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Project Guide
for Marine Plants
Engine L 58/64
Status: 02.2008
MAN Diesel SE
Stadtbachstr. 1
D-86224 Augsburg
Phone: +49-821-322-0
Telefax: +49-821-322-3382
e-mail: marineengines-de@mandiesel.com
Internet: www.mandiesel.com
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Our Project Guides provide customers and consultants with information and data for planning
plants incorporating four-stroke engines from the current MAN Diesel programme. On account of
the modifications associated with upgrading, the contents of the specific edition will remain valid for
a limit of time only.
For concrete projects you will receive the latest editions in each case with our quotation specifica-
tion or with the documents for order processing.
You can also find the latest updates on our homepage www.mandiesel.com under
"Products - Marine Power - Medium speed - Project Guides."
© MAN Diesel SE
Reproduction permitted provided source is given.
Content
Content - 1 58/64
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Table of Content
Table of Content...................................................................... 1
1 Basic information ............................................................... 1 - 1
1.1 Marine plants by MAN Diesel............................................................................... 1 - 3
1.1.1 Four stroke Diesel engine programme for marine applications.......................... 1 - 3
1.1.2 Typical marine plants and engine arrangements................................................ 1 - 4
2 Diesel engine and operation............................................... 2 - 1
2.1 Diesel engines - general rules.............................................................................. 2 - 3
2.1.1 General data ....................................................................................................... 2 - 3
2.1.1.1 Available outputs .............................................................................. 2 - 3
2.1.1.2 Load reduction ................................................................................. 2 - 7
2.1.1.3 Part-load operation ........................................................................... 2 - 9
2.1.1.4 Programme for works test of four-stroke marine engines .............. 2 - 11
2.1.1.5 Speed control ................................................................................. 2 - 13
2.1.1.6 Condensate amount ....................................................................... 2 - 15
2.1.1.7 Earthing measures on Diesel engines and bearing insulation
on generators 2 - 17
2.1.1.8 Torsional vibrations ......................................................................... 2 - 19
2.1.2 Propeller operation ........................................................................................... 2 - 23
2.1.2.1 Controllable-pitch propeller; operating range ................................ 2 - 23
2.1.2.2 General requirements for propeller pitch control ............................ 2 - 25
2.1.2.3 Fixed-pitch propeller ....................................................................... 2 - 29
2.1.2.4 Engine running-in ............................................................................ 2 - 31
2.1.2.5 Acceleration times .......................................................................... 2 - 35
2.1.3 Diesel electric operation ................................................................................... 2 - 39
2.1.3.1 Load application for shipboard- and isolated electrical systems ... 2 - 39
2.1.3.2 Available outputs dependent on frequency deviations .................. 2 - 41
2.1.3.3 Engine running-in ......................................................................... 2 - 43
2.1.3.4 Starting conditions for Diesel-electric marine plants ...................... 2 - 47
2.1.3.5 Diesel-electric operation of vessels - failure of one engine ............ 2 - 51
2.1.3.6 Generator - reverse power protection ............................................ 2 - 53
2.2 Engine characteristic data L 58/64 .................................................................... 2 - 55
2.2.1 Engine design ................................................................................................... 2 - 55
2.2.1.1 Engine cross section ....................................................................... 2 - 55
2.2.1.2 Engine designations - Design parameters ...................................... 2 - 57
2.2.2 Dimensions, weights and views ....................................................................... 2 - 59
Content
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2.2.3 Outputs, speeds ............................................................................................... 2 - 61
2.2.3.1 Engine ratings ................................................................................. 2 - 61
2.2.3.2 Speeds/Main data ........................................................................... 2 - 61
2.2.4 Fuel oil consumption; lube oil consumption..................................................... 2 - 63
2.2.4.1 Fuel oil consumption ....................................................................... 2 - 63
2.2.4.2 Lube oil consumption ..................................................................... 2 - 64
2.2.5 Planning data.................................................................................................... 2 - 65
2.2.5.1 Nominal values for cooler specification ......................................... 2 - 65
2.2.5.2 Temperature basis, nominal air and exhaust gas data ................ 2 - 66
2.2.5.3 Load specific values at tropical conditions .................................... 2 - 67
2.2.5.4 Load specific values at lSO conditions .......................................... 2 - 69
2.2.5.5 Filling volumes and flow resistances .............................................. 2 - 71
2.2.5.6 Operating pressures ....................................................................... 2 - 72
2.2.6 Emissions.......................................................................................................... 2 - 73
2.2.6.1 Composition of exhaust gas of medium speed
four-stroke Diesel engines 2 - 73
2.2.6.2 Exhaust gas emission ..................................................................... 2 - 75
2.2.6.3 Engine noise / intake noise / exhaust gas noise ............................. 2 - 77
2.2.7 Requirement for power drive connection (staticl.............................................. 2 - 81
2.2.8 Requirements for power drive connection (dynamicl ....................................... 2 - 83
2.2.8.1 Moments of inertia, flywheels ........................................................ 2 - 83
2.2.8.2 Balancing of masses ....................................................................... 2 - 85
2.2.8.3 Static torque fluctuation ................................................................. 2 - 87
2.2.9 Power transmission .......................................................................................... 2 - 91
2.2.9.1 Flywheel arrangement ..................................................................... 2 - 91
2.2.10 Attached pumps ............................................................................................... 2 - 95
2.2.11 Foundation....................................................................................................... 2 - 97
2.2.11.1 General requirements for engine foundation .................................. 2 - 97
2.2.11.2 Rigid seating ................................................................................... 2 - 99
2.2.11.3 Chocking with synthetic resin ....................................................... 2 - 103
2.2.11.4 Resilient seating ............................................................................ 2 - 107
2.2.11.5 Recommended configuration of foundation ................................. 2 - 109
2.2.11.6 lnstallation of flexible pipe connections for
resiliently mounted engines 2 - 111
2.3 Engine automation........................................................................................... 2 - 115
2.3.1 System overview............................................................................................. 2 - 115
2.3.2 Supply and distribution................................................................................... 2 - 117
2.3.3 SaCoS ........................................................................................................... 2 - 119
2.3.4 Temperature control ...................................................................................... 2 - 123
2.3.5 lnterfaces ..................................................................................................... 2 - 125
2.3.6 Technical data ............................................................................................... 2 - 127
2.3.7 lnstallation requirements ............................................................................... 2 - 129
2.3.8 Standard list of engine-located measuring and control devices.................... 2 - 131
2.3.9 OvERRlDE function ....................................................................................... 2 - 141
Content
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3 Quality requirements of operating supplies ....................... 3 - 1
3.1 Quality of lube oil (SAE40l for operation on gas oil and
Diesel oil (MGO/MDOl and Biofuel 3 - 3
3.2 Quality of lube oil (SAE40l for heavy fuel oil operation (HFOl .............................. 3 - 7
3.3 Quality of engine cooling water ......................................................................... 3 - 13
3.4 Checking cooling water ..................................................................................... 3 - 21
3.5 Cleaning cooling water ...................................................................................... 3 - 23
3.6 Quality of Marine Diesel Fuel (MDOl .................................................................. 3 - 27
3.7 Quality of gas oil/Diesel fuel (MGOl .................................................................. 3 - 29
3.8 Quality of Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl ......................................................................... 3 - 31
3.9 Quality of intake air (combustion airl ................................................................. 3 - 43
3.10 viscosity-Temperature (vTl diagram of fuel oil .................................................. 3 - 45
4 Diesel electric set ............................................................... 4 - 1
4.1 Arrangement of Diesel-electric propulsion plants................................................ 4 - 3
5 Propulsion train .................................................................. 5 - 1
5.1 Propulsion packages ........................................................................................... 5 - 3
5.1.1 General ............................................................................................................... 5 - 3
5.1.2 Dimensions ......................................................................................................... 5 - 4
5.1.3 Propeller layout data........................................................................................... 5 - 7
5.1.4 Propeller clearance............................................................................................. 5 - 9
6 Engine related service systems.......................................... 6 - 1
6.1 Basic principles for pipe selection....................................................................... 6 - 3
6.1.1 Pipe dimensioning .............................................................................................. 6 - 3
6.2 Lube oil system.................................................................................................... 6 - 1
6.2.1 Lube oil system description................................................................................ 6 - 1
6.2.2 Prelubrication / postlubrication .......................................................................... 6 - 7
6.2.3 Lube oil outlets - general .................................................................................... 6 - 9
6.2.4 Lube oil service tank......................................................................................... 6 - 13
6.2.5 Pressure control valve ...................................................................................... 6 - 17
6.2.6 Crankcase vent and tank vent .......................................................................... 6 - 19
Content
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6.3 Water systems ................................................................................................... 6 - 21
6.3.1 Cooling water system....................................................................................... 6 - 21
6.3.2 Cooling water diagrams.................................................................................... 6 - 29
6.3.3 Nozzle cooling system...................................................................................... 6 - 35
6.3.4 Nozzle cooling water module ........................................................................... 6 - 37
6.3.5 Cleaning systems ............................................................................................. 6 - 39
6.3.5.1 Cleaning charge air cooler air side; 40/54, 48/60B, 58/64 ............. 6 - 41
6.3.5.2 Option Ultrasonic cleaning ............................................................. 6 - 43
6.3.5.3 Turbine washing device, HFO-operation ........................................ 6 - 47
6.4 Fuel oil system................................................................................................... 6 - 49
6.4.1 Marine Diesel Oil (MDOl treatment system ..................................................... 6 - 49
6.4.2 MDO supply system for Diesel engines............................................................ 6 - 51
6.4.3 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl treatment system ........................................................... 6 - 53
6.4.4 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl supply system................................................................ 6 - 57
6.4.5 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl supply system - twin engine plant ................................. 6 - 67
6.5 Compressed air system..................................................................................... 6 - 71
6.5.1 Starting air system............................................................................................ 6 - 71
6.5.2 Starting air vessels, compressors .................................................................... 6 - 75
6.5.2.1 Propulsion plant with 1 main engine ............................................... 6 - 76
6.5.2.2 Multiple engine plants ..................................................................... 6 - 77
6.5.3 Jet Assist .......................................................................................................... 6 - 79
6.6 Combustion air................................................................................................... 6 - 81
6.7 Exhaust gas system........................................................................................... 6 - 83
6.7.1 General informations ........................................................................................ 6 - 83
6.7.2 Components and assemblies........................................................................... 6 - 85
7 Auxiliary modules and system components....................... 7 - 1
7.1 Auxiliary modules................................................................................................. 7 - 3
7.1.1 Nozzle cooling water module ............................................................................. 7 - 3
7.1.2 Preheating modul ............................................................................................... 7 - 4
7.2 System components............................................................................................ 7 - 5
7.2.1 Lube oil automatic filter ..................................................................................... 7 - 5
7.2.2 Lube oil double filter ........................................................................................... 7 - 6
8 Plant service systems......................................................... 8 - 1
8.1 Engine room ventilation ....................................................................................... 8 - 3
Content
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9 Engine room planning ........................................................ 9 - 1
9.1 lnstallation and arrangement ............................................................................... 9 - 3
9.1.1 General details.................................................................................................... 9 - 3
9.1.2 lnstallation drawings........................................................................................... 9 - 5
9.1.3 Removal of piston and cylinder liner .................................................................. 9 - 9
9.1.4 3D engine viewer -
a support program to configure the engine room 9 - 11
9.1.5 Lifting appliance ............................................................................................... 9 - 15
9.1.6 Major spare parts.............................................................................................. 9 - 19
9.1.7 Example: propulsion system arrangement ....................................................... 9 - 23
9.2 Exhaust gas ducting .......................................................................................... 9 - 25
9.2.1 Example: ducting arrangement ........................................................................ 9 - 25
9.2.2 Position of the outlet casing of the turbocharger ............................................. 9 - 27
lndex......................................................................................... l
Content
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Page 1 - 1
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1 Basic information
Page 1 - 2
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Basic information
Four stroke Diesel engine programme for marine applications
Status 08/2006 58/64 Page 1 - 3
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1.1 Marine plants by MAN Diesel
1.1.1 Four stroke Diesel engine programme for marine applications
Figure 1-1 MAN Diesel engine programme
Basic information
Typical marine plants and engine arrangements
Page 1 - 4 58/64 Status 08/2006
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1.1.2 Typical marine plants and engine arrangements
Figure 1-2 Ferries
Basic information
Typical marine plants and engine arrangements
Status 08/2006 58/64 Page 1 - 5
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Figure 1-3 Ferry: propelled by 4 x 8L 58/64, total output 44.5 MW
Basic information
Typical marine plants and engine arrangements
Page 1 - 6 58/64 Status 08/2006
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Figure 1-4 Cruising vessel
Basic information
Typical marine plants and engine arrangements
Status 08/2006 58/64 Page 1 - 7
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Figure 1-5 Cruising vessel: Diesel-electric propulsion plant with 3 x 6L 58/64 and 3 x 7L 58/64, total output 50.7 MW
Basic information
Typical marine plants and engine arrangements
Page 1 - 8 58/64 Status 08/2006
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Figure 1-6 Cruising vessel: 2 x 9L 58/64 and 2 x 6L 58/64 with 39.8 MW boards main supply
Basic information
Typical marine plants and engine arrangements
Status 08/2006 58/64 Page 1 - 9
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Figure 1-7 Tanker re-engined from steam to Diesel: 2 x 8L 58/64 MHl - MAN Diesel engines, total output 19.4 MW
Basic information
Typical marine plants and engine arrangements
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Figure 1-8 Chemical tanker: propelled by 1 x 6L 58/64; output 7,440 kW at 400 rpm
Basic information
Typical marine plants and engine arrangements
Status 08/2006 58/64 Page 1 - 11
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Figure 1-9 Container: propelled by 1 x 7L 58/64, output 9,730 kW at 428 rpm
Basic information
Typical marine plants and engine arrangements
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Figure 1-10 RoRo vessel: propulsion 2 x 9L 58/64, total output 25 MW
Page 2 - 1
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2 Diesel engine and operation
Page 2 - 2
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Diesel engine and operation
2.1.1 General data
Status 11/2007 Page 2 - 3
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2.1 Diesel engines - general rules
2.1.1 General data
2.1.1.1 Available outputs
Table 2-1 Available outputs / related reference conditions
1l
Blocking of the output for engines, driving a generator, at 110% of the rated output. Overload >100% may only be run
for a short time to compensate for a frequency drop when a load is applied
2l
Special turbocharger matching required - additional fuel consumption necessary
t
r
Air temperature at blower intake
t
cr
Cooling water temperature before charge air cooler
p
r
Barometric pressure
Available outputs/
related reference conditions

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% % % °C -
Electricity generation
Auxiliary engines in ships 100 110 - 45/38 1l
Marine main engines (with mechanical or Diesel electric drivel
Main drive with fixed-pitch propeller for
engines 40/54, 48/60B, 58/64
90 90 10 45/38 2l
Main drive with fixed-pitch propeller for
engine 32/40
96 96 10 45/38 2l
Main drive with fixed-pitch propeller for
engine 32/44CR
100 100 10 45/38 2l
Main drive with fixed-pitch propeller for
engine v 28/33D
100 100 10 45/40 -
Main drive with controllable pitch propeller 100 100 - 45/38 -
Main drive generator 100 110 - 45/38 1l
Suction dredger/pumps (mechanical drivel
6L - 9L, 12v, 14v, 16v, 18v 32/40 90 90 30 45/38 2l
6L - 10L, 12v, 14v, 16v, 18v 32/44CR 90 90 30 45/38 2l
20v 32/44CR 90 90 23 45/38 2l
40/54, 48/60B, 58/64 90 90 30 45/38 2l
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.1 General data
Page 2 - 4 Status 11/2007
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Diesel engine and operation
2.1.1 General data
Status 01/2005 Page 2 - 5
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De-rating for marine engines
A load reduction is not necessary as long as the
temperatures specified for the reference condi-
tion "tropical" are not exceeded.

lf the above-mentioned temperatures are ex-
ceeded, the rating has to be corrected as fol-
lows:
P
0
Nominal output according to table of ratings
a Correction factor for ambient conditions
f
D
Correction factor for speed reduction at full torque; for
suction dredger and pumps ( f
D
= 0.9 l
T
x
Ambient air temperature [Kì being considered ( 273+t
x
l
T
cx
Water temperature [Kì inlet charge air cooler
(LT-stagel being considered ( 273+t
cx
l
T Temperature in Kelvin [Kì
t Temperature in degree Celsius [°Cì
Reference Conditions: Tropical
Air temperature
°C
45
Cooling water temperature before
charge air cooler (LT-stagel
1l
38
Air pressure bar 1
P = P
o
* a * ( f
D
l
a = ( 318/T
x
l
1.2
* ( 311/T
cx
* 1.09 l - 0.09
a ≤ 1
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.1 General data
Page 2 - 6 Status 01/2005
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Diesel engine and operation
2.1.1 General data
Status 07/2005 Page 2 - 7
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2.1.1.2 Load reduction
Sudden load throw-off
For the sudden load throw-off from 100% P
Nominal
to 0% P
Nominal
, there are certain requirements on
the part of the classification societies with regard
to the dynamic and permanent speed change (see
Chapter 2.1.3 "Diesel electric operation", Page
2-39l, which are to be met by the engines / the
units.
The sudden load throw-off represents a rather
exceptional situation and corresponds to open-
ing the generator switch of a Diesel-electric
plant.
Care is to be taken that, after a sudden load
throw-off, the system circuits remain in opera-
tion for a minimum of 15 min. to dissipate the re-
sidual engine heat.
Recommended load reduction / stopping the
engine
√ Unloading the engine
ln principle, there are no regulations with re-
gard to unloading the engine. However, a
minimum of 1 min. is recommended for un-
loading the engine from 100% P
Nominal
to ap-
prox. 25% P
Nominal
.
√ Engine stop
As from 25% P
Nominal
, further engine unload-
ing is possible, without interruption, and af-
terwards the engine can be stopped.
√ Run-down cooling
ln order to dissipate the residual engine heat,
the system circuits should be kept in opera-
tion for a minimum of 15 min.
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.1 General data
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Diesel engine and operation
2.1.1 General data
Status 04/2003 Page 2 - 9
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2.1.1.3 Part-load operation
Definition
Generally the following load conditions are dif-
ferentiated:
√ Over-load (for regulationl:
>100% of full load output
√ Full-load: 100% of full load output
√ Part-load: <100% of full load output
√ Low-load: <25% of full load output
Correlations
The ideal operating conditions for the engine
prevail under even loading at 60% to 90% of the
full-load output. Engine control and rating of all
systems are based on the full-load output.
ln the idling mode or during low-load engine op-
eration, combustion in the cylinders is not ideal.
Deposits may form in the combustion chamber,
which result in a higher soot emission and an in-
crease of cylinder contamination.
Moreover, in low-load operation and during ma-
noeuvrung of ships, the cooling water tempera-
tures cannot be regulated optimally high for all
load conditions which, however, is of particular
importance during operation on heavy fuel oil.
Better conditions
Engines are genuinely better equipped for low-
load operation
√ if they have a two-stage charge-air cooler, the
second stage of which can be switched off in
order to improve the operating data or
√ if they have a two-stage charge-air cooler
and switch-over from HT to LT has been pro-
vided for, permitting the admission of HT wa-
ter to the LT stage.
HT: High temperature
LT: Low temperature
Operation on heavy fuel oil
Because of the aforementioned reasons, low-
load operation <20% of full load output on
heavy fuel oil is subjected to certain limitations.
According to Figure 2-1, Page 2-10, the engine
must, after a phase of part-load operation, either
be switched over to Diesel operation or be oper-
ated at high load (>70% of full load outputl for a
certain period of time in order to reduce the de-
posits in the cylinder and exhaust gas turbo-
charger again.
ln case the engine is to be operated at low-load
for a period exceeding that shown in Figure 2-1,
Page 2-10, the engine is to be switched over to
Diesel oil operation beforehand.
For continuous heavy fuel oil operation at part
loads in the range <25% of the full engine out-
put, co-ordination with MAN Diesel is absolutely
necessary.
Operation on Diesel fuel
For low-load operation on Diesel fuel oil, the fol-
lowing rules apply:
√ A continuous operation below 15% of full
load is to be avoided, if possible.
Note!
Should this be absolutely necessary, MAN Die-
sel has to be consulted for special arrangements
(e.g. the use of part-load injection nozzlesl.
√ A no-load operation, especially at nominal
speed (generator operationl is only permitted
for a maximum period of 1...2 hours
No limitations are required for loads above 15%
of full load, as long as the specified operating
data of the engine will not be exceeded.
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.1 General data
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Figure 2-1 Time limits for part-load operation on heavy fuel oil (on the leftl, duration of “relieving operation“(on the rightl
P Full load output [%ì t Operating period [hì
Explanations
√ Figure on the left:
Time limits for part-load operation on heavy
fuel oil
√ Figure on the right:
Necessary operation time at >70% of full-
load output after part-load operation on
heavy fuel oil.
Note!
Acceleration time from present output to 70% of
full-load output not less than 15 minutes.
Example
Line a:
At 10% of full-load output, HFO operation is per-
missible for maximum 19 hours, then switch
over to Diesel fuel oil, or
Line b:
Operate the engine for approx. 1.2 hours at not
less than 70% of full-load output to burn away
the deposits that have formed. Subsequently,
part-load operation on heavy fuel oil can be con-
tinued.
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.1 General data
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2.1.1.4 Programme for works test of four-stroke marine engines
The following table shows the operating points to be considered during acceptance test run.
Table 2-2 Test conditions of 4-stroke Marine diesel engines
1l
Two service recordings at an interval of 30 min.
3l
could be replaced by MCR loadpoint 85%
4l
replacement for
3l
ABS = American Bureau of Shipping
DNv = Det Norske veritas
GL = Germanischer Lloyd
lACS = lnternational Association of
Classification Societies
lBv = Bureau veritas
JG = Japanese government
LR = Lloyd's Register of Shipping
M = Measurement at a steady state
NK = Nippon Kaiji Kyokai
RlNa = Registro ltaliano Navale
The selection of the measuring points and the
measuring method are fixed in accordance with
lSO Standard 3046-1 and the specifications of
the classification societies.
The execution of the test run according to this
guideline will be confirmed in writing by the cus-
tomer or his representative, by the authorised
representative of the classification society and
by the person in charge of the tests.
After the test run, the components will be in-
spected, as far as this is possible without disas-
sembly. Only in exceptional cases (e.g. if
required by the customer/the classification soci-
etyl, will components be dismantled.
The works test will be accomplished with MGO
or MDO. Heavy fuel oil is not available at the se-
rial test beds.
Operating points ABS Bv DNv GL LR RlNa
JG
(NKl
lACS
MAN Diesel
programme
with accept-
ance by classi-
fication society
A
l
l

e
n
g
i
n
e
s
Starting attempts
Governor test
Operational test of
the attached
safety devices
X
X
X
X
X
X
--
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
M
a
r
i
n
e

m
a
i
n

e
n
g
i
n
e
s
Continuous rating
(MCRl
Speed: according to propeller curve or constant
100%
1l
110%
90%
85%
75%
50%
25%
Low speed and/or
idling
60'
30'
M
--
M
M
M
M
60'
30'
M
--
M
M
M
M
30'
30'
M
3l
M
4l
M
3l
M
--
--
60'
30'
M
--
M
M
M
M
60'
30'
M
--
M
M
M
M
60'
30'
M
--
M
M
M
M
20' (60'l
20' (30'l
--
--
20' (30'l
20' (30'l
20' (30'l
--
60'
30-45'
M
--
M
M
M
M
60'
30'
30'
3l
30'
4l
30'
30'
30'
30'
M
a
r
i
n
e

a
u
x
.

e
n
g
i
n
e
s
Continuous
rating
Constant speed
100%
1l
110%
75%
50%
25%
idling = 0%
60'
30'
M
M
M
M
60'
30'
M
M
M
M
30'
30'
M
M
--
--
60'
30'
M
M
M
M
60'
30'
M
M
M
M
60'
30'
M
M
M
M
20'(60'l
20'(30'l
20'(30'l
20'(30'l
20'(--l
--
60'
30'
M
M
M
M
60'
30'
30'
30'
30'
30'
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.1 General data
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Diesel engine and operation
2.1.1 General data
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2.1.1.5 Speed control
All specifications are valid for marine applica-
tions, i.e. for both marine main and auxiliary en-
gines.
Table 2-3 Specified governors
Speed adjustment
Electronic governor:
Remote control by raise/lower contacts or
4-20 mA signal.
Mechanical governor:
Speed adjustment manually on the governor or
by pneumatic / electric remote control.
Speed adjusting range
The following specification represents the
standard settings. For special applications, de-
viating settings may be necessary.
Engine type Specified governor Only in special cases
v 28/33D Electronic governor SaCoS
one
-
L 32/40
Electronic governor Heinzmann
Mechanical-hydraulic governor Woodward or
Regulateurs Europe
v 32/40 -
L 32/44CR -
L 40/54
Electronic governor Woodward Mechanical-hydraulic governor Woodward L+v 48/60(Bl
L 58/64
Drive Speed droop
Maximum
speed at full
load
Maximum
speed at idle
running
Minimum
speed
M
e
c
h
a
n
i
c
a
l

g
o
v
e
r
n
o
r
s
1 main engine with controlla-
ble-pitch propeller and with-
out PTO
3% 100.5% 103.5% 60%
1 main engine with controlla-
ble-pitch propeller and with
PTO
3% 100.5% 103.5% 60%
Parallel operation of 2 engines
driving 1 shaft with/without
PTO
5% 100.5% 105.5% 60%
Gensets/Diesel electric plants 5% 103% 108% 60%
Fixed-pitch propeller plants 5% 106% - 30%
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.1 General data
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Table 2-4 Mechanical / electronic governors
Load distribution - multi engine and master
slave plants
With mechanical governors, by the speed
droop.
With electronic governors, by speed droop iso-
chronously by loadsharing lines or master/slave
operation.
Shut-down
With mechanical/backup governors by shut-
down solenoid.
Shut-down is effected when energised.
With electronic governors, the shut-down is ef-
fected by an electrical contact.
Load limit curves
With electronic governors:
√ Start fuel limiter
√ Charge-air pressure dependent fuel limiter
√ Torque limiter
√ Jump-rate limiter
With mechanical governors:
√ Start fuel limiter
√ Charge-air pressure dependent fuel limiter
Remarks
ln the case of controllable-pitch propeller units
with combinator mode, the combinator curves
must be sent to MAN Diesel in the design stage
for assessment. lf load control systems of the
C.P. propeller supplier are used, the load control
curve is to be sent to MAN Diesel in order to
check whether it is below the load limit curve of
the engine.
E
l
e
c
t
r
o
n
i
c

g
o
v
e
r
n
o
r
s
1 main engine with controlla-
ble-pitch propeller and with-
out PTO
0% 100.5% 100.5% 60%
1 main engine with controlla-
ble-pitch propeller and with
PTO
0% 100.5% 100.5% 60%
Parallel operation of 2 engines
driving 1 shaft with/without
PTO:
Conventional or 5% 100.5% 105.5% 60%
Master/slave operation 0% 100.5% 100.5% 60%
Gensets/Diesel electric plants:
with PMS or 5% 100.5% 105.5% 60%
lsochronous operation 0% 100.5% 100.5% 60%
Fixed-pitch propeller plants 0% 100.5% 100.5% 30%
Note!
For single-engine plants with fixed-pitch propeller, the speed droop is of no significance.
Only if several engines drive one shaft with fixed-pitch propeller, the speed droop is relevant for the load distribution.
ln the case of electronic speed control, a speed droop of 0% is also possible during parallel operation.
Drive Speed droop
Maximum
speed at full
load
Maximum
speed at idle
running
Minimum
speed
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.1 General data
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2.1.1.6 Condensate amount
Charge-air pipes, air vessels
Figure 2-2 Diagram condensate amount
The amount of condensation water precipitated
from the air can be quite large, particularly in the
tropics, and depends of the condition of the air
drawn in, when the temperature of the charge air
in the charge-air pipes drops below the dew
point.
The volume of condensate in the air vessels is
determined by means of the curve at the bottom
right of the diagram, representing an operating
pressure of 30bar.
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.1 General data
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Determine the amount of water accumulating in the charge air pipe
Determine the amount of water condensing in the compressed air vessel
Parameter Unit value
Engine output (Pl kW 2,880
Specific air flow (lel kg/kWh 7.1
Ambient air condition (ll: Ambient air temperature
Relative air humidity
°C
%
35
90
Charge-air condition (lll: Charge-air temperature after cooler
Charge-air pressure (overpressurel
°C
bar
50
2.6
Solution acc. to above diagram:
Water content of air according to point of intersection (ll kg of water / kg of air 0.033
Maximum water content of air according to point of intersection (lll kg of water / kg of air 0.021
The difference between (ll and (lll is the condensed water amount (Al
Total amount of condensate Q
A
:
Parameter Unit value
volumetric capacity of tank (vl litre
m
3
4,000
4
Temperature of air in vessel (Tl °C
K
40
313
Overpressure in vessel (pl
Absolute pressure in tank (p
abs
l
bar
bar
30
31
31 x 10
5
Gas constant for air (Rl
287
Ambient air temperature °C 35
Relative air humidity % 90
Weight of air in the tank is calculated as follows:
Solution acc. to above diagram:
Water content of air according to point of intersection (ll kg of water / kg of air 0.033
Maximum water content of air according to point of intersection (llll kg of water / kg of air 0.002
The difference between (ll and (llll is the condensed water amount (Bl
Total amount of condensate in the vessel Q
B
:
Q
B
= 138 * 0.031 = 4.28 kg
A l ll – 0.033 0.021 – 0.012 kg of water / kg of air = = =
Q
A
A le × P × =
Q
A
0.012 7.1 × 2880 × 245.4 kg/h = =
N
m
2
-------
Nm
kgxK
--------------
m
p v ×
R T ×
-------------
31 10
5
× 4 ×
287 313 ×
------------------------------ 138 kg = = =
B l lll – =
B 0.033 0.002 – 0.031 kg of water / kg of air = =
Q
B
m B × =
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.1 General data
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2.1.1.7 Earthing measures on Diesel engines and bearing insulation on generators
General
The use of electrical equipment on Diesel en-
gines requires precautions to be taken for pro-
tection against shock current and for
equipotential bonding. These not only serve as
shock protection but also for functional protec-
tion of electric and electronic devices (EMC pro-
tection, device protection in case of welding,
etc.l.
Figure 2-3 Earthing connection on engine
Earthing connections on the engine
Threaded bores M12, 20 mm deep, marked with
the earthing symbol have been provided in the
engine foot on both ends of the engines.
lt has to be ensured that earthing is carried out
immediately after engine set-up! (lf this cannot
be accomplished any other way, at least provi-
sional earthing is to be effected right at the be-
ginning.l
Measures to be taken on the generator
Because of slight magnetic unbalances and ring
excitations, shaft voltages, i.e. voltages be-
tween the two shaft ends, are generated in elec-
trical machines. ln the case of considerable
values (e.g. >0.3vl, there is the risk that bearing
damage occurs due to current transfers. For this
reason, at least the bearing that is not located on
the drive end is insulated on generators approx.
>1MW. For verification, the voltage available at
the shaft (shaft voltagel is measured while the
generator is running and excited. With proper in-
sulation, a voltage can be measured. ln order to
protect the prime mover and to divert electro-
static charging, an earthing brush is often fitted
on the coupling side.
Observation of the required measures is the
generator manufacturer's responsibility.
Consequences of inadequate bearing
insulation on the generator, and insulation check
ln case the bearing insulation is inadequate,
e.g., if the bearing insulation was short-circuit by
a measuring lead (PT100, vibration sensorl,
leakage currents may occur, which result in the
destruction of the bearings. One possibility to
check the insolation with the machine at stand-
still (prior to coupling the generator to the en-
gine; this, however, is only possible in the case
of single-bearing generatorsl would be to raise
the generator rotor (insulated, in the cranel on
the coupling side, and to measure the insulation
by means of the Megger test against earth (in
this connection, the max. voltage permitted by
the generator manufacturer is to be observed!l.
lf the shaft voltage of the generator at rated
speed and rated voltage is known (e.g. from the
test record of the generator acceptance testl, it
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.1 General data
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is also possible to carry out a comparative
measurement.
lf the measured shaft voltage is lower than the
result of the “earlier measurement" (test recordl,
the generator manufacturer should be consult-
ed.
Earthing conductor
The nominal cross section of the earthing con-
ductor (equipotential bonding conductorl has to
be selected in accordance with DlN vDE 0100,
part 540 (up to 1000vl or DlN vDE 0141 (in ex-
cess of 1 Kvl.
Generally, the following applies:
The protective conductor to be assigned to the
largest main conductor is to be taken as a basis
for sizing the cross sections of the equipotential
bonding conductors.
Flexible conductors have to be used for the con-
nection of resiliently mounted engines.
Execution of earthing
On vessels, earthing must be done by the ship-
yard during assembly on board.
Earthing strips are not included in the MAN Die-
sel scope of supply.
Additional information regarding the use of
welding equipment
ln order to prevent damage on electrical compo-
nents, it is imperative to earth welding equip-
ment close to the welding area, i.e., the distance
between the welding electrode and the earthing
connection should not exceed 10 m.
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.1 General data
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2.1.1.8 Torsional vibrations
Data required for torsional vibration
calculation
MAN Diesel calculates the torsional vibrations
behaviour for each individual engine plant of
their supply to determine the location and sever-
ity of resonance points. lf necessary, appropri-
ate measures will be taken to avoid excessive
stresses due to torsional vibration. These inves-
tigations cover the ideal normal operation of the
engine (all cylinders are firing equallyl as well as
the simulated emergency operation (misfiring of
the cylinder exerting the greatest influence on vi-
brations, acting against compressionl. Besides
the natural frequencies and the modes also the
dynamic responce will be calculated, normally
under consideration of the 1
st
to 24
th
harmonic
of the gas and mass forces of the engine. Be-
yond that also further exciting sources such as
propeller, pumps etc. can be considered if the
respective manufacturer is able to make the cor-
responding data available to MAN Diesel.
lf necessary, a torsional vibration calculation will
be worked out which can be submitted for ap-
proval to a classification society or a legal au-
thority.
To carry out the torsional vibration calculation
following particulars and/or documents are re-
quired.
General
√ Type of propulsion (genset, Diesel mechanic,
Diesel-electricl
√ Arrangement of the whole propulsion system
including all engine-driven equipment
√ Definition of the operating modes
√ Maximum power consumption of the individ-
ual working machines
Engine
√ Rated output, rated speed
√ Kind of engine load (fixed-pitch propeller,
controllable-pitch propeller, combinator
curve, operation with reduced speed at ex-
cessive loadl
√ Operational speed range
√ Kind of mounting of the engine (can influence
the determination of the flexible couplingl
Flexible coupling
√ Make, size and type
√ Rated torque (Nml
√ Possible application factor
√ Maximum speed (rpml
√ Permissible maximum torque for passing
through resonance (Nml
√ Permissible shock torque for short-term
loads (Nml
√ Permanently permissible alternating torque
(Nml including influencing factors (frequency,
temperature, mean torquel
√ Permanently permissible power loss (Wl in-
cluding influencing factors (frequency, tem-
peraturel
√ Dynamic torsional stiffness (Nm/radl includ-
ing influencing factors (load, frequency, tem-
peraturel, if applicable
√ Relative damping (ψl including influencing
factors (load, frequency, temperaturel, if ap-
plicable
√ Moment of inertia (kgm²l for all parts of the
coupling
√ Dynamic stiffness in radial, axial and angular
direction
√ Permissible relative motions in radial, axial
and angular direction, permanent and maxi-
mum
√ Maximum permissible torque which can be
transferred through a get-you-home-device/
torque limiter if foreseen
Clutch coupling
√ Make, size and type
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.1 General data
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√ Rated torque (Nml
√ Permissible maximum torque (Nml
√ Permanently permissible alternating torque
(Nml including influencing factors (frequency,
temperature, mean torquel
√ Dynamic torsional stiffness (Nm/radl
√ Damping factor
√ Moments of inertia for the operation condi-
tions, clutched and declutched
√ Course of torque versus time during clutching
in
√ Permissible slip time (sl
√ Slip torque (Nml
√ Maximum permissible engagement speed
(rpml
Gearbox
√ Make and type
√ Torsional multi mass system including the
moments of inertia and the torsional stiffness,
preferably related to the individual speed; in
case of related figures, specification of the re-
lation speed is needed
√ Gear ratios (number of teeth, speedsl
√ Possible operating conditions (different gear
ratios, clutch couplingsl
√ Permissible alternating torques in the gear
meshes
Shaft line
√ Drawing including all information about
length and diameter of the shaft sections as
well as the material
√ Alternatively torsional stiffness (Nm/radl
Propeller
√ Kind of propeller (fixed-pitch or controllable-
pitch propeller
√ Moment of inertia in air (kgm²l
√ Moment of inertia in water (kgm²l; for control-
lable-pitch propellers also in dependence on
pitch; for twin-engine plants separately for
single- and twin-engine operation
√ Relation between load and pitch
√ Number of blades
√ Diameter (mml
√ Possible torsional excitation in % of the rated
torque for the 1
st
and the 2
nd
blade-pass fre-
quency
Pump
√ Kind of pump (e.g. dredging pumpl
√ Drawing of the pump shaft with all lengths
and dia-meters
√ Alternatively, torsional stiffness (Nm/radl
√ Moment of inertia in air (kgm²l
√ Moment of inertia in operation (kgm²l under
consideration of the conveyed medium
√ Number of blades
√ Possible torsional excitation in % of the rated
torque for the 1
st
and the 2
nd
blade-pass fre-
quency
√ Power consumption curve
Alternator for Diesel-electric plants
√ Drawing of the alternator shaft with all lengths
and diameters
√ Aternatively, torsional stiffness (Nm/radl
√ Moment of inertia of the parts mounted to the
shaft (kgm²l
√ Electrical output (kvAl including power factor
cosj and efficiency
√ Or mechanical output (kWl
√ Complex synchronizing coefficients for idling
and full load in dependence on frequency,
reference torque
√ lsland or parallel mode
√ Load profile (e.g. load stepsl
√ Frequency fluctuation of the net
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.1 General data
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Alternator for Diesel-mechanical parts (e.g.
PTO/PTHl
√ Drawing of the alternator shaft with all lengths
and diameters
√ Torsional stiffness, if available
√ Moments of inertia of the parts mounted to
the shaft (kgm²l
√ Electrical output (kvAl including power factor
cosj and efficiency
√ Or mechanical output (kWl
√ Complex synchronizing coefficients for idling
and full load in dependence on frequency, in-
cluding the reference torque
Secondary power take-off
√ Kind of working machine
√ Kind of drive
√ Operational mode, operation speed range
√ Power consumption
√ Drawing of the shafts with all lengths and di-
ameters
√ Aternatively, torsional stiffness (Nm/radl
√ Moments of inertia (kgm²l
√ Possible torsional excitation in size and fre-
quency in dependence on load and speed
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.1 General data
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Diesel engine and operation
2.1.2 Propeller operation
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2.1.2 Propeller operation
2.1.2.1 Controllable-pitch propeller; operating range
Figure 2-4 Operating range for controllable-pitch propeller
Rated output/operating range
MCR Maximum continuous rating
(blocked outputl
□Operating range for continuous operation
1 Load limit curve
2 Recommended combinator curve
3 Zero-thrust curve
The combinatior curve must be at a sufficient
distance from the limit curve 1. For overload pro-
tection, a load control is to be provided.
Transmission losses (e.g. by gearboxes and
shaft powerl and additional power requirements
(e.g. by PTOl must be taken into account.
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.2 Propeller operation
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2.1.2 Propeller operation
Status 04/2003 Page 2 - 25
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2.1.2.2 General requirements for propeller pitch control
Pitch control of the propeller plant
For mechanical speed governors:
4-20 mA signal from the admission teletransmit-
ter of the engine will be supplied to the propeller
control as a load indication.
For electronic speed governors:
4-20 mA signal from the electronic governor of
the engine will be supplied to the propeller con-
trol as a load indication.
General:
A distinction between constant-speed operation
and combinator-curve operation has to be en-
sured.
Combinator-curve operation:
The 4-20 mA signal has to be used for the as-
signment of the propeller pitch to the respective
engine speed. The operation curve of engine
speed and propeller pitch (for power range, see
2.1.2.1 Controllable-pitch propeller; operating
range of this documentationl has to be observed
also during acceleration/load increase and un-
loading.
Acceleration / load increase
The engine speed has to be increased prior to
increasing the propeller pitch. See the example
shown below.
Deceleration / unloading the engine
The engine speed has to be reduced later than
the propeller pitch. See the example shown be-
low.
Windmilling protection (pump admission at zero,
and engine being turned by the propellerl
Single-shaft plant
The propeller control has to take care that the
windmilling time is less than 30 sec.
Multi-shaft plant:
The propeller control has to take care that the
windmilling time is less than 30 sec.
Should, nevertheless, the windmilling time be
more than 40 sec., the respective engine has to
be disengaged.
ln case of plants without shifting clutch, it is to
be ensured that a stopped engine is not turned
by the propeller.
A shaft interlock is to be provided for each shaft
for maintenace work.
Overload / engine close to limit curve / reduction
input in propeller control (binary signall
Overload contact:
The overload contact is activated when the en-
gine fuel admission is set to maximum. At this
time, the control has to keep the propeller pitch
from increasing and, in case the signal remains
for more than an adjustable time, the propeller
pitch has to be decreased.
Operation close to the limit curves (only for elec-
tronic speed governorsl:
This contact is activated when the engine is op-
erated close to a limit curve (torque limiter,
charge air pressure limiter ...l. When the contact
is closed, the propeller control has to keep the
propeller pitch from increasing and, in case the
signal remains for more than an adjustable time,
the propeller pitch has to be decreased.
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.2 Propeller operation
Page 2 - 26 Status 04/2003
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Pitch reduction contact:
This contact is activated when disturbances in
engine operation occur, for example too high ex-
haust-gas mean-value deviation. When the con-
tact is closed, the propeller control has to
reduce the propeller pitch to 60% of the rated
engine output, without change in engine speed.
Distinction between normal manoeuvre and
emergency manoeuvre
The propeller control has to be able to distin-
guish between normal manoeuvre and emer-
gency manoeuvre (i.e., two different
acceleration curves are necessaryl.
MAN Diesel's directions concerning accelera-
tion times and power range are to be observed.
The power range according to sheet 2.1.2 Pro-
peller operation, page 2- 23 and the acceleration
times according to sheet Page 2 - 35 and
Page 2 - 37 of this documentation are to be ob-
served.
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.2 Propeller operation
Status 04/2003 Page 2 - 27
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Example for illustration of the change from one load step to another
Figure 2-5 Change from one load step to another
Changing from one power step to another
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
40 50 60 70 80 90 100
Engine speed [%]
E
n
g
i
n
e

