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Annotated Bibliography

Primary Sources

Co., Newspapers. “De Moines.” ​De Moines register​ (De Moines, IA), July 23, 1950.
https://desmoinesregister.newspapers.com/image/?spot=15283495&fcfToken=6b2b4346
55467730497a734c333962522b6664306f4e4a554b756f2f375a6b456c66596d7377644c6f
3777553435595855525a78724575494f566537632f43306d2b77794e7955334f496b3d.
This newspaper article includes the public’s view on what’s happening in the war. This is
a primary source due to the fact that it is from the 50’s and shows what people thought. It
is credible because it’s from a newspaper, not to mention being from the U.S. and the
state. We used this to list what people locally thought about the war.

Daily Mail. South Korean soldiers marching on June 28 1950. Photograph. Daily Mail. March
25, 2013.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2299134/A-time-change-captured-film-Fascinati
ng-photographs-united-Korea-500-year-old-dynasty-finally-fell.html.
We used this primary source image for a header on our home page of our site. We know
this site is credible because it is well written and the photograph we are using is not
fraudulent or fake.

The Daily Oklahoman authors. “600 Korean War Dead Arrive at California Port.” ​The Daily
Oklahoman​ (Oklahoman, OK), October 15, 1951, district edition, Front Page, 1.
http://archive.newsok.com/olive/apa/oklahoman/#panel=home.
In this newspaper archive of primary sources, we found info on casualties arriving back
from the Korean War battleground. This article gave us an insight on how many people
were dying on a daily basis in the war. This is a trusted newspaper, and the newspaper
has well reception. Since the article is free of grammatical errors, we believe that the
article and newspaper are trustworthy. We used the information from this article to
provide evidence of large daily casualties for the section in our website about the
casualties and effects of the Korean War.

Hickey, Michael. “The Korean War: An Overview.” BBC - History - World Wars: The Korean
War: An Overview. Last modified March 21, 2011. Accessed November 28, 2017.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwars/coldwar/korea_hickey_01.shtml.
This source is primary because a person from the military made it, who was actually from
the war. It has information like what happened, and gave a section just on the aftermath.
It is reliable because it’s from a news company and was from a veteran. It was used for
information across the site.

History.com. Harry Truman giving a speech. April 1951. Photograph.


http://www.history.com/topics/inchon.
We know this primary source is credible because it was taken during the speech, and it is
from History.com, which has proven multiple times to be reliable. We used this image for
our page about the different types of battles in the Korean War.
The Japan Times. ​Japan and Korea Made One​. Image. The Japan Times. August 22, 2010.
https://www.japantimes.co.jp/life/2010/08/22/general/uneasy-neighbors-across-the-sea/.
In this primary source image, we found an article which we will use for decorative
purposes in our site. We know it is a real image because The Japan Times is a trusted site
that has been proven to be reliable.

The Milwaukee Journal. “Gen. MacArthur Fired by Truman.” ​The Milwaukee Journal
(Milwaukee, WI), April 11, 1951, Front Page.
We used this primary source for our page about the battles in the Korean War. We know
it is reliable because the Milwaukee Journal is an old newspaper written by professionals.

National Archives. Soldiers marching near Inchon. Photograph.


https://history.army.mil/brochures/kw-unoff/unoff.htm.
We used this primary source for our slideshow about the United Nations sending help to
South Korea. This primary source poster is a primary source because it was created
during and is about the Korean War. We know we can use this source because just are
using the image, so we don’t have to worry about the textual content of the article.

The New York Times Reporters. “WAR IS DECLARED BY NORTH KOREANS; FIGHTING
ON BORDER; Communist Regime Attacks South Republic, Uses Tanks --Broadcasts
Hostilities FIRST DRIVE SEEN CURBED United States, Holding Soviet Responsible,
Watches Event --Plea to U.N. Likely.” ​The New York Times​ (New York, NY), June 25,
1950, breaking edition, Home Page, 1.
http://www.nytimes.com/1950/06/25/archives/war-is-declared-by-north-koreans-fighting-
on-border-communist.html.
In this primary newspaper article, we found out that the U.S. was actually pretty
concerned with North Korea and their invasion of South Korea. we also saw that
casualties were imminent, as a war was approaching with the U.S. The New York Times
is credible because they have been wrong very few times, and the newspaper has
professional writers and reporters to get correct information on the topic. We used this
information found here to provide some images for our site, as well as supporting
evidence for our site’s pages.

