning – objectives and strategies. History and evolution of planning – Egypt, Greek to modern times of the West Ancient town planning in India – directions of development during modern times – Industrial revolution and its impact on cities, factory town-urbanization problems– slums, the contemporary city, patterns of towns and cities. Land use planning, Land use classification for cities and rural settlements; analysis of land uses in Indian cities; suggested land use structure. Theories explaining land use pattern of cities relevance to Indian Conditions. Study 95

of planning standards with reference to Indian context. Institutions for planning – their roles, stages involved in preparation of development plan, surveys, planning techniques, development Plans, public participation. Reference: 1. Keeble, Lewis, (1968), Town and Country Planning, Ms Havding Gough Limited, UK 2. Gallion, Arthur (2003), The Urban Pattern, CBS Publishers & Distributors, India 3. Bandyopadhyay, Abir (2001), Text Book of Town Planning, Books and Allied (P) Limited, India 4. G.K., Hiraskar, (1997), Fundamentals of Town Planning, Dhanpat Rai Publications, India. ARC 412 POST MODERN ARCHITECTURE [2-1-0-3] Study of architecture developed in India (after independence onwards till present day). Study of simultaneous developments elsewhere in the world. Development of vernacular architect in India in t`he last 150 years. Postindependence Architecture – works of Le-corbuzier and Louis Kahn in India. The works of Modern Indian Masters like Charles Correa, J.A.Stien, B.V.Doshi, Ananth Raje, Kanvinde, etc. Works of other contemporary Architects in India. Studies of contemporary architectural theories like deconstructivism, post modernism, machine aesthetics, metabolism, back to the roots theory, chaos and order theory, and its application to architecture, works of contemporary international architects. ARC 414 RESEARCH TECHNIQUES [2-1-0-3] Course Objectives: Streamline the pursuit of research in the architectural design development. Course content Introduction to research- types of research- elements of research – research methodology- c h a r a c t e r i s t i c o f g o o d r e s e a r c h - s election of appropriate research design – planning the research elements of research - research in architectural design development – types of research survey - c o n d u c t i n g A r c h i t e c t u r a l s u r v e y Interviews in research- c a s e s t u d y i s t h e e l e m e n t i n a r c h i t e c t u r a l r e s e a r c h - observation in the research – role of p h y s i c a l t r a c e s i n a r c h i t e c t u r a l r e s e a r c h - applied researches in architectural design -Data collection - to o l s o f d a t a c o l l e c t i o n -data analysis – introduction to Statistical analysis and graphical representation.

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Introduction to report and research paper writing – c o m p o n e n t s o f r e s e a r c h p a p e r a n d r e s e a r c h r e p o r t - different styles of report writing- APA and MLA style of report writing. References: 1. Linda Groat, David Wang, (2002), Architectural research methods, John Wiley publication, New York 2. John Zeisel (1984), Inquiry by Design, Cambridge University press, Cambridge. 3. Dwivedi R.S(2001) Research Methods in behavioral science, Mcmillan, New Delhi 4. Sanhoff Henry (1991), Visual research methods in design, Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York. 5. Journal of Architectural and planning research 6. Architectural review – Journal 7. Architectural science review – Journal 8. Architectural theory review – Journal ARC 501 ARCHITECTURAL & URBAN DESIGN STUDIO II [9-0-0-9] The objective of this course is to relate the building/street design/urban space (which may be small in scale of design implementation) to the large scale master plan/development plan for which the studies of context is done in the previous semester and would imply complexity of detailed design, variety in the user profiles, large range in the issues addressed and involvement of public in design. Course contents: Defining Urban architecture. Aspects in Design: Introduction to historical development of urban design, various theories in modern times, aspects of planning, and cultural contribution in definition of spaces. Studies in urban design like behavioral studies and physical expression of socio-cultural aspects, morphology and typology of surrounding structure, imageability of public spaces, , communication systems and network of open spaces, etc are understood through examples or book reviews. Interdisciplinary role of sociology, economics, administration and governance, conservation, etc. are understood for the specific case and incorporate. Concept: Since urban design is a vast topic, a focus on concept is essential. This stage is supported by book reviews, case studies of trends in design. . Interpretive techniques and analyzing methods like visual analysis, questionnaire techniques, recording devises, mapping and vantage points, are reviewed and chosen. Observation, tasklist, questionnaires: Basic data collection is done in-groups in relation to the various stands. Methods of public participation in design are also planned. Charts, matrix, maps and overlays are planned and prepared for issues discussed in aspects of design. Analyzing and deriving conclusions from 97

the same, design guidelines are formed. Design concept, programme and strategies: Design proposal should consider all possibilities to achieve the aims and objectives of design. It could be in the form of guidelines, byelaws, phasing of design, prototype, design, or detailed design. A combination or singular mode of design can be done. Also the strategies of implementation and working of design in terms of economies, administration, public-private partnership, etc. must be worked out along with the concept. Detailed design: As per the concept the design could be the general prototype or demonstration of design as per the guidelines and laws proposed or physical design of part of the whole.

References: 1. Steele Fritz (1981), Sense of Place, CBI Publishing 2. Krier Rob, (1984), Urban Space, Academy Editions 3. Rapoport Amos, (1969), House, Form and Culture, Prentice Hall 4. Christopher Alexander, (1977), Pattern Language, Oxford University Press, 5. Sanoff Henry, (1991), Visual Research Methods in Design, Van Nostrand Reinghold 6. David Gosling & Barry Maitland, (1984), Concepts of Urban Design, Academy editions 7. Clovil Heimsath, (1977), Behavioural Architecture, MGH 8. Spiro Kostof, (1992), City Assembled, Thames and Hudson 9. Banargee Tridib Southworth Michael, (1990), Citty Sense and City Design, MIT Press 10. Zeisel John, (1995), Inquiry by Design, Cambridge Universtiy Press 11. Ameen Farooq, (1997), Contemporary Architecture and City Form, Marg Publishers 12. Institute of Landscape visual impact assessment (2002), Guideline for landscape and visual impact assessment, Spon, London 13. Hill Jonathan, (1999), Occupying architecture, Routledge, London 14. Birksted Jan, (1999), Relating architecture to Landscape, E and F N Spon, London 15. Harris Charles Ward: Dines Nicholas T, (1998), Time Saver Standards for Landscape Architecture Design and Construction data, McGraw Hill, NY 16. CIP (2002), Urban Landscape Design, Barcelona 17. Watson Donald; others, (2003), Time Saver Standards for Urban Design, McGraw Hill, NY 18. Paddison Ronand Ed (2001), Handbook on Urban Studies, Sage Publications, London 19. Chiara, J.D., and Callender, John (ed.), (1983), “Time Saver Standards for Building Types”, McGraw Hill Book Co., NY

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20. Chiara, J.D. (1984), “Time Saver Standard for Site Planning”, McGraw Hill Book Co., N.Y. 21. Dixon John Morris, (2004), Urban Spaces No.3, Visual reference Publications, New York. ARC 503 STRUCTURAL SYSTEM FOR BUILDINGS [1-2-0-3] The objective of this course is to provide exposure to various concepts and techniques for integration of building structures in Architectural Design. Introduction to various structural sysmstes for buildings, case studies, tutorial work – Application of concept and techniques in design studio work. References Building Structures Malcom Mlillias, E & FN Spon, 1997 Design of tall Buildings, National Science Foundation, USA Tall building systems, National Science Foundation, USA Guidelines for earthquake resistant non-engineered structures – NICEE Alternative construction system, V Suresh, HUDCO, 1997 Reinforced Concrete Design, Krishna Raju, New Age Publications, 2003 Design of Steel Structures, Ramachandra, Standard book house, 1991 www.greatbuildings.com

ARC 505 HUMAN SETTLEMENTS II [2-1-0-3] The objective of this course is to familiarize the students of Architecture with the principles and methods of designing and layout of residential neighbourhoods, study neighborhood planning, zoning regulations, landuse planning, planning concepts propounded by eminent planners, study of national housing policy and an independent study of a rural or urban settlement in a nearby region, study of urban renewal projects. Course contents: Concept of neighborhood. Neighborhood planning, Town and Country Planning Act, legal backing for urban and rural planning, land use and its importance in planning – zoning and zoning regulation – conforming and non-conforming land use – planning theories advocated by eminent planners and their applications; relevance to Indian conditions – like Ebenezer Howard, Patrick Geddes – Doxiadis – Soria Mata, Hilberseimer, Arthur Perry, Clarence stein, Le-Corbusier, FL Wright – Lewis Mumford, etc. Housing: Concept of housing – housing process and product – housing need, demand. National Housing Policy: National agencies for housing, Urban Renewal. The Comprehensive Development Plans, Preperation of Layouts and Planning Schemes, Corporate frame work for 99

Town and Country planning, the structure and functions of public authorities, Central Areas of Indian Cities, Urban Art Comission, National Urban Renewal Mission, strategic planning concepts ,Urban Amenities and Services. References: 1. Keeble, Lewis, (1968), Town and Country Planning, Ms Havding Gough Limited, UK 2. Gallion, Arthur (2003), The Urban Pattern, CBS Publishers & Distributors, India 3. Bandyopadhyay, Abir (2001), Text Book of Town Planning, Books and Allied (P) Limited, India 4. G.K., Hiraskar, (1997), Fundamentals of Town Planning, Dhanpat Rai Publications, India ARC 507 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE [2-1-0-3] The objective of this course is to critically look into the project and office management practice emphasizing on professional services and professional ethics as well as project responsibilities during design and construction. Course contents: Understanding the basic concepts and terminology in archtiectural practice. The differences between architectural profession and other professional discipline. A clear knowledge of code of conducts and ethics in profession. The knowledge of apex monitoring body to protect the interest of the profession. Role of an architect in conceptualising, design proposal until the execution procedures. The relationship between the architect and other executive agencies. The legal dimension of professional practice, architect’s role as an arbitrator. A comprehensive understanding of office set up, office administration, selection procedure for various posts, man power management within the office and resource levelling. Laws and regulations that effect architecture as well as building. References: 1. Namavati, Roshan, (1993), “Professional Practice”, Laxmi Book Depot, Mumbai 2. The Indian Institute of Architect, (1988), “Handbook of Professional Practice”, Architects Publishing Corporation, Bombay 3. Council of Architecture (1996), “Directory of Architects and Architectural Firm”, Council of Architecture, New Delhi. 4. Wills, Arthur (1974), “The Architect in Practice”, Crossby Lockwood Staples, London ARC 513 DISSERTATION [1-0-3-2]