o
u
t
p
u
t

p
o
w
e
r

[
%
]
100
T
o
r
q
u
e

M
d

[
%
]
b
m
e
p

p
e

[
%
]
90
80
70
60
50
30
40
20
10
Theoretical
propeller curve
Recommended
combinator load curve
Torque limit
min.speed
First increasing
engine speed
then increasing
propeller pitch
First decreasing
propeller pitch
then decreasing
engine speed
Or, if increasing both at
the same time, then is the
speed f aster to increase
than the pitch. The area
above the curve must not
be reached.
Or, if decreasing both at
the same time, then is the
pitch f aster to decrease
than the speed. The area
above the curve must not
be reached.
increasing
load
decreasing
load
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.2 Propeller operation
Page 2 - 28 Status 04/2003
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Diesel engine and operation
2.1.2 Propeller operation
Status 07/2005 Page 2 - 29
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2.1.2.3 Fixed-pitch propeller
Single shaft vessel
Figure 2-6 Operating range for fixed-pitch propellers
Type testing of engines is carried out at 110%
rated output and 103% rated engine speed.
Rated output:
√ MCR Maximum Continuous Rating (fuel stop
powerl
√ Range l: Operating range for Continuous
service subject to a propeller light-running of
1.5 - 3%, the lower value to be aimed for.
√ Range ll: Operating range temporarily admis-
sible e.g. during acceleration, manoeuvring
(torque limitl.
√ Theoretical propeller characteristic applies to
fully loaded vessel after a fairly long operating
time, and to possible works trial run with
zero-thrust propeller.
√ FP Design range of fixed-pitch propeller op-
erating range during sea trials under contrac-
tual conditions (such as weather, load
condition, depth of water, etc.l with the en-
gine speed range between 103% and 106%
being used for 1 hour maximum only.
The propeller design depends upon vessel type
and duty. lt is always the exclusive responsibility
of the yard to determine, on the strength of this,
the propulsive power to be installed in the ship.
When installing shaft-driven generators with fre-
quency conversion, the generator rating re-
quired apart from the propulsive power must be
deducted from the MCR. Transmission losses
(e.g. gearboxl to be made allowance for.
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.2 Propeller operation
Page 2 - 30 Status 07/2005
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Diesel engine and operation
2.1.2 Propeller operation
Status 08/2006 Page 2 - 31
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2.1.2.4 Engine running-in
Preconditions
Engines must be run in
√ during commissioning at site if, after the test
run, pistons or bearings were removed for in-
spection and/or if the engine was partly or
completely disassembled for transport,
√ on installation of new running gear compo-
nents, e.g. cylinder liners, piston rings, main
bearings, big-end bearings and piston pin
bearings,
√ on installation of used bearing shells,
√ after an extended low-load operation (> 500
operating hoursl.
Supplementary information
Adjustment required
Surface irregularities on the piston rings and the
cylinder liner running surface are smoothed out
during the running-in process. The process is
ended when the first piston ring forms a perfect
seal towards the combustion chamber, i.e. the
first piston ring exhibits an even running surface
around its entire circumference. lf the engine is
subjected to a higher load before this occurs,
the hot exhaust gases will pass between the pis-
ton rings and the cylinder liner running surface.
The film of oil will be destroyed at these loca-
tions. The consequence will be material destruc-
tion (e.g. scald marksl on the running surfaces of
the rings and the cylinder liner and increased
wear and high oil consumption during subse-
quent operation.
The duration of the running-in period is influ-
enced by a number of factors, including the con-
dition of the surface of piston rings and the
cylinder liner, the quality of the fuel and lube oil
and the loading and speed of the engine. The
running-in periods shown in Figure 2-7, Page
2-33, and Figure 2-8, Page 2-33, respectively,
are, therefore, for guidance only.
Operating media
Fuel
Diesel oil or heavy fuel oil can be used for the
running-in process. The fuel used must satisfy
the quality requirements (see Chapter 3 "Quality
requirements of operating supplies", Page 3-1l
and be appropriate for the fuel system layout.
Spark-ignited gas engines are best run in using
the gas which is to be used later on under oper-
ating conditions. Dual-fuel engines are run-in in
Diesel mode using the fuel oil that will later be
used as pilot oil.
Lubricating oil
The lubricating oil to be used while running in the
engine must satisfy the quality requirements
(see Chapter 3 "Quality requirements of operat-
ing supplies", Page 3-1l relating to the relevant
fuel quality.
Caution!
The lube oil system is to be rinsed out before fill-
ing it for the first time (see MAN Diesel Work
Card 000.03l.
Running-in the engine
Cylinder lubrication
During the entire running-in process, the cylin-
der lubrication is to be switched to the “Run-
ning-in" mode. This is done at the control
cabinet and/or the operator's panel and causes
the cylinder lubrication to be activated over the
entire load range already when the engine is
started. The increased oil supply has a favoura-
ble effect on the running-in of the piston rings
and pistons. After completion of the running-in
process, the cylinder lubrication is to be
switched back to “Normal Mode".
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.2 Propeller operation
Page 2 - 32 Status 08/2006
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Checks
During running-in, the bearing temperature and
crankcase are to be checked
√ for the first time after 10 minutes of operation
at minimum speed,
√ again after operational output levels have
been reached.
The bearing temperatures (camshaft bearings,
big-end and main bearingsl are to be measured
and compared with those of the neighbouring
bearings. For this purpose, an electric tracer-
type thermometer can be used as measuring
device.
At 85% load and on reaching operational output
levels, the operating data (firing pressures, ex-
haust gas temperatures, charge air pressure,
etc.l are to be checked and compared with the
acceptance record.
Standard running-in programme
Marine engines for propeller plants (operation at
variable speedl. Running-in can be carried out
with a fixed-pitch , controllable-pitch, or zero-
thrust-pitch propeller. During the entire running-
in period, the engine output is to remain within
the output range that has been marked in Figure
2-7, Page 2-33 and Figure 2-8, Page 2-33, resp.
Critical speed ranges are to be avoided.
Running-in during commissioning at site
Four-stroke engines are, with a few exceptions,
always subject to a test run in the manufactur-
er's works, so that the engine has been run in, as
a rule. Nevertheless, repeated running is re-
quired after assembly at the final place of instal-
lation if pistons or bearings were removed for
inspection after the test run or if the engine was
partly or completely disassembled for transpor-
tation.
Running-in after installation of new running gear
components
ln case cylinder liners, pistons and/or piston
rings are replaced on the occasion of overhaul
work, the engine has to be run in again. Run-
ning-in is also required if the rings have been re-
placed on one piston only. Running-in is to be
carried out according to Figure 2-7, Page 2-33
and Figure 2-8, Page 2-33, and/or the pertinent
explanations.
The cylinder liner requires rehoning according to
MAN Diesel Work Card 050.05 unless it is re-
placed. A portable honing device can be ob-
tained from one of our service bases.
Running-in after refitting used or installing new
bearing shells (main bearing, big-end and piston
pin bearingsl
lf used bearing shells were refitted or new bear-
ing shells installed, the respective bearings will
have to be run in. The running-in period should
be 3 to 5 hours, applying load in stages. The re-
marks in the previous paragraphs, especially un-
der "Checks", as well as Figure 2-7, Page 2-33
and Figure 2-8, Page 2-33, resp., are to be ob-
served.
ldling at high speed over an extended period is
to be avoided, wherever possible.
Running-in after low-load operation
Continuous operation in the low-load range may
result in heavy internal contamination of the en-
gine. Combustion residues from the fuel and lu-
bricating oil may deposit on the top-land ring of
the piston, in the ring grooves and possibly also
in the inlet ducts. Besides, the charge air and ex-
haust piping, the charge air cooler, the turbo-
charger and the exhaust gas boiler may become
oily.
Since the piston rings will also have adapted
themselves to the cylinder liner according to the
loads they have been subjected to, accelerating
the engine too quickly will result in increased
wear and possibly cause other types of engine
damage (piston ring blow-by, piston seizurel.
After prolonged low-load operation (≥500 opera-
tion hoursl, the engine should therefore be run in
again, starting from the output level, at which it
has been operated, in accordance with Figure 2-
7, Page 2-33 and Figure 2-8, Page 2-33.
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.2 Propeller operation
Status 08/2006 Page 2 - 33
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Please also refer to the notes in Chapter 2.1.1.3
"Part-load operation", Page 2-9.
Note!
For additional information, the after-sales serv-
ice department of MAN Diesel or of the license
will be at your disposal.
A Controllable-pitch propel-
ler (engine speedl
B Fixed-pitch propeller
(engine speedl
C Engine output (specified
rangel
D Running-in period in [hì
E Engine speed and output in
[%ì
Figure 2-7 Standard running-in programme for marine propulsion engines (variable speedl of the 32/40, 32/44CR
engine type
A Controllable-pitch propel-
ler (engine speedl
B Fixed-pitch propeller
(engine speedl
C Engine output (specified
rangel
D Running-in period in [hì
E Engine speed and output in
[%ì
Figure 2-8 Standard running-in programme for marine propulsion engines (variable speedl of the 40/54, 48/60B,
58/64 engine types
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.2 Propeller operation
Page 2 - 34 Status 08/2006
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Diesel engine and operation
2.1.2 Propeller operation
Status 03/1993 Page 2 - 35
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2.1.2.5 Acceleration times
Acceleration times for fixed-pitch and
controllable pitch-propeller plants
Notes on design
For remote controlled propeller drives for ships
with unmanned or centrally monitored engine-
room operation, a load programme is to be pro-
vided for the engines. Within the scope of the re-
mote control system (for the pitch adjustment of
the controllable pitch propeller or reversing and
load application of the enginel.
This programme serves to protect the pre-heat-
ed engine(sl (lube oil temperature ≥40°C and
fresh water temperature ≥60°Cl against exces-
sive thermal stresses, increased wear and ex-
haust gas turbidity, when the engines are loaded
for the first time - possibly up to the rated out-
put.
ln case of a manned engine room, the engine
room personnel are responsible for the soft
loading sequence, before control is handed over
to the bridge.
The lower time limits for normal and emergency
manoeuvres are given in our diagrams for appli-
cation and shedding of load. We strongly recom-
mend that the limits for normal manoeuvring is
observed during normal operation, to achieve
trouble-free engine operation on a long-term
basis. An automatic change-over to a shortened
load programme is required for emergency ma-
noeuvres.
The final design of the programme should be
jointly determined by all the parties involved,
considering the demands for manoeuvring and
the actual service capacity.
Please note that the time constants for the dy-
namic behaviour of the prime mover and the
vessel have a ratio of about 1:100, from which it
can be seen that demands for an extremely
short load application - wrongly believed to be
possible given the speed with which the propel-
ler pitch can be set - generally do not produce
an improvement in ship behaviour during ma-
noeuvring (except for tugs and small, fast ves-
selsl.
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.2 Propeller operation
Page 2 - 36 Status 03/1993
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Diesel engine and operation
2.1.2 Propeller operation
Status 08/1995 Page 2 - 37
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Engines 48/60 and 58/64
Figure 2-9 Control lever setting / propeller pitch - engine 48/60 and 58/64
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.2 Propeller operation
Page 2 - 38 Status 08/1995
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Diesel engine and operation
2.1.3 Diesel electric operation
Status 11/2007 Page 2 - 39
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2.1.3 Diesel electric operation
2.1.3.1 Load application for shipboard- and isolated electrical systems
ln the age of highly turbocharged Diesel en-
gines, building rules of classification societies
regarding load application (e.g. 0% ==> 50%
==>100%l cannot be complied with, even by
special measures. However the requirements of
the lACS (lnternational Association of Classifica-
tion Societiesl and lSO 8528-5 are realistic. ln
the case of ship…s engines the application of
lACS requirements is to be clarified with the re-
spective classification society as well as the
shipyard and the owner. During discussions on
load application, the lACS requirements are
therefore to be considered as “MAN Diesel
standard".
For applications from 0% to 100% continuous
rating, according to lACS and lSO 8528-5, the
following diagram applies:
Figure 2-10 Load application in steps as per lACS and lSO 8528-5
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.3 Diesel electric operation
Page 2 - 40 Status 11/2007
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Depending on the mean effective pressure of the
engines a load application from 0 to 100% re-
sults in the following number of load steps and
their percentages:
Note!
Bigger load steps than listed in the table are not
possible as a standard!
Observance of the following application rates
the minimum requirements of the institutions
listed below are realised.
ln case of load drop of 100% P
nominal
, the dy-
namical speed variation must not exceed 10%
of the nominal speed and the remaining speed
variation must not surpass 5% of the nominal
speed.
Requirements for plant design:
√ Load application must be taken into consid-
eration for the design of the isolated system
on board accordingly.
√ Board operation must be safe in case of
graduated load application of important con-
sumers.
√ The load application conditions (E-balancel
must be approved during the planning and
examination phase.
√ The possible failure of one engine must be al-
lowed for - please see Chapter 2.1.3.5 "Die-
sel-electric operation of vessels - failure of
one engine", Page 2-51
lt is absolutely necessary that all questions re-
garding the dynamical behaviour of the engines
are clarified prior to contract conclusion and for
all customer requirements and MAN Diesel con-
firmations are fixed in writing in the delivery con-
tract.
Engine b
mep
[barì 1st step 2nd step 3rd step 4th step
v 28/33D 26.6
33% 23% 18% 26%
32/40 24.9 ... 25.9
32/44CR 25.3 ... 26.4
40/54 23.2 ... 24.8
48/60 25.8 ... 26.5
58/64 23.2
Table 2-5 Mean effective pressures and application loads .The percentage of the load steps referring to a bmep of
24.8 bar in Figure 2-10.
Classification Society
Dynamic speed drop in
% of the nominal speed
Remaining speed
variation in % of the
nominal speed
Recovery time until
reaching the tolerance
band ±1% of nominal
speed
Germanischer Lloyd
≤10 % ≤5%
≤ 5 sec.
RlNA
Lloyd…s Register ≤ 5 sec., max 8 sec.
American Bureau of Shipping
≤ 5 sec.
Bureau veritas
Det Norske veritas
lSO 8528-5
Table 2-6 Minimum requirements of the institutions
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.3 Diesel electric operation
Status 05/2002 Page 2 - 41
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2.1.3.2 Available outputs dependent on frequency deviations
General
Generating sets, which are integrated in an elec-
tricity supply system, are subjected to the fre-
quency fluctuations of the mains. Depending on
the severity of the frequency fluctuations, output
and operation respectively have to be restricted.
Frequency adjustment range
According to DlN lSO 8528-5: 1997-11, operat-
ing limits of >2.5% are specified for the lower
and upper frequency adjustment range.
Operating range
Depending on the prevailing local ambient con-
ditions, a certain maximum continuous rating
will be available.
ln the output/speed and frequency diagrams, a
range has specifically been marked with “No
continuous operation allowed in this area". Op-
eration in this range is only permissible for a
short period of time, i.e. for less than 2 minutes.
ln special cases, a continuous rating is permis-
sible if the standard frequency is exceeded by
more than 3%.
Limiting parameters
Max. torque - ln case the frequency decreases,
the available output is limited by the maximum
permissible torque of the generating set.
Max. speed for continuous rating - An increase
in frequency, resulting in a speed that is higher
than the maximum speed admissible for contin-
uous operation, is only permissible for a short
period of time, i.e. for less than 2 minutes.
For engine-specific information see - Chapter
"Output, speeds"- of the specific engine.
Overload
Overload >100% may only be run for a short
time for recovery and preventing a frequency
drop in case of load application.
Figure 2-11 Available output at 100% load
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.3 Diesel electric operation
Page 2 - 42 Status 05/2002
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Diesel engine and operation
2.1.3 Diesel electric operation
Status 02/2007 Page 2 - 43
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2.1.3.3 Engine running-in
Preconditions
Engines must be run in
√ during commissioning at site if, after the test
run, pistons or bearings were removed for in-
spection and/or if the engine was partly or
completely disassembled for transport,
√ on installation of new running gear compo-
nents, e.g. cylinder liners, piston rings, main
bearings, big-end bearings and piston pin
bearings,
√ on installation of used bearing shells,
√ after an extended low-load operation (> 500
operating hoursl.
Supplementary information
Adjustment required
Surface irregularities on the piston rings and the
cylinder liner running surface are smoothed out
during the running-in process. The process is
ended when the first piston ring forms a perfect
seal towards the combustion chamber, i.e. the
first piston ring exhibits an even running surface
around its entire circumference. lf the engine is
subjected to a higher load before this occurs,
the hot exhaust gases will pass between the pis-
ton rings and the cylinder liner running surface.
The film of oil will be destroyed at these loca-
tions. The consequence will be material destruc-
tion (e.g. scald marksl on the running surfaces of
the rings and the cylinder liner and increased
wear and high oil consumption during subse-
quent operation.
The duration of the running-in period is influ-
enced by a number of factors, including the con-
dition of the surface of piston rings and the
cylinder liner, the quality of the fuel and lube oil
and the loading and speed of the engine. The
running-in periods shown in Figure 2-12, Page
2-45, and Figure 2-13, Page 2-45, respectively,
are, therefore, for guidance only.
Operating media
Fuel
For the engine running-in process can be used
Diesel oil or gas oil. The fuel used must satisfy
the quality requirements (see Chapter 3 "Quality
requirements of operating supplies", Page 3-1l
and be appropriate for the fuel system layout.
Lubricating oil
The lubricating oil to be used while running in the
engine must satisfy the quality requirements
(see Chapter 3 "Quality requirements of operat-
ing supplies", Page 3-1l relating to the relevant
fuel quality.
Caution!
The lube oil system is to be rinsed out before fill-
ing it for the first time (see MAN Diesel Work
Card 000.03l.
Running-in the engine
Cylinder lubrication
During the entire running-in process, the cylin-
der lubrication is to be switched to the “Run-
ning-in" mode. This is done at the control
cabinet and/or the operator's panel and causes
the cylinder lubrication to be activated over the
entire load range already when the engine is
started. The increased oil supply has a favoura-
ble effect on the running-in of the piston rings
and pistons. After completion of the running-in
process, the cylinder lubrication is to be
switched back to “Normal Mode".
Checks
During running-in, the bearing temperature and
crankcase are to be checked
√ for the first time after 10 minutes of operation
at minimum speed,
√ again after operational output levels have
been reached.
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.3 Diesel electric operation
Page 2 - 44 Status 02/2007
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The bearing temperatures (camshaft bearings,
big-end and main bearingsl are to be measured
and compared with those of the neighbouring
bearings. For this purpose, an electric tracer-
type thermometer can be used as measuring
device.
At 85% load and on reaching operational output
levels, the operating data (firing pressures, ex-
haust gas temperatures, charge air pressure,
etc.l are to be checked and compared with the
acceptance record.
Standard running-in programme
ln the case of engines driving generators, the
engine speed is, within the specified period, at
first increased up to the normal speed before
load is applied. During the entire running-in pe-
riod, the engine output is to remain within the
output range that has been marked in Figure 2-
12, Page 2-45 and Figure 2-13, Page 2-45, resp.
Critical speed ranges are to be avoided.
Running-in during commissioning at site
Four-stroke engines are, with a few exceptions,
always subject to a test run in the manufactur-
er's works, so that the engine has been run in, as
a rule. Nevertheless, repeated running-in is re-
quired after assembly at the final place of instal-
lation if pistons or bearings were removed for
inspection after the test run or if the engine was
partly or completely disassembled for transpor-
tation.
Running-in after installation of new running gear
components
ln case cylinder liners, pistons and/or piston
rings are replaced on the occasion of overhaul
work, the engine has to be run in again. Run-
ning-in is also required if the rings have been re-
placed on one piston only. Running-in is to be
carried out according to Figure 2-12, Page 2-45
and Figure 2-13, Page 2-45, and/or the pertinent
explanations.
The cylinder liner requires rehoning according to
MAN Diesel Work Card 050.05 unless it is re-
placed. A portable honing device can be ob-
tained from one of our service bases.
Running-in after refitting used or installing new
bearing shells (main bearing, big-end and piston
pin bearingsl
lf used bearing shells were refitted or new bear-
ing shells installed, the respective bearings will
have to be run in. The running-in period should
be 3 to 5 hours, applying load in stages. The re-
marks in the previous paragraphs, especially un-
der "Checks", as well as Figure 2-12, Page 2-45
and Figure 2-13, Page 2-45, resp., are to be ob-
served.
ldling at high speed over an extended period is
to be avoided, wherever possible.
Running-in after low-load operation
Continuous operation in the low-load range may
result in heavy internal contamination of the en-
gine. Combustion residues from the fuel and lu-
bricating oil may deposit on the top-land ring of
the piston, in the ring grooves and possibly also
in the inlet ducts. Besides, the charge air and ex-
haust piping, the charge air cooler, the turbo-
charger and the exhaust gas boiler may become
oily.
As also the piston rings will have adapted them-
selves to the cylinder liner according to the
loads they have been subjected to, accelerating
the engine too quickly will result in increased
wear and possibly cause other types of engine
damage (piston ring blow-by, piston seizurel.
After prolonged low-load operation (≥500 opera-
tion hoursl, the engine should therefore be run in
again, starting from the output level, at which it
has been operated, in accordance with Figure 2-
12, Page 2-45 and Figure 2-13, Page 2-45.
Please also refer to the notes in Chapter 2.1.1.3
"Part-load operation", Page 2-9.
Note!
For additional information, the after-sales serv-
ice department of MAN Diesel or of the licensee
will be at your disposal.
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.3 Diesel electric operation
Status 02/2007 Page 2 - 45
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A Engine speed n
M
B Engine output (specified
rangel
D Running-in period in [hì
E Engine speed and output in
[%ì
Figure 2-12 Standard running-in programme for marine auxiliary engines (constant speedl of the 32/40, 32/44CR
engine types
A Engine speed n
M
B Engine output (specified
rangel
D Running-in period in [hì
E Engine speed and output in
[%ì
Figure 2-13 Standard running-in programme for marine auxiliary engines (constant speedl of the 40/54, 48/60B,
58/64 engine types
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.3 Diesel electric operation
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Diesel engine and operation
2.1.3 Diesel electric operation
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2.1.3.4 Starting conditions for Diesel-electric marine plants
ln multiple-engine Diesel-electric ship propul-
sion plants with load regulation by a power man-
agement system, the availability of the engines
not in operation is an important aspect of engine
operation. The following data and conditions are
relevant to this:
√ Engine start-up time until synchronization
√ Max. permissible time on stand-by mode for
engines
√ “Black-start" capability (with restriction of the
plantl
√ Load application times
When reaching the maximum stand-by period,
the engine must either be started and loaded up
to about 30% load, or taken out of stand-by
mode via the power management system. This
switches off the priming lube pump and the fuel
system.
(for HFO-operation with separeted pressure sys-
tem per each engine exists different conditionsl
Engines not on stand-by mode can be started
with normal starting procedure at any time.
A stand-by period is only permissible after a pri-
or engine start with at least 30% loading.
Max. permissible stand-
by period
12 hours 48 hours
Depends on fuel system
see below
Start up time until load
application
< 1 minute < 2 minutes > 2 minutes
engine + system conditions Stand-by Stand-by standstill
Starting procedure Without slow turn With slow turn
With prelubrication and
“slow turn"
Start after black-out
permissible -
without lube-oil pressure,
without slow turn
Yes
Engine start-up only within 2 minutes/after black-out
No
Engine Equipment
Lube oil system Service pump attached
Preheating temperature
before engine
40°C
Prelubrication Permanent Permanent
Stand-by or prelubrication
pump starts up
Period of prelubrication 12 hours 48 hours 1 minute
Pressure before engine 0.6 - 0.8 bar 0.6 - 0.8 bar 0.6 - 4.0 bar
Pressure before turbo-
charger
0.2 - 0.4 bar 0.2 - 0.4 bar 0.2 - 1.5 bar
HT cooling water system Service pump attached or detached (electrically drivenl
Preheating temperature
before engine
60 - 90°C 60 - 90°C 60 - 90°C
Period of preheating permanent permanent
depends on ambient condi-
tions until minimum temper-
ature is reached
Start of the detached pump With starting command to engine
LT cooling water system Service pump attached or detached;
possibly one cooling-water system for several engines
Start of the external pump ln operation already, or with starting command to engine
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.3 Diesel electric operation
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Table 2-7 Starting conditions for Diesel-electric marine plants
Table 2-8 Starting conditions for Diesel-electric marine plants - engine control
Fuel system For black start ability an independent fuel supply or fuel
feed pump is required
Only for engine 32/44CR!
A+B+C: pressure before
injection pump in case of
black out
min 3 bar
A: MDF operation, start sup-
ply pump
ln operation already, or with starting command to engine
B: + C: HFO operation Supply and booster pumps in operation, fuel preheated to operating viscosity
B: HFO operation, separate
pressure system for each
engine, max. permissible
circulation time
12 hours 48 hours
ln case of increasing viscos-
ity due to extended circula-
tion time the fuel has to be
mixed with MDO in order to
be in agreement with the
temperature viscosity
requirements. See Chapter
3.10 "viscosity-Tempera-
ture (vTl diagram of fuel oil",
Page 3-45
C: HFO operation, one pres-
sure system for several
engines, max. permissible
circulation time
Permanent if at least one consumer
Engine Control
Slow turning Required for automatic start
Jet Assist Required for load application
Speed control Electronic governor
Max. permissible stand-
by period
12 hours 48 hours
Depends on fuel system
see below
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.3 Diesel electric operation
Status 03/2007 Page 2 - 49
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Figure 2-14 Start up times for Diesel-electric marine plants
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.3 Diesel electric operation
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Figure 2-15 Load application for Diesel-electric marine plants
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.3 Diesel electric operation
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2.1.3.5 Diesel-electric operation of vessels - failure of one engine
Diesel-electric operation of vessels means par-
allel operation of engine units with the genera-
tors forming a closed system.
When planning a marine installation, the possi-
ble failure of one engine must be allowed for in
order to avoid possible overloading of the re-
maining engines, and thus risking a black-out.
We therefore generally advise equipping Diesel-
electric marine installations with a power man-
agement system. This ensures that the engines
can be operated in the maximum output range
and, in case one unit fails, the propulsive output
is reduced or unimportant users are switched off
by the power management in order to avoid an
electric black-out due to underfrequency.
lt is up to the ship…s operator to decide, which
consumers are disconnected from the supply
under what operating conditions or which of
them are given priority.
With regard to contamination and soot behav-
iour during low-load operation, the chosen load
reserve achieved by the number of engines run-
ning in the system should not be too high (i.e.
several engines running on low loadl.
Regarding the optimum operating range and the
permissible part loads, the information provided
in Chapter 2.1.1.3 "Part-load operation", Page
2-9 are to be observed.
Load application in case one engine fails
ln case one engine fails while running at sea, its
output has to be made up for by the engines re-
maining in the system and/or the loading has to
be decreased by reducing the propulsive output
and/or by switching off electric consumers.
The immediate load transfer to one engine does
not always correspond with the load reserves
this particular engine still has available. This de-
pends on the base load that is being run at in the
respective moment.
The permissible load applications for such a
case can be derived from the following Figure 2-
16.
Figure 2-16 Load application depending on base load
0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%
0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%
Base load
L
o
a
d

a
p
p
l
i
c
a
t
i
o
n
Standard
Engine with jet-assistance
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.3 Diesel electric operation
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The maximum output as a function of the
number of engines running in a system, which
will not result into a total output reduction of the
multi-engine plant in case one unit fails, can be
derived from the following Table 2-9.

Table 2-9 Load application in case one engine fails
Example
The isolated network consists of 4 engines of
the 9L 58/64 type with an output of 12,170kW
electric each.
Reaching the same output at all load points re-
quires that the engines have the same speed
drop.
With all 4 units being in operation and running at
100% site rating, the possible mains output is:
lf the present system load is P
0
= 39,000, each
engine runs with:
ln case one unit suddenly fails, an immediate
transfer of 20% engine output is possible ac-
cording to the diagram, i.e. from 80% to100%
engine output.
100% engine output of the remaining 3 x 9L 58/
64 is calculated as follows:
Consequently, an immediate load decrease from
39,000kW to 36,500kW is necessary, i.e. reduc-
tion of the consumers in the system by 2,500kW.
No. of engines running in the system 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Utilisation of engines' capacity during sys-
tem operation in (%l of P
max

60 75 80 83 86 87.5 89 90
P
max
= 4 * 12,170 kW= 48,680 kW = 100 %
100 % * P
0
/ P
max
= 100 * 39,000 / 48,680 = 80 % Load
P
1
= 3 * 12,170 kW ≈ 36,500 kW
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.3 Diesel electric operation
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2.1.3.6 Generator - reverse power protection
Demand for reverse power protection
Generators of an electrical power output >50
kvA running in parallel operation have to be
equipped with a reverse power protection (re-
quirement of classification societiesl.
Definition of reverse power
lf a generator, which is connected to a combus-
tion engine, is no longer driven by this engine
but is supplied with propulsive power by the
connected net and is, therefore, working as an
electrical engine, this is called reverse power.
Examples for possible reverse power
√ The combustion engine does no longer drive
the generator, which is connected to the
mains, e.g., because of lack of fuel.
√ Stopping of the combustion engine with the
generator, which is connected to the mains.
√ On ships with electrical traction motor, the
propeller drives the electrical traction motor,
the electrical traction motor drives the gener-
ator, the generator drives the combustion en-
gine.
√ Sudden frequency increase, e.g. because of
a load decrease in an isolated net --> if the
combustion engine is operated at low load
(e.g. just after synchronisingl
Adjusting the reverse power protection relay
Adjusting value for reverse power protection re-
lay: maximum 3% P
nominal
On vessels with electric traction motor and
"Crash stop" requirements (shifting the manoeu-
vring lever from Forward to Full Reversel, special
arrangements for the adjustment value of the re-
verse power relay are to be made, which are only
valid in the event of a "crash stop" manoeuvre.
Time lags
For activation of the reverse power protection
relay, time lags of approximately 5 to 10 seconds
have to be fixed.
Maximum time for reverse power
√ lf a reverse power higher than the adjusted
value for the reverse power protection relay
occurs, the generator switch has to open im-
mediately after the time lag elapsed.
√ Reverse power below the adjusted value for
the reverse power protection relay for periods
exceeding 30 seconds is not permitted.
Diesel engine and operation
2.1.3 Diesel electric operation
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Diesel engine and operation
2.2.1 Engine design
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2.2 Engine characteristic data L 58/64
2.2.1 Engine design
2.2.1.1 Engine cross section
Figure 2-17 Cross section, view on counter coupling side - engine L 58/64
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.1 Engine design
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Figure 2-18 view on exhaust gas side
Engine related service systems
2.2.1 Engine design
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2.2.1.2 Engine designations - Design parameters
Engine 58/64
Example to declare engine designations

Table 2-10 Engine designations - engine L 58/64

Table 2-11 Design parameters - engine L 58/64
9 L 58/64
Piston stroke [cmì
Cylinder bore [cmì
ln-line engine
Cylinder number
Parameter Abbreviations Unit
Number of cylinders 6, 7, 8, 9
-
ln-line engine L
Cylinder bore 58
cm
Piston stroke 64
Parameter value Unit
Cylinder bore 580
mm
Piston stroke 640
Swept volume of each cylinder 169.1 litre
Compression ratio 13.2 -
Distance between cylinder centres 1000
mm Crankshaft diameter at journal 440
Crankshaft diameter at crank pin 420
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.1 Engine design
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Diesel engine and operation
2.2.2 Dimensions, weights and views
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2.2.2 Dimensions, weights and views
Engine L 58/64
Figure 2-19 Main dimensions - engine L 58/64
Table 2-12 Main dimensions and weights - engine L 58/64
1l
Tolerance 5 %
Minimum centreline distance for twin engine in-
stallation: 3,750mm
Engine
Length L Length L1 Width W Height H
Weight with-
out flywheel
1l
mm tons
6L 58/64 9,190 7,810
3,550 5,140
149
7L 58/64 10,600 8,810 170
8L 58/64 11,600 9,810 189
9L 58/64 12,600 10,810 208
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.2 Dimensions, weights and views
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Engine related service systems
2.2.3 Outputs, speeds
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2.2.3 Outputs, speeds
2.2.3.1 Engine ratings
Engine L 58/64
Table 2-13 Engine ratings L 58/64
Power take-off on engine free end up to 100 % of rated output.
2.2.3.2 Speeds/Main data
Table 2-14 Speeds/Main data - engine L 58/64
1l
This concession may possibly be restricted, see Chapter 2.1.3.2 "Available outputs dependent on frequency devia-
tions", Page 2-41.
Power take-off on engine free end up to 100 % of rated output.
Engine type
No. of cylinders
Engine rating
400rpm 428rpm
kW hp kW hp
6L 58/64 6 7,860 10,680 8,400 11,425
7L 58/64 7 9,170 12,470 9,800 13,330
8L 58/64 8 10,480 14,250 11,200 15,230
9L 58/64 9 11,790 16,035 12,600 17,135
Unit 50 Hz 60 Hz
Cylinder rating kW (HPl 1,400(1,900l 1,310(1,780l
Rated speed rpm 428 400
Mean piston speed m/s 9.1 8.5
Mean effective pressure bar 23.2 23.2
Number of pole pairs - 7 9
Lowest engine operating speed:
√ in case of rigid foundation
√ in case of resilient foundation speed
depends on layout of mounting
rpm
approx. 120
-
approx. 120
-
Highest engine operating speed rpm 441 441
1l
Speed adjusting range rpm See Chapter 2.1.1.5 "Speed control", Page 2-13
Engine related service systems
2.2.3 Outputs, speeds
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Definition of engine rating
General definition of Diesel engine rating
(according to lSO 15550: 2002; lSO 3046-1:
2002 l
Table 2-15 Standard reference conditions
No reduction of power up to:
Air temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ≤318K (45°Cl
+ Air pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100kPa
+ Cooling water temperature
upstream of charge-air cooler ≤311K (38°Cl
+Relative humidity Φr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ≤60%
+Exhaust gas overpressure
after turbine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ≤3kPa
Marine main engines
Blocking of the output is made for engines
driving a propeller, at 100% of the rated output.
Blocking of the output is made for engines
driving a generator, at 110% of the rated output.
Overload >100 % may only be run for a short
time for recovery and preventing a frequency
drop in case of load application.
Marine auxiliary engines
Blocking of the output is made at 110% of the
rated output.
Overload >100% may only be run for a short
time for recovery and preventing a frequency
drop in case of load application.
Note!
An increased exhaust gas back pressure
(>3 kPal raises the temperature level of the en-
gine and will be considered when calculating a
required derating by adding 2.5K to the ambient
temperature for every 1 kPa of the increased ex-
haust gas back pressure after the turbine.
Reference Conditions:
lSO 3046-1: 2002; lSO 15550: 2002
Air temperature T
r
K / °C 298/ 25
Air pressure p
r
kPa 100
Relative humidity Φr % 30
Cooling water temperature
upstream charge air cooler tcr
K / °C 298/ 25
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.4 Fuel oil consumption; lube oil consumption
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2.2.4 Fuel oil consumption; lube oil consumption
2.2.4.1 Fuel oil consumption
Engine L 58/64; 1310/1400 kW/cyl., 400/428 rpm

Table 2-17 lSO reference conditions
lMO Requirements:
see Chapter 6.3.1 "Cooling water system", Page
6-21: LT cooling water circuit.
lMO lnternational Marine Organization:
MARPOL 73/78; Annex vl; Regulation 13; NOx-
Technical Code on Control of Emission of Nitro-
gen Oxides from Diesel Engines

Table 2-18 ldle running fuel consumption
Fuel consumption (g/kWhl with HFO/MDO
1l
% Load 100 85
2l
75 50 25
lSO reference conditions see below 174 173
2l
177 186 199
Additions (g/kWhl
for one attached cooling water pump + 1.0 + 1.5 + 1.5 + 2.0 + 4.0
for all attached L.O. pumps + 2.0 + 2.5 + 3.0 + 4.0 + 8.0
for suction dredger operation + 2.0
for operation with MGO + 2.0
for exhaust gas back pressure after
turbine > 30 mbar
every additional 1 mbar (0.1 kPal + 0.05
in case a charge air blow-off device is
installed:
please consult MAN Diesel AG Augsburg
1l
Tolerance +5%
2l
Warranted fuel consumption at 85% MCR
Table 2-16 Fuel consumption - engine L 58/64
lSO reference conditions
(acc. to lSO 3046-1: 2002; lSO 1550: 2002l
Intake air temperature T
r
°C 25
Barometric pressure p
r
kPa 100
Relative humidity Φr % 30
Cooling water temp. bef. charge
air cooler T
cr
°C 25
Net calorific value LCV kJ/kg 42,700
ldle running fuel consumption (kg/hl
No. of cylinders 6L 7L 8L 9L
Speed 400/428 rpm 115 134 154 173
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.4 Fuel oil consumption; lube oil consumption
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2.2.4.2 Lube oil consumption
Engine L 58/64
1310/1400 kW/cyl.; 400/428 rpm

Table 2-19 Total lube oil consumption L 58/64
Specific lube oil consumption . . . . .0.8g/kWh
Note!
As a matter of principle, the lubricating oil con-
sumption is to be stated as total lubricating oil
consumption related to the tabulated lSO full-
load output (see Chapter 2.2.3 "Outputs,
speeds", Page 2-61l.
Total lube oil consumption (kg/hl 1l
No. of cylinders 6L 7L 8L 9L
Speed 400/428 rpm 6.7 7.8 8.9 10.0
1l Tolerance for warranty + 20%
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.5 Planning data
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2.2.5 Planning data
2.2.5.1 Nominal values for cooler specification
1l
Tolerance: +10% for rating coolers, -15% for heat re-
covery
2l
lncluding separator heat (30kJ/kWhl
3l
Basic values for layout design of the coolers
4l
Tolerances of the delivery capacities must be consid-
ered by the manufacturer
z = flushing oil of automatic filter
Note!
-capacities of priming/run-down lubrication pumps see
"Prelubrication / postlubrication", Page 6-7 and
-for preheating/run-down cooling pumps see Table 6-
12, Page 6-24
Reference conditions: Tropic
Air temperature
°C
45
Cooling water temperature before charge air cooler
(LT stagel
38
Air pressure bar 1
Relative humidity % 50
Number of cylinders - 6L 7L 8L 9L
Engine output kW 8,400 9,800 11,200 12,600
Speed rpm 428
Heat to be dissipated
1l
Cylinder cooling water
kW
800 930 1,065 1,200
Charge air cooler HT-stage 2,435 2,840 3,245 3,650
Charge air cooler LT-stage 870 1,010 1,155 1,300
Lube oil cooler + separator
2l
875 1,025 1,170 1,315
Cooling water fuel nozzles module 21 25 28 32
Heat radiation engine 260 305 345 390
Flow rates
3l
HT circuit (cylinder + charge air cooler ll
m
3
/h
85 100 115 130
Cooling water fuel nozzles nozzles 3.3 3.9 4.4 5.0
LT circuit (lube oil + charge air cooler lll 85 100 105 130
Lube oil (4 bar before enginel 180 210 240 270
Pumps
al Free-standing
4l
HT circuit cooling water (4.3barl
m³/h
85 100 115 130
Cooling water fuel nozzles (3.0barl 3.3 3.9 4.4 5.0
LT circuit cooling water (3.0barl Depending on plant design
Lube oil (8.0barl 180+z 210+z 240+z 270+z
Fuel supply (7.0barl 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5
Fuel booster (7.0barl 5.6 6.6 7.5 8.4
bl Attached
Lube oil (8.0barl variable speed
m³/h
240 282 282 324
Lube oil (8.0barl constant speed 212 240 282 324
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.5 Planning data
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2.2.5.2 Temperature basis, nominal air and exhaust gas data
Table 2-20 Temperature basis, air and exhaust gas data - engine L 58/64
1l
Tolerances: quantity œ5%, temperature œ20°C
Reference conditions: Tropic
Air temperature
°C
45
Cooling water temperature before charge air cooler 38
Air pressure bar 1
Relative humidity % 50
Number of cylinders - 6L 7L 8L 9L
Engine output kW 8,400 9,800 11,200 12,600
Temperature basis
HT cooling water engine outlet
°C
90
Cooling water inlet nozzles 60
LT cooling water air cooler inlet 38
Lube oil engine inlet 55
Air data
Temperature of charge air at charge air cooler outlet °C 54 55 55 55
Air flow rate
m
3
/h 54,170 63,195 72,225 81,250
t/h 59.3 69.2 79.1 89.0
Charge air pressure (absolutel bar 3.8
Air required to dissipate heat radiation (enginel
(t
2
- t
1
= 10°Cl
m³/h 85,150 99,340 113,535 127,725
Exhaust gas data
1l
volume flow (temperature turbocharger outletl m
3
/h 114,370 133,430 152,495 171,555
Mass flow t/h 61.0 71.2 81.4 91.5
Temperature at turbine outlet °C 380
Heat content (190°Cl kW 3,470 4,050 4,635 5,210
Permissible exhaust gas back pressure after turbocharger mbar <30
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.5 Planning data
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2.2.5.3 Load specific values at tropical conditions
1310 kW/cyl.; 400 rpm
Table 2-21 Planning data - engine L 58/64 - Tropic-400 rpm
Tolerances refer to 100% load.
1l
Tolerance: +10% for rating coolers, -15% for heat recovery.
2l
The values of the particular cylinder numbers can differ depending on the charge air cooler specification.
These figures are calculeted for 9L 58/64CD.
3l
Tolerances: quantity œ5%, temperature œ20°C.
Reference conditions: Tropic
Air temperature
°C
45
Cooling water temperature before charge air cooler
(LT stagel
38
Air pressure bar 1
Engine output % 100 85 75 50
Speed rpm 400 340 300 200
Heat to be dissipated
1l
Charge air
2l
√ cooling water HT
√ cooling water LT
kJ/kWh
1,069
387
1,074
429
1002
437
554
424
Oil cooler + separator (separator heat 30kJ/kWl 376 423 454 569
Water cooler cylinder 342 342 353 442
Water for fuel valves 9 9 9 9
Heat radiation (enginel 112 123 131 173
Air data
Temperature of charge air
√ after compressor
√ at charge air cooler outlet
°C
235
55
220
54
206
52
148
46
Air flow rate kg/kWh 7.20 8.01 8.32 8.62
Charge air pressure (absolutel bar 3.81 3.62 3.26 2.22
Exhaust gas data
3l
Mass flow kg/kWh 7.40 8.20 8.50 8.80
Temperature at turbine outlet °C 370 315 310 340
Heat content (190°Cl kJ/kWh 1,410 1,080 1,100 1,405
Permissible exhaust gas back pressure after T/C (max.l mbar <30 -
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.5 Planning data
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1400 kW/cyl.; 428 rpm
Table 2-22 Planning data - engine L 58/64 - Tropic-428 rpm
Tolerances refer to 100% load.
1l
Tolerance: +10% for rating coolers, -15% for heat recovery.
2l
The values of the particular cylinder numbers can differ depending on the charge air cooler specification.
These figures are calculeted for 9L 58/64CD.
3l
Tolerances: quantity œ5%, temperature œ20°C.
Reference conditions: Tropic
Air temperature
°C
45
Cooling water temperature before charge air cooler
(LT stagel
38
Air pressure bar 1
Engine output % 100 85 75 50
Speed rpm 428 364 321 214
Heat to be dissipated
1l
Charge air
2l
√ cooling water HT
√ cooling water LT
kJ/kWh
1,043
372
1,038
409
958
415
520
399
Oil cooler + separator (separator heat 30kJ/kWl 376 423 454 574
Water cooler cylinder 342 342 353 443
Water for fuel valves 9 9 9 9
Heat radiation (enginel 112 123 131 173
Air data
Temperature of charge air
√ after compressor
√ at charge air cooler outlet
°C
235
55
219
54
204
52
146
46
Air flow rate kg/kWh 7.05 7.80 8.10 8.35
Charge air pressure (absolutel bar 3.80 3.60 3.20 2.20
Exhaust gas data
3l
Mass flow kg/kWh 7.25 8.05 8.30 8.55
Temperature at turbine outlet °C 380 330 330 360
Heat content (190°Cl kJ/kWh 1,488 1,185 1,220 1,550
Permissible exhaust gas back pressure after T/C (max.l mbar <30 -
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.5 Planning data
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2.2.5.4 Load specific values at lSO conditions
1310 kW/cyl.; 400 rpm
Table 2-23 Planning data - engine L 58/64 - lSO-400 rpm
Tolerances refer to 100% load:
1l
Tolerance: +10% for rating coolers, -15% for heat recovery.
2l
The values of the particular cylinder numbers can differ depending on the charge air cooler specification.
These figures are calculeted for 9L 58/64CD.
3l
Tolerances: quantity œ5%, temperature œ20°C.
Reference conditions: lSO
Air temperature
°C
25
Cooling water temperature before charge air cooler
(LT stagel
25
Air pressure bar 1
Engine output % 100 85 75 50
Speed rpm 400 340 300 200
Heat to be dissipated
1l
Charge air
2l
√ cooling water HT
√ cooling water LT
kJ/kWh
906
405
896
450
819
467
374
494
Oil cooler + separator (separator heat 30kJ/kWl 360 405 435 545
Water cooler cylinder 310 310 320 400
Water for fuel valves 9 9 9 9
Heat radiation (enginel 145 160 170 225
Air data
Temperature of charge air
√ after compressor
√ at charge air cooler outlet
°C
210
40
196
39
182
38
127
33
Air flow rate kg/kWh 7.54 8.39 8.71 9.03
Charge air pressure (absolutel bar 3.92 3.72 3.35 2.29
Exhaust gas data
3l
Mass flow kg/kWh 7.75 8.60 8.90 9.25
Temperature at turbine outlet °C 335 280 280 305
Heat content (190°Cl kJ/kWh 1,185 840 850 1,140
Permissible exhaust gas back pressure after T/C (max.l mbar <30 -
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.5 Planning data
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1400 kW/cyl.; 428 rpm
Table 2-24 Planning data - engine L 58/64 - lSO-428 rpm
Tolerances refer to 100% load:
1l
Tolerance: +10% for rating coolers, -15% for heat recovery.
2l
The values of the particular cylinder numbers can differ depending on the charge air cooler specification.
These figures are calculeted for 9L 58/64CD.
3l
Tolerances: quantity œ5%, temperature œ20°C.
Reference conditions: lSO
Air temperature
°C
25
Cooling water temperature before charge air cooler
(LT stagel
25
Air pressure bar 1
Engine output % 100 85 75 50
Speed rpm 428 364 321 214
Heat to be dissipated
1l
Charge air
2l
√ cooling water HT
√ cooling water LT
kJ/kWh
885
395
865
436
781
451
346
474
Oil cooler + separator (separator heat 30kJ/kWl 360 405 435 550
Water cooler cylinder 310 310 320 400
Water for fuel valves 9 9 9 9
Heat radiation (enginel 145 160 170 225
Air data
Temperature of charge air
√ after compressor
√ at charge air cooler outlet
°C 210
41
190
40
180
38
125
33
Air flow rate kg/kWh 7.40 8.20 8.50 8.75
Charge air pressure (absolutel bar 3.88 3.67 3.30 2.24
Exhaust gas data
3l
Mass flow kg/kWh 7.60 8.40 8.70 8.95
Temperature at turbine outlet °C 345 296 295 325
Heat content (190°Cl kJ/kWh 1,263 947 971 1,289
Permissible exhaust gas back pressure after T/C (max.l mbar <30 -
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.5 Planning data
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2.2.5.5 Filling volumes and flow resistances
Table 2-25 Water and oil volume - engine L 58/64
1l
lncluding charge air cooling water
Table 2-26 Service tanks - engine L 58/64
1l
lnstallation height refers to tank bottom and crankshaft centre line
2l
Marine engines with attachted lube oil pump
3l
Marine engines with free-standing lube oil pump; capacity of the run-down lube oil tank included
4l
Required for marine main engine with free-standing lube oil pump only

Table 2-27 Flow resistances - engine L 58/64
Water and oil volume of engine
No. of cylinders 6 7 8 9
Cooling water approx.
1l
litres
835 970 1,105 1,240
Lube oil approx. 190 225 260 295
Service tanks lnstallation
height
1l
Minimum effective capacity
m m³
No. of cylinders - 6 7 8 9
Cooling water cylinder
√ cylinder and turbocharger
√ fuel nozzles
6 - 9
9
1.5
0.75
Lube oil
√ in double bottom
2l
√ in double bottom
3l