Office of Reports and Estimates, CIA Far East/Pacific Division. Telegram,


“Intelligence Highlights No. 106 | 21 June to 27 June 1950,” June 27, 1950.
In ​Baptism by Fire: CIA Analysis of the Korean War​, compiled by Central
Intelligence Agency. Washington D.C., District of Columbia: Central
Intelligence Agency, 2016. https://www.cia.gov/library/readingroom/
collection/baptism-fire-cia-analysis-korean-war-overview.
In this primary and secondary source collection, we found many many letters written to
military generals. In here we also found first hand info on life in the military. This source
is credible because it was assembled by the CIA, a government-made organization. We
used the information on here to get some primary sources and facts.
Photographer. Soldiers march through Korean soil. Photograph. Ducksters. June 21, 2012.
http://www.ducksters.com/history/cold_war/korean_war.php.
We know this images found on Ducksters is credible because the website this image is
from is recommended by teachers and the image is a photograph that can be found
elsewhere. We used this photograph for our page on the growing tensions between North
and South Korea.

———United Nations Meeting. Photograph. History on the Net. January 28, 2013.
https://www.historyonthenet.com/authentichistory/1946-1960/2-korea/1-overview/.
We plan on using this Primary Source image for a slideshow on our website about the
United Nations Meetings. We know the image is credible because it is about an event that
actually happened in 1950. Another reason it is credible is that it can be found in other
books and newspapers, so we know it wasn’t created on the spot.

Photographer Unknown. Soldiers fight at Heartbreak ridge. Photograph. Blogspot. May 5, 2011.
http://aoconnor12.blogspot.com/2011/05/september-13-october-13-1951-battle-of.html.
We used this primary source photo for an example of the battles fought during the
Korean War. Although the blog post may not be reliable, the image is reliable because
the picture was taken in the 50’s and not when the blog post was created.

Photographer unknown. United Nations Flag flying. Photograph. Ibiblio. January 17, 2000.
https://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/OnlineLibrary/photos/events/kowar/un-rok/un-rok.htm.
We used this primary source image for our slideshow about the United Nations. We
know this image is credible because it was taken in 1950, not today.

The Pittsburgh Press. “Korean Invaders Drive within Suburbs of Capital.” ​The Pittsburgh Press
(Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania), June 26, 1950, final edition, Front Page.
https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=djft3U1LymYC&dat=19500626&printsec=fro
ntpage&hl=en.
In this primary source article, we found an article headline about the invasion of South
Korea in 1950. We know this article is credible because it is from the Pittsburgh Press,
which is a long-running trusted paper newspaper. We used an image from the newspaper
for an image on our site.

San Francisco Chronicle. “WAR IS OVER.” ​San Francisco Chronicle​ (San Francisco, CA), July
28, 1953, Front Page.
We used this primary source newspaper article for an image on our website subpage titled
“Armistice.” We know it is credible because it is simply a front page of a legitimate
newspaper from 1953.

Unknown. ​Potsdam Conference​. Photograph. Shmoop. May 20, 2010.


https://www.shmoop.com/causes-of-cold-war/photo-potsdam.html.
This primary source photo from Shmoop was used on our site for a slideshow describing
the 38th parallel and the border between North and South Korea. We know the site used
is credible because Shmoop is a trusted website for students and teachers to use as a
resource.

———​The Potsdam Conference​. Photograph. History.com. March 1, 2003.


http://www.history.com/topics/world-war-ii/potsdam-conference.
We used this primary source photograph for our slideshow on our Weebly site about the
border of North and South Korea. We know this photograph is real because it is from a
website that is professionally written and has been proven to be trustworthy in the past.

———A truck crossing by a sign indicating that the truck is crossing the 38th parallel.
Photograph. Britannica. February 1, 2001.
https://www.britannica.com/place/38th-parallel.
We used this primary source photo we found on Britannica for a slideshow about the 38th
parallel and the border between North and South Korea. We know this photo is credible
because it is widespread and can be found on many other websites and books.

Unknown Photographer. Opening session of the Military Armistice Commission. July 27, 1953.
Photograph.
https://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2016/07/remembering-the-korean-war/493235/.
We used this primary source image as the background image for our page about the
armistice. We know this source is credible because it is an image that was taken during
the Military Armistice Commision, and not an image describing the Military Armistice
Commision.

———Soldiers marching over a narrow strip of land. Photograph. ChinaDaily. September 25,
2010. http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/cpc2011/2010-09/25/content_12474125.html.
We used this primary source photo for our section on the Korean War beginning. We
know this source is credible because it was taken in 1950 and could be found on other
sources if necessary.

War photographer. Aftereffects of the Battle of Heartbreak Ridge. October 16, 1951.
Photograph. https://alchetron.com/Battle-of-Heartbreak-Ridge.
We used this image of the Battle of Heartbreak Ridge for an image on our page about the
battles of the Korean War. We know this primary source is credible because it was taken
during the Korean War, and not sometime afterward.