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The objective of this course is to develop faculty of critical thinking in student in developing a thesis design/research statement, leading to creation of comprehensive base of information relevant to the thesis project in the subsequent semester. Course content: Each student shall select a topic related to Architecture/allied fields with the guidance of the faculty coordinator of dissertation course; who will check on the progress of the students work. It is important that the student should start thinking about the dissertation topic much earlier during the professional training. This will give the student an opportunity to interact with the professional architects and colleagues in the firm, where he/she undergoes training. Upon return back, the student can freely approach various faculty members during the VIII semester to decide upon the focus of dissertation which will be requested at the beginning of the IX semester. ARC 511 ELECTIVES [2-1-0-3] ARC 511.1 ADVANCED LANDSCAPE DESIGN: The objective of this course is to understand landscape design is a means to enhance the local and global environment. Course content: Introduction to western and eastern landscape – concept, philosophy, components of Japanese, Chinese and Mughal gardens – study of hard and soft landscape elements – design principles – plant materials – components of hard landscape – principles of landscape layout designing – site planning for larger developments such as campuses, housing developments – recreational facility design – influence of landscape design on our physical, visual environment – tool to utilize the site resources – site analysis for larger developments. Introduction to urban landscape design – elements of urban landscape – park system – play ground – recreational spaces – water landscapes. Introduction to ecology and landscape design – means to mitigate the human impacts – way to rejuvenate our natural resources like water, air, and microclimate – method to protect us from natural forces such as erosion, flood, landslide, cyclone, and sand storm. References: 1. Laurie M., Introduction to landscape architecture 2. Richard T.T., Godron Michael, Landscape Ecology 3. Tsu Frances, Ya Sing, Landscape design in Chinese gardens 4. Aldous Tony; Clouston Brian, Landscape by design 5. Sato Akira, Contemporary Japanese Landscape

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6. Miyagi Shunsaku, Yokohari Makoto, Contemporary landscapes in the world 7. Booth Norman K., Hiss James E., Residential Landscape Architecture 8. Moyet Janet Lennox, Landscape Lighting Book 9. Geoffery C., Jelicoe Sysan, Landscape of Man 10. Birlested Jan, Relating architecture to landscape 11. CIP, Urban landscape design 12. Harris Charles Ward Dines Nicholas, Time Saver Standards for Landscape Architecture ARC 511.2 PRINCIPLES OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT: The objective of this course is to create awareness of project management principles as applied to construction industry and relevance to architectural profession. Course Contents: Introduction to construction management, applied management techniques in construction projects. Application of project management tools like CPM and PERT networks to building projects. Concept of project management, relevance of project management to buildng industry. Project management team model. Role of Architect in the project management. Introduction to networking of projects and use of CPM and PERT networking and scheduling tools. Project monitoring – updating of networks, advantages and limitations of Bar and Milestone charts. Resource levelling. References: 1. NICMAR Construction Machines & Equipment, 1990 2. James D Steven, Techniques for Construction Network Scheduling, McGraw Hill Book Co. 3. R.I.Peurifoy, Construction Planning Equipment and Methods, McGraw Hill, 2007 4. L.S.Srinath “Pert and CPM” Orient Longman. ARC 511.3 ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS IN DESIGN The objective of this course is to understand the meaning of development, Economics of development, Impact on environmental system, architecture for sustainable development, attitude of conservation, materials-energy and environment, critical examination of development and constructional practises.

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Course contents: Meaning of development – economics of development – impact on environmental system – attitude of conservation – importance of environmental conservation – environmental quality parameters – ecosystem conservation – indicators of environmental health – environmental impact assessment. Sustainable development – understanding energy conservation in buildings – relationship between energy, environment and human development, energy conservation techniques – non conventional energy sources like, solar power – wind power – etc. renewable and non-renewable forms energy audit in buildings. Conservation of building materials – energy in building materials. References: 1. Boutet, T.S., Controlling air movement, McGraw Hill Book Co., 1987 2. Buchanan, P.Ten shades of green: architecture and the natural world, The Architectural League of New York, 2005 3. Givoni, B. Passive and low-energy cooling of buildings, Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., 1994 4. Guzowski, M. Daylighting for sustainable design, McGraw Hill (Professional Architecture Series), 2000 5. Hyde, R., Climate responsive design: a study of buildings in moderate and hot humid climate, E & FN Spon, 2000 6. Majumdar, M. (Ed.) Energy efficient buildings in India, MNES/TERI, 2002 7. Nayak J.I. et,. Al, Manual on Solar Passive Architecture, Solar energy Centre, MNES, 1999 8. Olygyay, V. Design with climate: bioclimatic approach to architectural regionalism, Purinceton University Press, 1963 9. Pita, E.G. Airconditioning, principles and systems: an energy approach, Prentice Hall of India, 2002 10. Thomas, R. Environmental design: an Introduction for architects and Engineers, E & FN Spon 1989. ARC 511.4 BUILDING VALUATION TECHNIQUES The objective of this course is to understand and practise various methods of valuation related to property and equipment. Assessing value of used items for purposes such as income tax, property tax and for getting loans. Valuation methods adopted by banks and financial organizations. Course contents: Theories and principles of valuation of immovable properties. Differences and similarities of Cost, price and value. Value subjected to purpose, date and title of property, different form of value. Deferred land value, capitalised value, annuity methods of valuation – factors affecting the values of land, comparative method, abstractive method, Belting method. Valuing by depreciation of cost, types of calculation, straight-line method constant percentage method, sinking fund 103

method, Sum of digit method. Local bodies and government taxes, annual repairs and maintenance insurance, loss of rent. Valuation of lease hold, free hold, properties, licenses premises, legal limits and advantages. References: 1. Namavathi Roshan, (1993), Professional Practice, Lakshmi Book Depot 2. Ashwath Damodaran, (2002), Investment Valuation: Tools & Techniques for Determining the Value of any Asset ARC 511.5 THEORY OF DESIGN The objective of the subject is to review sources and principles of theory and then see the applications and development of various theory of design. Course contents: The course will have the following aspects-introduction to need for theory, principles and method, its application and development of theory of arts and science. This would be then detailed in terms of theory of form, theory of aesthetics, Semiotics, theory from nature, new trends and development. References: 1. Zeisel John, (1995), Inquiry by design, Cambridge University Press 2. Clovil Heimsath, (1977), Behavioural Architecture, MGH 3. Sanoff Henry, (1991), Visual Research methods in Design, Van Nostrand Reinhold 4. Ballantyne Andrew, (2002), What is Architecture? New York 5. Unwin Simon, (2000), Architecture Note Book, Routledge, London 6. Pandya Yatin (2007), Elements of Space Making, Mapin Publications, Ahmedabad 7. Bruce Vicki; Green Patrick R., (1987), Visual Perception Physiology Psychology and Ecology, Lawrence Earthaum Associates, London 8. Amheim Rudolf, (1974), Art and Visual Perception, University of California Press, Berkley 9. Richard Padoram, E & FNSPON, (1999), Proportion, Science Philosophy Architecture, Taylor and Francis Group, Routledge, New York and London

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DETAILED SYLLABUS FOR TENTH SEMESTER B.ARCHITECTURE ARC 502 THESIS PROJECT [20-0-0-20] The objective of this course is to develop independent critical thinking and design/research abilities under the guidance of the faculty adviser, in demonstrating at the minimum the architectural knowledge gained over the last five years, skills developed and professionalism inculcated. Course contents: The thesis project is to prove the ability of student to handle all phases of a building/research design. It is a subject for scholastic study through analysis. It is the development and presentation to design of a building including its setting in specific environment and its typical aspects. The scope of this thesis can be in the areas such as architectural design, urban design, architectural research. Area of the study is left to the choice of the student. As per his inclination towards the area, the final selection of the topic will be as approved by the thesis selection committee of the Faculty of Architecture. The progressive evaluation of student’s work is mandatory. The student shall commence the work on the topic after the approval. The evaluation is conducted by a panel of jury intermittently & a final open defense is conducted.

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ARCHITECTURE (FIVE YEARS PROGRAM) – 2007-08 ACADEMIC YEAR ONWARDS
Yr Sub Code ARC 101 ARC 103 ARC 105 ARC 107 ARC 109 MEE 111 ARC 113 ARC 115 FIRST SEMESTER Sub.Name ARCH.DESIGN I BUILDING CONSTRUCTION I HISTORY OF ART & CULTURE ARCHITECTURAL GRAPHICS I VISUAL ARTS STUDIO I WORKSHOP PRACTICE STRUCTURES I ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES TOTAL L/S 6 2 2 3 3 1 1 2 20 T 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 P 0 3 0 0 0 3 0 0 C 6 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 Sub. Code ARC 102 ARC 104 ARC 106 ARC 108 ARC 110 ARC 112 ARC 114 ARC 116 SECOND SEMESTER Sub.Name ARCH.DESIGN II BUILDING CONSTRUCTION II BASICS OF LANDSCAPE ARCH. ARC. GRAPHICS-II VISUAL ARTS STUDIO II HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE-I STRUCTURES II COMMUNICATION SKILLS TOTAL L/S 6 2 3 3 3 2 1 2 22 T 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 3 P 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 05 C 6 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 27

1

4 6 26

THIRD SEMESTER ARC ARC ARC ARC ARC ARC ARC ARC 201 203 205 207 209 211 213 215 ARCHITECUTRAL DESIGN III BUILDING CONSTN.-III ARC. GRAPHICS-III HISTORY OF ARCH.II STRUCTURES III COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN PRINCIPLES OF ARCH. I BUILDING ACOUSTICS 6 2 3 2 1 1 2 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 1 0 3 0 0 0 3 0 0 6 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 ARC 202 ARC 204 ARC 206 ARC 208 ARC 210 ARC 212 ARC 214 ARC 216

FOURTH SEMESTER ARCH. DESIGN IV BUILDING CONSTN. IV ARC. GRAPHICS – IV HISTORY OF ARCH. III STRUCTURES IV BUILDING SERVICES I PRINCIPLES OF ARCHITECTURE II SURVEYING & LEVELLING 6 2 3 2 1 2 2 2 0 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 6 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

2

19 TOTAL

5

6

26

TOTAL

20

5

5

27

106

3
ARC 301 ARC 303 ARC 305 ARC 307 ARC 309 AR C 311 ARC 313 ARC 317

FIFTH SEMESTER ARCH. DESIGN V BUILDING CONSTN. V HISTORY OF ARCH. - IV CLIMATOLOGY STRUCTURES-V BUILDING SPECIFICATIONS BUILDING SERVICES-II SOCIO-ECONOMIC STUDIES 9 2 2 2 1 1 2 3 0 0 1 1 2 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 ARC 302 ARC 304 ARC 306 ARC 310 ARC 312 ARC 314 ARC 316