-
-
8.5
12.5
10.0
14.5
11.0
16.0
12.5
18.0
Run-down lubrication for engine
4l
min. 14.0 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5
Flow resistance bar
Charge air cooler (HT stagel 0.30
Charge air cooler (LT stagel 0.20
Cylinder (HT cooling waterl 1.0
Fuel nozzles (waterl 1.5
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.5 Planning data
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2.2.5.6 Operating pressures
Table 2-28 Operating pressures - engine L 58/64
Note!
Exhaust gas back pressure
An increased exhaust gas back pressure (>30
mbarl raises the temperature level of the engine
and will be considered when calculating a re-
quired derating by adding 2.5 K to the ambient
air temperature for every 10 mbar of the in-
creased exhaust gas back pressure after tur-
bine.
Operating pressures bar
min. max.
LT cooling water before charge
air cooler stage 2
2.0 4.0
HT cooling before cylinders 3.0 4.0
Nozzle cooling water
before fuel valves
√ open system
√ closed system
2.0
3.0
4.0
5.0
Fuel oil before injection pumps 4.0 8.0
Lube oil before engine 4.0 5.0
Exhaust gas back pressure after
turbocharger
30
mbar
Negative intake pressure before
compressor
20
mbar
Compression pressure at start of
ignition
125
Maximum cylinder pressure 150
Blow-off pressure (nozzlel 300
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.6 Emissions
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2.2.6 Emissions
2.2.6.1 Composition of exhaust gas of medium speed four-stroke Diesel engines
The exhaust gas of a medium speed four-stroke
Diesel engine is composed of numerous of con-
stituents. These are derived from either the com-
bustion air and fuel oil and lube oil used, or they
are reaction products, formed during the com-
bustion process. Only some of these are to be
considered as harmful substances.
The table below show the typical composition of
the exhaust gas of an MAN Diesel four-stroke
Diesel engine without any exhaust gas treatment
devices.
Note! : At rated power and without exhaust gas teatment
1l
SOx according to lSO-8178 or US EPA method 6C, with a sulphur content in the fuel oil of 3% by weight
2l
NOx according to lSO-8178 or US EPA method 7E, total NOx emission calculated as NO
2
3l
CO according to lSO-8178 or US EPA method 10
4l
HC according to lSO-8178 or US EPA method 25A
5l
PM according to vDl-2066, EN-13284,lSO-9096 or US EPA method 17; in-stack filtration
6l
Pure soot, without ash or any other particle-borne constituents
7l
Marine gas oil DM-A grade with an ash content of the fuel oil of 0.01 % and an ash content of the lube oil of 1.5 %
8l
Heavy fuel oil RM-B grade with an ash content of the fuel oil of 0.1 % and an ash content of the lube oil of 4.0 %
Main exhaust gas constituents approx. [% by volumeì approx. [g/kWhì
Nitrogen N
2
74.0 - 76.0 5020 - 5160
Oxygen O
2
11.6 - 12.6 900 - 980
Carbon dioxide CO
2
5.2 - 5.8 560 - 620
Steam H
2
O 5.9 - 8.6 260 - 370
lnert gases Ar, Ne, He... 0.9 75
Total > 99.75 7000
Additional gaseous exhaust gas con-
stituents considered as pollutants
approx. [% by volumeì approx. [g/kWhì
Sulphur oxides SO
x
1l
0.08 12.0
Nitrogen oxides NO
x
2l
0.08 - 0.15 9.6 - 16.0
Carbon monoxide CO
3l
0.006 - 0.011 0.4 - 0.8
Hydrocarbons HC
4l
0.1 - 0.04 0.4 - 1.2
Total <0.25 26
Additionally suspended exhaust gas
constituents, PM
5l
approx.
[mg/Nm
3
ì
approx.
[g/kWhì
operating on operating on
MGO
7l
HFO
8l
MGO
7l
HFO
8l
Soot (elemental carbonl
6l
50 50 0.3 0.3
Fuel ash 4 40 0.03 0.25
Lube oil ash 3 8 0.02 0.04
Table 2-29 Exhaust gas constituents (only for guidancel
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.6 Emissions
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Carbon dioxide CO
2
Carbon dioxide (CO
2
l is a product of combus-
tion of all fossil fuels.
Among all internal combustion engines the Die-
sel engine has the lowest specific CO
2
emission
based on the same fuel quality, due to its supe-
rior efficiency.
Sulphur oxides SO
x
Sulphur oxides (SO
x
l are formed by the combus-
tion of the sulphur contained in the fuel.
Among all propulsion systems the Diesel proc-
ess results in the lowest specific SO
x
emission
based on the same fuel quality, due to its supe-
rior efficiency.
Nitrogen oxides NO
x
(NO + NO
2
l
The high temperatures prevailing in the combus-
tion chamber of an internal combustion engine
cause the nitrogen contained in the combustion
air and also that contained in some fuel grades
to react with the oxygen of the combustion air to
form nitrogen oxides (NO
x
l.
Carbon monoxide CO
Carbon monoxide (COl is formed during incom-
plete combustion.
ln MAN Diesel four-stroke Diesel engines, opti-
misation of mixture formation and turbocharging
process successfully reduces the CO content of
the exhaust gas to a very low level.
Hydrocarbons HC
The hydrocarbons (HCl contained in the exhaust
gas are composed of a multitude of various or-
ganic compounds as a result of incomplete
combustion.
Due to the efficient combustion process, the HC
content of exhaust gas of MAN Diesel four-
stroke Diesel engines is at a very low level.
Particulate Matter PM
Particulate matter (PMl consists of soot (ele-
mental carbonl and ash.
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.6 Emissions
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2.2.6.2 Exhaust gas emission
lMO: engine in standard version
1l
Engine 58/64
Maximum allowable emission value NO
x
lMO
1l
Marine engines are guaranteed to meet “lnternational Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL
73/78l, Annex vl, Regulation 13 by lnternational Maritime Organisation (lMOl".
2l
Cycle values as per lSO 8178-4, operating on lSO 8217 DM grade fuel (marine distillate fuel: MGO or MDOl, contingent
to a charge air cooling water temperature of max. 32°C at 25°C reference sea water temperature.
3l
Maximum allowable NO
x
emissions for marine Diesel engines according to lMO: 130 ≤ n < 2000 → 45 * n
-0.2
g/kWh
(n = rated engine speed in rpml
4l
Calculated as NO
2
D
2
: test cycle for constant speed aux. engine application
E
2
: test cycle for constant speed main prop. application
E
3
: test cycle propeller law operated main and propeller law operated auxiliary engine application
Remark:
The certification testing of the engine for compliance wtih the NO
x
emission limits will be done as single certification
or group certification at the testbed.
Rated output
Rated speed
kW/cyl.
rpm
1310
400
1400
428
NO
x

2l 4l

lMO cycle E2/E3
g/kWh 13.57
3l
13.39
3l
Table 2-30 Maximum allowable emission value NO
x
- engine L 58/64
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.6 Emissions
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Diesel engine and operation
2.2.6 Emissions
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2.2.6.3 Engine noise / intake noise / exhaust gas noise
Engine L 58/64
Output 1400 kW/cyl., speed = 428rpm
Engine noise
Sound pressure level Lp
max: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . approx. ≤108dB(Al
min: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . approx. ≥105dB(Al
√ Measuring points
A total of 19 measuring points at 1m distance
from the engine surface distributed evenly
around the engine according to lSO 6798. The
noise at the exhaust outlet is not included.
√ Octave level diagram
ln the octave level diagram below the minimum
and maximum octave levels of all measuring
points have been linked by graphs. The data will
change, depending on the acoustical properties
of the environment.
Figure 2-20 Octave level diagram L 58/64 - sound pressure level Lp - air borne noise
80
85
90
95
100
105
110
1/1 octave band frequency [Hz]
s
o
u
n
d

p
r
e
s
s
u
r
e

l
e
v
e
l

L
p

[
d
B
]
r
e
f
:

2
0

µ
P
a
min
max
min 95 96 97 98 98 98 96 93 84 105
max 108 105 105 108 108 107 106 106 96 108
16 31,5 63 125 250 500 1000 2000 4000 8000 sum A
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.6 Emissions
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lntake noise
Sound power level Lw: approx. ≤137dB(Al
√ Octave level diagram
The sound power level Lw of the unsilenced
intake noise in the intake pipe is approx.
137 dB(Al at rated output. The octave level of
the sound power is shown in the diagram be-
low.
This data is required and valid only for ducted air
intake systems. The data is not valid if the stand-
ard air filter silencer is attached to the turbo-
charger.
Figure 2-21 Octave level diagram L 58/64 - sound power level Lw - unsilenced intake noise
100
105
110
115
120
125
130
135
140
145
1/1 octave band frequency [Hz]
s
o
u
n
d

p
o
w
e
r

l
e
v
e
l

L
w

[
d
B
]
r
e
f
:

1
0
e
x
p

-
1
2

W
Lw
Lw 115 120 117 112 105 104 109 118 135 130 137
16 31,5 63 125 250 500 1000 2000 4000 8000 sum A
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.6 Emissions
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Exhaust gas noise
Sound power level Lw: approx. ≤137dB(Al
√ Octave level diagram
The sound power level Lw of the unsilenced
exhaust noise in the exhaust pipe is approx.
137 dB(Al at rated output. The octave level of
the sound power is shown in the diagram be-
low.
.
Figure 2-22 Octave level diagram L 58/64 - sound power level Lw - unsilenced exhaust noise
125
130
135
140
145
150
155
160
1/1 octave band frequency [Hz]
s
o
u
n
d

p
o
w
e
r

l
e
v
e
l

L
w

[
d
B
]
r
e
f
:

1
0
e
x
p

-
1
2

W
Lw
Lw 137 154 156 151 138 136 135 134 132 131 142
16 31,5 63 125 250 500 1000 2000 4000 8000 sum A
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.6 Emissions
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Diesel engine and operation
2.2.7 Requirement for power drive connection (staticl
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2.2.7 Requirement for power drive connection (staticl
Limit values for alignment to be coupled after the engine
Evaluation of permissible theoretical bearing loads
F
1
= theoretical bearing force at the external engine bearing
F
2
= theoretical bearing force at the generator bearing
F
3
= flywheel weight
F
4
= coupling weight acting on the engine, including reset forces
F
5
= rotor weight of the generator
a = distance between end of coupling flange and centre of outer crankshaft bearing
l = distance between centre of outer crankshaft bearing and generator bearing
1l
lnclusive of couples resulting from restoring forces of the coupling
Distance between engine seating surface and
crankshaft centre line: 750 mm
Note!
Changes may be necessary as a result of the
torsional vibration calculation or special service
conditions.
Figure 2-23 Case A: overhung arrangement Figure 2-24 Case B: rigid coupling
M
max
= F * a = F
3
* x
3
+ F
4
* x
4
F
1
= (F
3
* x
2
+ F
5
* x
1
l/l
Engine
Distance a
Case A Case B
M
max
= F * a F
1 max
mm kNm kN
L 58/64 500 100
1l
250
Table 2-31 Example calculation case A and B
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.7 Requirement for power drive connection (staticl
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General remark:
Masses which are connected downstream of
the engine in the case of an overhung, resp. rig-
idly coupled, arrangement result in additional
crankshaft bending stress, which is mirrored in a
measured web deflection during engine installa-
tion.
Provided the limit values for the masses to be
coupled downstream of the engine (permissible
values for Mmax and F1maxl are complied with,
the permitted web deflections will not be ex-
ceeded during assembly.
Sufficient distance until obtaining the max. per-
missible web deflection value at which the max.
permissible crankshaft bending stress is
reached, i.e. new alignment of the engine has to
be carried out, is ensured.
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.8 Requirements for power drive connection (dynamicl
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2.2.8 Requirements for power drive connection (dynamicl
2.2.8.1 Moments of inertia, flywheels
Moments of inertia, flywheels for propeller operation
Table 2-32 Moments of inertia / flywheels for marine main engines L 58/64
For flywheels dimensions see Chapter 2.2.9
"Power transmission", Page 2-91.
Marine main engines
Engine
Moments of inertia Flywheel
Maximum
continuous
rating
Total
moment
required
J
min
Engine +
damper
Moments of
inertia
Mass
Required
moment of
inertia after
flywheel
kW kgm
2
kgm
2
kgm
2
kg kgm
2
n = 400 rpm
6L 58/64 7,860 5,620 4,270
3,360 5,093 - 7L 58/64 9,170 6,550 5,192
8L 58/64 10,480 7,490 5,733
9L 58/64 11,790 8,420 6,276 1,320 2,680 824
n = 428 rpm
6L 58/64 8,400 5,250 4,270
3,360 5,093 - 7L 58/64 9,800 6,120 5,192
8L 58/64 11,200 6,990 5,733
9L 58/64 12,600 7,860 6,276 1,320 2,680 264
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.8 Requirements for power drive connection (dynamicl
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Moments of inertia, flywheels for constant speed operation
Table 2-33 Moments of inertia / flywheels for Diesel-electric plants L 58/64
For flywheels dimensions see Chapter 2.2.9
"Power transmission", Page 2-91.
Diesel-electric plants
Engine
Moments of inertia Flywheels
Continu-
ous rating
Total
moment
required
J
min
Cyclic
irregular-
ity
Engine +
damper
Moments
of inertia
Mass
Required
moment
of inertia
after fly-
wheel
kW kgm
2
- kgm
2
kgm
2
kg kgm
2
n = 400 rpm
6L 58/64 7,860 22,401 340 4,270
3,360 5,093
14,771
7L 58/64 9,170 26,135 260 5,192 17,583
8L 58/64 10,480 29,868 400 5,733 20,775
9L 58/64 11,790 33,602 540 6,276 1,320 2,680 26,006
n = 428 rpm
6L 58/64 8,400 20,910 410 4,270
3,360 5,093
13,280
7L 58/64 9,800 24,395 280 5,192 15,843
8L 58/64 11,200 27,880 430 5,733 18,787
9L 58/64 12,600 31,365 580 6,276 1,320 2,680 23,769
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.8.2 Balancing of masses
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2.2.8.2 Balancing of masses
Rotating crank balancy 100%
Engine speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 428rpm
Static reduced rotating mass per
crank including counterweights and
rotating portion of connecting rod . . . . . . 0kg
(for a crank radius r = 320mml
Oscillating mass per cylinder . . . . . . . . 886kg
Connecting rod ratio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.221
Distance between cylinder
centrelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1000mm
Table 2-34 Residual external couples - engine L 58/64
For engines of type L 58/64 the external mass forces are equal to zero.
Firing order: counted from coupling side
Table 2-35 Firing order - engine L 58/64
1l
lrregular crank arrangement
Engine
Firing
order
Residual external couples
M
rot
(kNml M
osc 1st order
(kNml M
osc 2nd order
(kNml
6 L 58/64 A
0
0 0
7 L 58/64 C 0 120
8 L 58/64 B 0 0
9 L 58/64 B 72 199
No. of cylinders Firing order Clockwise rotation Counter clockwise rotation
6 A 1-3-5-6-4-2 1-2-4-6-5-3
7 C
1l
1-2-4-6-7-5-3 -
8 B 1-4-7-6-8-5-2-3 1-3-2-5-8-6-7-4
9 B 1-6-3-2-8-7-4-9-5 1-5-9-4-7-8-2-3-6
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.8.2 Balancing of masses
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Diesel engine and operation
2.2.8.3 Static torque fluctuation
Status 04/2000 58/64 Page 2 - 87
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2.2.8.3 Static torque fluctuation
General
The static torque fluctuation is the summation -
taking into account the correct phase-angles -
of the torques acting at all cranks around the
crankshaft axis. These torques are created by
the gas and mass forces acting at the crankpins,
with the crank radius being used as the lever
(see examples on the following pagesl. An abso-
lutely rigid crankshaft is assumed. The values
T
max
and T
min
listed in the tables on the follow-
ing pages represent a measure for the reaction
forces occurring at the foundation of the engine
(see the figure belowl. The static values listed in
the table undergo in each individual case a dy-
namic magnification which is dependent upon
the characteristics of the foundation (design and
material thicknesses in way of the foundation,
type of chockingl.
The reaction forces generated by the torque
fluctuation are the most important excitations
transmitted into the foundation in the case of a
rigidly or semi-resiliently mounted engine. Their
frequency is dependent upon speed and cylin-
der number, and is also listed in the table.
ln order to avoid local vibration excitations in the
vessel, it must be ensured that the natural fre-
quencies of important part structures (e.g. pan-
els, bulkheads, tank walls and decks, equipment
and its foundation, pipe systemsl have a suffi-
cient safety margin (if possible œ30%l in relation
to this main excitation frequency.
z Number of cylinders
L Distance between foundation bolts
F
D
L × z ×
T
max
T
min

2
------------------------------ =
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.8.3 Static torque fluctuation
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2.2.8.3 Static torque fluctuation
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Static torque fluctuation
Engine L 58/64
Example to declare abbreviations
Figure 2-25 Static torque fluctuation - engine L 58/64
Table 2-36 Static torque fluctuation and exciting frequency - engine L 58/64
1l
Exciting frequency of the main harmonic components.
Engine
Output Speed T
n
T
max
T
min
Main exciting components
Order Frequency œT
kW rpm kNm kNm kNm - Hz kNm
6L 58/64 7,860
400
187.6 424.5 -21.5
3.0
6.0
20.0
40.0
214.7
74.9
7L 58/64 9,170 218.9 575.5 -83.5
3.5
7.0
23.3
46.6
346.2
41.8
8L 58/64 10,480 250.2 551.9 -10.5
4.0
8.0
26.7
53.4
294.6
18.7
9L 58/64 11,790 281.5 554.6 41.3
4.5
9.0
30.0
60.0
259.4
8.4
6L 58/64 8,400
428
187.4 401.6 -8.6
3.0
6.0
21.4
42.8
200.2
68.1
7L 58/64 9,800 218.7 575.1 -83.3
3.5
7.0
25.0
50.0
349.4
33.5
8L 58/64 11,200 249.9 549.4 -8.5
4.0
8.0
28.5
57.0
292.2
9.9
9L 58/64 12,600 281.1 554.3 41.3
4.5
9.0
32.1
64.1
267.7
7.8
Engine related service systems
2.2.8.3 Static torque fluctuation
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Diesel engine and operation
2.2.9 Power transmission
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2.2.9 Power transmission
2.2.9.1 Flywheel arrangement
Flywheel with flexible coupling; propeller operation
Figure 2-26 Flywheel with flexible coupling - engine 58/64
Use for project purposes only!
Final dimensions of flywheel and flexible cou-
pling will result from clarification of technical de-
tails of drive and from the result of the torsional
vibration calculation. Flywheel diameter must
not be changed!
Engine
A E F
min
F
max
No. of
through
bolts
No. of fitted
bolts
6L 58/64
Dimension will result from clarification of
technical details of propulsion drive
200 400 8
4
7L 58/64 215 430 4
8L 58/64 215 430 8
9L 58/64 235 470 8
Table 2-37 Dimensions - power transmission L 58/64
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.9 Power transmission
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Flywheel with flexible coupling; Diesel-electric units
Figure 2-27 Flywheel with flexible coupling - engine L 58/64
Use for project purposes only!
Final dimensions of flywheel and flexible cou-
pling will result from clarification of technical de-
tails of drive and from the result of the torsional
vibration calculation. Flywheel diameter must
not be changed!
Engine
A B C D E G No. of
through
bolts
No. of fitted
bolts
mm
6L 58/64
Dimensions will result from clarification of technical
details of propulsion drive
2000 8
4
7L 58/64 2000 4
8L 58/64 2540 8
9L 58/64 2540 8
Table 2-38 Dimensions - power transmission L 58/64
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.9 Power transmission
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Arrangement of flywheel, coupling and gearbox
Figure 2-28 Example: arrangement of flywheel, coupling and gearbox
Arrangement of flywheel, coupling and generator
Figure 2-29 Example: arrangement of flywheel, coupling and generator
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.9 Power transmission
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Diesel engine and operation
2.2.10 Attached pumps
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2.2.10 Attached pumps
Figure 2-30 Attached pumps L 58/64
Note!
The final arrangement of the L.O. and cooling
water pumps will be made due to the inquiry or
order.
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.10 Attached pumps
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2.2.11 Foundation
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2.2.11 Foundation
2.2.11.1 General requirements for engine foundation
Plate thicknesses
The stated material dimensions are recommen-
dations, thicknesses smaller than these should
not be allowed.
Top plates
Before or after having been welded in place, the
bearing surfaces should be machined and freed
from rolling scale. Surface finish corresponding
to Ra 3.2 peak-to-valley roughness in the area of
the chocks.
The thickness given is the finished size after ma-
chining.
Downward inclination outwards, not exceeding
0.7 %.
Prior to fitting the chocks, clean the bearing sur-
faces from dirt and rust that may have formed:
After the drilling of the foundation bolt holes,
spotface the lower contact face normal to the
bolt hole.
Foundation girders
The distance of the inner girders must be ob-
served. We recommend that the distance of the
outer girders (only required for larger typesl also
be observed.
The girders must be aligned exactly above and
underneath the tank top.
Floor plates
No manholes are permitted in the floor plates in
the area of the box-shaped foundation. Welding
is to be carried out through the manholes in the
outer girders.
Top plate supporting
Provide support in the area of the frames from
the nearest girder below.
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.11 Foundation
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2.2.11 Foundation
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2.2.11.2 Rigid seating
Recommended configuration of foundation
Engine L 58/64
Figure 2-31 Recommended configuration of foundation L 58/64
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.11 Foundation
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Recommended configuration of foundation
Figure 2-32 Recommended configuration of foundation L58/64 - number of bolts
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.11 Foundation
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Recommended configuration of foundation
Figure 2-33 Arrangement of foundation bolts L 58/64
Two fitted bolts must be provided either on
standard or port side only, i.e. in each case
looking towards flywheel.
√ with engine rotating on port side,
√ with engine rotating on counter clockside on
startboard side.
Number and positioning of stoppers are to be
provided in accordance with the picture above.
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.11 Foundation
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2.2.11 Foundation
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2.2.11.3 Chocking with synthetic resin
Engine 58/64
Most classification societies permit the use of
the following synthetic resins for chocking Die-
sel engines:
√ Chockfast Orange
(Philadelphia Resins Corp. U.S.Al
√ Epocast 36
(H.A. Springer, Kiell
MAN Diesel accepts engines being chocked
with synthetic resin provided
√ processing is done by authorized agents of
the above companies
√ the classification society responsible has ap-
proved the synthetic resin to be used for a
unit pressure (engine weight + foundation
bolt preloadingl of 450 N/cm
2
and a chock
temperature of at least 80 °C.
The loaded area of the chocks must be dimen-
sioned in a way, that the pressure effected by
the engines dead weight does not exceed 70 N/
cm
2
(requirement of some classification socie-
tiesl.
The pre-tensioning force of the foundation bolts
was chosen so that the permissible total surface
area load of 450 N/cm
2
is not exceeded. This will
ensure that the horizontal thrust resulting from
the mass forces is safely transmitted by the
chocks.
The shipyard is responsible for the execution
and must also grant the warranty.
Tightening of the foundation bolts only permissi-
ble with hydraulic tensioning device. The point
of application of force is the end of the thread
with a length of 173 mm. Nuts definitely must
not be tightened with hook spanner and ham-
mer, even for later inspections.
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.11 Foundation
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Figure 2-34 Hydraulic tension device
The tensioning tool with tensioning nut and
pressure sleeve are included in the standard
scope of supply of tools for the engine
Hydraulic tension device L 58/64
Tool number -
009.301
055.100
021.436
Piston area cm ² 122.52
Maximum pump pressure bar 1000
Table 2-39 Hydraulic tension tool L 58/64
Pretensioning force L 58/64
Pre-tensioning force kN 715
Pump pressure required bar 700
Setting allowance % 20
Calculated screw elongation mm 0.70
Utilization of yield point % 62
Table 2-40 Pre-tension force L 58/64
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.11 Foundation
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Figure 2-35 Chocking with synthetic resin L 58/64
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.11 Foundation
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Figure 2-36 Chocking with synthetic resin 12v, 14v, 16v 48/60 B
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.11 Foundation
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2.2.11.4 Resilient seating
General
The engines cause dynamic effects on the foun-
dation. These effects are to be attributed to the
pulsating forces of reaction due to the irregular
torque, and in engines with certain cylinder
numbers these effects are attributable to the re-
sidual forces and couples. ln addition, an engine
with internal combustion generates structure-
borne sound, which is also transmitted into the
foundation.
The direct resilient mounting makes it possible
to keep the foundation practically free from the
dynamic forces which are generated by every
reciprocating engine and may have harmful ef-
fects on the environment of the engines under
adverse conditions.
Therefore, such a resilient mounting can be pro-
vided in order to increase comfort, particularly
on ferries, passenger and cruise vessels.
The desired shielding from the disturbances var-
iables (dynamical forcesl by means of resilient
mounting will only be achieved if the natural fre-
quencies of the resilient mounting are well below
the pulsation frequencies of the disturbances.
This can be easily achieved with medium-speed
engines. The anti-vibration mounts connected
to the engine parts by brackets must be suitably
selected to ensure that, particularly at low serv-
ice speeds, the natural frequencies of the resil-
iently mounted engine are below about 5 Hz.
The number and distribution of the anti-vibration
mounts as well as their inclination angle depend
on
√ the weight of the engine
√ the centre of gravity of the engine,
√ the desired natural frequencies.
The design of the resilient mounting will be ad-
justed to the requirements of the particular unit.
Where resilient mounting is applied, the design
concept of a propulsion plant must pay regard
to the following facts:
1. Between the resiliently mounted engine and
rigidly mounted gearbox or generator, a
flexible coupling with minimum axial and ra-
dial elastic forces and large axial and radial
displacement capacities must be provided.
2. With few exceptions it will be necessary to
use a controllable-pitch propeller, since a
relatively large speed range (below approx.
70% of the rated speedl has to be barred
due to the mounting frequencies and asso-
ciated resonances.
3. The pipes to and from the engine must be of
highly flexible type.
4. Stoppers must be provided due to the roll-
ing and pitching of the vessel.
5. The yard must specify with which inclination
related to the plane keel the engine will be
installed in the ship. When calculating the
resilient mounting system, it has to be
checked whether the desired inclination can
be realised without special measures. Addi-
tional measures always result in additional
costs.
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.11 Foundation
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Diesel engine and operation
2.2.11 Foundation
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2.2.11.5 Recommended configuration of foundation
Engine mounting on inclined sandwich elements
Figure 2-37 Recommended configuration of foundation L 58/64 - resilient seating
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.11 Foundation
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Figure 2-38 Recommended configuration of Foundation L 58/64 - resilient seating
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.11 Foundation
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2.2.11.6 lnstallation of flexible pipe connections for resiliently mounted engines
Arrangement of hoses on resiliently mounted engine
Flexible pipe connections become necessary to
connect resilient mounted engines with external
piping systems. They are used to compensate
the dynamic movements of the engine in relation
to the external piping system. The origin of the
dynamic engine movements, their direction and
identity, are in principle indicated in Table 2-41.
Table 2-41 Simplified trend synopsis of dynamic engine movements. The number of "x" indicates the incidence.
Figure 2-39 Coordinate system
Main direction of dynamic engine movements
Horizontal
lateral
Horizontal
axial
vertical
Rotation
around the
axial
direction
Rotation
around
the lateral
direction
Rotation
around the
vertical
direction
Y X Z Rx Ry Rz
O
r
i
g
i
n