“Wilson Center Digital Archives.” 2008. In ​Wilson Center Digital Archive - Korean War,
1950-1953​. http://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/collection/50/korean-war-1950-1953.
This archive includes events that happened throughout the Korean war and when. The
reason this is credible is because it includes information from the US government. We
used it for the information it includes.

Secondary Sources
Academy, Khan. “The Korean War.” Khan Academy. Accessed December 3, 2017.
https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/ap-us-history/period-8/apush-1950s-america/a/
the-korean-war.
A page on the Korean war, describing it as a “Hot War,” which in the context used, it
refers to it being directly fought between countries. This site includes information like an
overview, and things away from the 38th parallel. This is a secondary source and was
used for information and supporting evidence.

Asia Society. Last modified August 17, 2003.


https://asiasociety.org/education/geography-koreas.
In this secondary source, we found substantial amounts of information about the Korean
peninsula and how the land is shaped. We know this source is credible because this
information is supported in less detail on other websites. We also know it is credible
because it is free of grammatical errors and is professionally written. We used this source
for information on the background and geography of the Korean peninsula.

Atlantic, The. “What We Learned From the Korean War.” The Atlantic. Last modified July 23,
2013. Accessed December 7, 2017.
https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2013/07/what-we-learned-from-the-kor
ean-war/278016/.
We used the information from this secondary source to reinforce other evidence we
found. Although not everything on here was about the Korean War, the information we
did find some things. These included how the treaty was received in the public and how
the Korean War impacted people’s daily lives. We can trust this site because the
extensive article and research shown show that considerable effort was put into the
creation.

CNN Authors. “Korean War Fast Facts.” Korean War Fast Facts - CNN. Last modified June 10,
2017. Accessed November 28, 2017.
http://www.cnn.com/2013/06/28/world/asia/korean-war-fast-facts/index.html.
This site list different kinds of information in little bits. It also includes information, like
achievements, a timeline, statistics such as deaths and casualties, the cause, and other
information. It also includes many images from the war with captions, and the dates of
the images. It is a secondary source, it does include information that could be credible,
considering it’s a news company, and we used it for images and information.

DMZspytour. “Battle of Heartbreak Ridge.” Map. DMZspytour. November 26, 2015.


http://www.dmzspytour.com/2015/11/26/heartbreak-ridge-battle/.
We used this secondary source for a background image on our website. We know this
map is reliable because it is an illustration of a real battle. Another reason it is reliable is
that we found maps showing the same general layout in other places.
Dummies editors and authors. “A Brief History of the Korean Peninsula before World War II.”
Dummies. Last modified February 5, 2013.
http://www.dummies.com/education/history/world-history/a-brief-history-of-the-korean-
peninsula-before-world-war-ii/.
We used this secondary source to gain knowledge of events that happened before The
Korean War broke out. We can trust this site because the language is clear and free of
bias. The content is also up-to-date, as well as verifiable. We will use this source on our
website to inform the reader of background information

Encyclopedia Britannica. “Korean War.” Encyclopedia Britannica. Last modified January 16,
2004. Accessed December 3, 2017. https://www.britannica.com/event/Korean-War.
In this website, we found information on the invasion of South Korea and the
counter-invasion from South Korea. This secondary source is credible, due to the fact that
Britannica is a trusted source that is used by teachers all over. We used this information
for a subpage about the original invasion of South Korea.

History.com Staff. “Korean War.” History.com. Last modified January 29, 2011.
http://www.history.com/topics/korean-war.
Using this secondary source, we found information on the relationship between the
Korean War and the Cold War, as well as some quotes from American leaders.Using this
site, we found out that the Korean War had around 5 million deaths. This website is
credible because it lists multiple sources and had a clean design, which shows it was
created professionally. we used the quotes from the website to use in multiple sections to
create an immersive atmosphere.

———“Korean War Begins.” History.com. Last modified July 1, 2009.


http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/korean-war-begins.
In this secondary source from History.com, we learned about what happened before the
Korean War. This site was good for finding information on causes and factors of the
Korean War. We knew this site was credible because only professional hired writers can
write articles, and we have used the website before. We used this website to reinforce our
facts and project.

The History Learning Site. “The United Nations and the Korean War.” The History Learning
Site. Last modified July 1, 2002.
https://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/modern-world-history-1918-to-1980/the-united-nat
ions/the-united-nations-and-the-korean-war/.
In this secondary source, we found information on how the United Nations handled the
Korean War. We know this source is credible because it shows clear extensive research
and is professionally written. We used this site mainly for our Weebly page about the
Korean War starting.

Khan, Salman. “The Korean War (article).” Khan Academy. Last modified April 26, 2017.
https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/ap-us-history/period-8/apush-1950s-america/a/
the-korean-war.
In this secondary source, we got extensive coverage of the Korean War. There was
information on anti communism in the U.S, pop culture related to the war, and
information on the time of Eisenhower. This website is credible because teachers have
recommended it, and it is well known as a great place for information. We used this
website to fact-check other information found on other sites.