SIXTH SEMESTER ARCH. DESIGN VI BLDG. CONSTN. VI STRUCTURES VI MODERN ARCHITECTURE WORKING DRAWING QUANTITY SURVEYING ELECTIVE-I .1 Introduction to Heritage Conservation .2 Disaster Management .3 Advanced Computer Applications .4 Hydrogeology .5 Building Photography .6 Use of Glass in Buildings TOTAL EIGHTH SEMESTER 0 0 0 20 ARC 402 ARC 404 ARC 406 ARC 408 ARC 412 ARC 414 ARCH. & URBAN DESIGN STUDIO I BUILDING CONSTRUCTION VII STRUCTURES VII HUMAN SETTLEMENTS I POST MODERN ARCHITECTURE RESEARCH TECHNIQUES TOTAL 9 2 1 2 2 2 18 0 0 2 1 1 1 5 0 3 0 0 0 0 3 9 3 3 3 3 3 24 9 2 1 2 4 2 2 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 9 3 3 3 4 3 3

22 TOTAL SEVENTH SEMESTER

6 3 29

22

5

3

28

4
ARC 401

PRACTICE SCHOOL (PROFESSIONAL TRAINING)

0 TOTAL

0 0 20

107

5
ARC 501 ARC503 ARC505 ARC507 ARC513 ARC 511

NINTH SEMESTER ARCH.& URBAN DESIGN STUDIO II STRUCTURAL SYSTEM FOR BUILDINGS HUMAN SETTLEMENTS-II PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE DISSERTATION ELECTIVE-II .1 Advanced Landscape Systems .2 Principles of Project Management .3 Energy & Environmental Concerns in Design .4 Building Valuation Techniques .5 Theory of Design 9 1 2 2 1 2 0 0 9 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 3 3 3 2 3 ARC502

TENTH SEMESTER THESIS PROJECT 20 0 0 20

17

5 3 23

TOTAL

20

0

0

20

TOTAL

Total Credits: 26+27+26+27+29+28+20+24+23+20 = 250 credits

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MANIPAL UNIVERSITY MANIPAL — 576 104

SYLLABUS for Master of Architecture M. Arch. (Advanced Design) (2 years Post graduate Course)

(Applicable to the Students Admitted during 2007 onwards)
REVISED CREDIT – SYSTEM

FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE MANIPAL INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

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CONTENTS
Page no RULES AND REGULATIONS …………………………………………………… 1
1. Titles of the Course ………………………………………………………................. 2. Duration of the Course…………………………………………………………… 3. Educational Process…………………………………………………………………….. 3.1 Credit — Based System ……………………………………………………………….... 3.2 Outline of Evaluation…………………………………………………………………….. 3.3 Class Committee…………………………………………………………………………. 3.4 Faculty Advisers………………………………………………………………………….. 3.5 Promotion to Higher Semesters — Academic Performance Requirements………... 3.6 Attendance Requirements………………………………………………………………. 3.7 Evaluation Procedures…………………………………………………………………… 3.8 End-Semester Examination and Make-up (Supplementary) Examination…………. 3.9 Withholding of Results…………………………………………………………………… 3.10 Requirements for Graduation………………………………………………………….. 3.11 Declaration of Class…………………………………………………………………….. 1 1 1 1 2 4 5 5 6 7 9 10 10 10

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE (ADVANCED DESIGN) -Introduction………………. Course framework ……………………………………………………………….. Course description – semester I…………………………………………………………… Course description – semester II………………………………………………………….. Course description – semester III………………………………………………………….. Course description – semester IV…………………………………………………………..

11 12 13 23 29 35

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RULES AND REGULATIONS
1. Titles of the Courses: 1.1 Undergraduate degree course in engineering — Bachelor of Engineering in ________________ (name of discipline), abbreviated to B.E. in_____________________ (name of discipline), such as BE. in Civil Engineering. 1.2 Undergraduate degree course in Architecture — Bachelor of Architecture, abbreviated to B.Arch. 1 .3 Post-graduate degree course in architecture - Master of Architecture (area of specialization), abbreviated to M.Arch. _______________ (area of specialization), such as M.Arch. (Advanced design). 1.4 Post-graduate degree course in computer applications — Master of Computer Applications, abbreviated to MCA. 2. Duration of the Courses: 2.1 Normal Duration: B.E. — 4 Years (8 Semesters) B.Arch. — 5 Years (10 Semesters) M.Tech / M.Arch. —2 Years (4 Semesters) M.Tech. (Part Time) —3 Years (6 Semesters) MCA — 3 Years (6 Semesters) 2.2 Maximum Permissible duration of a course is twice the normal duration of that course. The permissible duration of full-time M.Arch. course is 2 years. 2.3 Each semester’s programme is made up of about 17 weeks of classes and related academic activities, immediately followed by about two weeks of end-semester examinations in the subjects of the current semesters. After 3 to 4 weeks of vacation, there will be make-up (supplementary) examinations in the same subjects, before the commencement of the next semester. 3. Educational Process: 3.1 Credit — Based System 3.1.1 The educational process at M.I.T., Manipal uses a Credit - Based System wherein the course content is expressed in number of credits. M.I.T. is already using a Credit - Based System since the year 2001. The present system, which is applicable to students admitted to the first year of the B.E/ B.Arch./M.Tech/ M.Arch. courses during the academic year 2007-2008 and later incorporates several modifications and shall be known as ‘Revised Credit— based System’ or simply ‘Revised Credit System’. 3.1.2 The course content of individual subjects — theory as well as practicals — is expressed in terms of a certain number of credits. The number of credits assigned to a subject depends on the number of contact hours per week. Normally, in the case of theory subjects, the number of credits is equal to the number of contact hours (lectures & tutorials) per week, while in the case of practicals, one credit is assigned for every three contact hours per week. 3.1.3 The course content of each semester is expressed in terms of a specified number of credits. A student is deemed to have successfully completed a particular semester’s programme of study when he/she earns all the credits of that semester, i.e., he/she has no F grade in any subject of that semester.

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3.1.4 Promotion of a student to higher semesters is based on his/her earning a prescribed minimum number of credits, as detailed in 3.5. 3.1.5 When a student earns the specified number of credits in every one of the specified number of semesters making up the course, he/she is deemed to have completed the requirements for graduation. This also means, a student should have an E grade or better in every subject of every semester, in order to be eligible to receive the degree 3.1.6 The programme of study during the first year (first two semesters) of the B.E. course is common to students of all disciplines of engineering. 3.1.7 The final (eighth) semester of the BE. Course is earmarked entirely for project work. 3.1.8 The seventh semester of B.Arch. course is entirely devoted to professional training. 3.1.9 The second year (entire fourth semester) of the M.Arch. course and the final (sixth) semester of the MCA course, are to be utilized for project work (and industrial training wherever applicable). 3.1.10 The first four semesters of the part-time M.Tech. course will comprise course work, while the entire Third year (fifth and sixth semesters) is devoted to project work. During each of the first four semesters, a candidate shall register for about 50% of the total number of subjects of a regular semester of the full-time M.Tech. course. Seminar assignment can be taken in any of the first four semesters, 3.2 Outline of Evaluation 3.2.1 The academic performance of a student is evaluated totally internally, by the concerned teachers/departments. 3.2.2 The student performance in each theory course (subject) is evaluated out of a maximum of 100 marks — of which 50 marks are for in-semester assessment and 50 marks for the end-semester examination. 3.2.3 The in-semester assessment in theory subjects is based on sessional tests, assignments, quizzes, case presentations, seminars etc. The students shall be informed, sufficiently early, of the procedure followed for in-semester assessment. 3.2.4 The student performance in practicals is also evaluated out of a maximum of 100 marks, and is based totally on in-semester assessment. There will be no end-semester examination in practicals, the insemester assessment is based on the work done by the student in the class, class tests, assignments, viva voce etc. The students shall be informed, sufficiently early, of the exact methodology of in-semester assessment. 3.2.5 Evaluation of Project Work Dissertation/Thesis 3.2.5.1 Eighth Semester B.E. — The full-semester project work can be carried out in the institution/industry/research laboratory or any other institution where facilities exist. There will be a midsemester evaluation of the work done on the project after about 8-9 weeks. This evaluation will be done by the concerned Department/Guide and will be out of 100 marks. The final evaluation and viva voce will be after the completion of the project work and submission of the dissertation I thesis / report. The final evaluation and viva voce will be conducted by a jury consisting of two internal examiners (one of whom,

112

preferably, should be the internal guide). The end-semester evaluation of the project work will be out of 200 marks, while 100 marks are for the viva voce. The grade awarded to the student will be on the basis of the total marks obtained by him/her out of 400. 3.2.5.2 Fourth semester M. Arch. / Sixth Semester MCA - A student of M.Arch course is expected to work on the project for a minimum of 16 weeks during the second year of the course, in the institution / industry / research laboratory or any other institution where facilities exist. There will be a mid-semester evaluation of the work after about 8-9 weeks by the concerned Department. In the case of the Sixth Semester MCA students, there will be a mid-semester evaluation by the concerned Department after about 8-9 weeks. These evaluations will be out of 100 marks. The final evaluation and viva voce will be after the completion of the project work and submission of the dissertation/thesis. The final evaluation and viva voce will be conducted by a jury consisting of an internal examiner (preferably the internal guide) and an external examiner from a panel of examiners approved by the concerned Department. The final evaluation will be out of 300 marks, the break-up of which is as follows: Evaluation by internal examiner — 100 marks Evaluation by external examiner — 100 marks Viva Voce — 100 marks Total marks for the Project Work — 400 marks The Grade awarded to the student will be on the basis of the total marks obtained by him / her out of 400. Calculation of GPA / CGPA for the second year of the M.Arch. course will be done only after the final evaluation of the project work and dissertation. There will be no calculation of GPA / CGPA after the midyear evaluation. 3.2.6 Evaluation of Architectural Design Studio/Thesis Project for students of the M.Arch. Course. 3.2.6.1 The marks for the in-semester internal evaluation and viva-voce /end-semester evaluation in Advanced design studios (M.Arch.) are as follows: Sub Code APG- 101 APG- 201 APG- 301 Subject Max marks for evaluation InEnd Total semester semester Studio I – Emerging Areas (Airpots) 75 75 150 Studio II – Emerging Areas (Hospitals) 75 75 150 Studio IV – Emerging Areas (Industrialized 75 75 150 Housing)

In-semester evaluation will be done by the Department. End-semester viva-voce I evaluation will be done by a jury consisting of one internal examiner and one external examiner. The Grade(s) awarded to students will be on the basis of the total marks obtained by them in the respective subject(s). 3.2.6.2 Thesis Project (Fouth semester M.Arch.) —the in-semester internal evaluation done by the Department/Guide will be out of 200 marks. The end-semester viva-voce/evaluation will be done by a jury consisting of two internal examiners (normally the internal guide and Dean of Faculty of Architecture) and two external examiners. The evaluation will be out of 400 marks. The grade awarded to the student will be on the basis of the total marks obtained by him/her out of 600. 3.2.7 The student performance in the sessional tests, assignments etc., shall be properly documented and announced/displayed on notice boards, within a week of the tests etc. 3.2.8 The overall performance of a student in different courses (subjects) is expressed in terms of a Letter Grade (details in 3.7).