o
f

d
y
n
a
m
i
c

m
o
v
e
m
e
n
t
s
Sea conditions xxxxx xx x xxxxx xx -
Engine torque - - - xxx - -
vibration during
normal operation
x x x x x x
run out reso-
nance
xxx - - xxxx x -
Sum xxxxxxxxx xxx xx xxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxx x
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.11 Foundation
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Generally flexible pipes (rubber hoses with steel
inlet, metal hoses, PTFE-corrugated hose-lines,
rubber bellows with steel inlet, steel bellows,
steel compensatorsl are nearly unable to com-
pensate twisting movements. Therefore the in-
stallation direction of flexible pipes must be
vertically (in Z-directionl if ever possible. An in-
stallation in horizontal-axial direction (in X-direc-
tionl is not permitted; an installation in
horizontal-lateral (Y-directionl is not recom-
mended.
Flange and screw connections
Flexible pipes delivered loosely by MAN Diesel
are fitted with flange connections, for sizes with
DN32 upwards. Smaller sizes are fitted with
screw connections. Each flexible pipe is deliv-
ered complete with counterflanges or, those
smaller than DN32, with weld-on sockets.
Arrangement of the external piping system
Shipyard's pipe system must be exactly ar-
ranged so that the flanges or screw connections
do fit without lateral or angular offset. Therefore
it is recommended to adjust the final position of
the pipe connections after engine alignment is
completed.
Figure 2-40 Arrangement of pipes in system
lnstallation of hoses
ln the case of straight-line-vertical installation, a
suitable distance between the hose connections
has to be chosen, so that the hose is installed
with a sag. The hose must not be in tension dur-
ing operation. To meet a correct sag in a
straight-line-vertically installed hose, the dis-
tance between the connected hose connections
(hose installed, engine stoppedl has to be ap-
prox. 5 % shorter as the same distance of the
unconnected hose (unconnected hose without
sagl.
ln case it is unavoidable (this is not recommend-
edl to connect the hose in lateral-horizontal di-
rection (Y-directionl the hose must be installed
preferably with a 90° arc. The minimum bending
radii, specified in our drawings, are to be ob-
served.
Never twist the hoses during installation. Turna-
ble lapped flanges on the hoses avoid this.
Where screw connections are used, steady the
hexagon on the hose with a wrench while fitting
the nut.
Comply with all installation instructions of the
hose manufacturer.
Depending on the required application rubber
hoses with steel inlet, metal hoses or PTFE-cor-
rugated hose lines are used.
lnstallation of steel compensators
Steel compensators are used for hot media, e.g.
exhaust gas. They can compensate movements
in line and transversal to their centre line, but
they are absolutely unable to compensate twist-
ing movements. Compensators are very stiff
against torsion. For this reason all kind of steel
compensators installed on resilient mounted en-
gines are to be installed in vertical direction.
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.11 Foundation
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Note!
Exhaust gas compensators are also used to
compensate thermal expansion. Therefore ex-
haust gas compensators are required for all type
of engine mountings, also for semi-resilient or
rigid mounted engines. But in these cases the
compensators are quite shorter, they are de-
signed only to compensate the thermal expan-
sions and vibrations, but not other dynamic
engine movements.
Angular compensator for fuel oil
The fuel oil compensator, to be used for resilient
mounted engines, can be an angular system
composed of three compensators with different
characteristics. Please observe the installation
instruction indicated on the specific drawing.
Supports of pipes
The flexible pipe must be installed as near as
possible to the engine connection.
On the shipside, directly after the flexible pipe,
the pipe is to be fixed with a sturdy pipe anchor
of higher than normal quality. This anchor must
be capable to absorb the reaction forces of the
flexible pipe, the hydraulic force of the fluid and
the dynamic force
Example for the axial force of a compensator to
be absorbed by the pipe anchor:
√ Hydraulic force
= (Cross section area of the compensatorl x
(Pressure of the fluid insidel
√ Reaction force
= (Spring rate of the compensatorl x (Dis-
placement of the comp.l
√ Axial force
= (Hydraulic forcel + (Reaction forcel
Additionally a sufficient margin has to be ob-
served to consider also pressure peaks and vi-
brations.
Diesel engine and operation
2.2.11 Foundation
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Figure 2-41 lnstallation of hoses
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.1 System overview
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2.3 Engine automation
2.3.1 System overview
The monitoring and automation system com-
prises devices directly attached to the engine,
switch cabinets to be set-up in the engine room,
switch cabinets for set-up in the engine control
room as well as operating devices and indicating
instruments.
The system consists of the following compo-
nents:
√ Signal pick-up and conversion
√ Local control station (local on enginel
√ SaCoS (switch cabinets in the engine control
room or engine rooml
√ Auxiliary cabinet (engine rooml
√ Uninterrupted power supply (engine control
rooml (optionall
√ lndicating and operating panel (in the engine
control rooml (optionall
√ CoCoS-EDS engine diagnosis system (op-
tionall
√ Remote indication and operating panel
(wheelhousel (optionall
√ Media temperature controllers (engine con-
trol rooml (optionall
√ Remote speed indicators (optionall.
The engine is fully monitored and controlled by
SaCoS (Safety and Control Systeml. Control is
normally performed by means of an operating
and indicating panel installed in the engine con-
trol room console. Local control from the engine
room is also possible. Both operating and indi-
cating panels are part of SaCoS. The connection
between SaCoS and the engine is effected via
permanent wiring.
The electronic speed controller is installed inside
one of the SaCoS cabinets. The speed con-trol
is subordinate to SaCoS.
The connection between the engine system and
the load management, the plant-specific control
system as well as the alarm system are effected
via the interfaces of SaCoS.
The auxiliary cabinet supplies and controls all
engine-attached electric motors.
The CoCoS-EDS engine diagnosis system is a
computer-controlled system which is supplied
with data by SaCoS and which is suitable for the
connection of up to four engines.
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.1 System overview
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Figure 2-42 Automation overview - system block diagram
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.2 Supply and distribution
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2.3.2 Supply and distribution
The supply of electric power for the automation
and monitoring system is divided into the com-
ponents "power supply" and "distribution".
Power supply is part of the yard's scope of sup-
ply. An uninterrupted power supply module may
be offered as an option
Figure 2-43 Supply of electric power
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.2 Supply and distribution
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2.3.2.1 Power supply
Power supply for the automation and monitoring
system is to be effected in accordance with the
classification society's requirements for marine
propulsion engines.
For this purpose, an uninterrupted power supply
is required which has to be provided by two in-
dividual supply networks and designed to en-
sure that in case both supply networks fail, the
power supply to the connected systems is guar-
anteed for a sufficiently long period.
2.3.2.2 Distribution, auxiliary drives
The supply to the individual subsystems of Sa-
CoS has to be realised by the yard.
The auxiliary drive cabinet has to be supplied
from the main switchboard. lt is controlled and
monitored by SaCoS and serves the purpose of
controlling the auxiliary drives in the vicinity of
the engine.
The following components are controlled:
√ Cylinder lubrication
√ valve lubrication
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.3 SaCoS
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2.3.3 SaCoS
The Safety and Control System serves for full
monitoring and control of an engine.
SaCoS comprises:
√ two control cabinets that contain the inde-
pendent subsystems safety system, engine
control and alarm pre-processing, and that
are to be set up in the engine control room or
in the engine room.
√ the operating panels in the engine room and
in the engine control room.
The subsystems safety system, engine control
and alarm pre-processing work completely in-
dependently from one another; however, the ex-
change of information is effected via a common
system bus (Arcnetl.
Each of the subsystems is connected with its
appertaining signal-processing modules.
The SaCoS control cabinets contain all interfac-
es to the other system components and to ex-
ternal systems, i.e.:
√ Generator protection
√ Load management
√ Alarm system/remote control
√ Pump control
√ Gear box
√ Propulsion control system
2.3.3.1 Safety system
The safety system monitors all required operat-
ing data of the engine and initiates the required
actions, i.e. load reduction or engine shut-down
in case the limit values are exceeded. The sys-
tem is designed to ensure that the functions are
achieved in accordance with the classification
societies' requirements for marine propulsion
engines.
The safety system directly monitors emergency
shut-down, speed control and the auxiliary drive
cabinet.
ln addition to the provisions made to permit the
internal initiation of demands, binary and ana-
logue channels have been provided for the initi-
ation of safety functions by external systems:
√ Emergency engine stop by the generator pro-
tection
√ Emergency engine stop by the load manage-
ment
√ Emergency engine stop by the heat recovery
boiler
√ Emergency stop by manual emergency shut-
down device
√ Monitoring of the generator windings
√ Emergency stop by gear box parameters.
Load reduction
Load reduction has to be realised by the propul-
sion control system. Load reductions are only
implemented after preceding alarm initiation by
the subsystem alarm pre-processing, and are
requested by the safety system.
Emergency stop
lf an emergency stop is triggered by the safety
system, the emergency stop signal has an im-
mediate effect on the emergency shut-down de-
vice and the speed control. At the same time the
emergency stop is triggered, SaCoS issues a
signal for zero pitch.
Override
Safety actions can be suppressed by the over-
ride function for various parameters. The over-
ride has to be selected before a safety action is
actuated. The scope of parameters prepared for
override are different and depend to the chosen
classification society.
2.3.3.2 Alarm pre-processing
The subsystem alarm pre-processing works in-
dependently from the safety system. lt monitors
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.3 SaCoS
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all operating parameters and signals alarms in
case impermissible deviations occur.
Alarm initiation
All impermissible deviations from operating pa-
rameters as well as malfunctions cause alarm si-
gnals to be issued and transmitted to the alarm
systems via a serial bus interface.
2.3.3.3 Engine control
The engine control system controls and moni-
tors all engine functions, the speed control and
the auxiliary drive cabinet.
Starting/stopping sequences
Demands regarding lube oil and cooling water
pumps, monitoring of the prelubrication and
post-cooling period, monitoring of the accelera-
tion period.
Control station switch-over
Switch-over from local operation in the engine
room to remote control from the engine control
room and to the remote control system.
Speed setting
Local and manual speed setting is realised by
the SaCoS operating panels. Automatic remote
speed setting is carried out by the propulsion
control system while remote control is selected
Jet-assist
To improve the response of the engine to a new
load condition, starting air is supplied to the tur-
bocharger via a valve when load is applied.
Pump control
The demands regarding the electric pumps for
lubricating oil and cooling water are issued by
SaCoS. SaCoS also supplies the request signals
for standby start of the lube oil and HT cool-ing
water pumps. The standby and pump logics are
to be realised in an external pump control sys-
tem.
Temperature control
Temperature controllers for various operating
medias are available. For more details, please
refer to chapter "temperature control" or chapter
of the respective subsystems.
2.3.3.4 Electronic speed control
The electronic speed governing system includes
the control and regulating devices for the fuel
rack actuator.
The speed governing system effects the ex-
change of all data required for safe and reliable
op-eration with the Safety and Control System.
This data exchange is carried out via hardware
connections. There is no direct connection be-
tween the speed control and the superior plant-
specific control system. Communication with
the plant-specific control system takes place via
SaCoS exclusively.
Speed setting
An influence on speed is exerted by SaCoS. ln
case of remote control, a set-point input by the
plant-specific control system is possible either
by means of binary contacts (e.g. for synchroni-
sationl or alternatively by an active 4-20mA an-
alogue signal via SaCoS.
ln the case of local control, speed alteration is
only possible at the local engine control stand.
Operating modes
The following operating modes are available as
a standard:
√ lsochronous
√ Droop (with a 5-percent speed increase when
reducing load from nominal load to no load,
as a standardl.
The operating mode is preselected via the Sa-
CoS interface and has to be defined during the
application period.
Details regarding special operating modes on
request.
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.3 SaCoS
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Load sharing
ln the case of multi-engine plants, load sharing
is effected by a droop function. ln the isochro-
nous operating mode, load distribution is possi-
ble by direct intercommunication between the
speed governors.
lnterfaces
The speed governing system is supplied with
electric power of the required voltage from the
power supply cabinet. Cabling is to be done by
the yard.
The connection of the speed control cabinet
with the actuators on the engine is to be carried
out by the yard. The restrictions with regard to
the length of these connecting lines mentioned
under item 2 are to be observed.
The connection to SaCoS is realised by means
of a prefabricated cable set.
2.3.3.5 Operation
Local operation
Local operation is carried out via an operating
panel which is directly installed at the engine.
visualisation of relevant operating data is real-
ised by gauges. The following operational func-
tions are possible:
√ Starting
√ Stopping
√ Adjustment of the desired speed value
√ Local control/remote control switch-over
√ Reset for stops and alarms
√ Engine emergency stop.
lndications:
√ Engine speed
√ Cylinder cooling water pressure
√ Charge air cooling water pressure
√ lnjection valve cooling water pressure
√ Turbocharger lube oil pressure
√ Fuel oil pressure
√ Engine lube oil pressure
√ Control air pressure
√ Charge air pressure
√ Starting air pressure.
Remote operation
An operating panel for installation at the control-
ling console of the engine control room will be
delivered for remote control.
The panel is equipped with an interactive display
for visualisation of all engine parameters, status
and fault indications.
The following operational functions are possible:
√ Starting
√ Stopping
√ Control station switch-over (local/remote
controll to remote control system
√ Reset for stops and alarms
√ Engine emergency stop.
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.3 SaCoS
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Diesel engine and operation
2.3.4 Temperature control
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2.3.4 Temperature control
To ensure trouble-free engine operation, various
media have to be controlled.
HT cooling water temperature control
The temperature control is effected by a sepa-
rate temperature controller.
The temperature control is equipped with a per-
formance-related feedforward control in order to
ensure best possible control accuracy.
The controller has to be mounted at the engine
control room desk and is to be wired to the Sa-
CoS cabinets and to the temperature control
valve.
LT cooling water temperature control
The temperature control is effected by a sepa-
rate temperature controller.
The temperature control is equipped with a per-
formance-related feedforward control in order to
ensure best possible control accuracy.
The controller has to be mounted at the engine
control room desk and is to be wired to the Sa-
CoS cabinets and to the temperature control
valve.
Charge-air temperature control
The design of the charge air temperature control
depends on the engine; its structure is identical
with that of the HT cooling water temperature
control.
Control of the cooling water quantity takes place
in the LT part of the charge-air cooler (see cool-
ing water systeml.
The controller has to be mounted at the engine
control room desk and is to be wired to the Sa-
CoS cabinets and to the temperature control
valve.
Lube oil temperature control
The temperature control is effected by a sepa-
rate temperature controller.
The temperature control is equipped with a per-
formance-related feedforward control in order to
ensure best possible control accuracy.
The controller has to be mounted at the engine
control room desk and is to be wired to the Sa-
CoS cabinets and to the temperature control
valve.
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.4 Temperature control
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Diesel engine and operation
2.3.5 lnterfaces
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2.3.5 lnterfaces
The automation and control system consists of
several interfaces to external systems.
√ Machinery alarm system
√ Propulsion control system
√ Gear box
√ Pump control
√ Remote control system
Machinery alarm system
Hardware
The main connection between SaCoS and the
machinery alarm system is implemented as se-
rial interface RS232 or RS422/RS485
√ RS422/RS485 - Standard 5 wire with electri-
cal isolation (cable length ≤ 100ml
√ RS232 - Standard, no electrical isolation (ca-
ble length < 10ml.
Software
The software interface is realised with a MOD-
BUS RTU protocol whereby the SaCoS-system
acts as MODBUS Slave.
All measured values of the engine are provided
as floating-point data words in a fixed register.
All pre-alarms, load reduction, shutdown and
status information from the SaCoS system are
also available as single bits in this register.
Propulsion control system
The interface to the propeller system is carried
out as hardwired interface. Signals for safety ac-
tions and control function as well as clutch con-
trol functions are exchanged.
Gear box
The interface includes all necessary signals for
gear box control by the main engine. Alarm in-
dications of the gear box have to be realised by
the machinery alarm system directly.
Pump control
SaCoS sends request signal for oil and cooling
water pumps to the pump control panel.
Remote control system
For various applications free programmable sig-
nals can be used at a separate interface.
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.5 lnterfaces
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Diesel engine and operation
2.3.6 Technical data
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2.3.6 Technical data
2.3.6.1 Design, environmental condi-
tions
All switch boards are designed as cabinets to be
placed on the floor with cable entry from below,
through the base.
The cabinets are accessible through doors pro-
vided at the front. All doors are equipped with
locking devices, the opening angle is 90° see
figure below.
Figure 2-44 Door opening area at control cabinets
All switch cabinets are supplied in the standard
colour light grey, RAL 7035. The cabinets' de-
gree of protection is lP54.
Environmental conditions for all cabinets:
Ambient temperature: . . . . .+10 °C to +45 °C
Relative humidity: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . < 60%
vibrations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . < 0.7g
2.3.6.2 lnstallation locations
Engine room
Auxiliary cabinet
lncludes all starters for electric motors mounted
on the engine and depending on the type of
electronic speed governor also the driver unit for
the actuator.
Engine control room
SaCoS control cabinets
Arrangement in the engine control room. The
cabinets do not have to be attended for daily op-
eration.
SaCoS operating panel
lnstallation in the engine control room consol for
permanent attendance.
Weights
Table 2-42 Weights of cabinets, panels
Device
Weight
approx.
kg
Uninterrupted power supply (optionl 80
Auxiliary cabinet 100
SaCoS switch cabinet 300
Operating panel in the engine control room 15
Generator control cabinet 300
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.6 Technical data
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Dimensions, views
Table 2-43 Dimensions of cabinets
Electrical consumption data
Width Height Depth
mm
Auxiliary cabinet
depending on type
of speed governor
1l
600 600 350
800 2,100
2l
400
SaCoS safety sys-
tem cabinet
1,200 2,100
2l
400
SaCoS control cabi-
net
1,200 2,100
2l
400
SaCoS operating
pane
400 600
3l
100
1l
Wall mounted
2l
lncluding base
3l
For control desk installation
Consumer Supply system
Remarks
Pn
[kvAì
Ub
[vì
f
[Hzì
Phase Fuse/starter
By yard[Aì
SaCoS safety system
0.3 24 DC +/- 16
Power supply from ship battery dis-
tribution
(two line redundant power supplyl
SaCoS engine control and
alarm preprocessing system 0.3 24 DC +/- 16
Power supply from ship battery dis-
tribution
(two line redundant power supplyl
SaCoS engine speed gover-
nor 0.15 24 DC +/- 10
Power supply from ship battery dis-
tribution
(two line redundant power supplyl
SaCoS safety system
0.25 230
50/
60
2≈ 10
Cabinet illumination, socket, anti
condensation heater
SaCoS engine control and
alarm preprocessing system
0.25 230
50/
60
2≈ 10
Cabinet illumination, socket, anti
condensation heater
Driver unit for engine speed
governor (EM300l
2.5 230
50/
60
2≈ 16
Battery buffered supply according
to class req. for electronic speed
governors.
Only if full electronic speed gover-
nor is used
Auxilliary cabinet 0.45/
2.2*/
5.1**
400
-
440
50/
60
3≈
6
10**
*peak load only short time for vlT-
setting
**only if full electronic speed gov-
ernor is used
Temperature controllers
0.07 * 230
50/
60
2≈ 1 *
* Temperature controller incl. regu-
lating valve drive, per each temper-
ature control system
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.7 lnstallation requirements
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2.3.7 lnstallation requirements
Location
The cabinets for engine control and safety sys-
tem are designed for installation in clean and
non hazardous areas like control rooms. Both
cabinets should be located side by side.
The cable length between the engine and the
SaCoS cabinets is limited to 60 meters.
The power stack cabinet is designed for engine
room installation. For some speed governor
types the cable length between the engine and
the power stack cabinet is limited to 15 meters.
Please refer also to the chapter engine room
planning.
All cabinets must be installed at a location suit-
able for service inspection.
Do not install the cabinets close to devices gen-
erating heat.
ln case of installation at walls, the distance be-
tween cabinet and wall has to be at least
100 mm in order to make air convection possi-
ble.
For installation in engine rooms the cabinets
should be supplied with fresh air by the engine
room ventilation.
lf the restrictions for ambient temperature can
not be kept, the cabinets have to be ordered
with an optional air condition system.
Ambient conditions
For restrictions of ambient conditions please re-
fer to the Chapter 2.3.6 "Technical data", Page
2-127
Cabling
The interconnection cables between the engine
and the SACOS cabinets have to be installed
according to the rules of electromagnetic com-
patibility. Control cables and power cables have
to be routed in seperate cable ducts.
The bending radius for installation of the pre-
manufactured SaCoS-cables is not allowed to
be less than 180 mm.
The cables for the connection of sensors and
actuators which are not mounted on the engine
are not included in the scope of MAN Diesel
supply. For the cabling of sensors shielded ca-
bles have to be used.
For electrical noise protection, an electric
ground connection must be made from each
cabinet to the ship's hull.
All cabling between the power stack cabinet and
the controlled device is scope of yard supply.
The cabinets are equipped with spring loaded
terminal clamps. All wiring to external systems
should be carried out without conductor
sleeves.
lnstallation works
During the installation period the yard has to
protect the cabinets against water, dust and fire.
lt is not allowed to do any welding works near
the cabinets. The cabinets have to be fixed to
the floor or to the walls by means of screws.
lf it is inevitable to do welding works near the
cabinet, the cabinets and panels have to be pro-
tected against heat, electric current and electro-
magnetic influences. For protection against
current, all cabling has to be disconnected from
the affected components.
lnstallation of additional components inside the
cabinets is allowed upon approval by the re-
sponsible project manager of MAN Diesel only.
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.7 lnstallation requirements
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Diesel engine and operation
2.3.8 Standard list of engine-located measuring and control devices
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2.3.8 Standard list of engine-located measuring and control devices
No. Measuring
point
Description Function Measur-
ing range
Location Connected
to
Depend-
ing on
option
local control station
1 1Sl1000 speed indicator
engine speed
local indication 0-600
rpm
control
station on
engine
2 1GO1010 indication lamp
"mech speed set-
point min"
setpoint indica-
tion
control
station on
engine
speed
control
3 2GO1010 indication lamp
"mech speed set-
point max"
setpoint indica-
tion
control
station on
engine
speed
control
4 1GO1011 indication lamp
"don't start"
indication while
remote start is
blocked
control
station on
engine
engine con-
trol
5 1HZv1011 push button and
pneumatic valve
emergency start
manual emer-
gency start
control
station on
engine
start valve
1SSv1011
speed
control
6 1HOZ1012 push button
local emergency
stop
emergency
stop from local
control station
control
station on
engine
safety sys-
tem
7 1HS1014 selector switch
local/remote
switch between
local and
remote control
control
station on
engine
engine con-
trol
elec-
tronic
speed
control
8 1HS1016 selector switch
electric or
mechanic gover-
nor
select elec-
tronic speed
governor
control
station on
engine
engine con-
trol
speed
control
9 1GO1070 indication lamp
turning gear
engaged
illuminated
while turning
gear is
engaged
control
station on
engine
engine con-
trol
10 1HS1075 push button
engine is turned
acknowledge
engine is
turned
control
station on
engine
engine con-
trol
slow turn
11 1Pl2170 pressure gauge
lube oil pressure
engine inlet
local indication 0-10 bar control
station on
engine
12 1PT2170 pressure transmit-
ter
lube oil pressure
engine inlet
alarm at low
lube oil pres-
sure
0-10 bar control
station on
engine
alarm pre-
processing
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.8 Standard list of engine-located measuring and control devices
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13 2PT2170 pressure transmit-
ter
lube oil pressure
engine inlet
auto shutdown
at low pressure
0-10 bar control
station on
engine
safety sys-
tem
14 1Pl2570 pressure gauge
lube oil pressure
turbocharger inlet
local indication 0-6 bar control
station on
engine
15 1PT2570 pressure transmit-
ter
lube oil pressure
turbocharger inlet
alarm at low
lube oil pres-
sure
0-6 bar control
station on
engine
alarm pre-
processing
16 2PT2570 pressure transmit-
ter
lube oil pressure
turbocharger inlet
auto shutdown
at low lube oil
pressure
0-6 bar control
station on
engine
safety sys-
tem
17 1Pl3170 pressure gauge
HT-water pres-
sure engine inlet
local indication 0-6 bar control sta-
tion on
engine
-
18 1PT3170 pressure transmit-
ter
HT-cooling water
pressure engine
inlet
alarm at low
pressure
0-6 bar control
station on
engine
alarm pre-
processing
19 2PT3170 pressure transmit-
ter
HT-cooling water
pressure engine
inlet
detection of
low cooling
water pressure
0-6 bar control
station on
engine
safety sys-
tem
20 1Pl4170 pressure gauge
LT-water pres-
sure charge air
cooler inlet
local indication 0-6 bar control
station on
engine
-
21 1PT4170 pressure transmit-
ter
LT-water pres-
sure charge air
cooler inlet
alarm at low
cooling water
pressure
0-6 bar control
station on
engine
alarm pre-
processing
22 1Pl5070 pressure gauge
fuel pressure
before injection
pumps
local indication 0-16 bar control
station on
engine
23 1PT5070 pressure transmit-
ter
fuel pressure
engine inlet
remote indica-
tion and alarm
0-16 bar control
station on
engine
alarm pre-
processing
No. Measuring
point
Description Function Measur-
ing range
Location Connected
to
Depend-
ing on
option
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.8 Standard list of engine-located measuring and control devices
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24 1Pl6180 pressure gauge
charge air pres-
sure before cylin-
ders
local indication
on engine
0-6 bar control
station on
engine
25 1PT6180 pressure transmit-
ter
charge air pres-
sure before cylin-
ders
engine control 0-6 bar control
station on
engine
engine con-
trol
26 1Pl7170 pressure gauge
starting air pres-
sure
local indication 0-40 bar control
station on
engine
27 1PT7170 pressure transmit-
ter
starting air pres-
sure
engine control,
remote indica-
tion
0-40 bar control
station on
engine
engine con-
trol
28 1PT7180 pressure transmit-
ter
emergency stop
air pressure
alarm at low air
pressure
0-40 bar control
station on
engine
alarm pre-
processing
29 1Pl7400 pressure gauge
control air pres-
sure
local indication 0-10 bar control
station on
engine
30 1PT7400 pressure transmit-
ter
control air pres-
sure
remote indica-
tion
0-10 bar control
station on
engine
alarm pre-
processing
engine speed, turbocharger speed
31 1SE1010 speed pickup
engine speed
overspeed
shutdown
0-310 Hz
/
0-600
rpm
engine safety sys-
tem
32 1SE1000 speed pickup
engine speed
slow turn and
indication
0-357Hz /
0-600
rpm
engine engine con-
trol
33 3SE1000 speed pickup
engine speed
engine speed
control
0-310 Hz
/
0-600
rpm
engine speed con-
troller
1SC1010
elec-
tronic
speed
control
34 4SE1000 speed pickup
engine speed
engine speed
control
0-310 Hz
/
0-600
rpm
engine speed con-
troller
1SC1010
elec-
tronic
speed
control
No. Measuring
point
Description Function Measur-
ing range
Location Connected
to
Depend-
ing on
option
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.8 Standard list of engine-located measuring and control devices
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35 1SE1004 speed pickup
turbocharger
speed
indication,
supervision
0-3667 Hz
/
0-20000
rpm
turbo-
charger
safety sys-
tem
36 1Sv1010 actuator
engine fuel admis-
sion
speed and load
governing
0-180 mA engine speed con-
trol
37 1GOS1010 limit switch
mech speed set-
point min
indication "min
speed set-
point"
speed
governor
on engine
control sta-
tion on
engine
speed
control
38 2GOS1010 limit switch
mech speed set-
point max
indication "max
speed set-
point"
speed gov-
ernor on
engine
control sta-
tion on
engine
speed
control
39 1HS1010 selector switch increase /
decrease
speed setpoint
engine
control
cabinet
speed con-
trol
speed
control
start and stop of engine
40 1SZ1010 solenoid valve
engine stop
manual stop
and auto shut-
down
speed
governor
on engine
engine con-
trol
speed
control
41 1PSH1011 pressure switch
start air pressure
feedback start
valve open,
reset and start
speed gover-
nor
0-10 bar start air
pipe on
engine
engine con-
trol
42 1SSv1011 solenoid valve
engine start
actuated dur-
ing engine start
engine engine con-
trol
43 1SZv1012 solenoid valve
engine shutdown
manual and
auto-emer-
gency shut-
down
engine safety sys-
tem
44 1PSH1012 pressure switch
emergency stop
air
feedback
emergency
stop, start-
blocking active,
speed gover-
nor stop acti-
vated
0-10 bar emergency
stop air
pipe on
engine
safety sys-
tem
fuel admission
No. Measuring
point
Description Function Measur-
ing range
Location Connected
to
Depend-
ing on
option
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.8 Standard list of engine-located measuring and control devices
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45 2GT1022 inductive position
sensor
for fuel admission
release of
engine opera-
tion depend-
ent on alarms
and engine
control
0-30°
rotation/
0-110%
fuel adm.
engine safety sys-
tem
variable injection timing
46 1Uv1028 solenoid valve
vlT adjustment
energise valve
means remove
hydraulic brake
for vlT-adjust-
ment
engine engine con-
trol
variable
injection
timing
47 2Uv1028 solenoid valve
vlT adjustment
energise valve
means remove
hydraulic brake
for vlT-adjust-
ment
engine engine con-
trol
variable
injection
timing
48 1EM1028 electric motor
vlT-setting
injection time
setting
engine power relay
cabinet on
engine
variable
injection
timing
49 1PSH1028 pressure switch
oil pressure vlT-
brake
release vlT-
motor at suffi-
cient pressure
0-6 bar engine engine con-
trol
variable
injection
timing
50 2PSH1028 pressure switch
oil pressure vlT-
brake
release vlT-
motor at suffi-
cient pressure
0-6 bar engine engine con-
trol
variable
injection
timing
51 1GOS1028 limit switch
early ignition
indication vlT
early position
engine engine con-
trol
variable
injection
timing
52 2GOS1028 limit switch
late ignition
indication vlT
late position
engine engine con-
trol
variable
injection
timing
charge air bypass
53 1XSv1030 solenoid valve
charge air bypass
flap
blow by while
partload or low
speed
engine engine con-
trol
charge air
bypass
charge air blow-off
54 1XSv1031 solenoid valve
charge air blow off
flap
charge air blow
off at low suc-
tion air temper-
ature
engine engine con-
trol
charge air
blow off
main bearings
No. Measuring
point
Description Function Measur-
ing range
Location Connected
to
Depend-
ing on
option
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.8 Standard list of engine-located measuring and control devices
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55 xTE1064 temp sensors
main bearings
indication and
engine protec-
tion
0-120°C engine safety sys-
tem
main
bearing
temp
monitor-
ing
turning gear
56 1GOS1070 limit switch
turning gear
engaged
indication and
start blocking
engine engine con-
trol
slow turn
57 1SSv1075 solenoid valve
M329 for slowturn
turning engine
with reduced
start air pres-
sure
engine engine con-
trol
slow turn
58 2SSv1075 solenoid valve
M371/2 for slow-
turn
turning the
engine in slow
mode
engine engine con-
trol
slow turn
jet assist
59 1SSv1080 solenoid valve
for jet assist
turbocharger
acceleration by
jet assist
engine engine con-
trol
jet assist
lube oil system
60 2PSZL2170 pressure switch
lube oil pressure
engine inlet
hardwired auto
shutdown
-1...4 bar engine safety sys-
tem
61 1Tl2170 temp indicator
lube oil temp
engine inlet
local indication 0-100°C engine -
62 1TE2170 temp sensor
lube oil temp
engine inlet
alarm at high
temp
0-120°C engine alarm pre-
processing
63 2TE2170 temp sensor
lube oil temp
engine inlet
request load
reduction at
high temp
0-120°C engine safety sys-
tem
64 3TE2170 temp sensor
lube oil temp
engine inlet
not used 0-120°C engine - lube oil
temp
control
65 1EM2470 electric motor
cylinder lubrica-
tion
cylinder lubri-
cation
engine power relay
cabinet
No. Measuring
point
Description Function Measur-
ing range
Location Connected
to
Depend-
ing on
option
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.8 Standard list of engine-located measuring and control devices
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66 1FE2470 limit switch
cylinder lubricator
function control
of cylinder
lubricator
0.1-1Hz engine engine con-
trol
67 1EM2475 electric motor
valve seat lubrica-
tion
valve seat
lubrication
engine power relay
cabinet
valve seat
lubrica-
tion
68 1TE2580 temp sensor
lube oil temp tur-
bocharger drain
alarm at high
temp
0-120°C engine alarm pre-
processing
69 2TE2580 temp sensor
lube oil temp tur-
bocharger drain
auto shutdown
at high temp
0-120°C engine safety sys-
tem
oil mist detection
70 1QTlA2870 oilmist detector
oilmist concentra-
tion in crankcase
oilmist supervi-
sion
engine oil mist
detection
splash oil
71 xTE2880 temp sensors
splashoil temp rod
bearings
splash oil
supervision
0-120°C engine safety sys-
tem
cooling water systems
72 1TE3168 temp sensor
HT-water temp
charge air cooler
inlet
for EDS visuali-
sation and con-
trol of
preheater valve
0-120°C engine alarm pre-
processing
73 1Tl3170 temp indicator
HT-water temp
engine inlet
local indication 0-120°C engine -
74 1TE3170 temp sensor
HT-water temp
engine inlet
alarm at low
temp
0-120°C engine alarm pre-
processing
75 1TE3180 temp sensor
HT-water temp
engine outlet
alarm at high
temp
0-120°C engine alarm pre-
processing
76 2TE3180 temp sensor
HT-water temp
engine outlet
load reduction
request at high
temp
0-120°C engine safety sys-
tem
77 3TE3180 temp sensor
HT-water temp
engine outlet
temp control of
HT-water
0-120°C engine temp con-
troller
1TC3180
HTCW
temp
control
No. Measuring
point
Description Function Measur-
ing range
Location Connected
to
Depend-
ing on
option
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.8 Standard list of engine-located measuring and control devices
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78 1TE4170 temp sensor
LT-water temp
charge air cooler
inlet
for EDS visuali-
sation
0-120 °C LT-pipe
charge air
cooler inlet
of engine
alarm pre-
processing
fuel system
79 1TE5070 temp sensor
fuel temp engine
inlet
alarm at high
temp in MDO-
mode
and for EDS
use
0-200°C engine alarm pre-
processing
80 1LSAH5080 level switch
fuel level in leak-
age fuel oil moni-
toring tank
alarm at high
level
fuel leak-
age moni-
toring tank
FSH-001
alarm pre-
processing
charge air system
81 1PT6100 pressure transmit-
ter
intake air pressure
for EDS visuali-
sation
-20...+20
mbar
tc-silencer
between fil-
ter and
silencer
alarm pre-
processing
82 1TE6100 temp sensor
intake air temp
temp input for
charge air
blow-off and
EDS visualisa-
tion
0-120°C intake air
duct of
engine
alarm pre-
processing
83 1TE6170 temp sensor
charge air temp
charge air cooler
inlet
for EDS visuali-
sation
0-300°C engine alarm pre-
processing
84 2PT6180 pressure transmit-
ter
charge air pres-
sure before cylin-
ders
for EDS visuali-
sation
0-4 bar engine alarm pre-
processing
85 1Tl6180 temp indicator
charge air temp
after charge air
cooler
local indication
on engine
0-120°C engine
86 1TE6180 temp sensor
charge air temp
after charge air
cooler
alarm at high
temp
0-120°C engine alarm pre-
processing
No. Measuring
point
Description Function Measur-
ing range
Location Connected
to
Depend-
ing on
option
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.8 Standard list of engine-located measuring and control devices
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Table 2-44 Standard list of engine-located measuring and control devices
87 2TE6180 temp sensor
charge air temp
after charge air
cooler
charge air temp
control
0-120°C engine temp con-
troller
1TC6180
88 1PT6182 pressure transmit-
ter
cooling air pres-
sure tc inlet
monitoring of
cooling air flow
for turbine disc
cooling
0-4 bar engine alarm pre-
processing
TC tur-
bine disc
cooling
exhaust gas system
89 1TE6500 temp sensor
temp in terminal
box on engine
temp compen-
sation for ther-
mocouples
0-120°C terminal
box on
engine
safety sys-
tem
90 1Tl6570 digital temp indi-
cator
exhaust gas temp
after each cylinder
and before and
after TC
local indication
on engine
0-800°C engine - local
exhaust
gas temp
indication
91 xTE6570 double thermo-
couples
exhaust gas temp
after cylinders
indication,
alarm and load
reduction
0-800°C engine safety sys-
tem
92 1XSv6570 solenoid valve
for waste gate
exhaust gas
blow off when
tc-speed high
engine engine con-
trol
waste
gate
93 1TE6575 double thermo-
couple
exhaust gas temp
before turbo-
charger
indication,
alarm and load
reduction
0-800°C engine safety sys-
tem
94 1TE6580 double thermo-
couple
exhaust gas temp
after turbocharger
indication 0-800°C engine safety sys-
tem
No. Measuring
point
Description Function Measur-
ing range
Location Connected
to
Depend-
ing on
option
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.8 Standard list of engine-located measuring and control devices
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Diesel engine and operation
2.3.9 OvERRlDE function
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2.3.9 OvERRlDE function
General
For marine plants, the principle "ship ranks be-
fore engine" applies in emergency cases. ln
dangerous situations, e.g. in case of possible
averages, the protection of the ship has priority
over engine protection.
With the valuation "ship ranks before engine",
slow-down or shut-down signals (with the ex-
ception of the "Overspeed" signall can be sup-
pressed by the function OvERRlDE.
An abuse of this function with consequential
damage to the engine or in its surroundings re-
lieifes MAN Diesel from any liability.
Cases for OvERRlDE
√ Possible average situations
√ Bad weather conditions resulting in danger
for the ship
√ Dangerous waters (e.g., fjords, harbours,
channelsl
Slow-down and stop alarms that must not be
suppressed by OvERRlDE
√ Overspeed
√ Manual stop switches remain operable
√ Additional alarms in accordance with the re-
quirements of the classification societies
(such as, e.g., OMD (oil mist detectorl, as
specified by the classification society LRSl.
Consequences of OvERRlDE
√ The alarm printer prints date and time of the
OvERRlDE activation
√ Engines, which have been stopped by auto-
matic controll, can be restarted.
√ lt is to be clearly indicated by visual warning
signals in the engine control room and in eve-
ry room, where OvERRlDE activation is pos-
sible, that the engine is being operated in the
OvERRlDE mode.
√ Slow-down and/or shut-down alarms are an-
nounced by visual and audible warning sig-
nals, and the text "Reduce load" and/or
"Stop engine".
√ Suppressed slow-down and shut-down sig-
nals are continued to be printed by the alarm
printer with an indication that the OvERRlDE
function has been activated.
√ Slow-down and shut-down signals, which
are released and suppressed after the OvER-
RlDE function has been activated, do not
have any impact on engine operation.
Caution!
A stop alarm that has already been released can
no longer be suppressed by the subsequent ac-
tivation of the OvERRlDE function.
Realisation of the OvERRlDE function
ln the alarm and safety system, the realisation of
the OvERRlDE function is effected in a part,
which is clearly separated from the actual func-
tions of the program.
Exemption from liability
The responsibility for the activation of the OvER-
RlDE function lies with the operator.
Because engine monitoring is not working while
the OvERRlDE function is activated, MAN Diesel
can, in principle, not accept any liability for inju-
ries to persons and damage to property, which
are due to this fact.
Diesel engine and operation
2.3.9 OvERRlDE function
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3 Quality requirements of operating supplies
Page 3 - 2
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Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.1 Quality of lube oil (SAE40l for operation on gas oil and Diesel oil (MGO/MDOl and Biofuel
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3.1 Quality of lube oil (SAE40l for operation on gas oil and Die-
sel oil (MGO/MDOl and Biofuel
The specific power output offered by today's
Diesel engines and the use of fuels which more
and more often approach the limit in quality in-
crease the requirements placed on the lube oil
and make it imperative that the lube oil is chosen
carefully. Doped lube oils (HD oilsl have proven
to be suitable for lubricating the running gear,
the cylinder, the turbocharger and for the cooling
of the pistons. Doped lube oils contain additives
which, amongst other things, provide them with
sludge carrying, cleaning and neutralisation ca-
pabilities.
Only lube oils, which have been released by
MAN Diesel, are to be used. These are listed in
Table 3-47, Page 3-5.
Note!
For Dual-fuel engines which will be operated for
>40% of the time on Diesel oil fuel we recom-
mend to use a quality of lube oil with a Base
Number (BNl from 10-16 according to this spec-
ification.
Specifications
Base oil
The base oil (doped lube oil = basic oil + addi-
tivesl must be a narrow distillation cut and must
be refined in accordance with modern proce-
dures. Bright stocks, if contained, must neither
adversely affect the thermal nor the oxidation
stability. The base oil must meet the limit values
as specified in Table 3-45, Page 3-3, particularly
concerning the ageing stability.
Doped lube oils (HD-oilsl
The base oil for which additives have been
mixed (doped lube oill must demonstrate the fol-
lowing characteristics:
Additives
The additives must be dissolved in the oil and
must be of such a composition that an absolute
minimum of ash remains as residue after com-
bustion. The ash must be soft. lf this prerequisite
is not complied with, increased deposits are to
be expected in the combustion chamber, espe-
cially at the outlet valves and in the inlet housing
of the turbochargers. Hard additive ash pro-
motes pitting on the valves seats, as well as
burnt-out valves and increased mechanical
wear.
Additives must not facilitate clogging of the filter
elements, neither in their active nor in their ex-
hausted state.
Table 3-45 Lube oil (MGO/MDOl - specified values
* in-house method
Characteristic features Unit Test method Limit value
Structure - - preferably paraffin-basic
Behaviour in cold, still flows
°C
ASTM-D2500 -15
Flash point (as per Clevelandl ASTM-D92 >200
Ash content (oxide ashl
Weight%
ASTM-D482 <0.02
Coke residue (as per Conradsonl ASTM-D189 <0.50
Ageing tendency after being
heated up to 135°C for 100hrs.
-
MAN Diesel
ageing cabinet *
-
n-heptane insolubles
Weight%
ASTM-D4055
or DlN 51592
< 0.2
Evaporation loss Weight% - <2
Drop test (filter paperl
- MAN Diesel test
Must not allow to recognise precipitation
of resin or asphalt-like ageing products
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.1 Quality of lube oil (SAE40l for operation on gas oil and Diesel oil (MGO/MDOl and Biofuel
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Detergency
The detergency must be so high that coke and
tar-like residues from fuel combustion must not
build-up.
Dispersancy
The dispersancy must be selected such that
commercially available lube-oil cleaning equip-
ment can remove the detrimental contamination
from the used oil, i.e. the oil must have good
separating and filtering properties.
Neutralisation capacity
The neutralisation capacity (ASTM-D2896l must
be so high that the acidic products which result
during combustion are neutralised. The reaction
time of the additives must be matched to the
process in the combustion chamber.
Evaporation tendency
The tendency to evaporate must be as low as
possible, otherwise the oil consumption is ad-
versely affected.
Further conditions
The lube oil must not form a stable emulsion
with water. Less than 40 ml emulsion are ac-
ceptable in the ASTM-D1410 test after one hour.
The foaming behaviour (ASTM-D892l must meet
the following conditions:
after 10 minutes <20ml.
The lube oil must not contain agents to improve
viscosity index. Fresh oil must not contain any
water or other contamination.
Lube oil selection
Doped grade
Doped lube oils (HD oilsl corresponding to inter-
national specifications MlL-L 2104 or APl-CD,
and having a Base Number (BNl of 10 - 16
mg KOH/g are recommended by us (Designa-
tion for armed forces of Germany: O-278l.
The content of additives included in the lube oil
depends upon the conditions under which the
engine is operated, and the quality of fuel used.
lf marine Diesel fuel is used, which has a sulphur
content of up to 2.0 weight % as per lSO-F
DMC, and coke residues of up to 2.5 weight %
as per Conradson, a BN of approx. 20 is pre-
ferred. Ultimately, the operating results are the
decisive criterion as to which content of addi-
tives ensures the most economic mode of en-
gine operation.
Cylinder lube oil
ln the case of engines with separate cylinder lu-
brication, the pistons and the cylinder liner are
supplied with lube oil by means of a separate oil
pump. The oil supply rate is factory-set to con-
form to both the quality of the fuel to be used in
service and to the anticipated operating condi-
tions.
A lube oil as specified above is to be used for the
cylinder and the lubricating circuit.
Speed governor
ln case of mechanic-hydraulic governors with
separate oil sump, multi grade oil 5W-40 is pref-
erably used. lf this oil is not available for top-
ping-up, an oil 15W-40 may exceptionally be
used. ln this context it makes no difference
whether multicoloured oils based on synthetic or
mineral oil are used. (Designation for armed
forces of Germany: O-236l
The oil quality specified by the manufacturer is
to be used for the remaining equipment fitted to
the engine.
Engine SAE-Class
16/24, 21/31, 27/38, 28/32S, 32/40,
32/44, 40/54, 48/60, 58/64, 51/60DF
40
Table 3-46 viscosity (SAE classl of lube oils
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.1 Quality of lube oil (SAE40l for operation on gas oil and Diesel oil (MGO/MDOl and Biofuel
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For the engine L27/38 (propulsionl service expe-
rience have shown that the operation tempera-
ture of the Woodward governor UG10MAS and
the corresponding actuator for UG723+ can ex-
ceed 93 °C. ln such case we recommend to use
a synthetic oil like Castrol Alphasyn HG150. En-
gines delivered later than March 2005 are al-
ready filled with this oil.
Lube-oil additives
lt is not allowed to add additives to the lube oil,
or mixing the different makes (brandsl of the
lube oil, as the performance of the carefully
matched package of additives which is suiting
itself and adapted to the base oil, may be upset.
Also, the lube oil company (oil supplierl is no
longer responsible for the oil.
Selection of lube oils / warranty
Most of the mineral oil companies are in close
and permanent consultation with the engine
manufacturers and are therefore in a position to
quote the oil from their own product line that has
been approved by the engine manufacturer for
the given application. lndependent of this re-
lease, the lube oil manufacturers are in any case
responsible for quality and performance of their
products. lf any questions, we are more than
willing to provide you with further information.
Oil in service
There are no defined oil change intervals for
MAN Diesel medium-speed engines. The oil has
to be analysed on a regular basis. As long as the
oil characteristics are within the specified limits
of Table 3-48, Page 3-6, the oil is suitable for fur-
ther use. An oil sample has to be analysed every
1-3 months (see maintenance planl. The quality
of the oil can only be maintained if the oil is
cleaned by an appropriate device (e.g. separa-
torl.
Examinations
We carry out the investigations on lube oil in our
laboratories for our customers. A representative
sample of about 0,5 litre is required for the ex-
amination.
Table 3-47 Lubricating oils which have been approved
for the use in MAN Diesel four-stroke
engines running on gas oil and Diesel oil
1l
lf Marine Diesel fuel of poor quality (lSO-F-DMCl is
used, a Base Number (BNl of approx. 20 is of advan-
tage.
2l
lf the sulphur content of the fuel is <1%.
MAN Diesel SE do not take any reponsibility for
difficulties that might be caused by these oils.
Approved SAE40 lube oils
Manufacturer Base Number
10-16
1l
[mgKOH/gì
AGlP Cladium 120 - SAE 40
Sigma S SAE 40
2l
BP Energol DS 3-154
CASTROL Castrol MLC 40
Castrol MHP 154
Seamax Extra 40
CHEvRON
(Texaco, Caltexl
Taro 12 XD 40
Delo 1000 Marine SAE 40
EXXON MOBlL Exxmar 12TP40
Mobilgard 412 / MG 1SHC
Mobilgard ADL 40
2l
Delvac 1640
PETROBRAS Marbrax CCD-410
Q8 Mozart DP40
REPSOL Neptuno NT 1540
SHELL Gadinia 40
Sirius FB 40
2l
Sirius/Rimula X40
2l
Gadinia AL40
STATOlL MarWay 1540
MarWay 1040
TOTAL Lubmarine Disola M4015
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.1 Quality of lube oil (SAE40l for operation on gas oil and Diesel oil (MGO/MDOl and Biofuel
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Table 3-48 Limit value
Limit value Method
viscosity at 40 °C 110 - 220 mm
2
/s lSO 3104 or ASTM D445
Base Number (BNl min. 50% of fresh oil BN lSO 3771
Flash Point (PMl min. 185 °C lSO 2719
Water Content max. 0.2% (for a short period max. 0.5%l lSO 3733 or ASTM D1744
n-Heptan lnsoluble max. 1.5% DlN 51592 or lP 316
Metal Content
dependent upon the engine type and operat-
ing condition
only for guidance
Fe
Cr
Cu
Pb
Sn
Al
Si
max. 50 ppm
max. 10 ppm
max. 15 ppm
max. 20 ppm
max. 10 ppm
max. 20 ppm
max. 10 ppm
For biofuel operation:
biofuel content
max. 12% FT-lR
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.2 Quality of lube oil (SAE40l for heavy fuel oil operation (HFOl
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3.2 Quality of lube oil (SAE40l for heavy fuel oil operation
(HFOl
The specific power output offered by today's
Diesel engines and the use of fuels which more
and more often approach the acceptable limit in
quality increase the requirements placed on the
lube oil and make it imperative that the lube oil
is chosen carefully. Medium-alkaline lube oils
have proven to be suitable for lubricating the
running gear, the cylinders, the turbocharger
and for the cooling of the pistons. Medium-alka-
line oils contain additives which, amongst other
things, provided them with a higher neutralising
capacity than doped (HDl engine oils have.
No international specifications exist for medium-
alkaline lube oils. An adequately long trial oper-
ation in compliance with the manufacturer's in-
structions is therefore necessary.
Only lube oils, which have been approved by
MAN Diesel, are to be used. These are listed in
Table 3-53, Page 3-11.
Requirements
Base oil
The base oil (medium-alkaline lube oil = base oil
+ additivesl must be a narrow distillation cut and
must be refined in accordance with modern pro-
cedures. Bright stocks, if contained, must nei-
ther adversely affect the thermal nor the
oxidation stability.
The base oil must meet the limit values given in
Table 3-49, Page 3-7, particularly as concerns
its ageing tendencies.
Medium-alkaline lube oil
The finished oil (base oil with additivesl must
demonstrate the following characteristics.
Additives
The additives must be dissolved in the oil and
must be of such a composition that an absolute
minimum of ash remains as residue after com-
bustion, even though the engine were run on
distillate fuel temporarily. The ash must be soft.
lf this prerequisite is not complied with, in-
creased deposits are to be expected in the com-
bustion spaces, especially the exhaust valves
and the inlet housing of the turbochargers. Hard
additive ash promotes pitting on the valve seats,
as well as burnt-out valves and increased me-
chanical wear in the cylinder liners.
Additives must not facilitate clogging of the filter
elements, neither in their active nor in their ex-
hausted state.
* in-house method
Properties/characteristics Unit Test method Limit values
Structure - - preferably paraffin-basic
Behaviour in cold, still flows
°C
ASTM-D2500 -15
Flash point (as per Clevelandl ASTM-D92 >200
Ash content (oxide ashl
Weight
%
ASTM-D482 <0.02
Coke residue (as per Conradsonl ASTM-D189 <0.50
Aging tendency after being
heated up to 135°C for 100 hrs.
MAN Diesel
ageing cabinet *
-
n-heptane insolubles ASTM-D4055 or
DlN 51592
<0.2
Evaporation loss - <2
Drop test (filter paperl
MAN Diesel test
Must not allow to recognize precipitation of
resinous or asphalt-like ageing products
Table 3-49 Lube oil (HFO operationl - specified values
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.2 Quality of lube oil (SAE40l for heavy fuel oil operation (HFOl
Page 3 - 8 Status 02/2008
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Detergency
The detergency must be so high that coke and
tar-like residues from fuel combustion must not
build-up. The lube oil must be able to avoid fuel
derived deposits.
Dispersancy
The dispersancy must be selected such that
commercially available lube-oil cleaning equip-
ment can remove the detremental contamina-
tions from the used oil, i.e. the used oil must
have good separating and filtering properties.
Diesel-Performance
The Diesel performance (without taking the neu-
tralisation ability into considerationl must, at
least, comply with MlL-L-21014 D resp. APl-CD.
Neutralisation capacity
The neutralisation capacity (ASTM-D2896l must
be so high that the acidic products of combus-
tion are neutralised at the lube oil consumption
rate that is specific for the engine. The reaction
time of the additives must be matched to the
process in the combustion chamber. Hints con-
cerning the selection of the BN are given in Table
3-51, Page 3-9.
Evaporation tendency
The tendency to evaporate must be as low as
possible, otherwise the oil consumption is ad-
versely affected.
Further conditions
The lube oil must not form a stable emulsion
with water. Less than 40ml emulsion are accept-
able in the ASTM-D1410 test after one hour.
The foaming behaviour (ASTM-D892l must meet
the following conditions: after 10 minutes
<20 ml.
The lube oil must not contain agents to improve
viscosity index. Fresh oil must not contain any
water or other contamination.
Lube oil selection
Neutralisation property (BNl
Medium-alkaline lube oils having differently high
levels of neutralisation capacity (BNl are availa-
ble on the market. According to the present-day
state of knowledge, operating conditions to be
expected and BN can be correlated as shown in
Table 3-51, Page 3-9. The operating resulting
will in the essence be the decisive criterion as to
which BN will ensure the most economic mode
of engine operation.
Operation on low sulphur fuel
ln order to meet the emission regulations, fuels
with different sulphur content are used today. ln
environmental sensitive areas (SECAl a low sul-
phur fuel must be used. Outside the SECA a fuel
with a high sulphur content can be used. ln this
case the lube oil BN should be selected to meet
the requirements of the operation on high sul-
phur fuel. Only for permanent operation on low
sulphur fuel, the lube oil with the lower BN
should be selected.
Ultimately, the operating results are the decisive
criterium as to which content of additives en-
sures the most economic mode of engine oper-
ation.
Cylinder lube oil
ln the case of engines with separate cylinder lu-
brication, the pistons and the cylinder liner are
supplied with lube oil by means of a separate oil
pump. The oil supply rate is factory-set to con-
form to both the quality of the fuel to be used in
service and to the anticipated operating condi-
tions.
A lube oil as specified above is to be used for the
cylinder and the lubricating circuit.
Engine SAE-
class
16/24, 21/31, 27/38, 28/32S, 32/40,
32/44, 40/54, 48/60, 58/64, 51/60DF
40
Table 3-50 viscosity (SAE classl of lube oils
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.2 Quality of lube oil (SAE40l for heavy fuel oil operation (HFOl
Status 02/2008 Page 3 - 9
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Speed governor
ln case of mechanic-hydraulic governors with
separate oil sump, multi grade oil 5W-40 is pref-
erably used. lf this oil is not available as refill, an
oil 15W-40 may exceptionally be used. ln this
context it is not important, if multi grade oils
based on synthetic or mineral oil are used.
The oil quality specified by the manufacturer is
to be used for the remaining equipment fitted to
the engine.
For the engine L27/38 (propulsionl service expe-
rience have shown that the operation tempera-
ture of the Woodward governor UG10MAS and
the corresponding actuator for UG723+ can ex-
ceed 93 °C. ln such case we recommend to use
a synthetic oil like Castrol Alphasyn HG150. En-
gines delivered later than March 2005 are al-
ready filled with this oil.
Lube-oil additives
lt is not allowed to add additives to the lube oil,
or mixing the different makes (brandsl of the
lube oil, as the performance of the carefully
matched package of additives which is suiting
itself and adapted to the base oil, may be upset.
Also, the lube oil company (oil supplierl is no
longer responsible for the oil.
Selection of lube oils / warranty
Most of the mineral oil companies are in close
and permanent consultation with the engine
manufacturers and are therefore in a the position
to quote the oil from their own product line that
has been approved by the engine manufacturer
for the given application. lndependent of this re-
lease, the lube oil manufacturers are in any case
responsible for quality and performance of their
products. lf you have further questions, we are
more than willing to provide you with further in-
formation.
approx. BN (mg
KOH/g oill
Engines / Operating conditions
20
Marine Diesel Oil (MDOl of poor quality (lSO-F-DMCl or heavy fuel oil with a sulphur content
of <0.5%.
30
23/30H and 28/32H in general. 23/30A, 28/32A and 28/32S under normal operating condi-
tions.
16/24, 21/31, 27/38, 32/40, 32/44CR, 40/54, 48/60 and 58/64 and 51/60DF in pure HFO mode
only if fuel sulphur content is <1.5%.
51/60DF in alternating mode (HFO/Gasl.
40
23/30A, 28/32A and 28/32S in case of severe operating conditions and in case of necessity
regarding oil life and engine cleanliness.
16/24, 21/31, 27/38, 32/40, 32/44CR, 40/54, 48/60 and 58/64 and 51/60DF in pure HFO mode
generally, provided the sulphur content is >1,5%.
50
32/40, 32/44CR, 40/54, 48/60, and 58/64 if BN 40 is inadequate in terms of oil life or engine
cleanliness (high sulphur content of the fuel, very low lube oil consumption.
Table 3-51 Determining the Base Number for operating conditions
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.2 Quality of lube oil (SAE40l for heavy fuel oil operation (HFOl
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Oil in service
There are no defined oil change intervals for
MAN Diesel medium-speed engines. The oil has
to be analysed on a regular basis. As long as the
oil characteristics are within the specified limits
of Table 3-52, Page 3-10 the oil is suitable for
further use. An oil sample has to be analysed
every 1-3 months (see maintenance planl. The
quality of the oil can only be maintained if the oil
is cleaned by an appropriate device (e.g. sepa-
ratorl.
Table 3-52 Limit value
Limit value Method
viscosity at 40 °C 110 - 220 mm
2
/s lSO 3104 or ASTM D445
Base Number (BNl min. 50% of fresh oil BN lSO 3771
Flash Point (PMl min. 185 °C lSO 2719
Water Content max. 0.2% (for a short period max. 0.5%l lSO 3733 or ASTM D1744
n-Heptan lnsoluble max. 1.5% DlN 51592 or lP 316
Metal Content
dependent upon the engine type and operat-
ing condition
only for guidance
Fe
Cr
Cu
Pb
Sn
Al
Si
max. 50 ppm
max. 10 ppm
max. 15 ppm
max. 20 ppm
max. 10 ppm
max. 20 ppm
max. 10 ppm
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.2 Quality of lube oil (SAE40l for heavy fuel oil operation (HFOl
Status 02/2008 Page 3 - 11
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Examinations
We carry out the investigations on lube oil in our
laboratories for our customers. A representative
sample of about 0,5litre is required for the exam-
ination.
Note!
MAN Diesel SE do not take any reponsibility for
difficulties that might be caused by these oils!
Manufacturer Base Number [mgKOH/gì
20 30 40 50
AGlP - Cladium 300 Cladium 400
BP Energol lC-HFX 204 Energol lC-HFX 304 Energol lC-HFX 404 Energol lC-HFX 504
CASTROL TLX Plus 204 TLX Plus 304 TLX Plus 404 TLX Plus 504
CEPSA Troncoil 3040 Plus Troncoil 4040 Plus Troncoil 5040 Plus
CHEvRON
(TEXACO, CALTEXl
Taro 20DP40 Taro 30DP40 Taro 40XL 40 Taro 50XL 40
EXXON MOBlL Mobilgard M 430
EXXMAR 30 TP 40
Mobilgard M 440
EXXMAR 40 TP 40
Mobilgard M50
PETROBRAS Marbrax CCD-420 Marbrax CCD-430 Marbrax CCD-440
REPSOL Neptuno NT 2040 Neptuno NT 3040 Neptuno NT 4040
SHELL Argina S 40 Argina T 40 Argina X40 Argina XL40
TOTAL Lubmarine Aurelia XL 4025 Aurelia XL 4030
Aurelia Tl 4030
Aurelia XL 4040
Aurelia Tl 4040
Aurelia XL 4055
Aurelia Tl 4055
Table 3-53 Lubricating oils, which have been approved for the use in MAN Diesel four-stroke engines running on heavy
fuel oil
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.2 Quality of lube oil (SAE40l for heavy fuel oil operation (HFOl
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Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.3 Quality of engine cooling water
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3.3 Quality of engine cooling water
Preliminary remarks
The engine cooling water, like the fuel and lubri-
cating oil, is a medium which must be carefully
selected, treated and controlled. Otherwise, cor-
rosion, erosion and cavitation may occur on the
walls of the cooling system in contact with water
and deposits may form. Deposits impair the heat
transfer and may result in thermal overload on
the components to be cooled. The treatment
with an anti-corrosion agent has to be effected
before the first commissioning of the plant. Dur-
ing subsequent operations the concentration
specified by the engine manufacturer must al-
ways be ensured. ln particular, this applies if a
chemical additive is used.
Requirements
Limiting values
The characteristics of the untreated cooling wa-
ter must be within the following limits:
1l
1°dGH (German hardnessl:
10mg CaO/litre
17.9mg CaCO
3
/litre
0.357mval/litre
0.179mmol/litre
2l
1 mg/l 1 ppm
Test device
The MAN Diesel water test kit includes devices
permitting, i.a., to determine the above-men-
tioned water characteristics in a simple manner.
Moreover, the manufacturer of anti-corrosion
agents are offering test devices that are easy to
operate. As to checking the cooling water con-
dition, see Chapter 3.4 "Checking cooling wa-
ter", Page 3-21.
Supplementary information
Distillate
lf a distillate (from the freshwater generator for
instancel or fully desalinated water (ion ex-
changerl is available, this should preferably be
used as engine cooling water. These waters are
free from lime and metal salts, i.e. major depos-
its affecting the heat transfer to the cooling wa-
ter and worsening the cooling effect cannot
form. These waters, however, are more corro-
sive than normal hard water since they do not
form a thin film of lime on the walls which pro-
vides a temporary protection against corrosion.
This is the reason why water distillates must be
treated with special care and the concentration
of the additive is to be periodically checked.
Hardness
The total hardness of the water is composed of
temporary and permanent hardness. lt is largely
determined by calcium and magnesium salts.
The temporary hardness is determined by the
carbonate content of the calcium and magnesi-
um salts. The permanent hardness can be deter-
mined from the remaining calcium and
magnesium salts (sulphatesl. The decisive fac-
tor for the formation of calcareous deposits in
the cooling system is the temporary (carbonatel
hardness.
Water with more than 10°dGH (German total
hardnessl must be mixed with distillate or be
softened. A rehardening of excessively soft wa-
Property/
feature
Characteristics Unit
Type of water Distillate or freshwater, free
from foreign matter.
Not to be used: Sea water,
brackish water, river water,
brines, industrial waste
water and rain water
-
Total hardness max. 10 °dH
1l
pH-value 6.5 - 8 -
Chloride ion
content
max.50
mg/l
2l
Table 3-54 Cooling water - characteristics to be adhered
to
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.3 Quality of engine cooling water
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ter is only necessary to suppress foaming if an
emulsifiable anti-corrosion oil is used.
Damage in the cooling water system
Corrosion
Corrosion is an electro-chemical process which
can largely be avoided if the correct water qual-
ity is selected and the water in the engine cool-
ing system is treated carefully.
Flow cavitation
Flow cavitation may occur in regions of high flow
velocity and turbulence. lf the evaporation pres-
sure is fallen below, steam bubbles will form
which then collapse in regions of high pressure,
thus producing material destruction in closely
limited regions.
Erosion
Erosion is a mechanical process involving mate-
rial abrasion and destruction of protective films
by entrapped solids, especially in regions of ex-
cessive flow velocities or pronounced turbulenc-
es.
Corrosion fatigue
Corrosion fatigue is a damage caused by simul-
taneous dynamic and corrosive stresses. lt may
induce crack formation and fast crack propaga-
tion in water-cooled, mechanically stressed
components if the cooling water is not treated
correctly.
Treatment of the engine cooling water
The purpose of engine cooling water treatment
is to produce a coherent protective film on the
walls of the cooling spaces by the use of anti-
corrosion agents so as to prevent the above-
mentioned damage. A significant prerequisite
for the anti-corrosion agent to develop its full ef-
fectively is that the untreated water which is
used satisfies the demands mentioned under
"Requirements", Page 3-13.
Protecting films can be produced by treating the
cooling water with a chemical anti-corrosion
agent or emulsifiable anti-corrosion oil.
Emulsifiable anti-corrosion oils fall more and
more out of use since, on the one hand, their use
is heavily restricted by environmental protection
legislation and, on the other hand, the suppliers
have, for these and other reasons, commenced
to take these products out of the market.
Treatment before operating the engine for the
first time
Treatment with an anti-corrosion agent should
be done before the engine is operated for the
first time so as to prevent irreparable initial dam-
age.
Warning!
lt is not allowed to operate the engine without
cooling water treatment.
Cooling water additives
No other additives than those approved by MAN
Diesel and listed in Table 3-55, Page 3-18 up to
Table 3-58, Page 3-20 are to be used.
Permission required
A cooling water additive can be approved for
use if it has been tested according to the latest
rules of the Forschungsvereinigung verbren-
nungskraftmaschinen (Fvvl, "Testing the suita-
bility of coolant additives for cooling liquids of
internal combustion engines". The test report is
to be presented if required. The necessary test-
ing is carried out by Staatliche MaterialprΩfan-
stalt, Department Oberflächentechnik,
Grafenstra≈e 2, 64283 Darmstadt on request.
ln case the cooling water additive has been suc-
cessfully tested at Fvv, an engine test for the fi-
nal approval has to be conducted.
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.3 Quality of engine cooling water
Status 02/2008 Page 3 - 15
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To be used only in closed circuits
Additives can only be used in closed circuits
where no appreciable consumption occurs ex-
cept leakage and evaporation losses.
√ Chemical additives
Additives based on sodium nitrite and sodi-
um borate, etc. have given good results. Gal-
vanised iron pipes or zinc anodes providing
cathodic protection in the cooling systems
must not be used. Please note that this kind
of corrosion protection, on the one hand, is
not required since cooling water treatment is
specified and, on the other hand, considering
the cooling water temperatures commonly
practised nowadays, it may lead to potential
inversion. lf necessary, the pipes must be
dezinced.
√ Anti-corrosion oil
This additive is an emulsifiable mineral oil
mixed with corrosion inhibitors. A thin protec-
tive oil film which prevents corrosion without
obstructing the transfer of heat and yet pre-
venting calcareous deposits forms on the
walls of the cooling system.
Emulsifiable anti-corrosion oils have nowa-
days lost importance. For reasons of environ-
mental protection legislation and because of
occasionally occurring emulsion stability
problems, they are hardly used any more.
√ Anti-freeze agent
lf temperatures below the freezing point of
water may be reached in the engine, in the
cooling system or in parts of it, an anti-freeze
agent simultaneously acting as a corrosion
inhibitor must be added to the cooling water.
Otherwise the entire system must be heated.
(Designation for armed forces of Germany:
Sy-7025l.
Sufficient corrosion protection will be
achieved by admixing the products listed in
Table 3-58, Page 3-20 taking care that the
specified concentration is observed. This
concentration will prevent freezing down to a
temperature of about -22°C. The quantity of
anti-freeze actually required, however, also
depends on the lowest temperatures expect-
ed at the site.
Anti-freeze agents are generally based on
ethylene glycol. A suitable chemical additive
must be admixed if the concentration of the
anti-freeze specified by the manufacturer for
a certain application does not suffice to af-
ford adequate corrosion protection or if, due
to less stringent requirements with redard to
protection from freezing, a lower concentra-
tion of anti-freeze agent is used than would
be required to achieve sufficient corrosion
protection. The manufacturer must be con-
tacted for information on the compatibility of
the agent with the anti-freeze and the con-
centration required. The compatibility of the
chemical additives stated in Table 3-55, Page
3-18 with anti-freeze agents based on ethyl-
ene glycol is confirmed. Anti-freeze agents
may only be mixed with each other with the
supplier's or manufacturer's consent, even if
the composition of these agents is the same.
Prior to the use of an anti-freeze agent, the
cooling system is to be cleaned thoroughly.
lf the cooling water is treated with an emulsi-
fiable anti-corrosion oil, no anti-freeze may
be admixed, as otherwise the emulsion is
broken and oil sludge is formed in the cooling
system.
For the disposal of cooling water treated with
additives, observe the environmental protec-
tion legislation. For information, contact the
suppliers of the additives.
√ Biocides
lf the use of a biocide is inevitable because
the cooling water has been contaminated by
bacteria, the following has to be observed:
- lt has to be ensured that the biocide suita-
ble for the particular application is used.
- The biocide must be compatible with the
sealing materials used in the cooling water
system; it must not attack them.
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.3 Quality of engine cooling water
Page 3 - 16 Status 02/2008
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- Neither the biocide nor its decomposition
products contain corrosion-stimulated
constituents. Biocides whose decomposi-
tion results in chloride or sulphate ions are
not permissible.
- Biocides due to the use of which the cool-
ing water tends to foam are not permissi-
ble.
Prerequisites for efficient use of an anti-corro-
sion agent
Clean cooling system
Before starting the engine for the first time and
after repairs to the piping system, it must be en-
sured that the pipes, tanks, coolers and other
equipment outside the engine are free from rust
and other deposits because dirt will considera-
bly reduce the efficiency of the additive. The en-
tire system has therefore to be cleaned using an
appropriate cleaning agent with the engine shut
down (see MAN Diesel Work Card 000.03 and
Chapter 3.5 "Cleaning cooling water", Page
3-23l.
Loose solid particles, in particular, have to be re-
moved from the system by intense flushing be-
cause otherwise erosion may occur at points of
high flow velocities.
The agent used for cleaning must not attack the
materials and the sealants in the cooling system.
This work is in most cases done by the supplier
of the cooling water additive, at least the suppli-
er can make available the suitable products for
this purpose. lf this work is done by the engine
user it is advisable to make use of the services
of an expert of the cleaning agent supplier. The
cooling system is to be flushed thoroughly after
cleaning. The engine cooling water is to be treat-
ed with an anti-corrosion agent immediately af-
terwards. After restarting the engine, the
cleaned system has to be checked for any leak-
ages.
Periodical checks of the condition of the cooling
water and cooling system
Treated cooling water may become contaminat-
ed in service and the additive will loose some of
its effectively as a result. lt is therefore neces-
sary to check the cooling system and the condi-
tion of the cooling water at regular intervals.
The additive concentration is to be checked at
least once a week, using the test kit prescribed
by the supplier. The results are to be recorded.
Note!
The concentrations of chemical additives must
not be less than the minimum concentrations
stated in Table 3-55, Page 3-18.
Concentrations that are too low may promote
corrosive effects and have therefore to be avoid-
ed. Concentrations that are slightly too high do
not cause damages. However, concentrations
more than double as high should be avoided.
A cooling water sample is to be sent to an inde-
pendent laboratory or to the engine supplier for
making a complete analysis every 2 - 6 months.
For emulsifiable anti-freeze agents , the supplier
generally prescribes renewal of the water after
approx. 12 months. On such renewal, the entire
cooling system is to be flushed, or if required to
be cleaned (also see Chapter 3.5 "Cleaning
cooling water", Page 3-23l. The fresh charge of
water is to be submitted to treatment immedi-
ately.
lf chemical additives or anti-freeze agents are
used, the water should be changed after three
years at the latest.
lf excessive concentrations of solids (rustl are
found, the water charge has to be renewed com-
pletely, and the entire system has to be thor-
oughly cleaned.
The causes of deposits in the cooling system
may be leakages entering the cooling water,
breaking of the emulsion, corrosion in the sys-
tem and calcareous deposits due to excessive
water hardness. An increase in the chloride ion
content generally indicates sea water leakage.
The specified maximum of 50mg/kg of chloride
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.3 Quality of engine cooling water
Status 02/2008 Page 3 - 17
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ions must not be exceeded, since otherwise the
danger of corrosion will increase. Exhaust gas
leakage into the cooling water may account for
a sudden drop in the pH value or an increase of
the sulphate content.
Water losses are to be made up for by adding
untreated water which meets the quality de-
mands according to "Requirements", Page
3-13. The concentration of the anti-corrosion
agent has subsequently to be checked and cor-
rected if necessary.
Checks of the cooling water are especially nec-
essary whenever repair and servicing work has
been done in connection with which the cooling
water was drained.
Protective measures
Anti-corrosion agents contain chemical com-
pounds which may cause health injuries if
wrongly handled. The indications in the safety
data sheets of the manufacturers are to be ob-
served.
Prolonged, direct contact with the skin should
be avoided. Thoroughly wash your hands after
use. Also, if a larger amount has been splashed
onto the clothing and / or wetted it, the clothing
should be changed and washed before being
worn again.
lf chemicals have splashed into the eyes, imme-
diately wash with plenty of water and consult a
doctor.
Anti-corrosion agents are a contaminating load
for the water in general. Cooling water must
therefore not be disposed off by pouring it into
the sewage system without prior consultation
with the competent local authorities. The re-
spective legal regulations have to be observed.
Marine Gen Sets
lf a marine auxiliar engine of the type 16/24, 21/
31, 23/30H, 27/38 or 28/32H shares the cooling
water system with a two-stroke main engine
MAN B+W Diesel type, the cooling water recom-
mendation from the main engine has to be fol-
lowed.
lnvestigation
Cooling water analysis are carried out in our
chemical laboratory for our customers. For ex-
amination a sample of approxiamately 0.5 l is re-
quired.
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.3 Quality of engine cooling water
Page 3 - 18 Status 02/2008
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Permissible cooling water additives
Chemical additives (Chemicalsl - containing nitrite
1l
The values in the marked areas can be determined with the test kit of the chemical manufacturer.
Manufacturer Product designation
lnitial
dose per
1,000 litre
Minimum concentration ppm
Product
Nitrite
(NO
2
l
Na-Nitrite
(NaNOl
2
Ashland Water Technologies
Drew Marine
One Drew Plaza
Boonton, New Jersey 07005
USA
Liquidewt
Maxigard
DEWT-NC
15l
40l
4.5kg
15,000
1l
40,000
4,500
700
1,330
2,250
1,050
2,000
3,375
Unitor Chemicals
KJEMl-Service A.S.
P.O. Box 49
3140 Borgheim
Norway
Rocor NB Liquid
Dieselguard
21.5l
4.8kg
21,500
4,800
2,400
2,400
3,600
3,600
Nalfleet Marine
Chemicals
P.O. Box 11
Northwich
Cheshire CW8DX, UK
Nalfleet EWT Liq (9-108l
Nalfleet EWT 9-111
Nalcool 2000
3l
10l
30l
3,000
10,000
30,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,500
1,500
1,500
Maritech AB
P.O. Box 143
29122 Kristianstad
Sweden
Marisol CW 12 l 12,000 2,000 3,000
Uniservice
via al Santuario di N.S.
della Guardia 58/A
16162 Genova, ltaly
N.C.L.T.
Colorcooling
12l
24l
12,000
24,000
2,000
2,000
3,000
3,000
Marichem - Marigases
64 Sfaktirias Street
18545 Piraeus, Greece
D.C.W.T -
Non-Chromate
48 l 48,000 2,400
Table 3-55 Chemical additives - containing nitrite
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.3 Quality of engine cooling water
Status 02/2008 Page 3 - 19
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Chemical additives (Chemicalsl - free from nitrite
Emulsifiable anti-corrosion oils
Manufacturer
Product designation
lnitial dose
per 1,000 l
Minimum concen-
tration
Arteco
Technologiepark
Zwinaarde 2
B-9052 GentBelgium
Havoline
XLl
75 l 7.5 %
Total Lubricants
Paris, France
WT Supra 75 l 7.5 %
Ashland Water Technologies
Drew Marine
One Drew Plaza
Boonton, New Jersey 07005
USA
Drewgard CWT 8 l 1 %
Table 3-56 Chemical additives - free from nitrite
Manufacturer Product
(Designationl
BP Marine
Breakspear Way
Hemel Hempstead
Herts HP2 4UL, UK
Diatsol M
Fedaro M
Castrol lnt.
Pipers Way
Swindon SN3 1RE, UK
Solvex WT 3
Deutsche Shell AG
Überseering 35
22284 Hamburg, Germany
Oil 9156
Table 3-57 Emulsifiable anti-corrosion oils
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.3 Quality of engine cooling water
Page 3 - 20 Status 02/2008
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Anti-freeze agents with corrosion inhibiting effect
Manufacturer Product
(Designationl
Minimum
concentration
BASF
Carl-Bosch-Str.
67063 Ludwigshafen, Rhein, Germany
Glysantin G 48
Glysantin 9313
Glysantin G 05
35 %
Castrol lnt.
Pipers Way
Swindon SN3 1RE, UK
Antifreeze NF,SF
BP, Britannic Tower, Moor Lane,
London EC2Y 9B, UK
Antifrost X 2270A
Deutsche Shell AG
Überseering 35
22284 Hamburg, Germany
Glycoshell
H∏chst AG, Werk Gendorf
84508 Burgkirchen, Germany
Genatin extra
(8021 Sl
Mobil Oil AG
Steinstra≈e 5
20095 Hamburg, Germany
Frostschutz 500
Arteco/Technologiepark, Zwijnaarde 2,
B-9052 Gent, Belgium
Havoline XLC
50 %
Total Lubricants
Paris, France
Glacelf Auto Supra
Total Organifreeze
Table 3-58 Anti-freeze agents with corrosion inhibiting effect
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.4 Checking cooling water
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3.4 Checking cooling water
Purpose of jobs to be done
Record and assess characteristic values of op-
erating media, avoid/reduce harmful effects.
Brief description
Fresh water that is used for filling cooling water
circuits must comply with the specifications.
Cooling water in the system must be checked at
regular intervals according to the maintenance
schedule.
The work/steps include:
√ Recording characteristic values of operating
media
√ Assessment of operating media and
√ Checking the concentration of anti-corrosion
agents.
Tools/appliances required
Means for checking the fresh water quality
Either use
√ MAN Diesel water test kit or a coorrespond-
ing testkit containing all the necessary instru-
ments and chemicals for determining the
water hardness, the pH value and the chlo-
ride content (can be obtained from MAN Die-
sel or from Messrs Mar-Tec Marine,
Hamburgl, or
√ Durognost tablets used to determine the wa-
ter hardness (Messrs Gebr. Hegl KG, Hild-
esheiml, and
√ pH value indicator paper with colour check-
ing pattern to determine the pH value (Messrs
Merk AG, Darmstadtl, or alternatively liquid
pH value indicator or electronic measuring
unit, and n/10 silver nitrate solution and 5-
percent potassium chromate solution to de-
termine the chloride ion content.
Means for checking the concentration of addi-
tives
√ When using chemical additives:
Testing means according to the recommen-
dations of the supplier.
Usually, the testkits delivered by the suppliers
also contain testing means for determining
the fresh water quality.
√ When using anti-corrosion oils:
Emulsion tester (Messrs Hamburger Labor-
bedarf Dargatz, Hamburgl, and concentrated
hydrochloric acid.
Check the characteristic values of the water
Brief specification
Table 3-59 Quality specifications for cooling water (briefl
1l
dGH = German hardness
1°dGH = 10mg/l CaO
= 17,9mg/l CaCO
3
=0,179 mmol/l
2l 1 mg/l = 1 ppm
Check the water hardness
The water hardness should be tested in compli-
ance with the instructions accompanying the
Durognost tablets.
Characteristic
value/Feature
Water for
charging and
topping up
Water in circu-
lation
Type of water Fresh water,
free of foreign
matter
Treated cool-
ing water
Total hardness ≤10°dGH
1l
≤10°dGH
1l
pH value 6.5 - 8 at
20°C
≥7.5 at 20°C
Chloride ion con-
tent
≤50mg/l ≤50mg/l
2l
Checking cooling water
3.4 Checking cooling water
Page 3 - 22 Status 12/2007
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Water of a hardness exceeding the specified
limit is to be mixed with distillate or softened wa-
ter.
Check the pH value
lndicator paper, a liquid indicator, or an electron-
ic measuring unit is to be used for measuring.
Make sure to observe the instructions given by
the respective supplier.
The pH value indicates the concentration of hy-
drogen ions and provides a comparative value
for the aggressiveness of the water. Check the
chloride ion content
The chloride contact should be measured ac-
cording the instruction in the testkit.
Check the chloride ion content
The chloride content should be measured ac-
cording the instruction in the test kit.
Testkit of the producer of the additive
As far as the testkit of the supplier of the additive
contains testing means to determine the charac-
teristic values of the fresh water, these can be
used.
Check the concentration of anti-corrosion
agents
Brief specification
Check the concentration of chemical additives
The concentration should be checked weekly
and/or in accordance with the maintenance
schedule, using the testing instruments and rea-
gents specified by the respective supplier, and in
accordance with the instructions issued.
A protection by chemical anti-corrosion agents
is only ensured if the concentration is exactly
adhered to. ln this connection, the concentra-
tions recommended by MAN Diesel (see Chap-
ter 3.3 "Quality of engine cooling water", Page
3-13l are to be adhered to by all means. These
recommended concentrations may differ from
the producer's specifications.
For reasons of environment protection, chemical
additives are almost exclusively used nowa-
days. Emulsifying anti-corrosion oils have lost
importance.
Check the concentration of anti-corrosion oils
The concentration of the anti-corrosion oil is de-
termined by means of the emulsion tester by
acid cleavage with concentrated hydrochloric
acid.
Check the concentration of anti-freeze agents
The concentration is to be checked in accord-
ance with the instructions of the producer, or a
suitable laboratory is to be entrusted with the
determination of the concentration. ln case of
doubt, MAN Diesel should be consulted.
Examination
We carry out examination of cooling water in our
laboratories for our customer. A representative
sample of about 0.5 l is required.
Anti-corro-
sion agent
Concentration
Chemical
additives
ln compliance with quality specification,
see Chapter 3.3 "Quality of engine cooling
water", Page 3-13
Anti-corro-
sion oil
lnitially, after filling in, 1.5 - 2% by volume;
when operating conditions have stabilised
0.5-1% by volume
Anti-freeze ln compliance with quality specification,
see Chapter 3.3 "Quality of engine cooling
water", Page 3-13
Table 3-60 Concentration of cooling additives
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.5 Cleaning cooling water
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3.5 Cleaning cooling water
Purpose of jobs to be done
Free operating media systems from contamina-
tion/residues, ensure/restore operational relia-
bility.
Brief description
Cooling water systems that show contamination
or deposits impede effective component cooling
and may endanger a stable emulsion of water
and anti-corrosion oil. Contamination and de-
posits are to be removed at regular intervals.
This includes:
√ cleaning of systems and, if necessary,
√ removing calcareous deposits
√ flushing of systems.
Cleaning
The cooling water system has to be checked for
contamination at the specified intervals. lf heav-
ily fouled, immediate cleaning is necessary. This
work should preferably be done by a specialist
firm which will provide the cleansers suitable for
the particular type of deposits and materials
used in the cooling system. Only in the event
that procurement of the services of a specialist
firm is not possible, the cleaning should be per-
formed by the engine operator.
Oil sludge
Oil sludge produced by lube oil entering the
cooling system or by an excessive concentra-
tion of anti-corrosion agents can be removed by
flushing with fresh water, with some cleaning
agent being added. Table 3-61, lists appropriate
agents in alphabetical order. Products of other
manufacturers may be used provided their prop-
erties are comparable. The manufacturer's in-
structions for use are to be strictly observed.
Calcareous and rust deposits
Calcareous and rust deposits may form if exces-
sively hard water or a too low concentration of
anti-corrosion agent has been used in operation.
A thin layer of scale need not be removed as, ac-
cording to experience, this provides protection
against corrosion. Calcareous layers of >0.5mm
in thickness, however, will impede the heat
transfer to an extent which results in thermal
overloading of the components to be cooled.
Rust in the cooling system adversely affects the
stability of the emulsion in case anti-corrosion
oil is being used for cooling water treatment.
Washed-off rust particles can act like an abra-
sive (e. g. on the sealing elements of the water
pumpsl. Together with the water hardness con-
stituents, they form so-called iron sludge which
settles predominantly in areas of low flow rates.
1l
Can also be used in case of short engine operating periods.
Manufacturer
Product Concentration
Duration of cleaning procedure /
temperature
Drew HDE - 777 4 - 5% 4 hrs at 50 - 60 °C
Nalfleet MaxiClean 2 2 - 5% 4 hrs at 60 °C
Unitor Aquabreak
1l
0.05 - 0.5% 4 hrs at ambient temperature
vecom Ultrasonic
Multi Cleaner
4% 12 hrs at 50 - 60 °C
Table 3-61 Cleaning agents for removing oil suldge
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.5 Cleaning cooling water
Page 3 - 24 Status 01/2008
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Table 3-62 Cleaning agents for dissolving calcareous scale and rust
ln general, products used for dissolving calcare-
ous scale deposits are also suitable for remov-
ing rust. Table 3-62, lists appropriate agents in
alphabetical order. Products of other manufac-
turers may also be used as long as their proper-
ties are comparable. The manufacturer's
instructions for use are likewise to be strictly ob-
served. Prior to cleaning, check whether the
agent concerned is suitable for the materials to
be cleaned. The agents listed in Table 3-62, are
also suitable for stainless steel
ln case of emergency
Only in exceptional cases, if none of the special
agents the application of which does not
present problems is available, calcareous de-
posits may be removed by using aqueous hy-
drochloric acid or amido sulphur acid as a
means of emergency. The following is to be ob-
served for application:
√ Heat exchangers made of stainless steel
must never be treated with aqueous hydro-
chloric acid.
√ Cooling systems containing non-ferrous
metals (aluminium, red brass, brass, etc.l
have to be treated with inhibited amido sul-
phur acid. This acid should be added to the
water at a concentration of 3 - 5%. The tem-
perature should be 40 - 50°C.
√ Aqueous hydrochloric acid may only be used
for cleaning steel pipes. The use of hydro-
chloric acid for system cleaning always in-
volves the risk of acid residues remaining in
the system even after thorough neutralisation
and flushing. Such residues promote corro-
sion pitting. We therefore recommend having
the cleaning operation performed by a firm
specialising in this field.
Carbon dioxide bubbles which form in the disso-
lution process of the calcareous deposits may
obstruct the access of the cleaning agent to the
water scaling. lt is, therefore, absolutely neces-
sary to circulate the water containing the clean-
ing agent so that the gas bubbles are carried
away and can escape. The duration of the clean-
ing process depends on the thickness and com-
position of the deposits. For guide values,
please see Table 3-62.
Manufacturer Product Concentration
Duration of the cleaning procedure /
temperature
Drew SAF-Acid
Descale-lT
Ferroclean
5 - 10%
5 - 10%
10%
4 hrs. at 60 - 70°C
4 hrs. at 60 - 70°C
4 - 24 hrs. at 60 - 70°C
Nalfleet Nalfleet 9 - 068 5% 4 hrs. at 60 - 75°C
Unitor Descalex 5 - 10% 4 - 6 hrs. at approx. 60°C
vecom Descalant F 3 - 10% approx. 4 hrs. at 50 - 60°C
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.5 Cleaning cooling water
Status 01/2008 Page 3 - 25
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After cleaning
Following the cleaning of cooling spaces using
cleaning agents, the system has to be flushed
several times. ln doing so, make sure to replace
the water. Where acids have been used for
cleaning, subsequently neutralise the cooling
system with appropriate chemicals, and then
flush it. When this has been done, the system
can be refilled with appropriately treated water.
Warning!
Do not start the cleaning process before the en-
gine has cooled down. Hot engine components
are not allowed to be charged with cold water.
Prior to proceeding to refilling the cooling water
system, make sure that the venting pipes are
open. Clogged venting pipes obstruct the es-
cape of air and involve the danger of thermal
overloading of the engine.
The relevant regulations have to be observed for
the disposal of cleaning agents or acids.
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.5 Cleaning cooling water
Page 3 - 26 Status 01/2008
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Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.6 Quality of Marine Diesel Fuel (MDOl
Status 02/2008 Page 3 - 27
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3.6 Quality of Marine Diesel Fuel (MDOl
Other designations
Diesel Fuel Oil, Diesel Oil, Bunker Diesel Oil, Ma-
rine Diesel Fuel.
Marine Diesel Oil (MDOl is offered as heavy dis-
tillate (designation lSO-F-DMBl or as a blend of
distillate and small amounts of residual oil (des-
ignation lSO-F-DMCl exclusively for marine ap-
plications. The commonly used term for the
blend, which is of dark brown to black colour, is
Blended MDO. MDO is produced from crude oil
and must be free from organic acids and any
non-mineral oil products.
Specification
The usability of a fuel depends upon the engine
design and available cleaning facilities as well as
on the conformity of the key properties with
those listed in the table below which refer to the
condition on delivery.
The key properties have been established to a
great extent on the basis of lSO 8217-2005 and
ClMAC-2003. The key properties are based on
the test methods specified.
1l
With good illumination and at room temperature, appearance of the fuel should be clear and transparent.
Property/feature Unit Test method Designation
Specification lSO-F DMB DMC
Density at 15°C kg/m
3
lSO 3675 900 920
Cinematic viscosity at 40°C mm
2
/s cSt lSO 3104 >2.5 < 11 >4 < 14
Pour Point winter quality
°C
lSO 3016 < 0 < 0
summer quality < 6 < 6
Flash point Pensky Martens lSO 2719 > 60 > 60
Total content of sediments % by weight lSO CD 10307 0.10 0.10
Water content % by weight lSO 3733 < 0.3 < 0.3
Sulphur content % by weight lSO 8754 < 2.0 < 2.0
Ash content % by weight lSO 6245 < 0.01 < 0.03
Coke residue (MCRl % by weight lSO CD 10370 < 0.30 < 2.5
Cetane number
-
lSO 5165 > 35 > 35
Copper-strip test lSO 2160 < 1 < 1
vanadium content
mg/kg
DlN 51790T2 0 < 100
Content of aluminium and silicon lSO CD 10478 0 < 25
visual inspection -
1l
-
Other specifications:
British Standard BS MA 100 -1987 Class M2 Class M3
ASTM D 975 2D 4D
ASTM D 396 No. 2 No. 4
Table 3-63 Marine Diesel Oil (MDOl - key properties to be adhered to
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.6 Quality of Marine Diesel Fuel (MDOl
Page 3 - 28 Status 02/2008
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Supplementary information
At transshipment facilities and in transit MDO is
handled like residual oil. Thus, there is the pos-
sibility of oil being mixed with high-viscosity fuel
oil or lnterfuel, for example with remainders of
such fuels in the bunkering boat, which may ad-
versely affect the key properties considerably.
The fuel shall be free of used lubricating oil
(ULOl. A fuel shall be considered to be free of
ULO if one or more of the elements Zn, P and Ca
are below the specified limits (Zn: 15 ppm;
P: 15 ppm; Ca: 30 ppml.
The Pour Point indicates the temperature at
which the oil will refuse to flow. The lowest tem-
perature the fuel oil may assume in the system,
should lie approx. 10°C above the pour point so
as to ensure it can still be pumped.
A minimum viscosity at the fuel injection pump is
required to ensure a sufficient lubricity. There-
fore the temperature of the fuel must never ex-
ceed 60 °C.
lf Blended MDOs (lSO-F-DMCl of differing bun-
kering are being mixed, incompatibility may re-
sult in sludge formation in the fuel system, a
large amount of sludge in the separator, clog-
ging of filters, insufficient atomization and a
large amount of combustion deposits. We would
therefore recommend to run dry the respective
fuel storage tank as far as possible before bun-
kering new fuel.
Sea water, in particular, tends to increase corro-
sion in the fuel oil system and hot corrosion of
exhaust valves and in the turbocharger. lt is also
the cause of insufficient atomization and thus
poor mixture formation and combustion with a
high proportion of combustion residues.
Solid foreign matter increase the mechanical
wear and formation of ash in the cylinder space.
lf the engine is mainly run on Blended MDO i.e.
lSO-F-DMC, we recommend to provide a cen-
trifugal separator upstream of the fuel oil filter.
Separator throughput 65% with relation to the
rated throughput. Separating temperature 40 to
50°C. Solid particles (sand, rust, catalyst finesl
and water can thus largely be removed and the
intervals between cleaning of the filter elements
considerably extended.
lnvestigations
Fuel analyses are carried out in our chemical
laboratory for our customers. For examination a
sample of approx. 0.5 l is required.
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.7 Quality of gas oil/Diesel fuel (MGOl
Status 12/2007 Page 3 - 29
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3.7 Quality of gas oil/Diesel fuel (MGOl
Other designations
Gas oil, Marine Gas Oil (MGOl, High Speed Die-
sel Oil.
Diesel fuel is a medium class distillate of crude
oil which therefore must not contain any residual
components.
Specification
Suitability of the fuel depends on the conformity
with the key properties as specified hereunder,
pertaining to the condition on delivery.
On establishing the key properties, the stand-
ards of DlN EN 590 and lSO 8217-2005 (Class
DMAl, as well as ClMAC-2003 were taken into
consideration to a large extent. The key property
ratings refer to the testing methods specified.
1l
Determination of filter ability to DlN EN 116 is comparable to Cloud Point as per lSO 3015.
2l
L/v 20/27 engines require a cetane number of at least 45
Property/feature Unit Test method Characteristic value
Density at 15°C
kg/m
3
lSO 3675
≥ 820.0
≤ 890.0
Cinematic viscosity / 40°C mm
2
/s (cStl lSO 3104
≥ 1.5
≤ 6.0
Filter ability
1l

