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INSIDE INSIDE Livestock auction highlights at fair Dexter-Pickney bridge re-opens Page 1-C Page 8-A Chelsea
INSIDE
INSIDE
Livestock auction
highlights at fair
Dexter-Pickney
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Chelsea Standard

VOL. 137, NO. 36

75 ¢

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2010

Networking events planned in Chelsea

McMahon to address importance of new gateway initiative

By Sean Dalton

Heritage Newspapers

A speed networking event

to competing with major metro- politan areas like Chicago. “I’ve often thought that our competition is not our local communities – we’re

actually competing against places like Chicago, Cleveland, Indianapolis and Cincinnati,” Pierce said. “Working with regional partnerships and col- laborations is a way to promote our entire area.” The speed net-

working event will be followed up on Sept. 15 by “The Dollars and Sense of Protecting Community Character,” a gate- way community event where par- ticipants will have an opportunity to share information

and resources with each other before Ed McMahon of the Urban Land Institute discusses the importance of gateway com- munities. McMahon is an expert on creating and sustaining livable and prosperous communities, Pierce said. Pierce said the event is another opportunity centered in Chelsea that is intended to draw interest from business owners and professionals from both inside and outside of Washtenaw County. “This is a unique opportunity for people to tap into a great deal of experience and exper- tise,” Pierce said. “McMahon is experienced in economic devel- opment, tourism promotion, and historic preservation.” The event will be held at 500 Washington St. and will begin

will take place today from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Chelsea Comfort Inn. The event caters to entrepreneurs,

professionals and specialists in the commu- nity. Business owners from Jackson, Chelsea, Pinckney and other areas will converge on Chelsea to meet

and learn about each other and the various businesses that operate in the region. The event will involve face time with up to 17 businesses with four minutes devoted to each fast-paced interaction, during which participants will pitch their own businesses but also spread the word about busi- nesses they have learned about. “The speed networking proj- ect is very similar to an event that we held a couple of years ago,” Chelsea Area Chamber of Commerce Director Bob Pierce said. “It’s a great way to get to learn about the variety of busi- nesses in the area, and in this case it’s a very strong regional event.” Pierce said the intent is to focus on bolstering the region from a business and tourism standpoint in a bid to shift thinking from competing with other Michigan communities

“It is a great way to get to learn about the variety of businesses in the area.”

BOB PIERCE

PLEASE SEE GATEWAY /3-A

Planning Commission revises master plan

By Daniel Lai

Heritage Newspapers

The Lyndon Township Planning Commission will host a public hearing to address any questions about its proposed township master plan at 7 p.m. Sept. 16 at the township hall. The master plan provides rec- ommendations for protection of rural character, farmland, and natural resources; residential, commercial, and industrial

develop-

LYNDON TWP.

ment;

roads; and

public facilities and services. “We’re excited about it. We’ve been working on the master plan for almost two years,” chairman Leon Moore said. Moore said unlike previous years, where the master plan was simply revised with new amendments, the commission rewrote several sections. “This is our first major rewrite in probably 15 years,” he said. Moore said the goal of the commission was to preserve the “rural recreation” aspect of the township. “We noticed how impor- tant recreation is to Lyndon Township, especially when 52

percent of the land is owned by the state,” he said. Some of the changes in the master plan include preserving the current lake residential zone and creating two more zones –– traditional and lake conservation. “The traditional lake resi- dential zone applies to existing communities or plotted subdivi- sions around the lakes,” Moore said. Under the old master plan, land plots under 1.2 acres were considered “non-conforming.” “The new plan basically takes care of that,” he said. The commission also revised its sewer use policy. “Under the old plan, munici- pal sewers were only to be used for existing homes or homes with existing problems,” Moore said. The new language allows for sewers to protect lake quality in communities around the lakes as long as it does not create dense population around the lakes. A third change in the master plan addresses private roads. “The old plan did not allow for the creation of new private roads,” Moore said. “The new plan allows for new private

PLEASE SEE REVISE/3-A

new plan allows for new private PLEASE SEE REVISE /3-A Photo by Krystle Dunham Students Samantha

Photo by Krystle Dunham

Students Samantha Gillman (left) and Elsa Ford work on an activity at Beach Middle School.

Back to school

Beach Middle School holds orientation for sixth grade students

By Krystle Dunham

Special Writer

Students entering the sixth grade at Beach Middle School may have an easier transition with the help of the school’s new mentoring program. Beach Middle School, located

at 445 Mayer Drive, held a sixth grade orientation for its stu- dents Aug. 31. The orientation introduced the students to the middle school and gave the children the opportunity to meet their eighth grade mentor that they will work with during the school year. Principal Patrick Little said the new mentoring pro- gram, which is called “Where

Everybody

CHELSEA

Belongs,”

is new this

year at the middle school. The idea behind the program is to help elemen- tary school students make an easier transition to middle school with help from a mentor. Each sixth grade student will receive a WEB mentor that they will be able to go to for help and support throughout the school year. “We’re just trying to tackle the problem head on,” Little said. This is the first year that Beach Middle School will now

This is the first year that Beach Middle School will now Photo by Krystle Dunham Eighth

Photo by Krystle Dunham

Eighth grade mentor Michael Wheeler (left) plays a game with sixth grade student Brady Friss (far right) as sixth grade stu- dents Joshua Wilkerson (middle left), Samantha Gillman, Cody Friday and Elsa Ford watch.

teach sixth grade through eighth grade. The change has occurred due to the closing of Pierce Lake Elementary School last year. Little said in order for an eighth grade student to become a mentor they had to apply by filling out an appli- cation and writing an essay on themselves that provided details on the school activities they are involved in and what extracurricular activities they do outside of school. From the group of students that applied, eighth grade math teacher Brian Boos, eighth grade English teacher Kathryn McCalla and Little determined

which students would be men- tors for the school year. “We were looking for a diverse group,” Little said. “We wanted them to all be able to relate to the students. “They all have good people skills and that’s what we want- ed.” There were 44 students picked as mentors who were trained for two days prior to orientation. Two mentors, a boy and a girl, will have eight students to work with for the school year. “At this age boys relate to

PLEASE SEE SCHOOL /3-A

Weave the Web:

Make sure to click on www. heritage.com around the clock for the most in-depth coverage of Washtenaw County. Our “Most Viewed” story this week is “U-M foot- ball: Can we just enjoy this victory?”

Check out our video:

Medical marijuana round-

table discussion at Heritage

Newspapers.

Washtenaw County has

high census survey participa- tion.

Washtenaw County has high census survey participa- tion. Connect with Yahoo’s Hot Jobs: Click on the

Connect with Yahoo’s Hot Jobs:

Click on the “jobs” tab on the home page of our Web site or go directly to http:// jobs.heritage.com.

Join us on Twitter:

Become a Chelsea Standard follower. Click on the Twitter tab on the home page of our Web site or go directly to http://twitter.com/ ChelseaDexter.

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The Marketplace:

Local ads are just a hop away at the MIcentral.com marketplace. While you are there, you can check out all the special supplements of Journal Register Co. newspa- pers in Michigan. Click on “marketplace” on the home page of our Web site or go directly to www. marketplace.micentral.com/

INDEX Editorial Page 8 Community Section C Calendar Page 3-C Obituaries Page 10-A Sports Page
INDEX
Editorial
Page 8
Community
Section C
Calendar
Page 3-C
Obituaries
Page 10-A
Sports
Page 1-B
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