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3.3 Class Committee 3.3.1 Constitution of the class committees A common class committee for each semester of the first year M.Arch. course shall be constituted by the Associate Director (Academic), to consist of: Chairman: A Professor, preferably not teaching any first year M. Arch Classes. Members: One course co-ordinator for each course (one among the many teachers). For Ill Semester M.Arch classes and for every semester class of B.Arch., M.Tech. & MCA courses, separate class committees shall be constituted by the Heads of the respective Departments to consist of: Chairman: A senior member of the teaching faculty of the concerned Dept., preferably not teaching the class. Members Teachers of all courses of study (subjects). Co-ordinator: If there are more sections than one (Where there are more sections than one and more teachers than one teaching a particular course of study, one of them will be nominated co-ordinator and shall be a member). 3.3.2 Functions of the Class Committee The class committee shall meet thrice in a semester. The first meeting will be held within two weeks from the date of commencement of the semester in which the nature of the cycle of tests as well as broad assessment procedure for the different tests and practicals (if any) will be decided. The second meeting will be held two weeks after the first cycle of tests to meaningfully interact and express opinions and suggestions to improve the effectiveness of the teaching — learning process and analyse the performance of the students in the tests. The Chairman of the class committee should send the minutes of the class committee meeting to the Associate Director (A) through the Head of the Department immediately after the first two class committee meetings. The third meeting is to be held within one week after the last day of the end-semester examination to analyse the performance of the students in all courses of study and to decide the grade ranges for each course and pass on the statement of grade to Associate Director (A)/Deputy Registrar (A) immediately through the Head of the Department. Associate Director (A) will declare the results of the 1st year and the HOD’s will declare the result of the rest. 3.4 Faculty Advisers To help the students in planning their courses of study and for getting general advice regarding either the academic programme or any other activity, the Head of the Department /Associate Director (SW) will assign every year a certain number of students from first semester to a faculty member who will be called Faculty Adviser. The set of students thus assigned will continue to be under the guidance of this Faculty Adviser till they complete the programme. 3.5 Promotion to Higher Semesters — Academic Performance Requirements 3.5. A. B.E. & B.Arch. Courses: 3.5. A.1 Promotion of a student from an odd semester to the next higher (even) semester is subject to his/her fulfilling the minimum attendance requirements as in 3.6. This promotion is not dependent upon any academic performance requirements.

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3.5. A.2 Promotion of a student from an even semester to the next higher (odd) semester is subject to his/her fulfilling not only the minimum attendance requirements as in 3.6, but also the minimum academic performance requirements as in 3.5.A.3. 3.5. A.3 to be eligible for admission to the Third Semester, a student of Engineering should have earned a minimum of 28 credits, whereas a student of Architecture should have earned a minimum of 22 credits at the end of their respective second semesters. (A student earns the credits assigned to a subject, when he/she obtains an E. Grade or better in that subject.) To be eligible for admission to the fifth semester of the B.E. course, a student should have earned a minimum of 75 credits at the end of the fourth semester, while a student of Architecture, should have earned a minimum of 65 credits at the end of the fourth semester in order to be eligible for admission to the fifth semester. To be eligible for admission to the seventh semester of the B.E. course, a student should have earned a minimum of 125 credits at the end of the sixth semester, while a student of Architecture should have earned a minimum of 115 credits at the end of the sixth semester in order to be eligible for admission to the seventh semester. To be eligible for admission to the ninth semester of the B.Arch. course, a student should have earned a minimum of 160 credits at the end of the eighth semester. 3.5. A.4 A student, who is not eligible for promotion from an even semester to the next higher (odd) semester for reasons of not having earned the prescribed minimum number of credits, will be required to discontinue the academic programme temporarily. He/she can rejoin the academic programme after fulfilling the academic performance requirements as in 3.5.A.3. 3.5.A.5 A student who discontinues the academic programme for any reason and rejoins the programme at a later date, shall be governed by the rules, regulations, courses of study and syllabi in force at the time of his/her rejoining the programme. 3.5.B M.Tech./ M.Arch Courses 3.5.B.1 Promotion of a student from the First Semester to the Second as well as from the Second Semester to the Third, is subject to his/her fulfilling the minimum attendance requirement as in 3.6. These promotions are not dependent upon any academic performance requirements. 3.5.B.2 A student can commence the project work at the beginning of the third semester, but he/she has to earn all the credits of the first and second semesters, before he /she is permitted to submit the project thesis. Further, he / she should complete the course within the maximum period stipulated for the course. 3.5.B.3 A student of part-time M.Tech. course can commence the Project work at the beginning of the third year, but he/she has to earn all the credits of the first four semesters, before he/she is permitted to submit the thesis/dissertation. 3.5.C MCA Course 3.5.C.1 Promotion of a student from an odd semester to the next higher (even) semester is subject to his / her fulfilling the minimum attendance requirements as in 3.6. This promotion is not dependent upon any academic performance requirements.

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3.5.C.2 Promotion of a student from an even semester to the next higher (odd) semester is subject to his / her fulfilling not only the minimum attendance requirements as in 3.6, but also the minimum academic performance requirements as in 3.5.C.3. 3.5.C.3 To be eligible for admission to the third semester, a student of MCA course should have earned a minimum of 30 credits at the end of the second semester. To be eligible for admission to the fifth semester, a student should have earned a minimum of 75 credits at the end of the fourth semester. 3.5.C.4 A student, who is not eligible for promotion from an even semester to the next higher (odd) semester for reasons of not having earned the prescribed minimum number of credits, will be required to discontinue the academic programme temporarily. He / She can rejoin the academic programme after fulfilling the academic performance requirements as in 3.5.C.3. 3.5.C.5 A student who discontinues the academic programme for any reason and rejoins the programme at a later date, shall be governed by the rules, regulations, courses of study and syllabi in force at the time of his / her rejoining the programme. 3.6 Attendance Requirements 3.6.1 Under the relative grading system a student must maintain an aggregate attendance record of at least 75% with not less than 70% attendance in individual subjects. Attendance of lectures, tests, practicals and tutorials all count towards the calculation of this attendance percentage. 3.6.2 Without the minimum attendance, students become ineligible for the end semester examination and subsequent grading. 3.6.3 The aggregate percentage of attendance of the student during the semester will be entered in his / her grade sheet of that semester. 3.7 Evaluation Procedures 3.7.1 Continuous Assessment All courses undertaken by students are evaluated during the semester using internal system of continuous assessment. The student is evaluated on class! tutorial participation, assignment work, lab work, class tests, midterm tests, quizzes, and end semester examinations, which contribute to the final grade awarded for the subject. Students will be notified at the commencement of each course about the evaluation methods being used for the course and weightages given to the different assignments and evaluated activities. Practicals exams are eliminated. 3.7.2 Relative Grading Marks obtained in the in-semester and end-semester examinations are added together and a 10-point grading system will be used to award the student with an overall letter grade for the course (subject). 3.7.3 Letter Grading System Final evaluation of course is carried out on a TEN POINT grading system. Performance Grades and Grade Points are as shown below.

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A student who earns a minimum of 5 grade points (E grade) in a course (subject) is declared to have successfully completed the course, and is deemed to be have earned the credits assigned to that course. A course successfully completed cannot be repeated. A student should have appeared for the end-semester examination of the prescribed course of study (mere appearance in the continuous assessment tests is not sufficient) to be eligible for the award of the grade in the course. If a student is eligible for but fails to appear in the end-semester examination, he/she will be awarded an ‘I’ grade (incomplete) on the grade sheet. For all practical purposes, an ‘I’ grade is treated as an ‘F’. If a student is not eligible to appear in the end-semester examination owing to his/her not fulfilling the minimum attendance requirements, he/she will be required to discontinue the programme temporarily till such time he/she fulfils the minimum attendance requirements by re-registering for those courses in which he/she had attendance shortage, at the next available opportunity. 3.7.4 Grade Point Average (GPA) & Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) Each course grade is converted into a specific number of points associated with the grade as in 3.7.3. These points are weighted with the number of credits assigned to a course. The Grade Point Average (GPA) is the weighted average of Grade Points awarded to a student. The grade point average for each semester will be calculated only for those students who have passed all the courses of that semester. The weighted average of GPA’s of all semesters that the student has completed at any point of time is the cumulative grade point average (CGPA) at that point of time. CGPA up to any semester will be calculated only for those students who have passed all the courses up to that semester. After the results are declared, grade cards will be issued to each student which will contain the list of courses for that semester and the grades obtained by the student, as well as GPA of that semester and CGPA upto that semester.

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Calculation of GPA and CGPA: Example:

3.7.5 Re-valuation of answer papers In case any student feels aggrieved about the evaluation, he/she shall have access to his/her answer paper in the end semester examination which may be shown to him/her by the teacher/s concerned, If the teacher feels that the case is genuine he/she may re-examine the case and forward a revised grade, if any, to the Associate Director (Academic) through the Chairman of the Class Committee with justification for the revision, with intimation to the Head of the Department. No further revision is permitted once the results are sent to the University for record. 3.7.6 Procedure for re-valuation of answer papers 1. The aggrieved student should submit an application, along with the prescribed fee, to the Academic Section within 7 days of the announcement of results. 2. The Academic Section will send this information to the teachers concerned.