in summer
in winter
°C
DlN EN 116
≤ 0
≤ -12
Flash point Abel-Pensky in closed cruci-
ble
lSO 1523 ≥ 60
Distillation range up to 350°C % by volume lSO 3405 ≥ 85
Content of sediment (Extraction methodl % by weight lSO 3735 ≤ 0.01
Water content % by volume lSO 3733 ≤ 0.05
Sulphur content
% by weight
lSO 8754 ≤ 1.5
Ash lSO 6245 ≤ 0.01
Coke residue (MCRl lSO CD 10370 ≤ 0.10
Cetane number - lSO 5165 ≥ 40
2l
Copper-strip test - lSO 2160 ≤ 1
Other specifications:
British Standard BS MA 100-1987 M1
ASTM D 975 1D/2D
Table 3-64 Diesel fuel oil (MGOl - key properties to be adhered to
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.7 Quality of gas oil/Diesel fuel (MGOl
Page 3 - 30 Status 12/2007
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Supplementary information
Using fuel oil
lf, in case of stationary engines a distillate in-
tended for oil firing (for instance Fuel Oil EL to
DlN 51603 or Fuel Oil No 1 or No 2 according to
ASTM D-396, resp.l, is used instead of Diesel fu-
el, adequate ignition performance and low-tem-
perature stability must be ensured, i.e. the
requirements as to properties concerning filter
ability and cetane number must be met.
A minimum viscosity at the fuel pump is required
to ensure a sufficient lubricity. The required max-
imum temperature to keep the viscosity before
the fuel pump above 2mm
2
/s is dependent on
the fuel viscosity. But in all cases the tempera-
ture of the fuel before the injection pump must
not exceed 50°C.
lnvestigations
Fuel analysis are carried out in our chemical lab-
oratory for our customers at cost price. For ex-
amination a sample of approx. 0,5 litre is
required.
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.8 Quality of Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl
Status 12/2007 Page 3 - 31
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3.8 Quality of Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl
Prerequisites
MAN Diesel four-stroke engines can be operat-
ed on any crude-oil based heavy fuel oil meeting
the requirements listed in Table 3-65, Page 3-33,
provided the engine and the fuel treatment plant
are designed accordingly. ln order to ensure a
well-balanced relation between the costs for fu-
el, spare parts and maintenance and repair
work, we recommend bearing in mind the fol-
lowing points.
Heavy fuel oil (HFOl
Provenance/refining process
The quality of the heavy fuel oil is largely deter-
mined by the crude oil grade (provenancel and
the refining process applied. This is the reason
why heavy fuel oils of the same viscosity may
differ considerably, depending on the bunker
places. Heavy fuel oil normally is a mixture of
residue oil and distillates. The components of
the mixture usually come from state-of-the-art
refining processes such as visbreaker or catalyt-
ic cracking plants. These processes may have a
negative effect on the stability of the fuel and on
its ignition and combustion properties. ln the es-
sence, these factors also influence the heavy
fuel oil treatment and the operating results of the
engine.
Bunker places where heavy fuel oil grades of
standardised quality are offered should be given
preference. lf fuels are supplied by independent
traders, it is to be made sure that these, too,
keep to the international specifications. The re-
sponsibility for the choice of appropriate fuels
rests with the engine operator.
Specifications
Fuels that can be used in an engine have to meet
specifications to ensure a suitable quality. The
limiting values for a heavy fuel oil are listed in Ta-
ble 3-65 Fuel oil specifications and associated
characteristic values.
Please note the entries in the last column of Ta-
ble 3-65 Fuel oil specifications and associated
characteristic values, because they provide im-
portant background information.
Several international specifications for heavy
fuel oils are existing. The most important speci-
fications are lSO 8217-2005 and ClMAC-2003.
These two specifications are more or less equiv-
alent. Table 3-66 ClMAC Recommendations for
residual fuels for diesel engines (as bunkeredl
shows the specifications ClMAC-2003. All qual-
ities of these specifications up to K700 can be
used provided the fuel treatment system is de-
signed for these fuel grades e.g. fuels with a
maximum density of 1010 kg/m
3
can only be
used with modern separation.
lmportant
Fuel oil characteristics as stated in analysis re-
sults - even if they meet the above mentioned
requirements - may be not sufficient for estimat-
ing the combustion properties and the stability
of the fuel oil. This means that service results de-
pend on oil properties which cannot be known
beforehand. This especially applies to the ten-
dency of the oil to form deposits in the combus-
tion chamber injection system, gas passages
and turbines. lt may, therefore, be necessary to
rule out some oils that cause difficulties.
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.8 Quality of Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl
Page 3 - 32 Status 12/2007
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Blends
The admixing of engine oils (ULO:used lube oill,
of non-mineral oil constituents (such as coal oill
and of residual products from chemical or other
processes (such as solvents, polymers or chem-
ical wastel is not permitted. The reasons are, for
example: the abrasive and corrosive effects, the
adverse combustion properties, a poor compat-
ibility with mineral oils and, last but not least, the
negative environmental effects. The order letter
for the fuel should expressly mention what is
prohibited, as this constraint has not yet been
incorporated in the commonly applied fuel spec-
ifications.
The admixing of engine oils (ULO: used lube oill
to the fuel involves a substantial danger be-
cause the lube oil additives have an emulsifying
effect and keep dirt, water and catfines finely
suspended. Therefore, they impede or preclude
the necessary cleaning of the fuel. We ourselves
and others have made the experience that se-
vere damage induced by wear may occur to the
engine and turbocharger components as a re-
sult.
A fuel shall be considered to be free of used lube
oil (ULOl if one or more of the elements Zn, P
and Zn are below the specific limits (Zn: 15 ppm;
P: 15 ppm; Ca: 30 ppml.
The admixing of chemical waste materials (such
as solventsl to the fuel is for reasons of environ-
mental protection prohibited by resolution of the
lMO Marine Environment Protection Committee
of 1st January 1992.
Leaked oil collectors
Leaked oil collectors into which leaked oil and
residue pipes as well as overflow pipes of the
lube oil system, in particular, must not have any
connection to fuel tanks. Leaked oil collectors
should empty into sludge tanks.
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.8 Quality of Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl
Status 12/2007 Page 3 - 33
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Fuel-system related characteristic values
viscosity
(at 50°Cl
mm
2
/s
(cStl
max.
700
"viscosity/injection vis-
cosity", Page 3-35
viscosity
(at 100°Cl
max.
55
"viscosity/injection vis-
cosity", Page 3-35
Density
(at 15°Cl
g/ml max.
1.010
"Heavy fuel oil treatment",
Page 3-35
Flash point °C min.
60
"Flash point (ASTMD-93l",
Page 3-37
Pour point
(summerl
max.
30
"Low temperature behav-
iour (ASTM D-97l", Page
3-37, and "Pump ability",
Page 3-38
Pour point
(winterl
max.
30
"Low temperature behav-
iour (ASTM D-97l", Page
3-37, and "Pump ability",
Page 3-38
Engine-related characteristic values
Carbon
residues
(Conradonl
% wt.
max.
22
"Combustion properties",
Page 3-38
Sulphur 5
4,5 in marine operation
"Sulphuric acid corro-
sion", Page 3-40
Ash
0.20
"Heavy fuel oil treatment",
Page 3-35
vanadium mg/kg
600
"Heavy fuel oil treatment",
Page 3-35
Water % vol.
1
"Heavy fuel oil treatment",
Page 3-35
Sediment
(potentiall
% wt.
0.1
Supplementary characteristic values
Aluminium
and silicon
mg/kg max.
80
"Heavy fuel oil treatment",
Page 3-35
Asphalts % wt. 2/3 of carbon residues
(Conradsonl
"Combustion properties",
Page 3-38
Sodium mg/kg Sodium<1/3 vanadium,
sodium<100
"Heavy fuel oil treatment",
Page 3-35
Cetane number of low-viscosity constituent minimum
35
"lgnition quality", Page
3-38
Fuel free of admixtures not based on mineral oil, such as coal oils or vegetable oils;
free of tar oil and lubricating oil (used oill, free of any chemical waste and of sol-
vents or polymers
Table 3-65 Fuel oil specifications and associated characteristic values
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.8 Quality of Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl
Page 3 - 34 Status 12/2007
0
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Table 3-66 ClMAC Recommendations for residual fuels for diesel engines (as bunkeredl
1l
1 mm
2
/s = 1cSt
2l
Fuels with density close to the maximum, but with very low viscosity, may exhibit poor ignition quality.
3
l A sulphur limit of 1,5% mm will apply in SOx Emission Control Areas designated by the lMO, when its relevant Protocol
comes into force. There may be local variations.
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Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.8 Quality of Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl
Status 12/2007 Page 3 - 35
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Supplementary remarks
The following remarks are thought to outline the
relations between heavy fuel oil grade, heavy
fuel oil treatment, engine operation and operat-
ing results.
Selection of heavy fuel oil
Economic operation on heavy fuel oil with the
limit values specified in Table 3-65, Page 3-33, is
possible under normal service conditions, with
properly working systems and regular mainte-
nance. Otherwise, if these requirements are not
met, shorter TBO's (times between overhaull,
higher wear rates and a higher demand in spare
parts must be expected. Alternatively, the nec-
essary maintenance intervals and the operating
results expected determine the decision as to
which heavy fuel oil grade should be used.
lt is known that as viscosity increases, the price
advantage decreases more and more. lt is there-
fore not always economical to use the highest
viscosity heavy fuel oil, which in numerous cas-
es means the lower quality grades.
Heavy fuel oils lSO-RM A/B 30 or ClMAC A/B 30
ensure reliable operation of older engines, which
were not designed for the heavy fuel oils that are
currently available on the market. lSO-RMA 30
or ClMAC A30 with a low pour point should be
preferred in cases where the bunker system
cannot be heated.
viscosity/injection viscosity
Heavy fuel oils if having a higher viscosity may
be of lower quality. The maximum permissible
viscosity depends on the existing preheating
equipment and the separator rating (through-
putl.
The specified injection viscosity of 12-14mm
2
/s
(for Gen Sets 16/24, 21/31, 23/30H, 27/38 and
28/32H: 12 - 18 cStl and/or fuel oil temperature
upstream of the engine should be adhered to.
Only then will an appropriate atomisation and
proper mixing, and hence a low-residue com-
bustion be possible. Besides, mechanical over-
loading of the injection system will be prevented.
The specified injection viscosity and/or the nec-
essary fuel oil temperature upstream of the en-
gine can be seen from the viscosity/temperature
diagram.
Heavy fuel oil treatment
Trouble-free engine operation depends, to a
large extent, on the care which is given to heavy
fuel oil treatment. Particular care should be tak-
en that inorganic, foreign particles with their
strong abrasive effect (catalyst residues, rust,
sandl are effectively separated. lt has shown in
practice that with the aluminium and silicon
content >15mg/kg abrasive wear in the engine
strongly increases.
The viscosity and density will influence the
cleaning effect, which has to be taken into con-
sideration when designing and setting the clean-
ing equipment.
√ Settling tank
The heavy fuel oil is precleaned in the settling
tank. This precleaning is all the more effective
the longer the fuel remains in the tank and the
lower the viscosity of the heavy fuel oil is
(maximum preheating temperature 75°C to
prevent formation of asphalt in the heavy fuel
oill. One settling tank will generally be suffi-
cient for heavy fuel oil viscosity below
380mm
2
/s at 50°C. lf the concentration of
foreign matter in the heavy fuel oil is exces-
sive, or if a grade according to lSO-F-RM, G/
H/K380 or H/K700 is preferred, two settling
tanks will be required, each of which must be
adequately rated to ensure trouble-free set-
tling within a period of not less than 24 hours.
Prior to separating the content into the serv-
ice tank, the water and sludge have to be
drained from the settling tank.
√ Separators
A centrifugal separator is a suitable device for
extracting material of higher specific gravity,
such as water, foreign particles and sludge.
The separators must be of the self-cleaning
type (i.e. with automatically induced cleaning
intervalsl.
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.8 Quality of Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl
Page 3 - 36 Status 12/2007
0
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Separators of the new generation are to be
used exclusively; they are fully efficient over a
large density range without requiring any
switchover, and are capable of separating
water up to a heavy fuel oil density
of 1.01g/ml at 15°C.
Table 3-67, Page 3-36, shows the demands
made on the separator. These limit values
which the manufacturers of these separators
take as a basis and which they also guaran-
tee.
The manufacturer' specifications have to be
adhered to in order to achieve an optimum
cleaning effect.
Layout of the separators is to be in accord-
ance with the latest recommendations of the
separator manufacturers, Alfa Laval and
Westfalia. ln particular, the density and vis-
cosity of the heavy fuel oil are to be taken into
consideration. Consulting MAN Diesel is re-
quired if other makes of separators come up
for discussion.
lf the cleaning treatment prescribed by MAN
Diesel is applied, and if the correct separa-
tors are selected, it can be expected that the
results given in Table 3-67, Page 3-36, for wa-
ter and inorganic foreign particles in the
heavy fuel oil are reached at the entry into the
engine.
The results obtained in practical operation re-
veal that adherence to these values helps to
particularly keep abrasive wear in the injec-
tion system and in the engine within accept-
able limits. Besides, optimal lube oil
treatment must be ensured.
Marine and stationary appli-
cation: connected in parallel
1 separator for
100% throughput
1 separator (standbyl for
100% throughput
Figure 3-1 Heavy fuel oil cleaning/separator arrangement
Definition Particle size Quantity
lnorganic foreign particles
incl. catalyst residues
<5”m
<20mg/kg
Al+Si content <15mg/kg
Water - <0.2% by volume
Table 3-67 Obtainable contents of foreign matter and water (after separationl
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.8 Quality of Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl
Status 12/2007 Page 3 - 37
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√ Water
Attention is to be paid to very thorough water
separation, since the water is not a finely dis-
tributed emulsion but in the form of adversely
large droplets. Water in this form promotes
corrosion and sludge formation also in the
fuel system, which has an adverse effect on
the delivery and atomisation and thus also on
the combustion of the heavy fuel oil. lf the
water involved is sea water, harmful sodium
chloride and other salts dissolved in the wa-
ter will enter the engine.
The water-containing sludge must be re-
moved from the settling tank prior to each
separating process, and at regular intervals
from the service tank. The venting system of
the tanks must be designed in such a way
that condensate cannot flow back into the
tanks.
√ vanadium/sodium
Should the vanadium/sodium ratio be unfa-
vourable, the melting temperature of the
heavy fuel oil ash may drop into the range of
the exhaust valve temperature which will re-
sult in high-temperature corrosion. By pre-
cleaning the heavy fuel oil in the settling tank
and in the centrifugal separators, the water,
and with it the water-soluble sodium com-
pounds can be largely removed.
lf the sodium content is lower than 1/3 of the
vadium content, the risk of high-temperature
corrosion will be small. lt must also be pre-
vented that sodium in the form of sea water
enters the engine together with the intake air.
lf the sodium content is higher than 100mg/
kg, an increase of salt deposits is to be ex-
pected in the combustion space and in the
exhaust system. This condition will have an
adverse effect on engine operation (among
others, due to surging of the turbochargerl.
Under certain conditions, high-temperature
corrosion may be prevented by a fuel additive
that raises the melting temperature of the
heavy fuel oil ash (also refer to "Additives to
heavy fuel oils", Page 3-40l.
√ Ash
Heavy fuel oils with a high ash content in the
form of foreign particles such as sand, corro-
sion and catalyst residues, promote the me-
chanical wear in the engine. There may be
catalyst fines (catfinesl in heavy fuel oils com-
ing from catalytic cracking processes. ln
most cases, these catfines will be aluminium
silicate, which causes high wear in the injec-
tion system and in the engine. The aluminium
content found multiplied by 5-8 (depending
on the catalyst compositionl will approxi-
mately correspond to the content of catalyst
materials in the heavy fuel oil.
√ Homogeniser
lf a homogeniser is used, it must not be in-
stalled between the settling tank and the sep-
arator on any account, since in that case,
harmful contaminants, and in particular sea-
water, cannot be separated out sufficiently.
Flash point (ASTMD-93l
National and international regulations for trans-
port, storage and application of fuels must be
adhered to in respect of the flash point. Gener-
ally, a flash point of above 60°C is specified for
fuels used in Diesel engines.
Low temperature behaviour (ASTM D-97l
√ Pourpoint
The pour point is the temperature at which
the fuel is no longer fluid (pumplikel. Since
many of the low-viscosity heavy fuel oils have
a pour point greater than 0°C, too, the bun-
kering system has to be preheated unless
fuel in accordance with ClMAC A30 is used.
The entire bunkering system should be de-
signed so as to permit preheating of the
heavy fuel oil to approx. 10°C above the pour
point.
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.8 Quality of Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl
Page 3 - 38 Status 12/2007
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Pump ability
Difficulties will be experienced with pumping if
the fuel oil has a viscosity higher than
1,000mm
2
/s (cStl or a temperature less than ap-
prox. 10°C above the pour point. Please also re-
fer to "Low temperature behaviour (ASTM D-
97l", Page 3-37.
Combustion properties
An asphalt content higher than 2/3 of the carbon
residue (Conradsonl may lead to delayed com-
bustion, which involves increased residue for-
mation, such as deposits on and in the injection
nozzles, increased smoke formation, reduced
power and increased fuel consumption, as well
as a rapid rise of the ignition pressure and com-
bustion close to the cylinder wall (thermal over-
loading of the lube oil filml. lf the ratio of
asphaltenes to carbon residues reaches the limit
value 0.66, and the asphaltene content also ex-
ceeds 8%, additional analyses of the heavy fuel
oil by means of thermogravimetric analysis
(TGAl must be performed by MAN Diesel to
evaluate the usability. This tendency will also be
promoted by the blend constituents of the heavy
fuel oil being incompatible, or by different and
incompatible bunkering being mixed together.
As a result, there is an increased separation of
asphalt (also see "Compatibility", Page 3-40l.
lgnition quality
Cracked products which nowadays are pre-
ferred as low-viscosity blend constituents of the
heavy fuel oil in order to achieve the specified
reference viscosity may have poor ignition qual-
ities. The cetane number of these constituents
should be >35. An increased aromatics content
(above 35%l also leads to a decrease in ignition
quality.
Fuel oils of insufficient ignition qualities will
show extended ignition lag and delayed com-
bustion, which may lead to thermal overloading
of the oil film on the cylinder liner and excessive
pressures in the cylinder. lgnition lag and the re-
sultant pressure rise in the cylinder are also influ-
enced by the final temperature and pressure of
compression, i.e. by the compression ratio, the
charge-air pressure and charge-air temperature.
Preheating of the charge-air in the part-load
range and output reduction for a limited period
of time are possible measures to reduce detri-
mental influences of fuel of poor ignition quali-
ties. More effective, however, are a high
compression ratio and the in-service matching
of the injection system to the ignition qualities of
the fuel oil used, as is the case in MAN Diesel
trunk piston engines.
The ignition quality is a key property of the fuel.
The reason why it does not appear in the inter-
national specifications is the absence of a
standardised testing method. Therefore, param-
eters such as the Calculated Carbon Aromaticity
lndex (CCAll are resorted to as an aid, which are
derived from determinable fuel properties. We
have found this to be an appropriate method of
roughly assessing the ignition quality of the
heavy fuel oil used.
A test instrument utilising a constant-volume
combustion technology (FlA fuel ignition analys-
erl has been developed and is currently being
evaluated at a number of testing laboratories.
The ignition quality of a fuel is determined as an
ignition delay in the instrument that is converted
to an instrument-related cetan number (FlA-CN
or ECNl. lt has been observed that fuels with a
low FlA cetan number or ECN could, in some
cases, lead to operational problems.
As the fluid constituent in the heavy fuel oil is the
determining factor for its ignition quality and the
viscous constituent is decisive for the combus-
tion quality, it is the responsibility of the bunker-
ing company to supply a heavy fuel oil grade of
quality matched to the Diesel engine. Please re-
fer to Figure 3-2, Page 3-39.
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.8 Quality of Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl
Status 12/2007 Page 3 - 39
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Figure 3-2 Nomogram for the determination of CCAl - assignment of CCAl ranges to engine types
v viscosity mm²/s (cStl at 50 °C
D Density [kg/m³ì at 15°C
CCAl Calculated Carbon Aromaticity lndex
A Normal operating conditions
B Difficulties may be encountered
C Problems encountered may increase up to engine damage after a short time of operation
1 Engine type
2 The combining straight line across density and viscosity of a heavy fuel oil results in CCAl.
CCAl can also be calculated with the aid of the following formula:
CCAl = D - 141 log log (v+0.85l - 81
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.8 Quality of Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl
Page 3 - 40 Status 12/2007
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Sulphuric acid corrosion
The engine should be operated at the cooling
water temperatures specified in the operating
manual for the respective load. lf the tempera-
ture of the component surface exposed to the
acidic combustion gases is below the acid dew
point, acid corrosion can no longer be sufficient-
ly prevented even by an alcaline lubricating oil.
lf the lube oil quality and engine cooling meet
the respective requirements, the BN values (see
Chapter 3.2 "Quality of lube oil (SAE40l for
heavy fuel oil operation (HFOl", Page 3-7l will be
adequate, depending on the sulphur concentra-
tion in the heavy fuel oil.
Compatibility
The supplier has to guarantee that the heavy fuel
oil remains homogenous and stable even after
the usual period of storage. lf different bunker
oils are mixed, separation may occur which re-
sults in sludge formation in the fuel system, large
quantities of sludge in the separator, clogging of
filters, insufficient atomisation and high-residue
combustion.
ln such cases, one refers to incompatibility or in-
stability. The heavy fuel oil storage tanks should
therefore be emptied as far as possible prior to
rebunkering in order to preclude incompatibility.
Blending heavy fuel oil
lf, for instance, heavy fuel for the main engine
and gas oil (MGOl are blended to achieve the
heavy fuel oil quality or viscosity specified for
the auxiliary engines, it is essential that the con-
stituents are compatible (refer to "Compatibility
abovel.
Additives to heavy fuel oils
MAN Diesel engines can be economically oper-
ated without additives. lt is up to the customer
to decide whether or not the use of an additive
would be advantageous. The additive supplier
must warrant that the product use will have no
harmful effects on engine operation.
The use of fuel additives during the guarantee
period is rejected as a matter of principle.
Additives currently in use for Diesel engines are
listed in Table 3-68, Page 3-40, together with
their supposed effect on engine operation.
Low sulphur HFO
From an engine manufacturer's point of view
there is no lower limit for the sulphur content of
HFO. We have not experienced any trouble with
the currently available low sulphur HFO, that are
related to the sulphur content or specific to low
sulphur HFO. This may change in the future if
new methods are applied for the production of
low sulphur HFO (desulphurization, uncommon
blending componentsl. MAN Diesel will monitor
developments and inform our customers if nec-
essary.
lf the engine is not operated permanently on low
sulphur HFO, then the lubricating oil should be
selected according to the highest sulphur con-
tent of the fuels in operation.
Pre-combustion √ Dispersants/stabilisers
√ Emulsion breakers
√ Biocides
Combustion √ Combustion catalysts (fuel econ-
omy, emissionsl
Post-combustion √ Ash modifier (hot corrosionl
√ Carbon remover (exhaust sys-
teml
Table 3-68 Additives to heavy fuels - Classification/
effects
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.8 Quality of Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl
Status 12/2007 Page 3 - 41
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Examinations
Sampling
To be able to check as to whether the specifica-
tion indicated and/or the stipulated delivery con-
ditions have been complied with, we
recommend a minimum of one sample of each
bunker fuel to be retained, at least during the
guarantee period for the engine. ln order to en-
sure that the sample is representative for the oil
bunkered, a sample should be drawn from the
transfer pipe at the start, at half the time and at
the end of the bunkering period. “Sample Tec",
supplied by Messrs Mar-Tec, Hamburg is an ap-
propriate testing kit for taking samples continu-
ously during the bunkering.
Analyse samples
The samples received from the bunkering com-
pany are frequently not identical with the heavy
fuel oil bunkered. lt is also appropriate to verify
the heavy fuel oil properties stated in the bunker
documents, such as density, viscosity. lf these
values should deviate from those of the heavy
fuel oil bunkered, one runs the risk that the
heavy fuel oil separator and the preheating tem-
perature are not set correctly for the given injec-
tion viscosity. The criteria for an economic
engine operation with regard to heavy fuel oil
and lubricating oil may be determined with the
help of the MAN Diesel Fuel and Lube Analysis
Set.
Our department for fuels and lube oils (Augsburg
Works, Department GQCl will be glad to furnish
further information if required.
Analysis of fuel oils are carried out by our chem-
ical laboratory for customers. For examination a
sample of approxiamately 0.5 l is required.
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.8 Quality of Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl
Page 3 - 42 Status 12/2007
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Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.9 Quality of intake air (combustion airl
Status 09/2003 Page 3 - 43
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3.9 Quality of intake air (combustion airl
General
The quality and the condition of the intake air
(combustion airl exert great influence on the en-
gine output. ln this connection, not only the at-
mospherical condition is of great importance but
also the pollution by solid and gaseous matter.
Mineral dust particles in the intake air will result
in increased wear. Chemical/gaseous constitu-
ents, however, will stimulate corrosion.
For this reason, effective cleaning of the intake
air (combustion airl and regular maintenance/
cleaning of the air filter are required.
When designing the intake air system, it has to
be kept in mind that the total pressure drop (fil-
ter, silencer, pipingl must not exceed 20mbar.
Requirements
The concentrations after the air filter and/or be-
fore the turbocharger inlet must not exceed the
limiting values given in Table 3-69, Page 3-43.
1l
m
3
(STPl Cubic metre at standard temperature and pressure
Properties/feature Characteristic value Unit
1l
Particle size max. 5 ”m
Dust (sand, cement, CaO, Al
2
O
3
etc.l max. 5
mg/m
3
(STPl
Chlorine max. 1.5
Sulphur dioxide (SO
2
l max. 1.25
Hydrogen sulphide (H
2
Sl max. 15
Table 3-69 lntake air (combustion airl - characteristic values to be observed
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.9 Quality of intake air (combustion airl
Page 3 - 44 Status 09/2003
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Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.10 viscosity-Temperature (vTl diagram of fuel oil
Status 12/2007 Page 3 - 45
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3.10 viscosity-Temperature (vTl diagram of fuel oil
Figure 3-3 viscosity-Temperature (vTl diagram
Quality requirements of operating supplies
3.10 viscosity-Temperature (vTl diagram of fuel oil
Page 3 - 46 Status 12/2007
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Explanations of the viscosity-temperature (vTl
diagram
The diagram shows the fuel temperatures on the
horizontal and the viscosity on the vertical
scales.
The diagonal lines correspond to the viscosity-
temperature curve of fuels with different refer-
ence viscosity. The vertical viscosity scales in
mm
2
/s = cSt apply to 40°C, 50°C or 100°C.
Determination of the viscosity-temperature
curve and the preheating temperature required
Example: Heavy fuel oil of 180mm
2
/s at 50°C.
Table 3-70 Determination of the viscosity-temperature
curve and the preheating temperature
1l
The temperature drop from the final preheater to the
fuel injection pump is not covered by these figures.
A heavy fuel oil of 180mm
2
/s at 50°C reaches a
viscosity of 1000mm
2
/s at 24°C (line el, which is
the max. permissible viscosity with respect to
the pump ability of the fuel.
Using a state-of-the-art final preheater a heavy
fuel oil outlet temperature of 152°C will be ob-
tained for 8bar saturated steam. Higher temper-
atures involve the risk of increased formation of
residues in the preheater, resulting in a reduction
of the heating power and a thermal overload of
the heavy fuel oil. This causes formation of as-
phaltenes, i.e. a deterioration of quality.
The fuel pipes from the final preheater outlet up
to the injection valve must be insulated ade-
quately to ensure that a temperature drop will be
limited to max. 4°C. Only then can the required
injection viscosity of max. 14mm
2
/s be achieved
with a heavy fuel oil of a reference viscosity of
700mm
2
/s = cSt/50°C (representing the maxi-
mum viscosity as referred to in international
specifications such as lSO, ClMAC or British
Standardl. lf a heavy fuel oil of a lower reference
viscosity is used, an injection viscosity of 12
mm
2
/s should be aimed at, ensuring improved
heavy fuel oil atomisation and thus fewer resi-
dues from combustion.
The transfer pump is to be designed for a heavy-
fuel-oil viscosity of up to 1000mm
2
/s. The pump
ability of the heavy fuel oil also depends on the
pour point. The design of the bunkering system
must permit heating up of the fuel oil to approx.
10°C above its pour point.
Caution!
Gas oil or Diesel oil (Marine Diesel Oill must have
a viscosity of at least 2mm
2
/s before engine.
With a too low viscosity, insufficient lubricity
may cause the seizure of the pump plungers or
the nozzle needles. This can be avoided if the
fuel temperature is controlled. The maximum al-
lowed temperature is dependent on the fuel vis-
cosity but must never exceed:
-max. 50°C for gas oil operation and
-max. 60°C for MDO operation.
Therefore a fuel oil cooler has to be installed.
ln case of fuel viscosities < 2,5 cSt, consultation
with the technical department of MAN Diesel SE
in Augsburg is required.
Specified injection
viscosity
Required heavy fuel oil
temperature before
engine inlet
1l
mm
2
/s = cSt °C
≥12 126 (line cl
≤ 14 119 (line dl
Page 4 - 1
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4 Diesel electric set
Page 4 - 2
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Diesel electric set
4.1 Arrangement of Diesel-electric propulsion plants
Status 03/2006 58/64 Page 4 - 3
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4.1 Arrangement of Diesel-electric propulsion plants
Figure 4-1 Example: Diesel-electric arrangement with engines L 58/64
Diesel electric set
4.1 Arrangement of Diesel-electric propulsion plants
Page 4 - 4 58/64 Status 03/2006
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Page 5 - 1
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5 Propulsion train
Page 5 - 2
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5

