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Department of Health Commission on Population

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Foreword...................................................................................iv
Department of Education (DEPED)
I. RATIONALE............................................................................1
Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG) II. OBJECTIVES AND SCOPE............................................................4
III. OPERATIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR CONDUCTING PLANNING,
Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) MONITORING AND EVALUATION.................................................8
IV. PLANNING GUIDE...................................................................9
V. MONITORING, ANALYSIS AND REPORTING GUIDE..........................17
National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA)
VI. EVALUATION AND RESEARCH GUIDE...........................................20

Philippine Commission on Women (PCW) Annexes

Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) Annex A. M&E Framework Results Indicator Matrix.........................23

Family Planning Organization of the Philippines (FPOP)


Annex B. Examples of RPRH-related Programs, Projects and
Activities.................................................................37
Likhaan Center for Women’s Health (Likhaan) Annex C. UWFP Monitoring Report Template.................................41

Philippine Society for Responsible Parenthood (PSRP) Annex D. Administrative Order 2015-0002. Creation of
National Implementation Team (NIT) and Regional
Union of Local Authorities of the Philippines (ULAP) Implementation Teams (RIT) for Republic Act 10354
(Responsible Parenthood and Reproductive Health
Law of 2012)............................................................43
United Nations Population Fund – Philippines (UNFPA)

Annex E. Department Personnel Order 2015-0200.


United States Agency for International Development – Philippines (USAID) Designation of the Members of the National
Implementation Team (NIT) for RA 10354
Health Policy Development Program – UPEcon (HPDP) (Responsible Parenthood and Reproductive
Health Law of 2012) created under
Zuellig Family Foundation (ZFF) Administrative Order No. 2015-0002...............................46
FOREWORD I. RATIONALE

This Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (PME) Guide prescribes the A. The Responsible Parenthood and Reproductive Health Law of
operating procedures in the implementation of the National Implementation Team 2012 [RA 10354]
(NIT) at the national level and the Regional Implementation Teams (RIT) at the
regional level, as a result of the Implementing Rules and Regulations (IRR) of RA The Responsible Parenthood and Reproductive Health (RPRH) Law of 2012 [RA
10354 or the Responsible Parenthood and Reproductive Health (RPRH) Act of 2012. 10354] is a landmark legislation aimed at protecting, promoting and fulfilling women’s
reproductive health and rights by accelerating the provision/delivery of and access to
The enactment of the RPRH Law, after 14 long years, is a victory of the Filipino reproductive health care services and information. Among other directives, the Law’s
people. We are now presenting this Guide to help the implementation teams not Implementing Rules and Regulations (IRR) mandate the Department of Health (DOH),
only in the national and regional levels but also in the provincial, city and municipal as lead implementing agency, to “prescribe and implement monitoring and evaluation
levels. Since its conception, the very point of the RPRH Law is to reach every Filipino strategies for the implementation of the responsible parenthood and reproductive
and give them the much needed information and services they rightfully deserve. health care program” (Section 12.01.o). Other IRR provisions further underscore the
This will greatly contribute in the fulfillment of each individual’s reproductive health criticality of defining mechanisms that are able to evaluate and provide a definitive and
and rights and soon realize a society with universal access to health care. comprehensive assessment of the content, implementation and impact of all RPRH-
related policies and programs to ensure that they meet the Law’s objectives as stated
The Guide serves as a monitoring tool for the NIT and RIT to carefully evaluate the above. These provisions include:
different programs and projects of various implementing partners in the country.
• “Section 15.01 Reporting Requirements. Before the end of April
It is intended to synchronize the activities and harmonize the reporting process to
keep an eye on the progress or obstacles, in the implementation of the Law. each year, the DOH shall submit to the President of the Philippines and
Congress an annual consolidated report…”
This PME Guide shall also be the steering wheel in the attainment of the 2030 • “Section 15.02 Programs to be Reported. …Information in the annual
Agenda for Sustainable Development with emphasis in Sustainable Development consolidated report shall include, among others:
Goal 3 to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages; Goal 5
a) Components of the programs related to reproductivehealth
to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls; and Goal 17 to
strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for and responsible parenthood, which include program objectives,
sustainable development. offices involved, procedures, timeline, areas of implementation,
segment of population served, budgetary allotments, and
Also, this Guide is in line with the Objectives of the National Evaluation Framework of expenditures;
the Philippines issued by the National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA)
b) Current implementation status of programs, which include the
and Department of Budget and Management DBM through Joint Memorandum
Circular No. 2015-01. current phase, accomplishments, challenges, and projections;
c) Relevant studies and researches that may contribute to the
It is with high hopes that this Guide will significantly contribute to the well-being of improvement of the programs; and
Filipinos –empower couples to exercise their reproductive rights, and cultivate an d) Recommendations and plans in addressing challenges and
environment for people to achieve their development goals. improving performance status.”
• “Section 15.03 Streamlining of Reporting Procedures. In the collection,
collation, and processing of data for any and all reports required by
NIT Secretariat these Rules, all DOH bureaus, offices, and units shall coordinate with
one another and with other stakeholders to minimize the paperwork
burden for field implementation units and workers. Preference shall
be given to the use of electronic, portable, and real-time (where
applicable) means of transferring information. Existing electronic