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3. The teachers will collect the answer scripts of the said students and attend a meeting of the Class Committee Chairman and teachers (& co-ordinator) fixed by the Associate Director (A) on a specified date. The student will be permitted to go through his/her papers and verify the markings and make his/her case before the committee. If the teacher feels that the case is genuine he/she may re-examine the case and revise the marks / grade which is to be justified and approved by the Chairman of the Class Committee. 4. The minutes of the meeting will be submitted by the Chairman of the Class Committee to the Associate Director (A) through the HODs who will regularise the final results incorporating the changes, if any. Negligence or carelessness on the part of any teacher should be reported to the Associate Director (A)! Director. 5. A note on the revisions and the nature of the same should be submitted to the Director by the Associate Director (A) for each semester. 6. Re-valuation fee will be returned to the students if the case is found genuine. 7. Once the final results are declared and validated the information will be passed on to the University and changes are not permitted thereafter. 3.7.7 Re-registration Students can re-register in one or more subjects of the previous semester(s) (odd semester subjects in the odd semester only, and even semester subjects in the even semester only), provided they have F grade(s) in that subject/those subjects, by paying the prescribed fees. Re-registration entitles the student to attend the classes where possible (however, there is no minimum attendance requirement), appear for the sessional tests and the end semester examinations, in the subject(s) in which they have re-registered. Re-registered candidates will have to appear for sessional tests/end-semester examinations along with the regular students. 3.8 End-Semester Examination and Make-up (Supplementary) Examination 3.8.1 The examinations at the end of a particular semester will be conducted only in the subjects of the current semester. That is, at the end of the odd semester, examinations in the subjects of the odd semester will be conducted. Similarly at the end of the even semester, examinations will be conducted in the subjects of the even semester. 3.8.2 In the case of First year B.E., examinations in most of the subjects are conducted at the end of the odd as well as even semester. However, at the end of a particular semester, students belonging to the Physics group are eligible to write examinations in subjects belonging to the Physics group only. Likewise, the students belonging to the Chemistry group are eligible to write examinations in subjects belonging to the Chemistry group only. 3.8.3 About 4 weeks after the conclusion of the regular examinations in the current semester subjects, there will be make-up (supplementary) examinations, before the commencement of the next semester classes. The make-up examinations will also be in the current semester subjects only. Students who have F grades in one or more subjects and those who missed one or more examinations in the regular series due to serious medical reasons are eligible to appear for the make-up examinations in the relevant subjects.

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3.8.4 The cut-off marks for conversion of marks into grades in the make-up examination will be same as those in the regular end-semester examination, in a particular subject. 3.9 Withholding of Results Results will be withheld when a student has not paid his/her dues or when there is a case of indiscipline pending against him/her. 3.10 Requirements for Graduation A student is deemed to have completed the requirements for graduation if he / she has: i) Fulfilled all minimum requirements in prescribed courses of study and earned the number of credits specified depending upon the programme of study (B.E./B.Arch./ M.Tech./MCA) (Annexure 1). ii) Satisfied all rules of evaluation. iii) Satisfied the requirements specified by the department, if any. iv) Paid all dues to the Institute. v) has no case of indiscipline pending against him/her. 3.11 Declaration of Class 3.11.1 Students who successfully complete the programme within the normal duration after joining the Institute, getting a CGPA of 8.5 and above, passing all the courses in the first appearance will be declared to have passed in First Class with Distinction. 3.11.2 Students who get a CGPA of 6.5 and above but below 8.5 and who complete the course within the normal period will be declared to have passed in First Class. 3.11.3 Students who get a CGPA of below 6.5 and who complete the programme within the maximum period after joining the institute will be declared to have passed in Second Class. (These rules and regulations are subject to change/amendment from time-to-time, as and when need arises)

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MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE (ADVANCED DESIGN) INTRODUCTION Recent development plans and policies in the country along with increased endorsement for environment friendly design and better quality of life for all has brought certain areas of architectural design into the limelight. Some such emerging fields are housing, IT office complexes, retail, hotels, airports, hospitals, entertainment parks, and townships. It is not only true that there is a growing need for these facilities but also that the design scope and approach for these emerging sectors have expanded substantially and changed as well in recent years in response to national policies and technological advances. The master of architecture program is designed to create professionals who can suitably respond and adapt to the market needs. Fundamental to the curriculum are design studios in emerging fields. These studios shall be enriched with supporting courses in newer building materials, advanced structural systems, energy-efficient design, urban design, interior design, earthquake resistant design, entrepreneurship and project planning and business communication. PROGRAM OUTLINE The program leads to the award of “Master of Architecture (Advanced Design)” degree. The two-year program shall be conducted in four semesters, each semester having 16 weeks duration. The first three semesters focus on design studios. In addition to studios, relevant core courses will also be taught to provide the required basis for design studios. In the fourth and final semester, students shall be required to submit their thesis on any one topic of their choice from a given list of projects. Minimum 50% marks in B. Arch or its equivalent as approved by Council of Architecture for postgraduate studies in architecture are required for admission to masters program.

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COURSE FRAMEWORK First Semester SL No 1 2 3 4 5 Code No APG-101 APG-102 APG-103 APG-104 APG-105 Subject Studio I – Emerging Areas (Airports) Newer Building materials , construction, and technologies Energy efficient building design Advanced structural systems Principles of urban design Total Credits 12 4 2 2 2 22 Contact hours / week Lectures Studios 12 1 3 2 2 2 7

15

Second Semester SL No 1 2 3 4 Code No APG-201 APG-203 APG-204 MGT-402 Subject Studio II – Emerging Areas (Hospitals) Earthquake and cyclone resistant building design Dissertation Entrepreneurship development and project planning Total Credits 12 2 6 2 22 Contact hours / week Lectures Studios 12 2 6 2 4 18

Third Semester SL No 1 2 3 4 Code No APG-301 APG-302 APG-303 MGT-105 Subject Studio IV – Emerging Areas (Industrialized housing) Seminar on Contemporary Architecture Advanced interior design Business communication Total Credits 12 6 2 2 22 Contact hours / week Lectures Studios 12 6 2 8 2 14

Fourth Semester SL No 1 Code No APG-401 Subject Thesis Total Credits 24 24 Contact hours /week Lectures Studios 24 24

Total credits: 90

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POST GRADUATE PROGRAMME 1. NAME OF THE DEPARMENT. FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE 2. TITLE OF THE PROGRAME: MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE (ADVANCED DESIGN)
PROGRAM OUTLINE The program leads to the award of “Master of Architecture (Advanced Design)” degree. The two-year program shall be conducted in four semesters, each semester having 16 weeks duration. The first three semesters focus on design studios. In addition to studios, relevant core courses will also be taught to provide the required basis for design studios. In the fourth and final semester, students shall be required to submit their thesis on any one topic of their choice from a given list of projects. Minimum 50% marks in B. Arch or its equivalent as approved by Council of Architecture for postgraduate studies in architecture are required for admission to masters program.

3. CURRICULUM AND SYLLABI:
First Semester SL Code No No 1 ARC-601 2 ARC-603 3 4 5 ARC-605 ARC-607 ARC-609 Subject Studio I – Emerging Areas (Airports) Newer Building materials , construction, and technologies Energy efficient building design Advanced structural systems Principles of urban design Total Credits 12 4 2 2 2 22 Contact hours / week Lectures Studios 12 1 3 2 2 2 7

15

Second Semester SL Code No Subject Credits No Studio II – Emerging Areas (Hospitals) 1 ARC-602 12 Earthquake and cyclone resistant 2 ARC-604 2 building design Dissertation 3 ARC-606 6 Entrepreneurship development and 4 ARC-608 2 project planning Total 22 Third Semester SL Code No Subject Credits No Studio IV – Emerging Areas 1 ARC-701 12 (Industrialized housing) Seminar on Contemporary Architecture 2 ARC-703 6 Advanced interior design 3 ARC-705 2 Business communication 4 ARC-705 2 Total 22 Fourth Semester SL Code No Subject Credits No

Contact hours / week Lectures Studios 12 2 6 2 4 18

Contact hours / week Lectures Studios 12 6 2 8 2 14

Contact hours /week Lectures Studios

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1

ARC-702

Thesis Total

24 24

24 24

Total credits: 90 SYLLABUS – SEMESTER I STUDIO I: EMERGING AREAS (AIRPORT) – ARC-601 Credits: 12 Contact hours / week: 12 Aim Commercial aviation traffic has increased ten fold in the last five years in India, a trend that is expected to continue in the future. This coupled with technological advances gives airport design a new dimension. The aim of this studio is to learn how to design a world-class airport that responds to increased air traffic, changing needs of passengers, and technological advances. Content The objective of the course is to precisely understand how an airport functions, what exactly has to be taken care of in terms its various activities related to passengers, luggage, ground staff and flight personnel. Security and convenience are the two major objectives that will have to be addressed here. Apart from design of facilities like terminal buildings, control towers, hangers etc, site planning for the airport will also be undertaken. Site planning would include complete understanding of the factors affecting orientation of the runway as well as constraints that have to be imposed on the area immediately adjacent to the airport regarding development rules. Case studies and literature studies will be done prior to formulation of requirements so as to give the design the required basis. A study tour may also be undertaken if permitted by airport authorities. Learning Outcome At the end of the course, the student shall be able to design the master plan, the terminal building, the control tower, and other related facilities of an airport. References Title Airport engineering Airport planning and design Airports some elements of design and future developments Civil airport and airways Planning and design of airports Airport planning and design Planning and design of airports IES Recommended practice for airport road automobile parking area lighting Author Rangwala S C ; Rangwala P S Khanna S K ; others Wood J W Black Archibald Horonjeff Robert ;Mckelvey Francis Khanna SK ; others Horonjeff Robert IESNA Pub Year 1992 1999 1940

1993 1994 1962 1987

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Modern terminal American airport designs Further references

Edwards Brian Pisano Dominick A

2000 1974

1. The Modern Airport Terminal by Brian Edwards; Taylor & Francis; 2 edition (April 11, 2005); ISBN-10:
0415248124; ISBN-13: 978-0415248129

2. Airport Design by daab; Daab (October 4, 2005); ISBN-10: 393771832X; ISBN-13: 978-3937718323
3. Airport Systems - Planning, Design and Management by Richard de Neufville and Amedeo Odoni; McGaw-Hill, 2003 NEWER BUILDING MATERIALS, CONSTRUCTION AND TECHNOLOGIES – ARC-603 Credits: 4 Contact hours / week: 4 Aim The aim of this studio is to learn about newer building materials and their construction techniques. Content The course will review newer building construction techniques and building materials such as glass, aluminum, stainless steel, curtain walls, aluminium composite sections, photo- voltaic cells embedded in the curtain wall panels used for the energy needs of the interior functioning of the building. The course will explore current research works as well. Learning Outcome At the end of the course, the student will have a comprehensive knowledge about the new building materials and their methods of construction. References Title Building materials Building materials New materials technologies Time saver standard for building materials and systems Further references Author Singh Gurucharana;Singh Jagdish Varghese P C Schwartz Mel Watson Donald Pub Year 2003 2005 2006 2000

1. Glass Buildings: Material, Structure and Detail by Heinz Krewinkel; Princeton Architectural Press
(October 1, 1998); ISBN-10: 3764356502; ISBN-13: 978-3764356507

2. Garg, N. K. (2007). Use of Glass in Buildings, New Age International (P) Limited, Publishers, 4835/24 Ansari Road, Daryaganj, New Delhi – 110002. ISBN: 81-224-2065-6.