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Propulsion train
General
Status 02/2006 58/64 Page 5 - 3
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5.1 Propulsion packages
5.1.1 General
MAN standard propulsion packages
The MAN Diesel standard propulsion packages
are optimised at 90% MCR, 100% rpm and
96,5% of the ship speed. The propeller is calcu-
lated with the class notation "No lce" and high
skew propeller blade design. These propulsion
packages are examples of different combina-
tions of engines, gearboxes, propellers and
shaft lines according to the design parameters
above.
Due to different and individual aft ship body de-
signs and operational profiles your inquiry and
order will be carefully reviewed and all given pa-
rameters will be considered in an individual cal-
culation. The result of this calculation can differ
from the standard propulsion packages by the
assumption of e.g. a higher lce Class or different
design parameters.
Figure 5-1 MAN Diesel standard propulsion package with engine 7L 58/64
Propulsion train
Dimensions
Page 5 - 4 58/64 Status 02/2006
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5.1.2 Dimensions
Figure 5-2 Propulsion package - L 58/64
Propulsion train
Dimensions
Status 02/2006 58/64 Page 5 - 5
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Propulsion train
Dimensions
Page 5 - 6 58/64 Status 02/2006
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Propulsion train
5.1.3 Propeller layout data
Status12/2005 Page 5 - 7
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5.1.3 Propeller layout data
ldentification: ________________________________________________________________________
Type of vessel: ________________________________________________________________________
For propeller purposes please provide us with the following informations:
1. S:________________mm W:_______________mm l:_______________mm (as shown abovel
D:_________________mm
2. Stern tube and shafting arrangement layout
3. Propeller aperture drawing
4. Complete set of reports from model tank (resistance test, self-propulsion test and wake meas-
urementl. ln case model test is not available the next page should be filled in.
5. Drawing of lines plan
6. Classification society :_______________
lce class notation :_______________
7. Maximum rated power of shaft generator:_______________
8. Optimisation condition for the propeller :
To optain the highest propeller efficiency please identify the most common service condition for
the vessel.
Ship speed :_______________kn Engine service load :________________%
Service/seamargin :_______________% Shaft gen service load :________________kW
Draft :_______________m
9. Comments:_________________________________________________________________________
S W I
D
Propulsion train
5.1.3 Propeller layout data
Page 5 - 8 Status 12/2005
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10. vessel main dimensions (Please fill-in if model test is not availablel
11. Comments: _____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Date: ____________________ Signature: ___________________________
Symbol Unit Ballast Loaded
Length between perpendiculars L
pp
m
Length of load water line L
wL
m
Breadth B m
Draft at forward perpendicular T
F
m
Draft at aft perpendicular T
A
m
Displacement s m
3
Block coefficient (L
pp
l C
B
-
Midship coefficient C
M
-
Waterplane area coefficient C
WL
-
Wetted surface with appendages S m
2
Centre of buoyancy forward pf L
pp
/2 LCB m
Propeller centre height above baseline H m
Bulb section area at forward perpendicular A
B
m
2
Propulsion train
5.1.4 Propeller clearance
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5.1.4 Propeller clearance
To reduce the emitted pressure impulses and vi-
brations from the propeller to the hull, MAN Die-
sel recommend a minimum tip clearance as
shown in Table 5-1.
For ships with slender aft body and favourable
inflow conditions the lower values can be used
whereas full after body and large variations in
wake field causes the upper values to be used.
ln twin-screw ships the blade tip may protrude
below the base line.
Figure 5-3 Recommended tip clearance
Table 5-1 Recommended tip clearance
Hub
Dismantling of cap
X mm
High skew propeller
Y mm
Non-skew propeller
Y mm
Baseline clearance
Z mm
vBS 1180 365
15 - 20% of D 20 - 25% of D Minimum 50 - 100
vBS 1280 395
vBS 1380 420
vBS 1460 450
vBS 1560 480
vBS 1680 515
vBS 1800 555
vBS 1940 590
Propulsion train
5.1.4 Propeller clearance
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6 Engine related service systems
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Engine related service systems
6.1.1 Pipe dimensioning
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6.1 Basic principles for pipe selection
6.1.1 Pipe dimensioning
The external piping systems are to be installed
and connected to the engine by the shipyard.
Piping systems are to be designed in order to
maintain the pressure losses at a reasonable
level. To achieve this with justifiable costs, it is
recommended to maintain the flow rates as indi-
cated below. Nevertheless, depending on spe-
cific conditions of piping systems, it may be
necessary in some cases to adopt even lower
flow rates. Generally it is not recommended to
adopt higher flow rates.

Recommended flow rates (m/sl
Suction side Delivery side Kind of system
Fresh water (cooling waterl 1.5 - 2.5 1.5 - 2.5 closed
Lube oil 0.5 - 1.0 1.5 - 2.5 open
Diesel fuel oil 0.5 - 1.0 1.5 - 2.0 open
Heavy fuel oil
0.3 - 0.8 0.8 - 1.2
open / closed
(pressurised systeml
Exhaust gas 40 open
Engine related service systems
6.1.1 Pipe dimensioning
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Engine related service systems
6.2.1 Lube oil system description
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6.2 Lube oil system
6.2.1 Lube oil system description
The diagrams represent the standard design of
external lube oil service systems, with engine
mounted and detached, freestanding, lube oil
pump(sl.
The internal lubrication of the engine and the tur-
bocharger is provided with a forcedfeed lubrica-
tion system.
The lubrication of the cylinder liners is designed
as a separate system attached to the engine but
served by the inner lubrication system.
For each engine a separate lube-oil system is re-
quired.
For dual-fuel engines (gas-Diesel enginesl a
supplement will explain additional specific re-
quirements.
Lube oil viscosity/quality
The lube oil specified for the Diesel engine oper-
ation has to be carefully selected.
The selection is mainly affected by the used fuel
grade.
Table 6-1 Lube oil viscosity/quality
For details see Quality of lube oil (SAE40l for op-
eration on gas oil and Diesel oil (MGO/MDOl and
Biofuel, Quality of lube oil (SAE40l for heavy fuel
oil operation (HFOl and when exist Quality re-
quirements for lube oil (Otto-gas and dual-fuel
operationl in Chapter 3.
T-001/ Service tank
For the design of the service tank the class re-
quirements have to be taken in consideration.
For design requirements of MAN Diesel see
Chapter "Lube oil service tank".
Lube oil heating
The lube oil in the service tank and the system
shall be heated up to 40 °C prior to the engine
start. A constant circulation of the lube oil with
the stand-by pump is not recommended. For
priming the engine, it is sufficient to start the
stand-by pump 15 min prior to engine start.
Suction pipes
Suction pipes must be installed with a steady
slope and dimensioned for the total resistance
(incl. pressure drop for suction filterl not exceed-
ing the pump suction head. A non-return flap
must be installed close to the lube oil tank in or-
der to prevent the lube oil backflow when the en-
gine has been shut off. For engine mounted
pumps this non-return flap must be by-passed
by a relief valve (PSv-004, DN50l to protect the
pump seals against high pressure because of
counter rotation (during shut downl.
Main fuel Lube oil type
viscosity
class
Base No. (BNl
Gas (+MDO/MGO for ignition
onlyl
doped (HDl + additives
SAE 40
6-12 mg KOH/g
depends on
sulphur con-
tent
MGO 12-20 mg KOH/g
MDO 12-20 mg KOH/g
HFO medium-alkaline +
additives
30-40 mg KOH/g
Engine related service systems
6.2.1 Lube oil system description
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FlL- 004 / Suction filter
The suction filters protect the lube oil pumps
against larger dirt particals that may have accu-
mulated in the tank. lt is recommended to use fil-
ters with a mesh size of 540 μm with magnetic
inserts. A differential pressure gauge connected
to the filter indicates when manual cleaning of
filter becomes necessary, which should prefera-
bly be done in port.
P-001/P-074 / Lube oil pumps
For ships with a single main engine drive it is
preferable to design the lube oil system with a
combination of an engine driven lube oil pump
(P-001l and an electrically driven stand-by
pump (P-074l (100% capacityl.
For ships with more than one main engine the
electrically driven pump can be dimensioned
smaller, to be used as a priming pump only.
As long as the installed stand-by pump is pro-
viding 100% capacity of the operating pump,
the class requirement to have an operating
pump in spare on board, is fulfilled.
The main advantages for an engine-driven lube
oil pump are
√ reduced power demand for genset / PTO for
normal operation
√ continous lube oil supply during black-out
and emergency stop for engine run-out.
ln general additional installations acc. to Table
6-2 Lube oil pumps, possible combinations. are
to be considered for different pump arrange-
ments
√ to comply with the rules of classification so-
cieties
√ to ensure continous lube oil supply during
black out and emergency stop for engine run-
out.
Table 6-2 Lube oil pumps, possible combinations.
Please select one "main lube oil pump" and one "second lube oil pump" and evaluate the consequences.
Main lube oil pump (operating pumpl
Attached on engine (engine drivenl
P-001
Electrically driven pump
100% capacity P-074
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Electrically driven pump
100% capacity
P-074
Lube oil system acc.Figure 6-1
√ no additional installation required
Lube oil system acc. Figure 6-2
√ Lube oil run down tank for engine is
required (T-050l
√ Lube oil run -down tank for T.C. is
required (T-073l
Electrically driven pump
priming capacity
P-074
Lube oil system acc. Figure 6-1
√ Main lube-oil pump as spare is re-
quested to be on bord acc. to class
society.
√ Only for ships with more than one
main engine
Lube oil system acc. Figure 6-2
√ Lube oil run down tank for engine is
required (T-050l
√ Lube oil run -down tank for T.C. is
required (T-073l
√ Main lube oil pump as spare is re-
quested to be on bord acc. to class
society
√ Only for ships with more than one
main engine
No second pump Not permitted
Engine related service systems
6.2.1 Lube oil system description
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For required pump capacities see Chapter "En-
gine characteristic data" Section "Planning da-
ta"
ln case of black out with engine stop the post lu-
brication must be started within 50 min after the
engine has stopped and must persist for mini-
mum 10 min. This is required to cool down the
bearings of T.C. and hot inner engine compo-
nents.
HE-002 / Lube oil cooler
Dimensioning
Heat data, flow rates and tolerances are indicat-
ed in Chapter "Engine characteristic data" Sec-
tion "Planning data".
Additional contamination margin in terms of a
10% heat transfer coefficient redundancy is to
be considered.
On the lube oil side the pressure drop shall not
exceed 1.1 bar.
Design / Outfitting
The cooler installation must be designed for
easy venting and draining.
TCv-001 / Temperature control valve
The valve is to regulate the inlet oil temperature
of the engine. The control valve can be executed
with wax-type thermostats.
Table 6-3 Temperature control valve
Lube oil cleaning
The cleaning of the circulating lube oil can be di-
vided in two major function
√ Remove of contaminations to keep the lube
oil performance
√ Retention of dirt to safe the engine
The removal of combustion residues, water and
other mechanical contaminations is the major
task of separators / centrifuges (CF-001l in-
stalled in bypass to the main lube oil service sys-
tem of the engine. The installation of a separator
per engine is recommended to ensure a contin-
uous separation during engine operation.
The system integrated filters protect the Diesel
engine in the main circuit retaining all residues
that will harm the engine. Depending on the filter
design, the collected residues are to be removed
from the filter mesh by automatic backflushing,
manual cleaning or changing the filter cartridge.
The retention capacity of the installed filter
should be as high as possible. For selection of
an applicable filter arrangement, the customer
request for operation and maintenance, as well
as the class requirements, have to be taken in
consideration.
Type of
Engine
Set point
L.O. inlet temperature
Type of temperature
control valve
Control range
L.O. inlet temperature
32/40
65 °C
Wax thermostat
(recommendedl
Set point minus 10K
32/44CR
40/54
55 °C
48/60B
51/60 DF
58/64
Engine related service systems
6.2.1 Lube oil system description
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Arrangement principles for L.O. filters FlL-001 /
FlL-002
Depending on the number of installed main en-
gines in one plant and of engine type, different
arrangement principles for the filters FlL-001 /
FlL-002 are possible:
Table 6-4 Arrangement principles for L.O. filters
FlL-001 / Automatic filter
The automatic backwashing filter is to be in-
stalled as a main filter. The backwashing / flush-
ing of the filter elements has to be arranged in a
way that lube oil flow and pressure will not be af-
fected. The flushing discharge (oil/sludge mix-
turel is led to the separator suction pipe in a
divided compartment of the service tank, which
provides an efficient final removal of deposits by
the separator (see Chapter 6.2.4 Lube oil service
tankl.
Table 6-5 Automatic filter
Number of main engines
installed in one plant
Engine
types
lndicator filter (duplex filterl
FlL-002
Automatic filter FlL-001
Plants with one ore more main
engines
32/40,
40/54,
48/60B,
51/60DF,
58/64
√ Required
√ lnstalled close to the engine
√ Automatic filter with bypass
Plants with more than one
main engine
32/40 only √ Not required √ Automatic filter without by-
pass
√ Filter design has to be ap-
proved by MAN Diesel
√ lnstalled close to the engine
Plants with more than one
main engine
32/44CR
only
√ Not required √ Automatic filter without by-
pass mounted on the engine
Lube oile automatic filter FlL-001
Type of Engine 32/44CR 32/40
32/40, 40/54, 48/60B,
51/60DF, 58/64
Application √ Multi-main-engine-
plant
√ Multi-main-engine-
plant
√ Single-main-engine-
plant
√ Multi-main-engine-
plant
Location of the filter √ Mounted on the engine √ To be installed in the
external piping system
close to the engine
√ To be installed in the
external piping system
Max. mesh width (absolute,
sphere-passing meshl
0.034 mm
Filter surface load According filter manufacturer
Supply lncluded Optional Optional
Engine related service systems
6.2.1 Lube oil system description
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As far as the automatic filter is installed without
any additional filters downstream, before the en-
gine inlet, the filter has to be installed as close as
possible to the engine (see Table 6-4 Arrange-
ment principles for L.O. filtersl. ln that case the
pipe section between filter and engine inlet must
be closely inspected before installation. This
pipe section must be devided and flanges have
to be fitted that all bends and welding seams
can be inspected and cleaned prior to final in-
stallation.
Differential pressure gauges have to be installed,
to protect the filter cartridges and to indicate
clocking condition of the filter. A high differential
pressure has to be indicated as an alarm.
Filter mesh sizes and surface loads see Table 6-
5 Automatic filter.
v-001 / Lead-sealed shut-off cock
This shut-off cock is only to be provided for sin-
gle-engine propulsion plants. The cock is closed
during normal operation. ln case the lube oil au-
tomatic filter FlL-001 has to be taken out of op-
eration, the cock can be opened and the
automatic filter shut off. Consequently, the auto-
matic filter is by-passed. The lube oil indicator
filter FlL-002 adopts temporarily the task of the
automatic filter. This measure ensures that dis-
turbances in backwashing do not result in a
complete failure of filtering and that the main
stream filter can be cleaned without interrupting
filtering.
FlL-002 / lndicator filter
The indicator filter is a duplex filter, which must
be cleaned manually. lt must be installed down-
stream of the automatic filter, as close as possi-
ble to the engine. The pipe section between filter
and engine inlet must be closely inspected be-
fore installation. This pipe section must be divid-
ed and flanges have to be fitted that all bends
and welding seams can be inspected and
cleaned prior to final installation.
Table 6-6 lndicator filter
Lube oil indicator filter FlL-002
Type of Engine 32/44CR 32/40
32/40, 40/54, 48/60B,
51/60DF, 58/64
Application √ Multi-main-engine-
plant
√ Multi-main-engine-
plant
√ Single-main-engine-
plant
√ Multi-main-engine-
plant
Location of the filter
lndicator filter not
required
lndicator filter not
required
To be installed in the
external piping system
close to the engine
Max. mesh width (absolute,
sphere-passing meshl
0.06 mm
Filter surface load According filter manu-
facturer
Supply - - Optional
Engine related service systems
6.2.1 Lube oil system description
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The indicator filter protects the engine also in
case of malfunctions of the automatic filter. The
monitoring system of the automatic filter gener-
ates an alarm signal to alert the operating per-
sonnel. A maintenance of the automatic filter
becomes necessary. For this propose the lube
oil flow thought the automatic filter has to be
stopped. Single-main-engine-plants can contin-
ue to stay in operation by bypassing the auto-
matic filter. Lube oil can still be filtrated
sufficiently in this situation by only using the in-
dicator filter.
ln multi-engine-plants, were it is not possible to
bypass the automatic filter without loss of lube
oil filtration, the affected engine has to be
stopped in this situation.
The design of the indicator filter must ensure
that no parts of the filter can be loosed and enter
the engine.
The drain connections provided with shut-off
fittings in the two chambers of the indicator filter
return in the leak oil tank (T-006l. Draining will re-
move the dirt accumulated in the casing and
prevents contamination of the clean oil side of
filter.
Filter mesh sizes and surface loads see Table 6-
6 lndicator filter.
lndication and alarm of filters
The automatic filter FlL-001 and the indicator /
duplex filter FlL-002 are equipped with local,
visual, differential pressure indicators and differ-
antial pressure switches. The switches are used
for the control of the filter (only intermittent flush-
ing automatic filterl and to generate alarms. The
alarms of the automatic filter and indicator / du-
plex filter are processed in the engine control
and safety system and are available for the ship
alarm system.
Table 6-7 lndication and alarm of filters
Differential pressure between filter inlet and outlet (dpl
dp switch with lower set point is
active
dp switch with higher set point is
active
Automatic filter
FlL-001
lntermittent
flushing type
(e.g. B&K 6.61l
This dp switch has to be installed twice
if an intermittent flushing filter is used.
The first switch is used for the filter
control; it will start the automatic flush-
ing procedure.
The second switch is adjusted at the
identical set point as the first. Once the
second switch is activated, and after a
time delay of approx. 3 min, the dp pre-
alarm "filter is polluted" is generated.
The time delay becomes necessary to
effect the automatic flushing procedure
before and to evaluate its effect.
The dp main alarm "filter failure" is gen-
erated immediately. lf the main alarm is
still active after 30 min, the engine out-
put power will be reduced automati-
cally.
Continuous
flushing type
(e.g. B&K 6.46l
The dp pre-alarm: "filter is polluted" is
generated immediately
Duplex / lndi-
cator filter
FlL-002
(e.g. B&K 2.05l
Engine related service systems
6.2.1 Lube oil system description
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Suction filters FlL-004 are equipped with a local,
visual, differential pressure indicator.
CF-001 / Separator
The lube oil is intensively cleaned by separation
in the by-pass thus relieving the filters and al-
lowing an economical design.
The separator (clarifierl should be of the self-
cleaning type. The design is to be based on a
lube oil quantity of 1.0 l/kW. This lube oil quantity
should be cleaned within 24 hours at:
√ HFO-operation 6 - 7 times,
√ MDO-operation 4 - 5 times,
√ DF-engines operating on gas (+MDO/MGO
for ignition onlyl 4 - 5 times,
The formula for determining the separator flow
rate Q is:
Q Separator flow rate.....................................l/h
P Total engine output................................... kW
n HFO=7, MDO=5, MGO=5, Gas(+MDO/MGO
for ignition onlyl =5 ........................................... -
With the evaluated flow rate the size of separator
has to be selected acc. to the evaluation table of
the manufacturer. MAN Diesel strictly recom-
mend to use evaluation tables according to a
"Certified flow rate" (CFRl. The separator rating
stated by the manufacturer should be higher
than the flow rate Q calculated according to the
above formula.
Separator equipment
The preheater H-002 must be able to heat the oil
to 95 °C and the size is to be selected accord-
ingly. ln addition to a Pl-temperature control,
which avoids a thermal overloading of the oil,
silting of the preheater must be prevented by
high turbulence of the oil in the preheater.
Control accuracy ± 1 °C.
Cruise ships in arctic waters require larger pre-
heaters. ln this case the size of the preheater
must be calculated with a Δt of 60K.
The freshwater supplied must be treated as
specified by the separator supplier.
The supply pumps shall be of the free-standing
type, i.e. not mounted on the separator and are
to be installed in the immediate vicinity of the
lube oil service tank.
This arrangement has three advantages:
√ suction of lube oil without causing cavitation
√ the lube oil separator need not be installed in
the vicinity of the service tank but can be
mounted in the separator room together with
the fuel oil separators
√ better matching of the capacity to the re-
quired separator throughput.
As a reserve for the lube oil separator, the use of
the MDO separator is admissible. For reserve
operation the MDO separator must be convert-
ed accordingly. This includes the pipe connec-
tion to the lube oil system which must not be
implemented with valves or spectacle flanges.
The connection is to be executed by removable
change-over joints that will definitely prevent
MDO from getting into the lube oil circuit.
See also rules and regulations of classification
societies.
PCv-007 / Pressure control valve
By use of the pressure control valve, a constant
lube oil pressure before the engine is adjusted.
The pressure control valve is installed upstream
of the lube oil cooler. The installation position is
to be observed. By spilling off exceeding lube oil
quantities upstream of the major components
these components can be sized smaller. The re-
turn pipe (spilling pipel from the pressure control
valve returns into the lube oil service tank.
Q
1 0 P n × × ,
24
---------------------------- =
Engine related service systems
6.2.1 Lube oil system description
Page 6 - 8 Status 08/2006
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The measurement point of the pressure control
pipe is connected directly to the engine in order
to measure the lube oil pressure at the engine. ln
this way the pressure losses of filters, pipes and
cooler are compensated automatically (see also
chapter "Pressure control valve"l
T-050 / Lube oil run-down tank for engine
lf the lube oil system is designed for two electri-
cally driven lube oil pumps (see Table 6-2 Lube
oil pumps, possible combinations.l, a lube oil
run-down tank for the engine must be installed
(delivery and installation by the shipyardl in the
engine room. The tank is filled when the lube oil
system is put into operation and the tank con-
tent will then be available for emergency lubrica-
tion.
Only with filled tank the engine can be started.
To accelerate the filling time, the valve LOv-001
remains open till the lube oil level in the run-
down tank is sufficient to start the engine. Then
valve LOv-001 is closed and the engine can be
started. During normal engine operation a small
heating lube oil flow, through an orifice installed
parallel to valve LOv-001, ensures that the lube
oil content of the run-down tank will preserve a
sufficient temperature. lt is recommended to ad-
just the heating lube oil flow in order to ex-
change the complete oil content of the run-
down tank in 2-3 hours. An overflow will dis-
charge the heating lube oil flow into the service
lube oil tank T-001. ln case the lube oil pump is
stopped, e.g. by black-out, the non return valve
NRv-002 will open automatically and the tank
content is used to lubricate the engine during
run-out for a few minutes with low oil pressure.
Also by a normal stop of the lube oil pump the
run-down tank is discharged automatically.
For tank capacity and installation height of the
lube oil run-down tank, see Chapter "Engine
characteristic data" Section "Planning data-Fill-
ing volumes and flow resistance".
The capacity of the service tank (T-001l must be
increased by the capacity of the run-down tank
(T-050l as its content returns into the service
tank when the lube oil pump is stopped.
The diameter of the connecting pipe from the
main lube oil pipe to the run-down tank and the
installed valves are to be designed with min.
0,75 x diameter of the main lube oil pipe. ln case
of cold ambient conditions it could be necessary
to insulate the run-down tank and the connect-
ing pipe.
T-073 / Lube oil run-down tank for turbocharger
lf the lube oil system is designed for two electri-
cally driven lube oil pumps (see Table 6-2 Lube
oil pumps, possible combinations.l, a lube oil
run-down tank for the turbocharger must be in-
stalled (attached on the turbocharger, delivery
by MAN Diesell. ln case of an unexpected stop
of the oil pump (black-outl, the oil content of the
tank is used to lubricate the bearings of the tur-
bocharger during run-out.
Engine related service systems
6.2.1 Lube oil system description
Status 08/2006 Page 6 - 9
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TR-001 / Condensate trap
The condensate traps required for the vent pipes
of the turbocharger, the engine crankcase and
the service tank must be installed as close as
possible to the vent connections. This will pre-
vent condensate water, which has formed on the
cold venting pipes, to enter the engine or service
tank.
See also Chapter 6.2.6 Crankcase vent and tank
vent.
T-006 / Leakage oil tank
Leaked fuel and the dirty oil drained from the
lube oil filter casings is collected in this tank. lt is
to be emptied into the sludge tank. The content
must not be added to the fuel. lt is not permitted
to add lube oil to the fuel.
Alternatively, separate leakage oil tanks for fuel
and lube oil can be installed.
P-012 Transfer pump
The transfer pump supplies fresh oil from the
lube oil storage tank to the operating tank. Start-
ing and stopping of the pump should preferably
be done automatically by float switches fitted in
the tank.
P-075 / Cylinder lube oil pump
The pump fitted to the engine is driven by an
electric motor (asynchronous motor 380-420v /
50Hz or 380-460v / 60Hz three-phase AC with
pole changingl.
For the cylinder lubrication MAN Diesel will sup-
ply a control unit inclusive a pump contactor,
with a power consumption of about 0.5 kW for
pump, control and heating.
This value must be doubled for v-engines, as
two control units (one for each rowl are supplied
in one cabinet.
Withdrawal points for samples
Points for drawing lube oil samples are to be
provided upstream and downstream of the fil-
ters and the separator, to verify the effectiveness
of these system components.
Piping system
lt is recommended to use pipes according to the
pressure class PN 10.
Engine related service systems
6.2.1 Lube oil system description
Page 6 - 10 Status 08/2006
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Engine related service systems

Status 01/2007 32/40, 40/54, 48/60B, 51/60 DF, 58/64 Page 6 - 1
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Lube oil diagrams - engine 32/40, 40/54, 48/60B, 51/60DF, 58/64
Lube oil diagrams please see overleaf!
Engine related service systems
Page 6 - 2 32/40, 40/54, 48/60B, 51/60 DF, 58/64 Status 01/2007
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Figure 6-1 Lube oil system - service pump attached
Engine related service systems

Status 01/2007 32/40, 40/54, 48/60B, 51/60 DF, 58/64 Page 6 - 3
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Engine related service systems
Page 6 - 4 32/40, 40/54, 48/60B, 51/60 DF, 58/64 Status 01/2007
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Figure 6-2 Lube oil system - service pump electrically driven
Engine related service systems

Status 01/2007 32/40, 40/54, 48/60B, 51/60 DF, 58/64 Page 6 - 5
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Engine related service systems
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Engine related service systems
6.2.2 Prelubrication / postlubrication
Status 07/2006 32/40, 32/44CR, 40/54, 48/60B, 51/60 DF, 58/64 Page 6 - 7
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6.2.2 Prelubrication / postlubrication