Khan Academy. ​Korean Border​. Image. Khan Academy. August 7, 2016.


https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/ap-us-history/period-8/apush-1950s-america/a/
the-korean-war.
We used this secondary source image for our slideshow on our Weebly site about the
38th parallel. we know this site is credible because Khan Academy is very often used by
educators and is simply an illustration of the Korean peninsula border that can be found
elsewhere.

Lindsay, James M. “The History of the Cold War in 40 Quotes.” ​The Water’s Edge​ (blog). Entry
posted November 7, 2014. https://www.cfr.org/blog/history-cold-war-40-quotes.
In this secondary source blog post, we found the date of many of Harry Truman’s quotes,
as well as other quotes that relate to the Cold War. although not all blogs are reliable, this
one simply states quotes and the dates that they were said. These quotes can still be found
in various textbooks, so we know they are real. We used these quotes in various locations
on our website in order to have a interactive environment and show our effort put into the
project.

Millett, Allan R. “Korean War | Combatants, Summary, Facts, and Causalities.[sic]”


Britannica.com. Last modified January 6, 2004.
https://www.britannica.com/event/Korean-War.
In this secondary source, we got information on what led to the war, as well as what types
of battle techniques were used. We also got information on the negotiating side of the
war, finding out when people met to talk. We believe this source to be credible because
there are sources linked and the author has information on themselves. We used this
information on our section of the project “Before the War.”

Shmoop editors. “Truman Doctrine Quotes.” Shmoop. Last modified February 1, 2001.
https://www.shmoop.com/historical-texts/truman-doctrine/quotes.html.
In this secondary source, we found quotes from the Truman Doctrine. We know this site
is credible because Shmoop is used by teachers for education on many things so we knew
it would be safe. We used this site for quotes on our own Weebly site.

SparkNotes editors. “The Korean War (1950-1953).” SparkNotes. Last modified February 1,
2002. http://www.sparknotes.com/history/american/koreanwar/summary.html.
In this secondary source, we found simply an overview of the Korean War.We know it is
credible it is a trusted study guide website that teachers occasionally use. We used this
website for small facts to add to our document of information which will then be spread
out through our website.
———SparkNotes: The Korean War (1950 - 1953). SparkNotes. Last modified February 6,
2002. http://www.sparknotes.com/history/american/koreanwar/timeline/.
This secondary source we used is comprised of a timeline of the Korean War. We know
this source is reliable because it is professionally written, and has other editors review the
work when a subpage is proposed. We used this website for reference when creating our
page about the many battles of the Korean War.

Student News Daily. An illustration depicting the Korean Peninsula. Photograph. Student News
Daily. February 25, 2016.
https://www.studentnewsdaily.com/daily-news-article/largest-ever-us-south-korea-militar
y-drill-planned-as-a-warning-to-pyongyang/.
in this secondary source, we found an image that shows the Korean peninsula as an
illustration. We used this image as a background image for a header of a page on our
website. We know this site is credible because the writing professionalism and is an
adaptation. from another trusted site.

Totally History. “Korean War Timeline.” Totally History. Last modified February 28, 2013.
http://totallyhistory.com/us-history/korean-war/.
in this secondary source, we found information on what happened before the Korean
War. We know this source is credible because it is a composition of facts that can be
searched and found elsewhere, and it is free of grammatical and factual errors. We used
this information for text in many web pages on our site.

Unknown. “The Korean War - Home.” The Korean War. Last modified February 7, 2013.
https://sdaviskoreanwarprojectwebsite.weebly.com/important-people.html.
This secondary source is a site which includes important people in the Korean War,
impact on Americans, and general history. We can use this site safely because The
people listed on ones which we went and found elsewhere, and the general history is just
facts found on other sites. We used this website (in conjunction with others) for general
information across our site.

———“Major Battles - Korean War.” Korean War. Last modified October 9, 2017.
https://barrientoskoreanwar.weebly.com/major-battles.html.
With this secondary source, we got some information on politics, how nations responded,
and what major battles happened. This source is safe to use because the author lists
sources, and the site is written in a professional manner. We used this website to get a list
of major battles for our site, as well as fact comparison for other categories of the site.

World Atlas. “Battle of Heartbreak Ridge.” WorldAtlas. Last modified May 18, 2016.
https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/battle-of-heartbreak-ridge-korean-war.html.
In this secondary source, we found information about the Battle of Heartbreak Ridge. We
know this source is reliable because it is professionally written, and a teacher has
recommended it to use for other projects. We used the information on this website
mainly for out section about the battles of the Korean War.