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ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDING DESIGN – ARC-605 Credits: 2 Contact hours / week: 2 Aim Buildings can be designed to be more comfortable, healthy and economical through application of energy efficient design principles and utilization of emerging design tools. The aim of this course is to review energy efficient building technologies, understand scope of their applications and design an energy efficient building. Content The course emphasizes both a fundamental understanding and practical applications of energy efficient building design strategies. It will explore the needs of present and future, understanding the climate, and learn about the technologies and their applications. Topics include energy efficient building elements, climate and comfort parameters, passive and active energy systems, and environmental implications of buildings. Learning Outcome At the end of the course the student will be able to design an energy efficient building, and evaluate it for energy efficiency. References Title Author Rural and renewable energy perspectives from Venkataramana P developing countries Energy planning Principles of energy conversion Recent trends in renewable Energy Sources Renewable energy development in India Technology of efficient energy utilization Materials science for solar energy conversion systems Energy conservation in buildings TERI energy data directory and Lapillonne B ; others Culp ArchieW Jangamshetti Suresh H Ramana Venkata P Kovach Eugene G ; Churchman A T Grnqvist C G Pub Year 1997 1990 1987 2001 1995 1974

Sayigh A A M yearbook TERI Mathur CN ; others Owen W F Kadambi V ; Prasad Manohar Burberry Peter Raju R Kadambi V;Prasad Manohar; Veziruglu T Nejal Robinette Gary O Tabb Phillip

1991 2006 1992 1982 1986 1978 1996 1999 1983 1983 1984

2004/05 (CDROM) Economics of energy plantation Energy in waste water treatment Introduction to energy conversion Building for energy conservation Engineering economics and energy management Introduction to energy conversion Energy research Landscape planning for energy conservation Solar energy planning

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Strategic management of energy conservation Renewable energy technologies Energy environment Energy conservation potential in an educational

Shukla PR ; others Kristoferson L A ; Bokalders V TERI Padmaja ; others

1993 1991 2005 2003 2000 1997 1999 2001 1982 2005 1983 1985

institution campus Prospects for Sustainable Energy Cassedy Edward S; Rural and renewable energy perspectives from Venkataramana P developing countries Renewable energy resources and its Athpenia R P ; others Culp Archiu W Sorcar Prafulla C Kadambi V;Prasad Manohar Chapman Duane Kadambi V ;Prasad Manohar

management Principles of energy conversion Energy saving lighting systems Introduction to energy conversion Energy resources and energy corporations Introduction to energy conversion Further references

1. Climatic Building Design: Energy-Efficient Building Principles and Practices by Donald Watson,
Kenneth Labs; Mcgraw-Hill; Reprint edition (February 1993); ISBN-10: 007068488X; ISBN-13: 9780070684881

2. Heating, Cooling, Lighting: Design Methods for Architects by Norbert Lechner; Wiley; 2 edition
(December 18, 2000); ISBN-10: 0471241431; ISBN-13: 978-0471241430

3. Sun, Wind & Light: Architectural Design Strategies, 2nd Edition by G. Z. Brown, Mark DeKay; Wiley; 2
edition (October 24, 2000); ISBN-10: 0471348775; ISBN-13: 978-0471348771

4. Energy-Efficient Building; ISBN: 978-1-56158-340-9 (1-56158-340-5) 5. Garg, N. K. (2007). Use of Glass in Buildings, New Age International (P) Limited, Publishers, 4835/24 Ansari Road, Daryaganj, New Delhi – 110002. ISBN: 81-224-2065-6.

ADVANCED STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS – ARC-607 Credits: 2 Contact hours / week: 2 Aim Introduction to various construction systems and structural systems for buildings with emphasis on study of structural stability of building typologies together with the practical application of structural design concepts. Content The course work will involve the identification of various structural systems for buildings, structural mechanism involved and integration with the architectural and services design. Advanced construction systems, Introduction to modular design, standardization and prefabrication systems for buildings.

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Learning Outcome At the end of the course the student should have acquired sufficient knowledge towards identification of the most appropriate construction system and structural system to complement the architectural design scheme. References Title Design of steel structures Structured design Design of steel structures Design of steel structures Design of steel structures Steel structures and timber structures Architectural structure Mechanics of structures Data structures and algorithms Structure in Architecture Design of reinforced concrete structures Analysis of framed structures Handbook of nanostructured materials and nanotechnology Reinforced concrete structures Planning industrial structures Building materials and structures Design of R C structures Practical design of simple steel structures Relevant IS Codes Further references Author Negi L S Yourdon E ; Constanitine L L Chandra Ram; Negi L S Chandra Ram Ramchandra; Vazirani V N ; Ratwani M M; Cowan HenryJ Junnarkar Jadavpur University Resource Centre Salvadori Mario ; Heller Robert Ramamrutham Gere JamesM ; Weaver William Nalwa Hari Singh Syal IC ; Goel Dunham Clarence W Clark D A P Ramamrutham Stuart D S Pub Year 1993 1979 1981 1999 1991 1987 1979 1953 1997 1986 1968 1969 2000 1998 1948

1. Membrane Structures: The Fifth Building Material by Klaus-Michael Koch (Editor), Karl J. Habermann;
Prestel Publishing (January 30, 2005); ISBN-10: 3791330497; ISBN-13: 978-3791330495

2. Structure as Architecture: A Source Book for Architects and Structural Engineers; Architectural Press
(August 11, 2005); ISBN-10: 0750665270; ISBN-13: 978-0750665278

3. Light Structures - Structures of Light: The Art And Engineering of Tensile Architecture Illustrated by the
Work of Horst Berger; Authorhouse (June 30, 2005); ISBN-10: 1420852671; ISBN-13: 978-1420852677

4. The Tensioned Fabric Roof by Craig G. Huntington; American Society of Civil Engineers (September
27, 2004); ISBN-10: 0784404283; ISBN-13: 978-0784404287

5. Frei Otto. Complete Works: Lightweight Construction Natural Design; Birkhauser; 1 edition (July 1,
2005); ISBN-10: 3764372311; ISBN-13: 978-3764372316 PRINCIPLES OF URBAN DESIGN – ARC-609 Credits: 2 Contact hours / week: 2

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Aim The aim of the course is to familiarize the students to guidelines and principles of urban design. Content Movement systems and their impact on urban space: human characteristics related to pedestrian behavior, analyzing patterns of pedestrian movement, factors that influence choice of path, design of path, interface between the automobile and the pedestrian, traffic calming, and design alternatives for commercial streets, commercial uses of the theories of path and node and the knowledge of movement patterns. Visual perception and the organization of urban spaces: non-material influences on the perception, organization, and use of urban space, influence of urban space design on public social life and the psychological needs of users, analysis of squares and other import public spaces, retailing strategies and their impact on urban centers. Patterns of Urbanization: urban spaces as spatial generators of urban form, urban open spaces: design guidelines and principles, historic evolution of squares and streets, the neighborhood shopping street, “corporate” urban spaces: plaza to atrium Learning Outcome At the end of the course, the student will be able to trace the development of the urban set up and analyze the quality of urban space, which would be useful in put for studios.

Reference: Title Architecture and Urbanism Urban space Computers in urban planning and urban management Urban and regional planning Urban Environment in Crisis Urban pattern city planning and design Concepts of urban design Urban planning and design criteria Urban economic development in India Design of urban space Models of urban and regional systems in developing countries Urban pattern city planning and design Rural urban development in India Urban design Computers in urban planning and urban management Development and urban metamorphosis Urban development and planning Author Paul Rudolph; Crier Rob Sikdar PK ;others Gowda K S Rame Rame Gowda K S Maitra Asesh Kumar; Gallion Arthur B ; Eisner Simon Gosling D Dechiara J ; Koppel Subrahmanyam V V;Bawa R L; Cartwright Richard M; Chadwick George Gallion Arthur B ; Eisner Simon Dubey M K Lang Jon Sikdar P K ;others Evin Ahmet Hancock John Pub Year 1977 1984 1998 1986 2000 1963 1984 1982 1998 1980 1987 1984 2000 2005 1998 1983 1985

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New landscape urbanization in the third world Perspectives in urban geography Urban landscape design Time saver standards for urban design Contemporary urban planning Perspective in urban geography Leisure and urban processes Slums and urbanization Housing and urbanisation Further references

Correa Charles Yadav CS CIP Watson Donald;others Levy JohnM Yadav CS Bramham Peter ; others Desai A R ; Pillai S Devadas Correa Charles

1989 1987 2002 2003 1988 1986 1989 1990 1999

1. Urban Design: A typology of Procedures and Products. Illustrated with 50 Case Studies by Jon Lang
Urban Design: Street and Square, Third Edition by J C Moughtin

2. Urban Design: Method and Techniques, Second Edition by J C Moughtin 3. The Urban Design Handbook: Techniques and Working Methods by Ray Gindroz 4. Public Places - Urban Spaces by Matthew Carmona 5. Time-Saver Standards for Urban Design by Donald Watson
SYLLABUS – SEMESTER II STUDIO II: EMERGING AREAS (HOSPITAL) – ARC-602 Credits: 12 Contact hours / week: 12 Aim The Indian healthcare sector has been growing at a frenetic pace in the past few years. The windfall began ever since the developed world discovered that it could get quality service for less than half the price in India. The number of patients visiting India for medical treatment has risen from 10,000 in 2000 to about 100,000 in 2005. With an annual growth rate of 30 per cent, India is already inching closer to Singapore, an established medicare hub that attracts 150,000 medical tourists a year. Not only that, diagnosis patterns today increasingly rely on medical tests thus requiring specific instruments to do so. The aim of this studio is to focus on design of hospitals with the latest health care processes and technologies and at the same time impart comfort to its patients and their attendants through space design. Content Case studies and literature studies will be undertaken to formulate both the quantitative and the qualitative requirements. Efficient provision of services is one of the most important factors in proper functioning of a hospital. Emphasis will hence be given on services and not to mention on site planning too. Learning Outcome