Prelubrication is on principle required before en-
gine start.
For main engines the stand-by pump is to be
put into operation 5 minutes before engine start.
A prelubrication pump is required for:
√ Emergency power generating sets
√ Generator plants in cases where the lube oil
pump is mounted on the engine
Prelubrication in cases where the lube oil pump
is mounted on the engine
The prelubrication pump is switched on before
the engine is started, and serves to assist the
mounted lube oil pump until the engine attains
its rated speed.
Pressure before engine . . . . . . . . .0.6 - 0.8bar
Oil temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . min. 40°C
Postlubrication
The prelubrication oil pumps are also to be used
for postlubrication when the engine is stopped.
Postlubrication is effected for a period of 15 min.
Table 6-10 Delivery rates of prelubrication / postlubrication pumps
Engine
type
Prelubrication / postlubrication pumps
Minimum delivery rates (m
3
/hl
No. of cylinders
6L 7L 8L 9L 10L 12v 14v 16v 18v 20v
32/40 18 20 23 25 30 35 40 45
32/44CR 18 20 23 25 28 30 35 40 45 50
40/54 25 30 33 38 - - - - - -
48/60B 35 41 47 53 - 70 82 93 105 -
51/60 DF 35 41 47 53 - 70 82 93 105 -
58/64 41 48 55 61 - - - - - -
Engine related service systems
6.2.2 Prelubrication / postlubrication
Page 6 - 8 32/40, 32/44CR, 40/54, 48/60B, 51/60 DF, 58/64 Status 07/2006
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Engine related service systems
6.2.3 Lube oil outlets - general
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6.2.3 Lube oil outlets - general
Lube oil drain
Two connections for oil drain pipes are located
on both ends of the engine oil sump, except for
L 48/60 and L 40/54 - with flexible engine
mounting - with one drain arranged in the middle
of each side.
lf the engine is installed in the horizontal posi-
tion, two oil drain pipes are required, one at the
coupling end and one at the free end.
lf the engine is installed in an inclined position,
three oil drain pipes are required, two at the low-
er end and one at the higher end of the engine
oil sump.
The drain pipes must be kept short. The slanted
pipe ends must be immersed in the oil, so as to
create a liquid seal between crank case and
tank.
Expansion joints
At the connection of the oil drain pipes to the
service tank, expansion joints are required.
Shut-off butterfly valves
lf for lack of space, no cofferdam can be provid-
ed underneath the service tank, it is necessary
to install shut-off butterfly valves in the drain
pipes. lf the ship should touch ground, these
butterfly valves can be shut via linkages to pre-
vent the ingress of seawater through the engine.
Drain pipes, shut-off butterfly valves with linkag-
es, expansion joints, etc. are not supplied by the
engine builder.
Engine related service systems
6.2.3 Lube oil outlets - general
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Engine related service systems
6.2.3 Lube oil outlets - general
Status 06/1993 58/64 Page 6 - 11
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Lube oil outlets
Rigidly mounted engines
Figure 6-3 Lube oil outlets engine L 58/64
Engine related service systems
6.2.3 Lube oil outlets - general
Page 6 - 12 58/64 Status 06/1993
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Engine related service systems
6.2.4 Lube oil service tank
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6.2.4 Lube oil service tank
The lube oil service tank is to be arranged over
the entire area below the engine, in order to en-
sure uniform vertical thermal expansion of the
whole engine foundation.
To provide for adequate degasing, a minimum
distance is required between tank top and the
highest operating level. The low oil level should
still permit the lube oil to be drawn in free of air
if the ship is pitching severly
5° longitudinal inclination for ship's lengths
≥ 100 m
7.5° longitudinal inclination for ship's lengths
< 100 m
A well for the suction pipes of the lube oil pumps
is the preferred solution.
The minimum quantity of lube oil for the engine
is 1.0 litre/kW. This is a theoretical factor for per-
manent lube-oil-quality control and the decisive
factor for the design of the by-pass cleaning.
The lube oil quantity, which is actually required
during operation, depends on the tank geometry
and the volume of the system (piping, system
componentsl, and may exceed the theoretical
minimum quantity to be topped up.
The low-level alarm in the service tank is to be
adjusted to a height, which ensures that the
pumps can draw in oil, free of air, at the longitu-
dinal inclinations given above. The position of
the oil drain pipes extending from the engine oil
sump and the oil flow in the tank are to be se-
lected so as to ensure that the oil will remain in
the service tank for the longest possible time for
degasing.
Draining oil must not be sucked in at once.
The man holes in the floor plates inside the serv-
ice tank are to be arranged so as to ensure suf-
ficient flow to the suction pipe of the pump also
at low lube oil service level.
The tank has to be vented at the ends.
Lube oil preheating
Preheating the lube oil to 40 °C is effected by the
preheater of the separator via the free-standing
pump. The preheater must be enlarged in size if
necessary, so that it can heat the content of the
service tank to 40 °C, within 4 hours.
Engine related service systems
6.2.4 Lube oil service tank
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Figure 6-4 Lube oil service tank_1
Engine related service systems
6.2.4 Lube oil service tank
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Figure 6-5 Lube oil service tank_2
Engine related service systems
6.2.4 Lube oil service tank
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Engine related service systems
6.2.5 Pressure control valve
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6.2.5 Pressure control valve
Figure 6-6 Pressure control valve
Engine related service systems
6.2.5 Pressure control valve
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Engine related service systems
6.2.6 Crankcase vent and tank vent
Status 02/2007 48/60B, 58/64 Page 6 - 19
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6.2.6 Crankcase vent and tank vent
vent pipes
The vent pipes from the
√ Lube oil service tank
√ Engine crankcase
√ Turbocharger
are to be arranged according to the following di-
agram. The required nominal pipe diameters ND
of the vent pipes are to be found in the
Table 6-11Pipe diameters for tank - and crank-
case vent.
Figure 6-7 Crankcase vent and tank vent
1 Connection crank case vent
2 Connection turbocharger vent
3 Lubricating oil service tank
4 Condensate trap, continuously open
Engine related service systems
6.2.6 Crankcase vent and tank vent
Page 6 - 20 48/60B, 58/64 Status 02/2007
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Table 6-11 Pipe diameters for tank - and crankcase vent
Engine
Nominal Diameter ND (mml
A B C D
6L, 7L 48/60B 100 100 65 125
8L, 9L 48/60B 100 100 80 125
12v, 14v 48/60B 100 125 100 150
16v, 18v 48/60B 100 125 125 200
L 58/64 100 125 6L = 65; 7-9L = 80 150
Engine related service systems
6.3.1 Cooling water system
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6.3 Water systems
6.3.1 Cooling water system
The diagrams showing cooling water systems
for main engines comprising the possibility of
heat utilisation in a freshwater generator and
equipment for preheating of the charge air in a
two-stage charge air cooler during part-load op-
eration.
Note!
The arrangement of the cooling water system
shown here is only one of many possible solu-
tions. lt is recommended to inform MAN Diesel
in advance in case other arrangements should
be desired.
For special applications, e.g. 32/40 gensets or
dual-fuel engines, supplements will explain spe-
cific necessities and deviations.
The design data of the system components
shown in the diagram are indicated in Chapter
"Engine characteristic data" Section "Planning
data".
The cooling water is to be conditioned using a
corrosion inhibitor according to "Chapter 3.3
"Quality of engine cooling water", Page 3-13.
LT = Low Temperature
HT = High Temperature
Cooler dimensioning, general
For coolers operated by seawater (not treated
waterl, lube oil or MDO/MGO on the primary
side and treated freshwater on the secondary
side, an additional safety margin of 10% related
to the heat transfer coefficient is to be consid-
ered. lf treated water is applied on both sides,
MAN Diesel does not insist on this margin.
ln case antifreeze is added to the cooling water,
the corresponding lower heat transfer is to be
taken into consideration.
The cooler arrangement has to ensure venting
and draining facilities for the cooler.
6.3.1.1 LT- cooling water system
ln general the LT cooling water passes through
the following components:
√ Stage 2 of the two-stage charge-air cooler
(HE-008l
√ Lube oil cooler (HE-002l
√ Nozzle cooling water cooler (HE-005l
√ Fuel oil cooler (HE-007l
√ Governor oil cooler (HE-022l
√ Gear lube oil cooler (HE-023l (or e.g. genera-
tor cooling in case of a Diesel-electric plantl
√ LT cooling water cooler (HE-024l
√ Other components such as, e.g., auxiliary en-
gines (gensetsl
The system components of the LT cooling water
circuit are designed for a max. LT cooling water
temperature of 38 °C with a corresponding sea-
water temperature of 32 °C (tropical conditionsl.
However, the capacity of the LT cooler (HE-024l
is determined by the temperature difference be-
tween seawater and LT cooling water. Due to
this correlation an LT freshwater temperature of
32 °C can be ensured at a seawater temperature
of 25 °C.
To meet the lMO regulations the set point of the
temperature regulator valve (MOv-016l is to be
adjusted to 32 °C. However this temperature will
fluctuate and reach at least 38 °C under tropical
conditions.
The charge air cooler stage 2 (HE-008l and the
lube oil cooler (HE-002l are installed in series to
obtain a low delivery rate of the LT cooling water
pump (P-076l.
P-076 / LT cooling water pump
The delivery rates of the service and standby
pump are mainly determined by the cooling wa-
Engine related service systems
6.3.1 Cooling water system
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ter required for the charge-air cooler stage 2 and
the other coolers.
For operating auxiliary engines (gensetsl in port,
the installation of an additional smaller pump is
recommendable.
MOv-003 / Temperature control valve for charge
air cooler
This three-way valve is to be installed as a mix-
ing valve.
lt serves two purposes:
1. ln engine part-load operation the charge air
cooler stage 2 (HE-008l is partially or com-
pletely bypassed, so that a higher charge air
temperature is maintained.
2. The valve reduces the accumulation of con-
densed water during engine operation un-
der tropical conditions by regulation of the
charge air temperature. Below a certain in-
take air temperature the charge air temper-
ature is kept constant. When the intake
temperature rises, the charge air tempera-
ture will be increased accordingly.
The three-way valve is to be designed for a pres-
sure loss of 0.3 - 0.6 bar and is to be equipped
with an actuator with high positioning speed.
The actuator must permit manual emergency
adjustment.
HE-002 / Lube oil cooler
See description in Chapter 6.2.1 "Lube oil sys-
tem description", Page 6-1. Heat data, flow
rates and tolerances are indicated in Chapter
"Engine characteristic data" Section "Planning
data". The principal design criteria for coolers
has been described before in paragraph "cooler
dimensioning, general".
HE-024 / LT-cooling water cooler
Heat data, flow rates and tolerances of the heat
sources are indicated in Chapter "Engine char-
acteristic data" Section "Planning data". The
principal design criteria for coolers has been de-
scribed before in paragraph "cooler dimension-
ing, general".
MOv-016 / LT cooling water temperature regula-
tor
This is a motor-actuated three-way regulating
valve with a linear characteristic. lt is to be in-
stalled as a mixing valve. lt maintains the LT
cooling water at set-point temperature, which is
32 °C.
The three-way valve is to be designed for a pres-
sure loss of 0.3 - 0.6 bar. lt is to be equipped with
an actuator with normal positioning speed (high
speed not requiredl. The actuator must permit
manual emergency adjustment.
Caution!
For engine operation with reduced NOx emis-
sion, according to lMO requirement, at 100%
engine load and a seawater temperature of
25 °C (lMO reference temperaturel, an LT cool-
ing water temperature of 32 °C before charge air
cooler stage 2 (HE-008l is to be maintained.
Fil-021 / Strainer
ln order to protect the engine and system com-
ponents, several strainers are to be provided at
the places marked in the diagram before taking
the engine into operation for the first time. The
mesh size is 1mm.
HE-005 / Nozzle cooling water cooler
The nozzle cooling water system is a separate
and closed cooling circuit. lt is cooled down by
LT-cooling water via the nozzle cooling water
cooler (HE-005l. Heat data, flow rates and toler-
ances are indicated in Chapter "Engine charac-
teristic data" Section "Planning data". The
principal design criteria for coolers has been de-
scribed in paragraph "cooler dimensioning, gen-
eral". For plants with two main engines only one
nozzle cooling water cooler (HE-005l is needed.
See also "Chapter 6.3.3 "Nozzle cooling sys-
tem", Page 6-35 ". As an option a compact noz-
zle-cooling module (MOD-005l can be delivered,
see "Chapter 7.1.1 "Nozzle cooling water mod-
ule", Page 7-3 ". For plants with two main en-
gines only one nozzle-cooling module is
required.
Engine related service systems
6.3.1 Cooling water system
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HE-007 / MDO/MGO cooler
This cooler is required to dissipate the heat of
the fuel injection pumps during MDO/MGO op-
eration. For dimensioning the cooler capacity
see "Chapter 6.4.4 "Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl supply
system", Page 6-57" and the a.m. paragraph
"cooler dimensioning, general ". For plants with
more than one engine, connected to the same
fuel oil system, only one MDO/MGO cooler is re-
quired.
HE-022 / Oil cooler for speed governor
This cooler is required to dissipate the heat in
the hydraulic oil system of the engine speed
governor.
The cooler is attached to the governor (attached
on the enginel and is supplied by MAN Diesel.
Data for required LT-cooling water:
√ Cooling capacity 5.0 kW
√ LT cooling water flow rate 1.0 m³/h
Note!
Not all types of speed governors need to be wa-
ter-cooled.
T-075 / LT cooling water expansion tank
The effective tank capacity should be high
enough to keep approx. 2/3 of the tank content
of T-002. ln case of twin-engine plants with a
common cooling water system, the tank capac-
ity should be by approx. 50% higher. The tanks
T-075 and T-002 should be arranged side by side
to facilitate installation. ln any case the tank
must be installed above the highest point of the
LT system.
6.3.1.2 HT Cooling water circuit
General
The HT cooling water system consists of the fol-
lowing coolers and heat exchangers:
√ Charge air cooler stage 1 (HE-010l
√ Cylinder cooling
√ HT cooler (HE-003l
√ Heat utilisation, e.g. freshwater generator
(HE-026l
√ HT cooling water preheater (H-020l
The HT cooling water pumps can be either of en-
gine-driven or electrically-driven type. The outlet
temperature of the cylinder cooling water at the
engine is to be adjusted to 90 °C.
For HT cooling water systems, where more than
one main engine is integrated, each engine
should be provided with an individual engine
driven HT cooling water pump. Alternatively
common electrically-driven HT cooling water
pumps may be used for all engines. However, an
individual HT temperature control valve is re-
quired for each engine. The total cooler and
pump capacities are to be adapted accordingly.
The shipyard is responsible for the correct cool-
ing water distribution, ensuring that each engine
will be supplied with cooling water at the flow
rates required by the individual engines, under
all operating conditions. To meet this require-
ment, e.g., orifices, flow regulation valves, by-
pass systems etc. are to be installed were
necessary.
H-001 / Preheater
ln order to bring the cooling water temperature
up to 60 °C, it is necessary to preheat the water
jacket of the cylinders before engine start-up.
The following table specifies the total heating
power required for preheating the HT cooling
water from 10 °C to 60 °C within 4 hours.
These values include the radiation heat losses
from the outer surface of the engine. Also a mar-
gin of 20% for heat losses of the cooling system
has been considered.
Engine
type
32/40
32/44CR
40/54
48/60B
51/60DF
58/64
L/v L L/v L
Min. heat-
ing power
(kW/cylin-
derl
6 12 14 18
Engine related service systems
6.3.1 Cooling water system
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A secondary function of the preheater is to pro-
vide heat capacity in the HT cooling water sys-
tem during engine part-load operation. This is
required for marine propulsion plants with a high
freshwater requirement, e.g. on passenger ves-
sels, where frequent load changes are common.
lt is also required for arrangements with an addi-
tional charge air preheating by deviation of HT-
cooling water to the charge air cooler stage 2
(HE-008l. ln this case the heat output of the pre-
heater is to be increased by approx. 50%.
An electrically driven pump becomes necessary
to circulate the HT-cooling water during preheat-
ing. The required minimum flow rate is indicated
in Table 6-12.
Table 6-12 Minimum flow rate during preheating and
postcooling
The preheating of the main engine with cooling
water from the auxiliary engines is also possible,
provided that the cooling water is treated in the
same way. ln that case, the expansion tanks of
the two cooling systems have to be installed at
the same level. Furthermore, it must be checked
whether the available heat is sufficient for pre-
heating the main engine. This depends on the
number of auxiliary engines in operation and
their load. lt is recommended to install a sepa-
rate preheater for the main engine, as the avail-
able heat from the auxiliary engines may be
insufficient during operation in the port.
As an option MAN Diesel can supply a compact
preheating module (MOD-004l. One module for
each main engine is required.
HE-026 / Fresh water generator
The freshwater generator must be switched off
automatically when the cooling water tempera-
ture at the engine outlet drops below 88 °C.
This will prevent operation of the engine at too
low temperatures.
HE-003 / HT cooling water cooler
Heat data, flow rates and tolerances of the heat
sources are indicated in "Chapter "Engine char-
acteristic data" Section "Planning data". The
principal design criteria of coolers has been de-
scribed before in paragraph "cooler dimension-
ing, general ".
HT temperature control
The HT temperature control system consists of:
√ 1 electronic temperature controller (TCl with
proportional-integral control characteristics
and additional inputs for external signals
(supplied by the engine control systeml.
√ 1 electrically activated three-way mixing
valve with linear characteristic curve (MOv-
002l.
√ 1 temperature sensor (PT100l TE, directly
downstream of the three-way mixing valve in
the supply pipe to charge-air cooler stage 1
(refer to the explanations given beneathl.
√ 1 temperature sensor (PT100l TE, directly
downstream of the engine outlet.
lt serves to maintain the cylinder cooling water
temperature constantly at 90 °C at the engine
outlet - even in the case of frequent load chang-
es - and to protect the engine from excessive
thermal load.
Minimum flow rate required during
preheating and postcooling
m
3
/h
No. of
cyl.
32/40
32/44CR
40/54
48/60B
51/60 DF
58/64
6L 7.2 12 14 17
7L 8.4 14 16 20
8L 9.6 16 18 23
9L 10.8 18 20 26
10L 12.0 - - -
12v 14.4 - 28 -
14v 16.8 - 30 -
16v 19.2 - 30 -
18v 21.6 - 30 -
20v 24.0 - - -
Engine related service systems
6.3.1 Cooling water system
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For adjusting the outlet water temperature (con-
stantly to 90 °Cl to engine load and speed, the
cooling water inlet temperature is controlled.
The electronic water temperature controller rec-
ognizes deviations by means of the sensor at the
engine outlet and afterwards corrects the refer-
ence value accordingly.
The electronic temperature controller is installed
in the switch cabinet of the engine room.
For a stable control mode, the following bound-
ary conditions must be observed when design-
ing the HT freshwater system:
√ The PT100 temperature sensor is to be in-
stalled in the supply pipe to stage 1 of the
charge-air cooler. To ensure instantaneous
measurement of the mixing temperature of
the three-way mixing valve, the distance to
the valve should be 5 to 10 times the pipe di-
ameter.
√ The three-way valve (MOv-002l is to be in-
stalled as a mixing valve. lt is to be designed
for a pressure loss of 0.3 - 0.6 bar. lt is to be
equipped with an actuator of high positioning
speed. The actuator must permit manual
emergency adjustment.
√ The pipes within the system are to be kept as
short as possible in order to reduce the dead
times of the system, especially the pipes be-
tween the three-way mixing valve and the in-
let of the charge-air cooler stage 1 which, are
critical for the control.
The same system is required for each engine,
also for multi-engine installations with a com-
mon HT freshwater system.
ln case of a deviating system layout, MAN Diesel
is to be consulted.
P-002 / HT cooling water pumps
As an option the engine is available with an at-
tached (engine drivenl HT cooling water pump.
Alternatively also electrically driven HT cooling
water pumps can be used.
The standby pump has to be of the electrically
driven type.
lt is required to cool down the engine for a peri-
od of 15 minutes after shut down. For this pur-
pose the standby pump can be used. ln the case
that neither an electrically driven HT cooling wa-
ter pump nor an electrically driven standby
pump is installed (e.g. multi-engine plants with
engine driven HT-cooling water pump without
electrically driven HT standby pump, if applica-
ble by the classification rulesl, it is possible to
cool down the engine by the separate small pre-
heating pump see Table 6-12, or if the optional
preheating unit (MOD-004l with integrated circu-
lation pump is installed, it is also possible to cool
down the engine with this small pump. However,
the pump used to cool down the engine, has to
be electrically driven and started automatically
after engine shut down.
None of the cooling water pumps is a self-prim-
ing centrifugal pump.
Design flow rates should not be exceeded by
more than 15% to avoid cavitation in the engine
and its systems. A throttling orifice is to be fitted
for adjusting the specified operating point.
FSH-002 / Condensate monitoring tank
(not indicated in the diagraml
Only for acceptance by Bureau veritas:
The condensate deposition in the charge air
cooler is drained via the condensate monitoring
tank. A level switch releases an alarm when con-
densate is flooding the tank.
T-002 / HT cooling water expansion tank
The expansion tank compensates changes in
system volume and losses due to leakages. lt is
to be arranged in such a way, that the tank bot-
tom is situated above the highest point of the
system at any ship inclination. The expansion
pipe should empty into the suction pipe as close
to the pump as possible. The required volume of
the tank and the recommended installation
height is indicated in the "Chapter "Engine char-
acteristic data" Section "Planning data" (see:
cooling water cylinderl.
Engine related service systems
6.3.1 Cooling water system
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Tank equipment:
√ Sight glass for level monitoring
√ Low-level alarm switch
√ Overflow and filling connection
√ lnlet for corrosion inhibitor
6.3.1.3 Cooling water collecting and
supply system
T-074 / Cooling water collecting tank (not indi-
cated in the diagraml
The tank is to be dimensioned and arranged in
such a way that the cooling water content of the
circuits of the cylinder, turbocharger and nozzle
cooling systems can be drained into it for main-
tenance purposes.
This is necessary to meet the requirements with
regard to environmental protection (water has
been treated with chemicalsl and corrosion inhi-
bition (re-use of conditioned cooling waterl.
P-031 / Transfer pump (not indicated in the dia-
graml
The content of the collecting tank can be dis-
charged into the expansion tanks by a freshwa-
ter transfer pump.
6.3.1.4 Miscellaneous items
Piping
For piping, black steel pipe should be used.
Treatment of the cooling water as specified by
MAN Diesel will safely protect the inner pipe
walls against corrosion.
Galvanised steel pipe must not be used for the
piping of the system as all additives contained in
the engine cooling water attack zinc.
Moreover, there is the risk of the formation of lo-
cal electrolytic element couples where the zinc
layer has been worn off, and the risk of aeration
corrosion where the zinc layer is not properly
bonded to the substrate.
Please see the instructions in our "Work card
6682 000.16 - 01E" for cleaning of steel pipes
before fitting.
Pipe branches must be fitted to discharge in the
direction of flow in a flow-conducive manner.
venting is to be provided at the highest points of
the pipe system and drain openings at the low-
est points.
Cooling water pipes are to be designed accord-
ing to pressure class PN 6, flanges and engine
connections are often designed according to
PN 10.
Turbocharger washing equipment
The turbochargers of engines operating on
heavy fuel oil must be washed at regular inter-
vals. This requires the installation of a freshwater
supply line from the sanitary system to the tur-
bine washing equipment and two dirty-water
drain pipes via a funnel (for visual inspectionl to
the sludge tank.
The lance must be removed after every washing
process. This is a precautionary measure, which
serves to prevent an inadvertent admission of
water to the turbocharger.
The compressor washing equipment is com-
pletely mounted on the turbocharger and is sup-
plied with freshwater from a small tank.
Sea water pump
A self-priming service and standby pump, and a
harbour pump for the Diesel gensets must be in-
stalled. For calculating the delivery rate, the heat
to be dissipated in the LT and HT circuit is to be
taken in consideration.
Engine related service systems
6.3.1 Cooling water system
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Delivery volume v:
v Delivery volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . m³/h
Q Total heat to be dissipated . . . . . . . . . . kJ/h
t2-t1 Temperature difference . . . . . . . . . . . °C
(between seawater temperature at inlet/outlet of LT cool-
ing water cooler.l
cp specific heat = . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2 kJ/kg. °K
The maximum permissible seawater tempera-
ture also depends on the type (plates or tubesl
and the corrosion resistance of the coolers and
has to be specified by the cooler manufacturer.
We recommend that a seawater outlet tempera-
ture of 48 °C is not exceeded.
Sea water filter
lt protects the system against rough dirt. For
vessels with only one seawater box a reversible
duplex filter is recommended. The mesh size
should be in a range of 2-4 mm. For dredgers
operating predominantly in sandy waters, a
mesh size of 0.3-0.5 mm is recommended.
v
Q
t2 t1 – ( ) cp 1000 × ×
----------------------------------------------------- =
Engine related service systems
6.3.1 Cooling water system
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Engine related service systems
6.3.2 Cooling water diagrams
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6.3.2 Cooling water diagrams
Please see overleaf!
Engine related service systems
6.3.2 Cooling water diagrams
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Figure 6-8 Cooling water system - single engine plant
Engine related service systems
6.3.2 Cooling water diagrams
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Figure 6-9 Legend to cooling water system - single engine plant
Engine related service systems
6.3.2 Cooling water diagrams
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Figure 6-10 Cooling water system - twin engine plant (part 1l
Engine related service systems
6.3.2 Cooling water diagrams
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Figure 6-11 Cooling water system - twin engine plant (part 2l
Engine related service systems
6.3.2 Cooling water diagrams
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Figure 6-12 Legend to cooling water system - twin engine plant
Engine related service systems
6.3.3 Nozzle cooling system
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6.3.3 Nozzle cooling system
General
The nozzles of the fuel injection valves are
cooled by fresh water circulation, therefore a
nozzle cooling water system is required. lt is a
separate and closed system recooled by the LT-
cooling water system, but not directly in contact
with the LT-cooling water. The nozzle cooling
water is to be treated with corrosion inhibitor ac-
cording to MAN Diesel specification "Quality of
engine cooling water" in chapter 3.
Note!
√ ln Diesel engines designed to operate preva-
lently on HFO the injection valves are to be
cooled during operation on HFO. ln the case
of MGO or MDO operation exceeding 72 hrs,
the nozzle cooling is to be switched off and
the supply line is to be closed. The return
pipe, however, has to remain open.
√ ln Diesel engines designed to operate exclu-
sively on MGO or MDO (no HFO operation
possiblel, nozzle cooling is not required. The
nozzle cooling system is omitted.
√ ln dual fuel engines (liquid fuel and gasl the
nozzles are to be cooled according to the en-
gine design.
P-005 / Cooling water pump
The centrifugal (non self-primingl pump dis-
charges the cooling water via cooler HE-005 and
the strainer FlL-021 to the header pipe on the
engine and then to the individual injection
valves. From here, it is pumped through a mani-
fold into the expansion tank from where it re-
turns to the pump.
One system can be installed for two engines.
T-076 / Expansion tank
The installation height above the crankshaft
centerline is shown in Chapter "Engine charac-
teristic data" Section "Planning data".
lf there is not enough room to install the tank at
the prescribed height, an alternative pressure
system of modular design is available, permit-
ting installation at the engine room floor level
next to the engine (see system drawing over-
leafl.
The system is to be closed with an over-/under-
pressure valve on tank top to prevent flashing to
steam.
HE-005 / Cooler
The cooler is to be connected in the LT cooling
water circuit according to schematic diagram.
Cooling of the nozzle cooling water is effected
by the LT cooling water.
lf an antifreeze is added to the cooling water, the
resulting lower heat transfer rate must be taken
into consideration. The cooler is to be provided
with venting and draining facilities.
TCv-005 / Temperature control valve
The temperature control valve with thermal-ex-
pansion elements regulates the flow through the
cooler to reach the required inlet temperature of
the nozzle cooling water. lt has a regulating
range from approx. 50 °C (valve begins to open
the pipe from the coolerl to 60°C (pipe from the
cooler completely openl.
FlL-021 / Strainer
To protect the nozzles for the first commission-
ing of the engine a strainer has to be provided.
The mesh size is 0.4 mm.
TE / Temperature sensor
The sensor is mounted upstream of the engine
and is delivered loose by MAN Diesel. Wiring to
the common engine terminal box is present.
Engine related service systems
6.3.3 Nozzle cooling system
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Nozzle cooling system
Figure 6-13 Nozzle cooling system
Engine related service systems
6.3.4 Nozzle cooling water module
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6.3.4 Nozzle cooling water module
Purpose
The nozzle cooling water module serves for
cooling the fuel injection nozzles on the engine
in a closed nozzle cooling water circuit.
Design
The nozzle cooling water module consists of a
storage tank, on which all components required
for nozzle cooling are mounted.
Description
By means of a circulating pump, the nozzle cool-
ing water is pumped from the service tank
through a heat exchanger and to the fuel injec-
tion nozzles. The return pipe is routed back to
the service tank, via a sight glass. Through the
sight glass, the nozzle cooling water can be
checked for contamination. The heat exchanger
is integrated in the LT cooling water system. By
means of a temperature control valve, the nozzle
cooling water temperature upstream of the noz-
zles is kept constant. The performance of the
service pump is monitored within the module by
means of a flow switch. lf required, the optional
standby pump integrated in the module, is start-
ed.
Throughput 0.8 - 10.0 m³/h nozzle cooling water,
suitable for cooling of all number of cylinders of
the engine types 32/40 - 58/64 and single/ dou-
ble engine plants.
Required flow rates for the respective engine
types and number of cylinders see Chapter "En-
gine characteristic data" Section "Planning da-
ta".
Engine related service systems
6.3.4 Nozzle cooling water module
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Figure 6-14 Nozzle cooling water module
Engine related service systems
6.3.5 Cleaning systems
Status 05/2006 Page 6 - 39
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6.3.5 Cleaning systems
Charge air cooler - air side
Deposits accumulating on the air side of the
charge air cooler reduce heat conductivity and
increase the pressure drop to an unacceptable
level. Therefore, deposits must be removed reg-
ularly.
The cooler bundle can be cleaned without being
removed. Prior to filling with cleaning solvent,
the charge air cooler and its adjacent housings
must be isolated from the turbocharger and
charge air pipe using blind flanges.
Four flexible hoses must be connected to the
adjacent housings of the charge air cooler.
T-077 / Cleaning tank
The volume of the tank must exceed the filling
capacity of the charge air cooler stated in the ta-
ble by about 200 litres.
Table 6-13 Filling capacities of charge air cooler casing
The delivery rate of the circulating pump must
be choosen so as to ensure that the charge air
cooler is filled within 30 min.
The dirt particles which have been flushed into
the cleaning tank from the charge air cooler are
caught by exchangeable filter mats or by a filter
installed on the delivery side of pump.
ln order to ensure a complete drainage of all
pipes, the tank should be installed at the lowest
point of the system.
A steam connection with pressure gauge and
two drainage connections leading to the dirt-
water collecting tank is to be provided to carry
out the necessary subsequent cleaning with
steam.
Engine Filling capacity (litresl with adja-
cent housing parts
One stage Two stage
32/40 1,200 1,200
32/44CR 1,200 1,200
40/54 1,250 1,200
40/48 B 1,500 1,600
58/64 2,000 2,200
Engine related service systems
6.3.5 Cleaning systems
Page 6 - 40 Status 05/2006
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Cleaning agents:
The cleaning agents listed below can, among
others, be recommended

Table 6-14 Cleaning agents
Note!
When using the cleaning agents:
√ the instructions of the manufacturers are to
be observed
√ attention is to be paid to their safety-relevant
data sheets
√ the temperature of these products has - due
to the fact that some of them are inflammable
- to be by 10 °C lower than the respective
flash point
Designation Manufacturer
Air Cooler Cleaner; ACC Plus
Air Cooler Cleaner
ACC-9; ACC/ME
Atlas D.G. Reiniger
ACC "Sea Shield" 79101
Norus Degreaser
Unitor Ship Service AS, Mastemyr, N-1410 Kolbtn, Norway
vecom B.v., Maassluis, Netherlands
Drew Chemical Corp., Boonton, New Jersey, USA
Atlas Mc Alpine LTD, Erith, Kent, Great Britain
Nalco Chemical Comp., Oak Brrok, lllinois, USA
Norus Sales Co., Stabekk, Norway
Engine related service systems
6.3.5 Cleaning systems
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6.3.5.1 Cleaning charge air cooler air side; 40/54, 48/60B, 58/64
Figure 6-15 Cleaning charge air cooler
Engine related service systems
6.3.5 Cleaning systems
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Engine related service systems

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6.3.5.2 Option Ultrasonic cleaning
The cooler bundle can be cleaned without being
removed. Prior to filling with cleaning solvent,
the charge air cooler and its adjacent housings
must be isolated from the turbocharger and
charge air pipe using blind flanges.
The casing must be filled and drained with a big
firehorse with shut-off valve (see P&ll.
All piping dimensions execute in DN 80.
1. When contamination with oil, fill the charge
air cooler casing with fresh water and a liq-
uid washing-up additive.
2. lnput the sono pusher after addition of the
cleaning agent in default dosing portion.
See Table 6-15, Page 6-43.
3. Flushing with fresh water (Quantity: approx.
2x to fill in and to drainl.
The contaminated water must be cleaned after
every sequence and must be drained into the
dirty water collecting tank.
Table 6-15 Filling capacities of charge air cooler casing
.
Table 6-16 Cleaning agents
Engine Typ
Content of charge-
air cooler
Fresh
water
Cleaning agent Flange connecting
40/54 6L-9L
1200 l 1150 l 50 l
DN 50 to norm R570-T1
Ø122x57
48/60 6L-9L
1900 l 1825 l 75 l
DN 50 to norm R570-T1
Ø122x57
48/60B 12v-18v According 6L-9L,
each cooler
DN 50 to norm R572-T1
Ø50x57
58/64 6L-9L
2500 l 2400 l 100 l
DN 50 to norm R570-T1
Ø122x57
Producer Product
Drew Enviromate 2000
Unitor Aquabreck PX
Environclean
Haug Eskaphor N6773
Engine related service systems
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lncrease in differential pressure = actual condition - new condition (mm WCl
Table 6-17 Degree of fouling of the charge-air cooler
Note!
When using the cleaning agents:
√ The instructions of the manufacturers must
be observed.
√ Attention is to be paid to their safety-relevant
data sheets.
√ The temperature of these products has - due
to the fact that some of them are inflammable
- to be by 10 °C lower than the respective
flash point.
√ The waste disposal instructions of the manu-
facturers must be observed.
√ Follow all terms and conditions of the Classi-
fication Societies.
lncrease in differential pressure
1l
Degree of fouling
Cleaning periode (guide
valuel
<100 mm WC Hardly fouled Cleaning not required
100-200 mm WC Slightly fouled approx. 1 hour
200-300 mm Severely fouled approx. 1,5 hour
>300 mm Extremely fouled approx. 2 hour
Engine related service systems

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Figure 6-16 Principle layout
1l
Required size of dirty water collecting tank:
volume at the least 4-multiple charge air cooler volume!
1 lnstallation ultrasonic cleaning
2 Firehose with sprag nozzle
3 Firehose
4 Dirty water collecting tank
1l
5 ventilation
A lsolation with blind flanges
Engine related service systems
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Engine related service systems
6.3.5 Cleaning systems
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6.3.5.3 Turbine washing device, HFO-operation
Figure 6-17 Cleaning turbine
Engine related service systems
6.3.5 Cleaning systems
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Engine related service systems
6.4.1 Marine Diesel Oil (MDOl treatment system
Status 04/2005 Page 6 - 49
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6.4 Fuel oil system
6.4.1 Marine Diesel Oil (MDOl treatment system
Figure 6-18 MDO treatment system
Engine related service systems
6.4.1 Marine Diesel Oil (MDOl treatment system
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Engine related service systems
6.4.2 MDO supply system for Diesel engines
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6.4.2 MDO supply system for Diesel engines
Figure 6-19 Fuel supply (MDOl - single engine plant
Engine related service systems
6.4.2 MDO supply system for Diesel engines
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Figure 6-20 Fuel supply (MDOl - twin engine plant
Engine related service systems
6.4.3 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl treatment system
Status 04/2005 Page 6 - 53
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6.4.3 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl treatment system
A prerequisite for safe and reliable engine oper-
ation with a minimum of servicing is a properly
designed and well-functioning fuel oil treatment
system.
The schematic diagram shows the system com-
ponents required for fuel treatment for HFO.
Bunker
Fuel compatibility problems are avoidable if mix-
ing of newly bunkered fuel with remaining fuel
can be prevented by a suitable number of bun-
kers.
Heating coils in bunkers to be designed so that
the HFO in it is at a temperature of at least 10 °C
minimum above the pour point.
P-038 / Transfer pump
The transfer pump discharges fuel from the bun-
kers into the settling tanks. Being a srew pump,
it handles the fuel gently, thus prevent water be-
ing emulsified in the fuel. lts capacity must be
sized so that complete settling tank can be filled
in ≤ 2 hours.
T-016 / Settling tank for HFO
Two settling tanks should be installed, in order to
obtain thorough precleaning and to allow fuels
of different origin to be kept separate.
Size
Precleaning by settling is the more effective the
longer the solid material is given time to settle.
The storage capacity of the settling tank should
be designed to hold at least a 24-hour supply of
fuel at full load operation, including sediments
and water the fuel contains.
The minimum volume v to be provided is:
v Minimum volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . m³
P Engine rating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . kW
Tank heating
The heating surfaces should be so dimensioned
that the tank content can be evenly heated to
75 °C within 6 to 8 hours.
The supply of heat should be automatically con-
trolled, depending upon the fuel oil temperature.
ln order to avoid
√ agitation of the sludge due to heating, the
heating coils should be arranged at a suffi-
cient distance from the tank bottom.
√ the formation of asphaltenes, the fuel oil tem-
perature should not be allowed to exceed
75 °C.
√ the formation of carbon deposits on the heat-
ing surfaces, the heat transferred per unit sur-
face must not exceed 1.1 W/cm².
Design
The tank is to be fitted with baffle plates in lon-
gitudinal and transverse direction in order to re-
duce agitation of the fuel in the tank in rough
seas as far as possible. The suction pipe of the
separator must not reach into the sludge space.
One or more sludge drain valves, depending on
the slant of the tank bottom (preferably 10°l, are
to be provided at the lowest point. Tanks reach-
ing to the ship hull must be heat loss protected
by a cofferdam. The settling tank is to be insulat-
ed against thermal losses.
Sludge must be removed from the settling tank
before the separators draw fuel from it.
T-021 /Sludge tank
lf disposal by an incinerator plant is not planned,
the tank has to be dimensioned so that it is ca-
pable to absorb all residues which accumulate
during the operation in the course of a maximum
duration of voyage. ln order to render emptying
of the tank possible, it has to be heated. The
heating is to be dimensioned so that the content
of the tank can be heated to approx. 60 °C
v
5 7 P × ,
1000
------------------- =
Engine related service systems
6.4.3 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl treatment system
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P-015 / Heavy fuel supply pump
The supply pumps should preferably be of the
free-standing type, i.e. not mounted on the sep-
arator, as the delivery volume can be matched
better to the required throughput.
H-008 / Preheater for HFO
To reach the separating temperature a preheater
matched to the fuel viscosity has to be installed.
CF-002 / Separator
As a rule, poor quality, high viscosity fuel is used.
Two new generation separators must therefore
be installed.
From Alfa Laval: Alcap, type SU
From Westfalia: Unitrol, type OSD
Separators must always be provided in sets of 2
of the same type
- 1 service separator
- 1 stand-by separator
of self-cleaning type.
As a matter of principle, all separators are to be
equipped with an automatic program control for
continuous desludging and monitoring.
Mode of operation
The stand-by separator is always to be put into
service, to achieve the best possible fuel clean-
ing effect with the separator plant as installed.
The piping of both separators is to be arranged
in accordance with the makers advice, prefera-
bly for both parallel and series operation.
The discharge flow of the free-standing dirty oil
pump is to be split up equally between the two
separators in parallel operation.
The freshwater supplied must be treated as
specified by the separator supplier.
Size
The separators are dimensioned in accordance
with the separator manufacturers' guidelines.
The required flow rate Q can be roughly deter-
mined by the following equation:

Q Separator flow rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . l/h
P Engine rating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . kW
b
e
Fuel consumption (see belowl . . . . . g/kWh
ρ Density at separating temp. approx. 0.93 kg/l
With the evaluated flow rate the size of separator
has to be selected acc. to the evaluation table of
the manufacturer. MAN Diesel strictly recom-
mend to use evaluation tables according to a
"Certified flow rate" (CFRl. The separator rating
stated by the manufacturer should be higher
than the flow rate Q calculated according to the
above formula.
By means of the seprarator flow rate which was
determined in this way, the separator type, de-
pending on the fuel viscosity, is selected from
the lists of the separator manufacturers.
For determining the maximum fuel consumption
(bel, increase the specific table value by 15 %.
This increase takes into consideration:
√ tropical conditions
√ the engine-mounted pumps
√ the calorific value fluctuations
√ the consumption tolerance
Withdrawal points for samples
Points for drawing fuel oil samples are to be pro-
vided upstream and downstream of each sepa-
rator, to verify the effectiveness of these system
components.
Q
P b ×
e
ρ
---------------- =
Engine related service systems
6.4.3 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl treatment system
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Figure 6-21 HFO treatment system
Engine related service systems
6.4.3 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl treatment system
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6.4.4 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl supply system
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6.4.4 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl supply system
To ensure that high-viscosity fuel oils achieve
the specified injection viscosity, a preheating
temperature is necessary, which may cause de-
gassing problems in conventional, pressureless
systems.
A remedial measure is adopting a pressurised
system in which the required system pressure is
1 bar above the evaporation pressure of water.
Table 6-18 lnjection viscosity and temperature after final preheater
The indicated pressures are minimum require-
ments due to the fuel characteristic. Neverthe-
less, to meet the required fuel pressure at the
engine inlet (see Chapter 2.2.5 "Planning data"l,
the pressure in the mixing tank and booster cir-
cuit becomes normally higher as indicated in
this table.
T-022 / Heavy fuel oil service tank
The heavy fuel oil cleaned in the separator is
passed to the service tank, and as the separa-
tors are in continuous operation, the tank is al-
ways kept filled. To fulfill this requirement it is
necessary to fit the heavy fuel oil service tank T-
022 with overflow pipes, which are connected
with the setting tanks T-016. The tank capacity
is to be designed for at least 8-hours' fuel supply
at full load so as to provide for a sufficient period
of time for separator maintenance. The tank
should have a sludge space with a tank bottom
inclination of preferably 10°, with sludge drain
valves at the lowest point, and is to be equipped
with heating coils.
The sludge must be drained from the service
tank at regular intervals.
The heating coils are to be designed for a tank
temperature of 75 °C.
The rules and regulations for tanks issued by the
classification societies must be observed.
T-003 / MDO/MGO service tank
The classification societies specify that at least
two service tanks are to be installed on board.
The minimum volume of each tank should, in ad-
dition to the MDO/MGO consumption of the
generating sets, enable an eight-hour full load
operation of the main engine.
Cleaning of the MDO/MGO by an additional
separator should, in the first place, be designed
to meet the requirements of the Diesel generator
sets on board. The tank should be provided, like
the heavy fuel oil service tank, with a sludge
space with sludge drain valve and with an over-
flow pipe from the MDO/MGO service tank T-
003 to the MDO/MGO storage tank T-015.
Fuel lnjection viscosity
*l
Temperature after
final preheater
Evaporation
pressure
Required system
pressure
mm²/50°C mm²/s °C bar bar
180 12 124 1.4 2.4
320 12 137 2.4 3.4
380 12 140 2.7 3.7
420 12 142 2.9 3.9
500 14 140 2.7 3.7
700 14 146 3.2 4.2
*l
Fuel viscosity depending on fuel temerature please see 3.10 viscosity-Temperature (vTl diagram of fuel oil, Page 3 - 45
Engine related service systems
6.4.4 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl supply system
Page 6 - 58 Status 07/2006
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CK-002 / Three way valve
This valve is used for changing over from MDO/
MGO operation to heavy fuel operation and vice
versa. Normally it is operated manually, and it is
equipped with two limit switches for remote in-
dication and suppression of alarms from the vis-
cosity measuring and control system during
MDO/MGO operation.
STR-010 / Y-type strainer
To protect the feed pumps, an approx. 0.5 mm
gauge (sphere-passing meshl strainer is to be
installed on the suction side of the pump.
P-018 / Supply pump
The volumetric capacity must be at least 160%
of max. fuel consumption.
Table 6-19 Simplified supply pump dimensioning
Q
P1
= P
1
x br
lSO
x f
4
Required supply pump delivery
capacity with HFO at 90°C:
Q
P1
l/h
Engine output at 100% MCR: P
1
kW
Specific engine fuel consumption
(lSOl at 100% MCR
br
lSO
g/kWh
Factor for pump dimensioning
- For Diesel engines operating on
main fuel HFO:
f
4
= 2.00 x 10
-3
- For Diesel engines installed in
dredgers operating on main fuel
HFO:
f
4
= 2.02 x 10
-3
f
4
l/g
Note!
The factor f
4
includes the following parameters:
- 160% fuel flow
- main fuel: HFO 380 mm
2
/50°C
- attached lube oil and cooling water pumps
- tropical conditions
- realistic lower heating value
- specific fuel weight at pumping temperature
- tolerance
ln case more than one engine is connected to the same
fuel system, the pump capacity has to be increased
accordingly.
Engine related service systems
6.4.4 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl supply system
Status 07/2006 Page 6 - 59
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The delivery height of the pump have to be
min. 5 bar and shall be selected according to
the required system pressure (see Table 6-18,
Page 6-57 l, the required pressure in the mixing
tank and the resistance of the automatic filter,
flow meter and piping system.
Table 6-20 Example for the determination of the expected operating delivery height of the supply pump
The recommended design height of the supply
pump is 7.0 bar for conventional and common
rail fuel injection systems.
HE-025 / Finned-tube cooler
lf no fuel is consumed in the system while the
pump is in operation, the finned-tube cooler pre-
vents excessive heating of the fuel.
lts cooling surface must be adequate to dissi-
pate the heat that is produced by the pump to
the ambient air.
PCv-009 / Pressure limiting valve
This valve is used for setting the required system
pressure and keeping it constant.
lt returns in the case of
- engine shutdown 100 %, and of
- engine full load 37.5 %
of the quantity delivered by the supply pump
back to the pump suction side.
Fil-003 / Automatic filter
Only filters have to be used, which cause no
pressure drop in the system during flushing.
Table 6-21 Required filter mesh width (sphere passing
meshl
Design criterion is the filter area load specified
by the filter manufacturer.
Conventional fuel
injection system
32/40, 40/54,
48/60B, 58/64
Common rail
injection system
32/44CR
Poitive pressure at the fuel module inlet due to tank level
above fuel module level
- 0.10 0.10
Pressure loss of the pipes between fuel module inlet and
mixing tank inlet
+ 0.20 0.20
Pressure loss of the automatic filter + 0.80 0.80
Pressure loss of the fuel flow measuring device + 0.10 0.10
Pressure in the mixing tank + 5.70 5.70
Operating delivery height of the supply pump = 6.70 6.70
Conven-
tional fuel
injection sys-
tem
32/40, 40/54,
48/60B,
58/64
Common rail
injection sys-
tem
32/44CR
Filter mesh width
(mml
0.034 0.010
Design pressure PN10 PN10
Engine related service systems
6.4.4 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl supply system
Page 6 - 60 Status 07/2006
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T-011 / Mixing tank
The mixing tank compensates pressure surges
which occur in the pressurised part of the fuel
system. For this purpose, there has to be an air
cushion in the tank. As this air cushion is ex-
hausted during operation, compressed air (max.
10 barl has to be refilled via the control air con-
nection from time to time.
Before prolonged shutdowns the system is
changed over to MDO/MGO operation. The tank
volume shall be designed to achieve gradual
temperature equalisation within 5 minutes in the
case of half-load consumption.
The tank shall be designed for the maximum
possible service pressure, usually approx. 10
bar and is to be accepted by the classification
society in question.
The expected operating pressure in the mixing
tank depends on the required fuel oil pressure at
the inlet (see Chapter 2.2.5 Planning datal and
the pressure losses of the installed components
and pipes.
Table 6-22 Example for the determination of the expected operating pressure of the mixing tank
ln this example the calculated operating pres-
sure in the mixing tank is (for all HFO viscositiesl
higher than the min. required fuel pressure ac-
cording to Table 6-18 lnjection viscosity and
temperature after final preheater.
Conventional fuel
injection system
32/40, 40/54,
48/60B, 58/64
Common rail
injection system
32/44CR
bar
Required max. fuel pressure at engine inlet + 8.00 10.00
Pressure difference between fuel inlet and outlet engine - 2.00 4.00
Pressure loss of the fuel return pipe between engine outlet
and mixing tank inlet
- 0.30 0.30
Pressure loss of the flow balancing valve (to be installed
only in multi engine plants, pressure loss approx. 0,5 barl
- 0.00 0.00
Operating pressure in the mixing tank = 6.70 6.70
Engine related service systems
6.4.4 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl supply system
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P-003 / Booster pumps
The pump capacity to be at least 300% of max-
imum fuel oil consumption at injection viscosity.
Table 6-23 Simplified booster pump dimensioning
The delivery head of the booster pump is to be
adjusted to the total resistance of the booster
system.
Q
P2
= P
1
x br
lSO
x f
5
Required booster pump delivery
capacity with HFO at 145°C:
Q
P2
l/h
Engine output at 100% MCR: P
1
kWh
Specific engine fuel consumption
(lSOl at 100% MCR
br
lSO
g/kWh
Factor for pump dimensioning
- For Diesel engines operating on
main fuel HFO:
f
5
= 3.90 x 10
-3
- For Diesel engines installed in
dredgers operating on main fuel
HFO:
f
5
= 3.94 x 10
-3
f
5
l/g
Note!
The factor f
5
includes the following parameters:
- 300% fuel flow
- main fuel: HFO 380 mm
2
/50°C
- attached lube oil and cooling water pumps
- tropical conditions
- realistic lower heating value
- specific fuel weight at pumping temperature
- tolerance
ln case more than one engine is connected to the same
fuel system, the pump capacity has to be increased
accordingly.
Engine related service systems
6.4.4 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl supply system
Page 6 - 62 Status 07/2006
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Table 6-24 Example for the determination of the expected operating delivery height of the bosster pump
lt is recommended to install booster pumps de-
signed for a delivery height of 7.0 bar for con-
ventional injection systems and 9.0 bar for
common rail injection systems (safety allowance
includedl.
H-004 / Final preheater
The capacity of the final-preheater shall be de-
termined on the basis of the injection tempera-
ture at the nozzle, to which 4 K must be added
to compensate for heat losses in the piping.
The piping for both heaters shall be arranged for
separate and series operation.
Parallel operation with half the throughput must
be avoided due to the risk of sludge deposits.
vl-001 / viscosity measuring and control device
This device regulates automatically the heating
of the final-preheater depending on the viscosity
of the bunkered fuel oil, so that the fuel will reach
the nozzles with the viscosity required for injec-
tion.
Fil-013 / Duplex filter
This filter is to be installed upstream of the en-
gine and as close as possible to the engine.
The emptying port of each filter chamber is to be
fitted with a valve and a pipe to the sludge tank.
lf the strainer elements are removed for clean-
ing, the filter chamber must be emptied.This
prevents the dirt particles remaining in the filter
casing from migrating to the clean oil side of the
filter.
Design criterion is the filter area load specified
by the filter manufacturer.
Table 6-25 Required filter mesh width (sphere passing
meshl
Conventional fuel
injection system
32/40, 40/54,
48/60B, 58/64
Common rail
injection system
32/44CR
bar
Pressure difference between fuel inlet and outlet engine + 2.00 4.00
Pressure loss of the flow balancing valve (to be installed
only in multi engine plants, pressure loss approx. 0.5 barl
+ 0.00 0.00
Pressure loss of the pipes, mixing tank - engine mixing
tank
+ 0.50 0.50
Pressure loss of the final preheater max. + 0.80 0.80
Pressure loss of the indicator filter + 0.80 0.80
Operating delivery height of the booster pump = 4.10 6.10
Conven-
tional fuel
injection sys-
tem
32/40, 40/54,
48/60B,
58/64
Common rail
injection sys-
tem
32/44CR
Filter mesh width
(mml
0.034 0.025
Design pressure PN16 PN16
Engine related service systems
6.4.4 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl supply system
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Table 6-26 Duplexfilter
FBv-010 / Flow balancing valve (throttle valvel
The flow balancing valve at engine outlet is to be
installed only (one per enginel in multi engine ar-
rangements connected to the same fuel system.
lt is used to balance the fuel flow through the en-
gines. Each engine has to be feed with its cor-
rect , individual fuel flow.
FSH-001 / Leakage fuel monitoring tank.
lf an injection pipe bursts, the escaping fuel is
carried by the jacket pipe to the monitoring tank
from which it is drained into the leakage oil col-
lecting tank. The float switch mounted in the
tank must be connected to the alarm system.
All parts of the monitored leakage system (pipes
and monitoring tankl have to be designed for a
fuel rate of 6,7 l/(minxCyl.l. The classification so-
cieties require the installation of a monitoring
tank for unmanned engine rooms. Lloyd's Reg-
ister specify a monitoring tank for manned en-
gine rooms as well.
Table 6-27 Leakage fuel monitoring tank
T-006 / Leakage oil collecting tank for fuel and
lube oil
Leak fuel and leak oil are collected in the leakage
oil collecting tank. lt must be emptied into the
sludge tank.
The content must not be added to the fuel.
Alternatively, separate leakage oil tanks for fuel
and lubricating oil can be installed.
The leak rate for both media is listed in the table
below.
Table 6-28 Leak rate (fuel and lube oill
Withdrawal points for samples
Points for drawing fuel oil samples are to be pro-
vided upstream and downstream of each filter,
to verify the effectiveness of these system com-
ponents.
HE-007/CK-003
MDO/MGO cooler/three way cock
With these fittings, the MDO/MGO cooler HE-
007 has to be switched on when the plant is
switched over to MDO/MGO operation. That
way, the MDO/MGO, which was heated while
circulating via the injection pumps, is recooled
before it is returned to the mixing tank T-011.
Switching over of these fittings to the MDO/
MGO cooler may be effected only after flushing
the pipes with MDO/MGO. The MDO/MGO-
cooler is cooled by LT cooling water.
Engine type
Duplexfilter attached on the engine 32/44CR
Duplexfilter not attached on the
engine (loosely supplied, if requiredl
32/40, 40/54,
48/60B,
58/64
Engine type
Leakage fuel monitoring tank
attached on the engine
32/44CR,
58/64,
L48/60B
Leakage fuel monitoring tank not
attached on the engine (loosely sup-
pliedl
32/40, 40/54,
v48/60B,
Engine type Leak rate
1l
litre/cyl. x h
32/40 0.5 ... 1.0
32/44CR 0.6 ... 1.1
40/54 0.5 ... 1.0
48/60B 0.8 ... 1.3
58/64 1.0 ... 1.5
values valid for HFO only
1l
For running with MGO leak rate +10%
Engine related service systems
6.4.4 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl supply system
Page 6 - 64 Status 07/2006
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The design pressure of the MDO-cooler is PN
16.
Table 6-29 Simplified MDO-cooler dimensioning
PCv-011 / Pressure limiting valve
ln case two engines are operated with one fuel
module, it has to be possible to separate one
engine at a time from the fuel circuit for mainte-
nance purposes. ln order to avoid a pressure in-
crease in the pressurised system, the fuel, which
cannot circulate through the shut-off engine, has
to be rerouted via this valve into the return pipe.
This valve is to be adjusted so that rerouting is
effected only when the pressure, in comparison
to normal operation (multi-engine operationl, is
exceeded.
v-002 / Shut-off cock
The stop cock is closed during normal operation
(multi-engine operationl. When one engine is
separated from the fuel circuit for maintenance
purposes, this cock has to be opened.
T-008 / Pressure peaks compensation tank
The injection nozzles cause pressure peaks in
the pressurised part of the fuel system. ln order
to protect the viscosity measuring and control
unit, these pressure peaks have to be equalised
by a compensation tank.The volume of the pres-
sure peaks compensation tank is 20l.
Piping
We recommend to use pipes according to PN16
for the fuel system (more information see Chap-
ter 6.1.1 "Pipe dimensioning", Page 6-3l.
Material
The casing material of pumps and filters should
be EN-GJS (nodular cast ironl, in accordance to
the requirements of the classification societies.
P
C
= P
1
x br
lSO
x f
1
Q
C
= P
1
x br
lSO
x f
2
Cooler outlet temp. MDO/MGO *:
- T
out
= 45°C
T
out
°C
Dissipated heat of the cooler P
C
kW
MDO flow for thermal dimensioning of
the cooler **
Q
c
l/h
Engine output at 100% MCR P
1
kW
Specific engine fuel consumption
(lSOl at 100% MCR:
br
lSO
g/kWh
Factor for dissipated heat
- f
1
= 2.01 x 10
-5
f
1
kWh/g
Factor for MDO/MGO flow
- f
2
= 2.80 x 10
-3
f
2
l/g
Note!
ln case more than one engine is connected to the same
fuel system, the cooler capacity has to be increased
accordingly.
*l This temperature has to be normally max. 45°C. Only
for very light MGO fuel types this temperature has to
be even lower in order to preserve the min. admissible
fuel viscosity in engine inlet (see Chapter 3.10 "vis-
cosity-Temperature (vTl diagram of fuel oil", Page
3-45l
**l The max. MDO/MGO throughput is identical to the de-
livery quantity of the installed booster pump.
Engine related service systems
6.4.4 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl supply system
Status 07/2006 Page 6 - 65
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HFO supply system
Figure 6-22 HFO supply system
Engine related service systems
6.4.4 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl supply system
Page 6 - 66 Status 07/2006
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Engine related service systems
6.4.5 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl supply system - twin engine plant
Status 06/2006 Page 6 - 67
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6.4.5 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl supply system - twin engine plant
Please see overleaf!
Engine related service systems
6.4.5 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl supply system - twin engine plant
Page 6 - 68 Status 06/2006
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Figure 6-23 HFO supply system - twin engine plant
Engine related service systems
6.4.5 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl supply system - twin engine plant
Status 06/2006 Page 6 - 69
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Engine related service systems
6.4.5 Heavy Fuel Oil (HFOl supply system - twin engine plant
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Engine related service systems
6.5.1 Starting air system
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6.5 Compressed air system
6.5.1 Starting air system
Marine main engines
The compressed air supply to the engine plant
requires air vessels and air compressors of a ca-
pacity and air delivery rating which will meet the
requirements of the relevant classification soci-
ety (see the following chapter "Starting air ves-
sels, compressors"l.
1 C-001, 2 C-001, 3 C-001 / Air compressor
1 service compressor . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 C-001
1 auxiliary compressor . . . . . . . . . . . 1 C-001
1 Jet Assist compressor . . . . . . . . . . 1 C-001
These are multi-stage compressor sets with
safety valves, cooler for compressed air and
condensate traps.
The operational compressor is switched on by
the pressure control at low pressure, respective-
ly switched off at max. service pressure.
A max. service pressure of 30 bar is required.
The standard design pressure of the starting air
vessels is 30 bar and the design temperature is
50 °C.
The service compressor is electrically driven, the
auxiliary compressor may also be driven by a
Diesel engine. The capacity of both compres-
sors (1 C-001 and 2 C-001l is identical.
The total capacity of the compressors has to be
increased if the engine is equipped with Jet As-
sist. This can be met either by providing a larger
service compressor, or by an additional com-
pressor (3 C-001l.
For special operating conditions such as, e.g.,
dredging service, the capacity of the compres-
sors has to be adjusted to the respective re-
quirements of operation.
1 T-007, 2 T-007 / Starting air vessels
The installation situation of the air vessels must
ensure a good drainage of condensed water. Air
vessels, if supplied by MAN Diesel, must be in-
stalled with a downward slope of 10° towards
the bottom end.
The installation situation also has to ensure that
during emergency discharging of the safety
valve no persons can be compromised.
lt is not allowed to weld supports (or otherl on
the air vessels. The original design must not be
altered. Air vessels are to be bedded and fixed
by use of external supporting structures.
T-018 / Air vessel for Jet Assist
Technical notes identical to 1 T-007, 2 T-007 /
starting air vessels.
As an alternative it is possible to omit the sepa-
rate air vessel for Jet Assist (T-018l. ln this case,
the volume of the starting air vessels (1 T-007, 2
T-007l must be increased accordingly.
Piping
The main starting pipe (engine connection
7171l, connected to both air vessels, leads to
the main starting valve (MSv- 001l of the engine.
A second 30 bar pressure line (engine connec-
tion 7172l with separate connections to both air
vessels supplies the engine with control air. This
does not require larger air vessels.
A line branches off the aforementioned control
air pipe to supply other air-consuming engine
accessories (e.g. lube oil automatic filter, fuel oil
filterl with compressed air through a separate
30/8 bar pressure reducing station.
A third 30 bar pipe is required for engines with
Jet Assist (engine connection 7177l. Depending
on the air vessel arrangement, this pipe can be
branched off from the starting air pipe near en-
gine or must be connected separately to the air
vessel for Jet Assist.
Additional connections on the air vessels are
provided for air requirements of the ship and for
the horn. The pipes to be connected by the ship-
Engine related service systems
6.5.1 Starting air system
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yard have to be supported immediately behind
their connection to the engine. Further supports
are required at sufficiently short distance.
Galvanised steel pipe must not be used for the
piping of the system.
General requirements of classification societies
The equipment provided for starting the engines
must enable the engines to be started from the
operating condition 'zero' with shipboard facili-
ties, i.e. without outside assistance.
Compressors
Two or more starting air compressors must be
provided. At least one of the air compressors
must be driven independently of the main en-
gine and must supply at least 50 % of the re-
quired total capacity.
The total capacity of the starting air compres-
sors is to be calculated so that the air volume
necessary for the required number of starts is
topped up by the atmospheric pressure within
one hour.
The compressor capacities stated in the table
are calculated as follows:
P Total volumetric capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . m³/h
of the compressors
v Total volume of the starting air vessels. . . . . . . . . litre
at 30 bar service pressure
As a rule, compressors of identical ratings
should be provided. An emergency compressor,
if provided, is to be disregarded in this respect.
Starting air vessels
The starting air supply is to be split up into not
less than two starting air vessels of about the
same size, which can be used independently of
each another.
The sizes of the starting air vessels for the re-
spective engines are listed in the chapter "Start-
ing air vessels, compressors".
Diesel-mechanical main engine:
For each non-reversible main engine driving a
C.P.-propeller, or where starting without counter
torque is possible, the stored starting air must
be sufficient for a certain number of starting ma-
noeuvres, normally 6 per engine. The exact
number of required starting manoeuvres de-
pends on the arrangement of the propulsion
system and on the special requirements of the
classification society.
Diesel-electric auxiliary engine:
For auxiliary marine engines, separate air tanks
shall only be installed in case of turbine-driven
vessels, or if the auxiliary sets in engine-driven
vessels are installed far away from the main pro-
pulsion plant.
Diesel-electric main engine:
For each Diesel-electric main engine the stored
starting air must be sufficient for a certain
number of starting manoeuvres, normally 6 per
engine. The exact number of required starting
manoeuvres depends on the number of engines
and on the special requirements of the classifi-
cation society.
P
v 30 ×
1000
--------------- =
Engine related service systems
6.5.1 Starting air system
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Calculation formula for starting air vessels see below:
v Required vessel capacity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . litre
vSt Air consumption per nominal start
1l
. . . . litre
fdrive factor for drive type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -
(1.0 = Diesel-mechanic,
1.5 = generator drivel
zst No. of starts required by the
classification society . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -
zSafe Number of starts as safety margin . . . . . . . . -
vJet Assist Air consumption per Jet Assist
1l
. . litre
zJet Number of Jet Assist procedures
2l
. . . . . . . -
tJet Duration of Jet Assist procedures . . . . . . sec.
vSl Air consumption per slow turn . . . . . . . . . litre
zSl Number of slow turn manoeuvres . . . . . . . . . -
pmax Maximum starting air pressure . . . . . . . . . bar
pmin Minimum starting air pressure. . . . . . . . . . bar
1l 2l
Tabulated values see "Chapter starting air vessels,
compressors"
lf other consumers (i.e. auxiliary engines, ship air
etc.l which are not listed in the formula are con-
nected to the starting air vessel, the capacity of
starting air vessel must be increased according-
ly, or an additional separate air vessel has to be
installed.
v vSt fdrive zSt zSafe + 〈 〉 vJet 5 ond sec ⁄ zJet tJet vSl zSl fdrive × × + × × + × × 〈 〉 pmax pmin – 〈 〉 ⁄ =
Engine related service systems
6.5.1 Starting air system
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Starting air system
Figure 6-24 Starting air system
Engine related service systems
6.5.2 Starting air vessels, compressors
Status 01/2006 58/64 Page 6 - 75
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6.5.2 Starting air vessels, compressors
General
The engine requires compressed air for starting,
start-turning, for the Jet Assist function as well
as several pneumatic controls. The design of the
pressure air vessel directly depends on the air
consumption and the requirements of the clas-
sification societies.
Table 6-32 Starting air consumption 58/64
√ The air consumption per starting manoeuvre
depends on the inertia moment of the unit.
For generator plants, 1.5 times the air con-
sumption per starting manoeuvre has to be
expected.
√ The above-mentioned air consumption per
Jet Assist activation is valid for a jet duration
of 5 seconds. The jet duration may vary be-
tween 3 sec and 10 sec, depending on the
loading (average jet duration 5 secl. The air
consumption is substantially determined by
the respective turbocharger design.
For more information concerning Jet Assist
see "Jet Assist" Page 6-79.
√ The air consumption per slow-turn activation
depends on the inertia moment of the unit.
Starting air vessels:
Service pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . max. 30 bar
Minimum starting air pressure . . . min. 10 bar
Starting air compressors:
The total capacity of the starting air compres-
sors has to be capable to charge the air receiv-
ers from the atmospheric pressure to full
pressure of 30 bar within one hour.
Number of cylinders 6L 7L 8L 9L
Swept volume of engine litre 1,015 1,184 1,384 1,522
Air consumption per start Nm³
(20 °Cl
3,35 3,73 4,06 4,42
Air consumption per Jet Assist activation 4,0 5.5 5.5 5.5
Air consumption per slow turn manoevre 6,70 7,46 8,12 8,84
Engine related service systems
6.5.2 Starting air vessels, compressors
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6.5.2.1 Propulsion plant with 1 main engine
1. General drive
Table 6-33 Starting air vessels, compressors - single-shaft vessel
2. Diesel-mechanical drive without shifting clutch
Table 6-34 Starting air vessels, compressors-single shaft vessel
3. Diesel-mechanical drive with shifting clutch
Table 6-35 Starting air vessels, compressors-single shaft vessel
4. Diesel-mechanical drive with shaft-driven alternator (> 50% P
rated
l
Table 6-36 Starting air vessels, compressors-single shaft vessel
Starting air vessels and compressor capacities (6 starts + 1 safety start, 0 Jet Assist, 0 slow turnl
Engine 58/64 6 L 7 L 8 L 9 L
Min. required vessel capacity litre 1,170 1,310 1,420 1,550
Required vessels litre 2x 710 2x 710 2x 710 2x 1,000
Min. required compressor capacity m³/h 43 43 43 60
Starting air vessels and compressor capacities (6 starts + 1 safety start, 0 Jet Assist, 0 slow turnl
Engine 58/64 6 L 7 L 8 L 9 L
Min. required vessel capacity litre 1,170 1,310 1,420 1,550
Required vessels litre 2x 710 2x 710 2x 710 2x 1,000
Min. required compressor capacity m³/h 43 43 43 60
Starting air vessels and compressor capacities (6 starts + 1 safety start, 3 x 5sec. Jet Assist, 0 slow turnl
Engine 58/64 B 6 L 7 L 8 L 9 L
Min. required vessel capacity litre 1,770 2,130 2,250 2,370
Required vessels litre 2x 1,000 2x 1,250 2x 1,250 2x 1,250
Min. required compressor capacity m³/h 60 75 75 75
Starting air vessels and compressor capacities (6 starts + 1 safety start, 5 x 5sec. Jet Assist, 0 slow turnl
Engine 58/64 6 L 7 L 8 L 9 L
Min. required vessel capacity litre 2,170 2,680 2,800 2,920
Required vessels litre 2x 1,250 2x 1,500 2x 1,500 2x 1,500
Min. required compressor capacity m³/h 75 90 90 90
Engine related service systems
6.5.2 Starting air vessels, compressors
Status 01/2006 58/64 Page 6 - 77
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5. Diesel-electrical drive
Table 6-37 Starting air vessels, compressors-single shaft vessel
6. Diesel-mechanical drive with frequent load changes e.g. ferries etc.
Table 6-38 Starting air vessels, compressors-single shaft vessel
6.5.2.2 Multiple engine plants
ln case of multi-engine plants, the required vol-
ume of the starting air supply is to be fixed in ag-
grement with the respective classification
society.
ln this connection, the number of starts required
for each engine is generally reduced.
Starting air vessels and compressor capacities (6 starts + 1 safety start, drive type factor 1.5, 10 x 5sec. Jet
Assist, 1 slow turnl
Engine 58/64 6 L 7 L 8 L 9 L
Min. required vessel capacity litre 4,260 5,270 5,490 5,730
Required vessels litre 2x 2,250 2x 2,750 2x 2,750 2x 3,000
Min. required compressor capacity m³/h 135 165 165 180
Starting air vessels and compressor capacities (6 starts + 1 safety start, 10 x 5sec. Jet Assist, 0 slow turnl
Engine 58/64 6 L 7 L 8 L 9 L
Min. required vessel capacity litre 3,170 4,060 4,170 4,300
Required vessels litre 2x 1,750 2x 2,250 2x 2,250 2x 2,250
Min. required compressor capacity m³/h 105 135 135 135
Engine related service systems
6.5.2 Starting air vessels, compressors
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Engine related service systems
6.5.3 Jet Assist
Status 03/2007 Page 6 - 79
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6.5.3 Jet Assist
General
Jet Assist is a system for acceleration of the tur-
bocharger. By means of nozzles in the turbo-
charger, compressed air is directed to the
compressor wheel resulting in its acceleration.
This causes the turbocharger to adapt more rap-
idly to a new load condition and improves the re-
sponse of the engine.
Air consumption
The air consumption for Jet Assist is, to a great
extent, dependent on the load profile of the en-
gine. ln case of frequently and quickly changing
load steps, Jet Assist will be actuated more of-
ten than this will be the case during long routes
at largely constant load.
Air consumption (litrel see chapter 6.5.2 Starting
air vessels, compressors.
General data
Jet Assist air pressure (overpress.l max. 4 bar
At the engine connection the pressure is max.
30 bar. The air pressure will reduced on the en-
gine by an orifice to max. 4 bar (overpressl.
Activation below 50% load:
√ at constant speed mode when speed drops
quickly and fuel admission rises
√ at combinator mode the power command le-
ver in the control room is changed quickly for
load request
Jet Assist activating time:
3 sec to 10 sec (5 sec in averagel
Deactivation of Jet Assist:
√ after 10 sec activating time or
√ charge air pressure >1bar
(= engine load > approx. 50%l
Guiding values for the number of Jet Assist manoeuvres dependent on application
Table 6-39 Jet Assist manoeuvres and dependent on application
Application
No. of manoeuvres per hour /
Average duration
No. of manoeuvres,
which take place in
rapid succession, if
necessary
Diesel-mechanical drive without shifting clutch Jet Assist is required
Diesel-mechanical drive with shifting clutch approx. 3 times, 5 sec approx. 2 times
Diesel-mechanical drive with shaft-driven alternator
(> 50% Pratedl
approx. 5 times, 5 sec approx. 3 times
Diesel-electric marine drive approx. 10 times, 5 sec approx. 5 times
Auxiliary engines approx. 3 times, 5 sec approx. 3 times
Ships with frequent load changes (e.g. ferriesl
1l
approx. 10 times, 5 sec approx. 5 times
Dredger, high-torque applications
1l
approx. 2 times, 20 sec approx. 2 times
1l
Adaptation required in special cases
Engine related service systems
6.5.3 Jet Assist
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Dynamic positioning for drilling vessels, cable-
laying vessels, off-shore applications
When applying dynamic positioning, pulsating
load application of > 25% may occur frequently,
up to 30 times per hour. ln these cases, the pos-
sibility of a specially adapted, separate com-
pressed air system has always to be checked.
Air supply
Generally, larger air bottles are to be provided for
the air supply of the Jet Assist.
lf the planned load profile is expecting a high re-
quirement of Jet Assist, it should be checked
whether an air supply from the working air cir-
cuit, a separate air bottle or a specially adapted,
separate compressed air system is necessary or
reasonable.
ln each case the delivery capacity of the com-
pressors is to be adapted to the expected Jet
Assist requirement per unit of time.
Engine related service systems
6.6 Combustion air
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6.6 Combustion air
General informations
Engine room ventilation system
lts purpose is
√ supplying the engines and auxiliary boilers
with combustion air
√ carrying off the radiant heat from all installed
engines and auxiliaries
Combustion air
The combustion air must be free from spray wa-
ter, dust and oil mist.
This is achieved by:
√ Louvres, protected against the head wind,
with baffles in the back and optimally dimen-
sioned suction space so as to reduce the air
flow velocity to 1-1,5 m/s.
√ Self-cleaning air filter in the suction space (re-
quired for dustladen air, e.g. cement, ore or
grain carrierl.
√ Sufficient space between the intake point and
the openings of exhaust air ducts from the
engine and separator room as well as vent
pipes from lube oil and fuel oil tanks and the
air intake louvres. (The influence of winds
must be taken into considerationl.
√ Positioning of engine room doors on the
ship's deck so that no oil-laden air and warm
engine room air will be drawn in when the
doors are open.
√ Arranging the separator station at a suffi-
ciently large distance from the turbochargers.
The combustion air is normally drawn in from the
engine room.
The MAN Diesel turbochargers are fitted with an
air intake silencer and can additionally be
equipped with an air filter to meet with special
circumstances, in which case the cleaning inter-
vals for the compressor impeller of the turbo-
charger and for the charge air cooler can be
extended.
The air intake filter will retain 95 % of the parti-
cles larger than 10 ”m.
ln tropical service a sufficient volume of air must
be supplied to the turbocharger(sl at outside air
temperature. For this purpose there must be an
air duct installed for each turbocharger, with the
outlet of the duct facing the respective intake air
silencer, separated from the latter by a space of
1.5 m. No water of condensation from the air
duct must be allowed to be drawn in by the tur-
bocharger.
The air stream must not be directed onto the ex-
haust manifold.
ln arctic service the air must be heated to at
least 0 °C. lf necessary, steam heated air pre-
heaters must be provided.
For the required combustion air quantity, see
Chapter "Engine characteristic data" Section
"Planning data". Cross-sections of air supply
ducts are to be designed to obtain the following
air flow velocities:
- Main ducts 8-12 m/s
- Secondary ducts max. 8 m/s.
Air fans are to be designed so as to maintain a
positive air pressure of 50 Pa (5 mmWCl in the
engine room.
Engine related service systems
6.6 Combustion air
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Radiant heat
The heat radiated from the main and auxiliary
engines, from the exhaust manifolds, waste heat
boilers, silencers, generators, compressors,
electrical equipment, steam and condensate
pipes, heated tanks and other auxiliaries is ab-
sorbed by the engine room air.
The amount of air v required to carry off this ra-
diant heat can be calculated as follows:
v Air required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . m³/h
Q Heat to be dissipated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . kJ/h
Δt Air temperature rise in engine room (10-12.5l . . . . °C
cp Specific heat capacity of air (1.01l . . . . . . . . kJ/kg∗k
ρt Air density at 35 °C (1.15l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . kg/m³
ventilator capacity
The capacity of the air ventilators (without sepa-
rator rooml must be large enough to cover:
√ The combustion air requirements of all con-
sumers.
√ The air required for carrying off the radiant
heat.
A rule-of-thumb applicable to plants operating
on heavy fuel oil is 20-24 m
3
/kWh.
v
Q
Δt cp ρt × ×
------------------------------- =
Engine related service systems
6.7.1 General informations
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6.7 Exhaust gas system
6.7.1 General informations
Layout
As the flow resistance in the exhaust system has
a very large influence on the fuel consumption
and the thermal load of the engine, the total re-
sistance of the exhaust gas system must not ex-
ceed 30 mbar.
Permissible values for special cases please con-
tact MAN Diesel.
The pipe diameter to be selected depends on
the engine output, the exhaust gas volume, the
length and arrangement of the piping as well as
the number of bends. Sharp bends result in very
high flow resistance and should therefore be
avoided. lf necessary, pipe bends must be pro-
vided with cascades.
We recommend a guideline for the exhaust gas
velocity in the pipe of 40 m/s.
lnstallation
When installing the exhaust system, the follow-
ing points must be observed:
√ The exhaust pipes of two or more engines
must not be joined.
√ The exhaust pipes must be able to expand.
The expansion joints to be provided for this
purpose are to be mounted between fixed-
point pipe supports installed in suitable posi-
tions. One sturdy fixed-point support must be
provided for the expansion joint on the turbo-
charger. lt should be positioned, if possible,
immediately above the expansion joint in or-
der to prevent the transmission of forces to
the turbocharger, resulting from the weight,
thermal expansion or lateral displacement of
the exhaust piping.
√ The exhaust piping should be elastically hung
or supported by means of dampers in order
to keep the transmission of sound to other
parts of the ship to a minimum.
√ The exhaust piping is to be provided with wa-
ter drains, which are to be kept constantly
opened for draining the condensation water
or possible leak water from boilers.
√ During commissioning and maintenance
work, checking of the exhaust gas counter
pressure by means of a temporarily connect-
ed measuring device may become neces-
sary. For this purpose, a measuring socket is
to be provided approx. 1-2 m after the ex-
haust gas outlet of the turbocharger at an
easily acceptance place. Usual pressure
measuring devices require a measuring sock-
et size of 1/2". This measuring socket is to be
provided as to ensure utilisation without any
damage to the exhaust gas pipe insulation.
Engine related service systems
6.7.1 General informations
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Engine related service systems
6.7.2 Components and assemblies
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6.7.2 Components and assemblies
Mode of operation
The silencer operates on the absorption princi-
ple which means that it is effective in a wide fre-
quency band. The flow path, which runs through
the silencer in a straight line, ensures optimum
noise reduction with minimum flow resistance.
lnstallation
lf possible, the silencer should be installed to-
wards the end of the exhaust line; the exact po-
sition can be adapted to the space available
(from vertical to horizontall. ln case of silencers
with spark arrester, it must be ensured that the
cleaning ports are accessible.
lnsulation
The exhaust gas pipe system has to be insulated
to reduce the maximum surface temperature to
the required level and to avoid temperatures be-
low the dew point. So the complete exhaust gas
system (from outlet of turbocharger, silencer,
boiler to outlet stackl should be sufficiently insu-
lated, particularly when burning on liquid fuel.
Also to avoid temperatures below the dew point,
the exhaust gas piping to the outside, including
boiler and silencer, should be insulated to avoid
intensified corrosion and soot deposits on the
interior surface of the exhaust gas pipe. ln case
of fast load changes, such deposits might flake
off and be entrained by exhaust in the form of
soot flakes.
The rectangular flange connection on the turbo-
charger outlet, as well as the adjecent round
flanges of the adaptor, must also be covered
with insulating collars, for reasons of safety.
lnsulation and covering of the compensator may
not restrict its freedom of movement.
The relevant provisions concerning accident
prevention and those of the classification socie-
ties must be observed.
Engine related service systems
6.7.2 Components and assemblies
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7 Auxiliary modules and system components
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Auxiliary modules and system components
7.1.1 Nozzle cooling water module
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7.1 Auxiliary modules
7.1.1 Nozzle cooling water module
Figure 7-1 Example : Compact nozzle cooling water module
Auxiliary modules and system components
7.1.2 Preheating modul
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7.1.2 Preheating modul
Figure 7-2 Example : Compact preheating cooling water module
Auxiliary modules and system components
7.2.1 Lube oil automatic filter
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7.2 System components
7.2.1 Lube oil automatic filter
Figure 7-3 Example : Lube oil automatic filter
Auxiliary modules and system components
7.2.2 Lube oil double filter
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7.2.2 Lube oil double filter
Figure 7-4 Example : Lube oil double filter
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8 Plant service systems
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Plant service systems
Engine room ventilation
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8.1 Engine room ventilation
Purpose
The engine room ventilation system serves to
√ supplying the engines and auxiliary boilers
with combustion air
√ carrying off the radiant heat from all installed
engines and auxiliaries.
Combustion air
The combustion air must be free from spray wa-
ter, dust and oil mist.
This is achieved by:
√ Louvres, protected against the head wind,
with baffles in the back and optimally dimen-
sioned suction space so as to reduce the air
flow velocity to 1-1,5 m/s.
√ Self-cleaning air filter in the suction space (re-
quired for dustladen air, e.g. cement, ore or
grain carrierl.
√ Sufficient space between the intake point and
the openings of exhaust air ducts from the
engine and separator room as well as vent
pipes from lube oil and fuel oil tanks and the
air intake louvres. (The influence of winds
must be taken into considerationl.
√ Positioning of engine room doors on the
ship's deck so that no oil-laden air and warm
engine room air will be drawn in when the
doors are open.
√ Arranging the separator station at a suffi-
ciently large distance from the turbochargers.
The combustion air is normally drawn in from the
engine room. The MAN Diesel turbochargers are
fitted with an air intake silencer and can addi-
tionally be equipped with an air filter to meet
with special circumstances, in which case the
cleaning intervals for the compressor impeller of
the turbocharger and for the charge air cooler
can be extended. The air intake filter will retain
95 % of the particles larger than 10 μm.
ln tropical service a sufficient volume of air must
be supplied to the turbocharger(sl at outside air
temperature. For this purpose there must be an
air duct installed for each turbocharger, with the
outlet of the duct facing the respective intake air
silencer, separated from the latter by a space of
1.5 m. No water of condensation from the air
duct must be allowed to be drawn in by the tur-
bocharger.The air stream must not be directed
onto the exhaust manifold.
ln arctic service the air must be heated to at
least 0 °C. lf necessary, steam heated air pre-
heaters must be provided
For the required combustion air quantity, see
Chapter "Engine characteristic data" Section
"Planning data".
. Cross-sections of air supply ducts are to be de-
signed to obtain the following air flow velocities:
√ main ducts 8-12 m/s
√ secondary ducts max. 8 m/s
Air fans are to be designed so as to maintain a
positive air pressure of 50 Pa (5 mmWCl in the
engine room.
Plant service systems
Engine room ventilation
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Radiant heat
The heat radiated from the main and auxiliary
engines, from the exhaust manifolds, waste heat
boilers, silencers, generators, compressors,
electrical equipment, steam and condensate
pipes, heated tanks and other auxiliaries is ab-
sorbed by the engine room air.
The amount of air v required to carry off this ra-
diant heat can be calculated as follows:
v Air required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . m³/h
Q Heat to be dissipated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . kJ/h
Δt Air temperature rise in engine room (10-12.5l . . . . °C
cp Specific heat capacity of air (1.01l . . . . . . . . kJ/kg∗k
ρt Air density at 35 °C (1.15l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . kg/m³
ventilator capacity
The capacity of the air ventilators (without sepa-
rator rooml must be large enough to cover:
√ The combustion air requirements of all con-
sumers
√ The air required for carrying off the radiant
heat
A rule-of-thumb applicable to plants operating
on heavy fuel oil is 20-24 m³/kWh.
v
Q
Δt cp ρt × ×
------------------------------- =
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9 Engine room planning
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Engine room planning
9.1.1 General details
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9.1 lnstallation and arrangement
9.1.1 General details
Apart from a functional arrangement of the com-
ponents, the shipyard is to provide for an engine
room layout ensuring good accessibility of the
components for servicing.
The cleaning of the cooler tube bundle, the emp-
tying of filter chambers and subsequent clean-
ing of the strainer elements, and the emptying
and cleaning of tanks must be possible without
any problem whenever required.
All of the openings for cleaning on the entire unit,
including those of the exhaust silencers, must
be accessible.
There should be sufficient free space for tempo-
rary storage of pistons, timing shafts, exhaust
gas turbochargers etc. dismounted from the en-
gine. Additional space is required for the mainte-
nance personnel. The panels in the engine sides
for inspection of the bearings and removal of
components must be accessible without taking
up floor plates or disconnecting supply lines and
piping. Free space for installation of a torsional
vibration meter should be provided at the crank-
shaft end.
A very important point is that there should be
enough room for storing and handling vital spare
parts so that replacements can be made without
loss of time.
ln planning marine installations with two or more
engines driving one propeller shaft through a
multi-engine transmission gear, provision must
be made for a minimum clearance between the
engines because the crankcase panels of each
must be accessible. Moreover, there must be
free space on both sides of each engine for pull-
ing pistons or cylinder liners.
Special note:
MAN Diesel supplied scope is to be arranged
and fixed by proven technical experiences as
per state of the art. Therefore the technical re-
quirements have to be taken in consideration as
described in the following documents subse-
quential:
√ Order related engineering documents.
√ lnstallation documents of our subsuppliers
for vendor specified equipment.
√ Operating manuals for Diesel engines and
auxiliaries.
√ Project guides of MAN Diesel.
Any deviations from the principles specified in
the a.m. documents provides a previous ap-
proval by us.
Arrangements for fixitation and/or supporting of
plant related equipment attached to the scope
supplied by us, not described in the a.m. docu-
ments and not agreed with us are not allowed.
For damages due to such arrangements we will
not take over any responsibility.
Engine room planning
9.1.1 General details
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Diesel engine and operation
9.1.2 lnstallation drawings
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9.1.2 lnstallation drawings
Engine 6L 58/64
Figure 9-1 lnstallation drawing 6L 58/64 - turbocharger on coupling side
Diesel engine and operation
9.1.2 lnstallation drawings
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Engine 6L 58/64
Figure 9-2 lnstallation drawing 6L 58/64 - turbocharger on counter coupling side
Diesel engine and operation
9.1.2 lnstallation drawings
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Engine 7+8+9L 58/64
Figure 9-3 lnstallation drawing 7-8+9 L 58/64 - turbocharger on coupling side
Diesel engine and operation
9.1.2 lnstallation drawings
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Engine 7+8+9L 58/64
Figure 9-4 lnstallation drawing 7+8+9L 58/64 - turbocharger on counter coupling side
Diesel engine and operation
9.1.3 Removal of piston and cylinder liner
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9.1.3 Removal of piston and cylinder liner
Engine L 58/64
Figure 9-5 Piston removal L 58/64
Diesel engine and operation
9.1.3 Removal of piston and cylinder liner
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Engine L 58/64
Figure 9-6 Cylinder liner removal L 58/64
Engine room planning
9.1.4 3D engine viewer - a support program to configure the engine room
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9.1.4 3D engine viewer -
a support program to configure the engine room
MAN Diesel offers a free-of-charge online pro-
gramme for the configuration and provision of
installation data required for installation exami-
nations and engine room planning: The 3D En-
gine viewer and the 3D GenSet viewer.
Easy-to-handle selection and navigation masks
permit configuration of the required engine type,
as necessary for virtual installation in your en-
gine room.
ln order to be able to use the 3D Engine, resp.
GenSet viewer, please register on our
homepage under:
www.manbw.com/extranet
After successful registration, the 3D Engine and
GenSet viewer is available under
https://extranet.manbw.de
by clicking onto the requested application.
ln only three steps, you will obtain professional
engine room data for your further planning:
√ Selection
Select the requested output, resp. the requested
type.
√ Configuration
Dropdown menus permit individual design of
your engine according to your requirements.
Each of your configurations will be presented on
the basis of isometric models.
√ view
The models of the 3D Engine viewer and the 3D
GenSet viewer include all essential geometric
and planning-relevant attributes (e.g. connec-
tion points, interfering edges, exhaust gas out-
lets, etc.l required for the integration of the
model into your project.
The configuration with the selected engines can
now be easily downloaded. For 2D representa-
tion as .pdf or .dxf, for 3D as .dgn, .sat, .igs or
3D-dxf.
Engine room planning
9.1.4 3D engine viewer - a support program to configure the engine room
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Figure 9-7 Preselected standard configuration for a 14v 48/60 B
Figure 9-8 lsometric view for the turbocharger arrangement on the coupling side
Engine room planning
9.1.4 3D engine viewer - a support program to configure the engine room
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Figure 9-9 Dismantling areas
Figure 9-10 Connection points / nozzle ports
Engine room planning
9.1.4 3D engine viewer - a support program to configure the engine room
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Engine room planning
9.1.5 Lifting appliance
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9.1.5 Lifting appliance
Lifting gear with varying lifting capacities are to
be provided for servicing and repair work on the
engine, turbocharger and charge-air cooler.
Engine
Lifting capacity
An overhead travelling crane is required which
has a lifting power equal to the heaviest compo-
nent that has to be lifted during servicing of the
engine.
The overhead travelling crane can be chosen
with the aid of the following table.
Table 9-1 Lifting capacity
Crane arrangement
The rails for the crane are to be arranged in such
a way that the crane can cover the whole of the
engine beginning at the exhaust pipe. The hook
position must reach along the engine axis, past
the centreline of the first and the last cylinder, so
that valves can be dismantled and installed
without pulling at an angle. Similarly, the crane
should be able to reach the tierod at the ends of
the engine. ln cramped conditions, eyelets must
be welded under the deck above, to accommo-
date a lifting pulley.
The required crane capacity to be determined by
the crane supplier.
Crane design
lt is necessary that:
√ There is an arresting device for securing the
crane while hoisting if there is a seaway.
√ There is a two-stage lifting speed.
Precision hoisting = 0.5 m/min
Normal hoisting = 2 - 4 m/min
Places of storage
ln planning the arrangement of the crane, a stor-
age space must be provided in the engine room
for the dismantled engine components which
can be reached by the crane. lt should be capa-
ble of holding two rocker arm casings, two cyl-
inder covers and two pistons. lf the cleaning and
service work is to be carried out here, additional
space for cleaning troughs and work surfaces
should be planned for.
Transport to the workshop
Grinding of valve cones and valve seats is car-
ried out in the workshop or in a neighbouring
room.
Transport rails and appropriate lifting tackle are
to be provided for the further transport of the
complete cylinder cover from the storage space
to the workshop. For the necessary deck open-
ings, see turbocharger casing.
Engine type 32/44CR 32/40 40/54
48/60B
51/60 DF
58/64
Cylinder head with valves
kg
568 566 785 1,124 2,200
Piston with connecting shaft/head 238 230 393 707 954
Cylinder liner 205 205 466 663 1,178
Recommended lifting capacity of
travelling crane
1,000 1,000 1,500
L=2,000
v=2,500
3,000
Engine room planning
9.1.5 Lifting appliance
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Turbocharger
Hoisting rail
A hoisting rail with a mobile trolley is to be pro-
vided over the centre of the turbocharger run-
ning parallel to its axis, into which a lifting tackle
is suspended with the relevant lifting power for
lifting the above-mentioned parts (see tablel, to
carry out the operations according to the main-
tenance schedule.
Table 9-2 Hoisting rail for NR/NA turbocharger
Table 9-3 Hoisting rail for TCA turbocharger
Table 9-4 Hoisting rail for TCR turbocharger
Withdrawal space dimensions
The withdrawal space dimensions shown in our
dimensioned sketch of the engine and in the
above table are needed in order to be able to
separate the silencer from the turbocharger. The
silencer must be shifted axially by this distance
before it can be moved laterally.
ln addition to this measure, another 100 mm are
required for assembly clearance.
This is the minimum distance that the silencer
must be from a bulkhead or a tween-deck. We
recommend that a further 300-400 mm be
planned for as working space.
Make sure that the silencer can be removed ei-
ther downwards or upwards or laterally and set
aside, to make the turbocharger accessible for
further servicing. Pipes must not be laid in these
free spaces.
Fan shafts
The engine combustion air is to be supplied to-
wards the intake silencer in a duct ending at a
Turbocharger NR 29/S NR 34/S NA 34/S NA 40/S NA 48/S NA 57/T9
Silencer
kg
85 300 300 480 750 1015
Compressor casing 105 340 340 460 685 720
Rotor plus bearing casing 190 245 270 485 780 1040
Space for removal of silencer mm 110 + 100 230 + 100 200 + 100 50 + 100 50 + 100 250 + 100
Turbocharger TCA 55 TCA 66 TCA 77 TCA 88
Silencer
kg
430 800 1,770 2,010
Compressor casing 550 830 1,450 2,500
Space for removal of silencer mm 110 + 100 120 + 100 150 + 100 200 + 100
Turbocharger TCR 20 TCR 22
Silencer
kg
76 156
Compressor casing 132 277
Rotor plus bearing casing 152 337
Space for removal of silencer mm 130 + 100 150 + 100
Engine room planning
9.1.5 Lifting appliance
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point 1.5 m away from the silencer inlet. lf this
duct impedes the maintenance operations, for
instance the removal of the silencer, the end
section of the duct must be removable. Suitable
suspension lugs are to be provided on the deck
and duct.
Gallery
lf possible the ship deck should reach up to both
sides of the turbocharger (clearance 50 mml to
obtain easy access for the maintenance person-
nel. Where deck levels are unfavourable, sus-
pended galleries are to be provided.
Charge-air cooler
For cleaning of the charge air cooler bundle, it
must be possible to lift it vertically out of the
cooler casing and lay it in a cleaning bath.
Exception 32/40: the cooler bundle of this en-
gine is drawn out at the end. Similarly, transport
onto land must be possible.
Table 9-5 Weights and dimensions of charge air cooler bundle
For lifting and transportation of the bundle, a lift-
ing rail is to be provided which runs in transverse
or longitudinal direction to the engine (according
to the available storage placel, over the cen-
treline of the charge air cooler, from which a trol-
ley with hoisting tackle can be suspended.
Figure 9-11 Air direction
Engine type
Weight Length Width Height
kg mm mm mm
L 32/40 650 430 1,705 830
L 32/44CR 450 520 712 1,014
L 40/54 550 484 786 1,680
L 48/60 950 730 1,052 1,874
L 48/60B, 51/60 DF 1,000 730 1,052 1,904
L 58/64 1,250 785 1,116 1,862
Engine room planning
9.1.5 Lifting appliance
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Diesel engine and operation
9.1.6 Major spare parts
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9.1.6 Major spare parts
Engine L 58/64
Cylinder liner 1178 kg Piston 562 kg; Piston pin 163 kg
Connecting rod 962 Cylinder head with valves 2012 kg
Diesel engine and operation
9.1.6 Major spare parts
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Major spare parts
Engine L 58/64
Figure 9-12 Main spare parts
Fuel injection pump 154 kg lnlet valve 31.4 kg; Outlet valve 31.6 kg
Cylinder lube oil pump
Diesel engine and operation
9.1.6 Major spare parts
Status 01/2006 58/64 Page 9 - 21
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Engine L 58/64
Diesel engine and operation
9.1.6 Major spare parts
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9.1.7 Example: propulsion system arrangement
Status 07/2005 Page 9 - 23
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9.1.7 Example: propulsion system arrangement
Figure 9-13 Example: propulsion system arrangement
Engine room planning
9.1.7 Example: propulsion system arrangement
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Figure 9-14 Example: engine room and engine arrangement; top view
Engine room planning
9.2.1 Example: ducting arrangement
Status 04/2003 Page 9 - 25
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9.2 Exhaust gas ducting
9.2.1 Example: ducting arrangement
Figure 9-15 Example: Exhaust gas ducting arrangement
Engine room planning
9.2.1 Example: ducting arrangement
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9.2.2 Position of the outlet casing of the turbocharger
Status 04/2005 58/64 Page 9 - 27
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9.2.2 Position of the outlet casing of the turbocharger

Table 9-6 Position of exhaust outlet casing L 58/64
Number of cylinders 6L 7L 8L 9L
Turbocharger TCA 55 TCA 66 TCA 66 TCA 66
A
mm
705 835 832 832
B 302 302 302 302
C* 387 387 432 432
C** 1,357 1,356 1,421 1,421
D 1,016 1,120 1,200 1,200
* = for rigidly mounted engines ** = for resiliently mounted engines
Engine room planning
9.2.2 Position of the outlet casing of the turbocharger
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lndex - l
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A
Air
Flow rate, temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-66
Starting air vessels, compressors . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-73
Air vessel - condensate amount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15
Atutomation
SaCoS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-119
Automation
lnstallation requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-129
lnterfaces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-125
Measuring and control devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-131
Supply and distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-117
System overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-115
Technical data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-127
Temperature control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-123
Available outputs - related reference conditions . . . . . 2-3
C
Charge air cooler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15
Condensate amount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15
Combustion air
Quality requirement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-41
Cooler
Flow rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-65
Heat to be dissipated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-65
Temperature basis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-66
Cooling water
Checking of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-21
Cleaning of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-25
Quality requirement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-13
Cylinder liner, removal of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-9
D
De-rating. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
E
Engine
3D engine viewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-11
Definition of engine rating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-62
Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-77
Running in of-, Diesel electric operation . . . . . . . 2-43
Running-in of, - Propeller operation. . . . . . . . . . . 2-31
Table of ratings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-61
Exhaust gas
Composition of. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-73
Flow rates, temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-66
Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-77
F
Flywheel
Arrangement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-91
Mass, moments of inertia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-83, 2-84
Foundation
Chocking with synthetic resin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-103
General requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-97
lnclined sandwich elements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-109
Resilient seating. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-107
Rigid seating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-99
Fuel oil
Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-63
MDO supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-49
MDO supply diagram. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-49
MDO treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-47
Quality requirement HFO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-27
Quality requirement of Gas oil, Diesel fuel (MGOl 3-39
Quality requirements MDO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-37
Supply system HFO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-55
System - diagram HFO supply system . . . . . . . . 6-63
viscosity-diagram (vTl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-43
G
Generator, reverse power protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-53
l
lnstallation drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
lntake Noise. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-77
lndex
lndex - ll .
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Layout of pipes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3
Load
Load reduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
Part-load operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9
Lube oil
consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-64
Quality requirement (HFOl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
Quality requirement (MGO/MDOl . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
Quality requirements dual-fuel operation . . . . . . . 3-3
System description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
System diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
M
Moments of inertia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-83, 2-84
N
Noise
Exhaust gas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-77
O
Operation
Acceleration times. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-35
Diesel electric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-39
Load application for shipboard systems. . . . . . . 2-39
Load reduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
Part load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9
Running-in of engine, - Diesel electric operation 2-43
Running-in of engine, - Propeller operation . . . . 2-31
Outputs
Available outputs, related reference condition . . . 2-3
Dependent on frequency deviations . . . . . . . . . . 2-41
Outputs, speeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-61
Override function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-141
P
Part-load operation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9
Pipe dimensioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3
Piston, removal of. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-9
Priming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7
Propeller
Clearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9
General requirements for pitch comtrol . . . . . . . . 2-25
Layout data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Operating range CPP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-23
Operating range FPP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-29
Pumps, capacities of. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-65
Q
Quality requirement
Cleaning cooling water. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-25
Combustion air. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-41
Engine cooling water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-13
Gas oil, Diesel fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-39
Heavy fuel oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-27
Lube oil (dual-fuell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Lube oil (HFOl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
Lube oil (MGO/MDOl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
Marine Diesel fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-37
viscosity-diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-43
Water, exhaust gas boiler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-45
R
Reference conditions
Tropical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
Running-in. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-31, 2-43
S
Spare parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-19
v
viscosity diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-43
W
Water
Quality requirement for exhaust gas boiler . . . . . 3-45
Quality requirements for engine cooling water . . 3-13
Works test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11

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