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At the end of the course, the student shall be able to design a 1500 bed high end hospital with provision for future expansion. References Title Author National seminar on hospital architecture Institute of Military Engineers planning and engineering Hospital planning and design in developing Sinha R P countries Design for hospitality British hospital and health care buildings Hospital architecture Hospitals design and development Hospital architecture Hospitals and health care facilities Hospitals and health care facilities Hospital clinics and health centres Hospital modernization and expansion Health care and hospital management Further references Davies Thomas D ; Beasley Kim A Stone Peter Rosenfield James W P ; Tatton Brown W World Health Organisation Redstone Louis G; Cox Anthony ; Groves Philip Architectural record Book Wheeler Todd E AICTE 1988 1980 1971 1986 1978 1990 1960 1971 1995 Pub Year 1995

1. Hospital and Healthcare Facility Design by Richard L. Miller, Earl S. Swensson; W. W. Norton &
Company; 2nd edition (October 2002); ISBN-10: 0393730727; ISBN-13: 978-0393730722

2. Design Details for Health: Making the Most of Interior Design's Healing Potential by Cynthia A.
Leibrock; Wiley (November 29, 1999); ISBN-10: 0471241946; ISBN-13: 978-0471241942

3. Hospital and Healthcare Facility Design by Richard L. Miller, Earl S. Swensson; W. W. Norton &
Company; 2nd edition (October 2002); ISBN-10: 0393730727; ISBN-13: 978-0393730722

4. Building Type Basics for Healthcare Facilities by Michael Bobrow, Thomas Payette, Ronald Skaggs,
Richard Kobus, Julia Thomas; Wiley (September 15, 2000); ISBN-10: 0471356727; ISBN-13: 9780471356721

5. Guidelines for Design and Construction of Hospital and Health Care Facilities: 2001 Edition by Aia;
ISBN-10: 1571650024; ISBN-13: 978-1571650023

6. Design That Cares: Planning Health Facilities for Patients and Visitors, Second Edition by Janet R.
Carpman, Myron A. Grant; Jossey-Bass; 2 edition (January 19, 2001); ISBN-10: 0787957399; ISBN-13: 978-0787957391

7. Healthcare Architecture in an Era of Radical Transformation by Stephen Verderber, David J. Fine; Yale
University Press (February 9, 2000); ISBN-10: 0300078390; ISBN-13: 978-0300078398 EARTHQUAKE AND CYCLONE RESISTANT BUILDING DESIGN – ARC-604 Credits: 2 Contact hour / week: 2

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Aim It is become mandatory to incorporate guidelines of earthquake resistant design based on the earthquake zone. The aim of the course is to familiarize the student to the design guidelines he has to follow for earthquake resistant and cyclone resistant design.

Content
Earthquake resistant building design: Introduction: Importance of earthquake resistant design – ground motion in an earthquake – types of seismic waves – wave reflection and refraction – earthquake intensity – modified Mercalli scale – comprehensive intensity scale. Fundamentals of the earthquake-resistant design of engineering structures. Codal provisions (I S 1893 -2002, IS 4326 -1976 and SP 22 -1982) earthquake resistant design. Earth quake zones: buildings). Cyclone resistant building design: Fundamentals of cyclone resistant design, case studies and precautions to be taken while designing in cyclone prone areas. Learning Outcome At the end of the student will be able to incorporate guidelines of earthquake resistant design depending on the site location. Reference: Title Author Seismic design of reinforced and precast Englekirk Robert E concrete buildings Earthquake protection Design for earthquakes Earthquake design practice for buildings Learning from experience Coburn Andrew; Spence Robin Ambrose James;Vergun D Key David Comerio mary C;others Publisher John Wiley Sons John Wiley John Wiley and Terminology – design criteria: multistory buildings, elevated structures like elevated tanks and stack like structures, retaining walls (emphasis on design of multi-storey

and

Sons Thomas Telford National Science Foundation Architectural Institute of Japan John Wiley and Sons John Wiley and

Design essentials in earthquake resistant Architectural Institute of Japan buildings Earthquake resistant design for engineers and Dowrick David J architects Fundamentals of earthquakes resistant Krinitzsky Ellis L;others

construction IITK-BMTPC earthquake tip Earthquake resistant design of structures

Sons Murty C V R IIT, Kanpur Agarwal Pankaj;Shrikhande PHI

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Fundamentals

of

earthquakes

Manish resistant Krinitzsky Ellis L;others Lomnitz Cinna

John Sons John Sons John

Wiley Wiley Wiley

and and and

construction Fundamentals of earthquake prediction

Seismic design of reinforced concrete and Paulay T;Priestley M J N masonry buildings Earthquake resistant concrete structures Design of seismic isolated Penelis George

Sons G;Kappos E and F N Spon John Sons South Publishers Bureau of Standard Bureau of Standard Wiley and Asian Indian Indian

Andreas J structures Naeim Farzad;Kelly James M Mallick Dharam V

(CDROM) Protection against earthquakes

Improving earthquake resistance of earthen Bureau of Indian Standard buildings guidelines IS 13827 1993 Improving earthquake resistance of low Bureau of Indian Standard

strength masonry buildings: Guidelines IS 13828 1993 Chopra, A.K. `Dynamics of structures~, Prentice Hall of India Pvt Ltd. New Delhi.

Clough,R.W and Penzien J., `Dynamics of structures`, McGraw Hill Book Co. New York. Jaikrishna et.al. `Elements of earthquake Engg.`, South Asia Publishers, New Delhi. DISSERTATION ARC-606 Aim The aim of this course is each student should take a current architectural issue for study so that he learns the various tools and techniques needed for research work Content Every student shall take up a topic related to the emerging areas with the guidance of the class teacher or any other faculty and give a seminar on that topic. The topic shall be a broad area of intervention. Student shall also submit a term paper on the particular topic chosen, at the end of the semester. Students should be able to publish at least one paper in a refereed journal by the end of the semester. The references depend on the topics selected by the student. Learning Outcome At the end of this course, the student shall be able to publish an article preferably in a refereed journal.

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ENTERPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT AND PROJECT PLANNING – ARC-608 Credits: 2 Contact hour / week: 2 Aim The focus of the course is to enable the students to understand the relevance of entrepreneurship and innovation in business activity in the Indian context. It also covers important aspects such as project formulation and feasibility analysis and social cost benefit analysis. Content: Nature and development of entrepreneurship – importance of entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial qualities and characteristics, environmental factors influence entrepreneurship, innovation and entrepreneurship, innovation process, corporate entrepreneurship, project formulation and feasibility analysis. Social cost benefits analysis, institutional support for the growth and development of entrepreneurship in India. Learning Outcome At the end of the course the student shall be able to incorporate entrepreneurship during professional practice. Reference: 1. David H Holt, Entrepreneurship and New Venture Creation, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi, 2000 SYLLABUS – SEMESTER III STUDIO IV – EMERGING AREAS (INDUSTRIALIZED HOUSING) – ARC-701 Credits: 12 Contact hour / week: 12 Aim Providing housing to the ever growing population has been a concern in India. The aim of this studio is to learn how to design industrialized housing for a large community. Content The post independence era has a focus on housing various sections of society economically. The post economic liberalization era has seen emergence of a new generation of people who demand quality housing as soon as possible. The focus has shifted to quality, speed and economy of housing. With a large number of financial institutions offering housing loans to people and people being used to the concept of EMI, affordability has taken a back seat. Industrialized housing can address the emerging challenges of housing. The content of the course is intended to give exposure to the vast spectrum of industrialized housing with a view that an appropriate concept / technology may be developed for a specific context.

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Learning Outcome At the end of the course, the student shall be able to design industrialized housing including its master plan, circulation pattern, commercial and public spaces etc. Reference: Title Form of housing Hand book of low cost housing Traditional housing in African cities Housing and community in old Delhi Manual of tropical housing and building climatic design Handbook of Low Cost housing Crime prevention through housing design Rehumanizing housing Introduction to housing layout Town and country planning and housing Housing an Indian perspectives Management of sites and services housing schemes Site costs in housing development Housing for elderly people Housing and urbanisation Introduction to housing layout Typology and mapping of housing zones Low cost housing in developing countries Affordable housing and infrastructure in India Metropolitan housing market Low cost housing for developing countries Earth sheltered housing design guidelines examples and references Low cost housing and infrastructure Urban housing Practical cost saving techniques Author Davis Sam; Lal A K Schwerdtfeger Friedrich W Trivedi Harshad R Koenigsberger O H ;others Pub Year 1977 1995 1982 1980 1974

Lal A K; 1995 Stolland Paul 1991 Teymur Necdet ; Markus Thomas A 1988 Woolley Tom Greater London Council; Modak N V ; Ambdekar V N Guha P K; Swan P J ; others Simpson B J Valins Martin Correa Charles Architectural Press Ministry of Urban Development ; National Building Organization Mathur G C Bhattacharya K P Mehta Meera ; Mehta Dinesh Central Building Research Institute University of Minnesota 1978 1971 1999 1983 1983 1988 1999 1978 1988 1993 1998 1989 1984 1979 1994 1995 1984 1992

for

INAE None housing Jahn Bart Central Building Research Institute Jain A K

construction Low cost housing for developing countries Building systems for low income housing Further references 10:0442218206, ISBN-13: 978-0442218201

1. Handbook of Housing Systems for Designers and Developers by Lawrence S Cutlar; ISBN2. Best Designed Modular Houses by Martin Nicholas Kung; December 2005 3. A Practical Guide to Prefabricated Houses by A L Larr SEMINAR ON CONTEMPORARY ARCHITECTURE – ARC-703

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Credits: 6 Contact hour / week: 6 Aim The aim of this course is each student should take a current architectural issue for study so that he learns the various tools and techniques needed for research work Content Every student shall take up a topic related to the design studio undergone with the guidance of the class teacher or any other faculty and give a seminar on that topic. The topic shall be a broad area of intervention (on which the student needs to base his / her thesis later in the fourth semester). Student shall also submit a term paper on the particular topic chosen, at the end of the semester. Students should be able to publish at least one paper in a refereed journal by the end of the semester. The references depend on the topics selected by the student. Learning Outcome At the end of this course, the student shall be able to publish an article preferably in a refereed journal. ADVANCED INTERIOR DESIGN – ARC-705 Credits: 2 Contact hour / week: 2 Aim The aim of this studio is to learn how to design interiors of world class buildings such as airports, high end hospitals etc Content Students will be introduced to materials used for interior construction, custom furnishing and decor. Students will prepare working drawings for furniture and interior detailing. Emphasis will be on entertainment parks, airport and hospital interiors and on presenting working drawings for construction (as part of a set of drawings). During the semester each student will have to take up a minimum of three projects – related to the design of the interiors of – airport and hospital The students will have to incorporate the knowledge he has gained in the use of newer material, construction and technologies. Learning Outcome At the end of the course, the student shall be able to design the interiors world class buildings using newer building materials and construction technologies. Reference: Title Contemporary details Author Niesewand Nonie Publisher Simon and Schuster

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Architectural houses - 02 Creative interiors design of enclosed space Sanskruti Sanskruti Interior design Interior world Interior world Interior world Professional practice for interior designers Beyond the plan Influential interiors Interior spaces of the USA Interior design of the 20th century Interior design principles and practice Further references Malkin

Cerver F A Jain Shashi Diwan Sudhir Diwan Sudhir Rao Pratap M Kyoung Shin Hwa Yun Kim Joo Gak Jang Soon Piotrowski, Christine M Willats Stephen Trocme Suzanne Images Australia Massey Anne Rao Pratap M

F A Cerver Management Publishing Interior affairs Interior affairs Standard Publisher Distributors Archi world Co Archi world Co Archi world Co John wiley John Wiley and Sons Clarkson Potter Images Australia Pty Ltd Thames and Hudson standard |Publishers

1. Hospital Interior Architecture: Creating Healing Environments for Special Patient Populations by Jain 2. Hospital and Healthcare Facility Design by Richard L. Miller 3. Design Details for Health: Making the Most of Interior Design's Healing Potential (Wiley Series in
Healthcare and Senior Living Design) by Cynthia A. Leibrock

4. Medical and Dental Space Planning: A Comprehensive Guide to Design, Equipment, and Clinical
Procedures by Jain Malkin

5. Building Type Basics for Healthcare Facilities by Michael Bobrow 6. Healthcare Spaces No.2 (Good Idea) by Roger Yee 7. Airport Interiors by Thomas-Emberson, Steve; April 2007; ISBN-10: 0-470-03475-0; ISBN-13: 978-0470-03475-0; John Wiley & Sons

BUISNESS COMMUNICATION – ARC-707 Credits: 2 Contact hour / week: 2 Aim Communication – both oral and written, plays an important role in decision making of business management. This course aims at providing some basic tools and techniques in oral and written communication. Content

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Human communication process, importance of communication in business activity verbal and non verbal communication, body talk at work place (gestures, postures, etc) communication channels – barriers in communication, communicating successfully in an organization, written communication in business – fundamentals, do`s and don’ts, format and layout of business document, business correspondence – various letters, memos, circulars, applications, complaints, sales letters etc. Writing business reports, writing short and long reports, documentation of report sources, format, layout- do`s and don’ts oral communication – public speaking, presentation of reports, leading and participating in meetings and conferences, seminars, symposia, press conferences and press release – use of visual and audio aids in written and oral communication, micro oral presentation (with audio and audio- visual aids), communication workshop. Preparation of curriculum vitae, how to perform in GD and interview, cross cultural communication, business etiquette. Learning Outcome At the end of the course, the student shall be able to prepare project reports, documentations etc and his communication skills would improve. Reference: 1. John V. Thill and Courtland L. Bovee “Excellence in business Communication”. 2. Kent, Robert W,” A Short Guide to Successful writing in Management Communication” HBS publishing Division 3. Kent Robert W.”Writing Some Fundamentals” Part A and Part B, HBS Published Division. 4. Kepner Charles H., and Tregoe, Benjamin B, “The rational manager: A synthetic approach to problem solving and decision making”. New York McGraw – Hill Book Co. 5. Docter and Docter, “Business Communication”.

COURSE DESCRIPTION – SEMESTER IV THESIS – ARC-702 Credits: 24 Contact hour / week: 24 Aim The thesis project is to prove the ability of the student to handle all phases of building design. Content

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Final individual project work under the guidance of faculty advisor to demonstrate architectural knowledge and professional interest. It is development and presentation to design of a building including its setting in specific environment and its typical aspects. The scope of the thesis can be in areas related to the topics of the design studios handled before. As per his inclination towards the area, the final selection of the topic will be as approved by the thesis selection committee appointed by the department. The references depend on the topics selected by the student. At the end of the semester the student will have to give a report giving details of literature study, case study, area requirements, evolution of rational/ concept, etc and set of sheets explaining in detail the entire project Learning Outcome At the end of the thesis, the student will be able to handle similar projects in the profession.

4. Faculty Profile:
Sl.No. Name 1. Prof. Yogish Chandra Dhar

Designation Professor (Design Chair) Professor (Design Chair) Lecturer (Selection Grade)

Subject Teaching ARC-702 Thesis Project ARC-702 Thesis Project ARC-702 Thesis Project

2. 3.

Prof. Nelson Pais Ar Sanghamitra Roy •

Brief profile of each faculty. Enclosed with faculty detailed (Part A) • Laboratory facilities exclusively for the PG programme. nil SPECIAL PURPOSE:
• • Software, design tools.--- not acquired Academic Calendar and frame work.

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Academic Calendar
Events
Orientation Commencement of Odd Semester First Test (Thursday, Friday, Saturday) Tech Fest – Tech -Tatva ‘09 Second Test (Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday) Third Test (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday) Last instructional day (Friday) Commencement of End Semester Examination (Monday) Last working day (Saturday) Commencement of Even Semester (Monday) First Test (Thursday, Friday, Saturday) Revels ‘2010 Second Test (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday) Utsav ‘2010 Third Test (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday) Last instructional day (Friday) Commencement of End Semester Examination (Monday) Last working day (Saturday) April 19 – 21, 2010 May 07, 2010 May 10, 2010 April 19 – 21, 2010 May 07, 2010 May 10, 2010 April 19 – 21, 2010 May 07, 2010 May 10, 2010 March 15 – 17, 2010 March 15 – 17, 2010 March 15 – 17, 2010 September 22 – 24, 2009 September 22 – 24, 2009 October 8 – 10, 2009 (Thursday, Friday, Saturday)

I Semester
July 16, 2009 (Thursday) July 17, 2009(Friday) August 20 – 22, 2009

BE/B ARCH III, V, I Semester VII, IX Semesters& MTech/ M Arch/ MCA MCA III,V Sem.
July 20, 2009 (Monday) August 20 – 22, 2009 August 3, 2009 (Monday) August 4, 2009 (Tuesday) September 3 – 5, 2009

October 26 – 28, 2009 October 26 – 28, 2009 November 12 - 14, 2009 (Thursday, Friday, Saturday) November 13, 2009 November 16, 2009 November 13, 2009 November 16, 2009 November 28, 2009 (Saturday) November 30, 2009

November 28, 2009 January 4, 2010

November 28, 2009 January 4, 2010

December 11, 2009 (Friday) January 4, 2010

February 11 – 13, 2010 February 11 – 13, 2010 February 11 – 13, 2010

May 22, 2010

May 22, 2010

May 22, 2010

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Academic Year (2010 – 2011) Orientation Commencement of Odd Sem. July 15, 2010 (Thursday) July 16, 2010 (Friday) July 19, 2010 (Monday) August 2, 2010 (Monday) August 3, 2010 (Tuesday)
2010: January 26, April 2, and May 1

List of Holidays: 2009: August 15, September 21, October 2, 7 December 25

Research focus.
Recent development plans and policies in the country along with increased endorsement for environment friendly design and better quality of life for all has brought certain areas of architectural design into the limelight. Some such emerging fields are housing, IT office complexes, retail, hotels, airports, hospitals, entertainment parks, and townships. It is not only true that there is a growing need for these facilities but also that the design scope and approach for these emerging sectors have expanded substantially and changed as well in recent years in response to national policies and technological advances. The master of architecture program is designed to create professionals who can suitably respond and adapt to the market needs. Fundamental to the curriculum are design studios in emerging fields. These studios shall be enriched with supporting courses in newer building materials, advanced structural systems, energy-efficient design, urban design, interior design, earthquake resistant design, entrepreneurship and project planning and business communication.

• project) • • nil. • •

List of typical research projects: Mixed use high rise development and Medi-city (ongoing Industry Linkage ---na Publications (if any) out of research in last three years out of masters projects --Placements status: the first batch of students will graduate in July 2009 Admission procedures on merit basis

ELIGIBILITY CITIZENSHIP: Indian Nationals can apply under the General category. Foreign nationals or Non Resident Indians or Indian nationals supported by NRI relatives can apply under the Foreign/NRI category. QUALIFICATIONS: The candidates must have passed BArch or its equivalent as approved by Council of Architecture with minimum 50% marks in aggregate. ADMISSIONS GENERAL CATEGORY/ FOREIGN/NRI CATEGORY: Admissions are made on the basis of marks obtained at the qualifying examination. MERIT LIST

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FOREIGN/NRI CATEGORY: A separate merit list of the applicants under the Foreign/NRI category will be prepared based on marks obtained in the qualifying examination and those selected for admission will be informed separately. GENERAL CATEGORY: Based on the marks obtained at the qualifying examination, Manipal University will declare a merit list on 20.06.09 in the website.

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• FEE STRUCTURE Details of Fees for 2009-2010 batch PG Courses (amount in rupees)
FIRST YEAR PG Courses
M Arch Course Reg. Fee Caution fees Deposit 147000 10000 7500 Total

Second Third Year Year
Course fee Course fee --164500 118000

TOTAL

282500

Hostel Facilities

Hostel Facilities in the Campus : Hostel Library STD Booths Floodlit Basket Ball Court Table Tennis Gymnasium Swimming Pool Badminton Hall Cable TV Athletics, Football, Hockey, Volley Ball Washing Machine in Women’s Hostel Night Canteen for Women Internet

Contact address of co-coordinator of the PG program.
Name Address: : Prof. (Dr) Chitrarekha Kabre : Prof. (Dr) Chitrarekha Kabre, Professor and Dean Faculty of Architecture, Manipal Institute of Technology, Manipal, Karnataka 576104 Telephone: 0820- 2924111 E.mail:crekha.kabre@manipal.edu

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