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tracking systems shall integrate reproductive health and responsible reports to the Secretary of Health;
parenthood data, and shall be fully developed, functional, and linked • Provide recommendations to the Secretary of Health to improve the
with one another…” implementation and impact of the Law and its IRR; and
• “Section 15.04 Contribution of Other Agencies in Reporting. Other • Prepare an annual report on the implementation of the Law for approval
government and non-government agencies and units shall submit the by the Secretary of Health for reporting purposes to Congress no later than
following reports to the DOH for inclusion in the annual consolidated April of every year.
report:
a) The DSWD shall submit a report on its anti-poverty programs, Responding to the above mandates, this Guide presents a harmonized
highlighting the integration of responsible parenthood and approach to planning, monitoring, and evaluating the Government’s RPRH program
reproductive health components; at the national and local levels. While different agencies have different planning and
b) The DepEd shall submit a report on the implementation of age- M&E mechanisms for the various elements/components of Reproductive Health,
and development-appropriate reproductive health education; the imperative remains for uniformity and consistency in the indicators used, their
c) The DILG shall ensure the submission of data and reports from definitions, as well as in the integration/harmonization of a wide array of planning
LGUs; targets and performance data generated by each component intervention and by the
d) LGUs shall regularly submit any and all relevant data and reports; agencies responsible for their implementation.
e) CSOs and private sector organizations involved in responsible
parenthood and reproductive health shall also submit a regular C. 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development
report on their activities.” Harmonization enables RPRH implementers to come-up with a unified,
• “Section 13.01 Congressional Oversight Committee on Responsible correlated and broad-based analysis for decision-makers in assessing whether RPRH
Parenthood and Reproductive Health Act. …The COC shall monitor and is delivering on its programmed outputs vis-à-vis the level of human, financial and
ensure the effective implementation of the RPRH Act, recommend other resources being invested by the Government and its partners, and whether these
the necessary remedial legislation or administrative measures, and outputs significantly contribute to achieving higher level results such as, but not limited
shall conduct a review of the RPRH Act every five (5) years from its to, the following Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and targets under the 2030
effectivity…” Agenda for Sustainable Development adopted by United Nations member-states in
October 2015 as they relate to the RPRH mandate:
B. DOH Administrative Order 2015-0002 creating RPRH National
Implementation Team • Target 3.1 By 2030, reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than
Likewise, DOH Administrative Order 2015-0002 created a National 70 per 100,000 live births;
Implementation Team (NIT) and Regional Implementation Teams (RITs) – composed of • Target 3.3 By 2030, end the epidemics of AIDS (among other communicable
national government agencies (NGAs), local government units (LGUs), and civil society diseases);
organizations (CSOs) – to manage the implementation of the Law and tasked them with • Target 3.7 By 2030, ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive
the following planning, monitoring and evaluation-related functions: health-care services, including for family planning, information and education,
and the integration of reproductive health into national strategies and
• Coordinate the actions of the national and regional agencies implementing programmes;
the Law and its IRR in the areas of policy development, capacity building, • Target 3.8 Achieve universal health coverage, including financial risk
advocacy, education, information, health service delivery, field operations protection, access to quality essential health-care services and access to safe,
and monitoring and evaluation; effective, quality and affordable essential medicines and vaccines for all;
• Craft a unified annual work and financial plan (WFP), integrating resources • Target 5.2 Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the
from all members of the NIT/RITs, for the national and field implementation public and private spheres, including all trafficking and sexual and other types
of the Law and endorse such for approval by the heads of agencies of the of exploitation;
NIT/RITs for RPRH as necessary; • Target 5.6 Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health and
• Set up a system to monitor the implementation and evaluate the impact reproductive rights as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of
of the Law at the national and local levels and provide regular quarterly the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing

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Platform of Action and the outcome documents of their review conferences; in the areas of policy development, budget formulation, capacity building,
and demand generation, procurement of commodities/supplies and logistics
• Target 17.18 By 2020, enhance capacity-building support to developing management, service delivery, field operations and monitoring and
countries, including for least developed countries and small island developing evaluation, including in the sharing of resources for the implementation of
States, to increase significantly the availability of high-quality, timely and the Law;
reliable data disaggregated by income, gender, age, race, ethnicity, migratory c. At the national level, the NIT will monitor all programs, projects and
status, disability, geographic location and other characteristics relevant in activities (PPAs) undertaken by NGAs, government-owned and controlled
national contexts. corporations (GOCCs), LGUs, CSOs, FBOs, and prepare consolidated
quarterly and annual reports – based on monitoring reports of the NIT
II. OBJECTIVES AND SCOPE member-agencies and of the RITs – for submission to the Secretary of
Health and the Congressional Oversight Committee, respectively;
A. Objectives d. At the regional level, PPAs to be coordinated, harmonized, monitored,
This Guide addresses the need for a decision support system in undertaking reported and evaluated include:
policy strategy reviews and improvements to accelerate the provision/delivery of and • all foreign-assisted projects (loan or grant funded);
access to reproductive health care services and information. More specifically, it lays • interprovincial projects implemented in two or more provinces in the
down detailed processes to guide members of the NIT, RITs, and all other stakeholders, region;
in: • all area development projects;
• nationally-funded projects implemented in the region; and
a. Crafting a unified annual work and financial plan (WFP), integrating • PPAs funded by CSOs, academe, FBOs and donor agencies and
resources from all members of the NIT/RITs, for the national and field organizations.
implementation of the Law; e. These programs, projects and activities (PPAs) may be funded by the
b. Operationalizing a monitoring system that is able to regularly generate up- National Government with or without foreign assistance, or financed
to-date and reliable information on the overall implementation status of purely from local revenues of LGUs or financed by CSOs and faith-based
programs, projects and activities at the national and local levels vis-à-vis organizations (FBOs). More specifically, these PPAs include:
the targets set in the unified WFP; • those under the General Appropriations Act for the current fiscal year;
c. Detecting at an early stage factors that impede implementation so that • those which comprise the approved National Infrastructure Program;
remedial actions can be readily undertaken at the level nearest the • those undertaken by government-owned and controlled corporations
program sites and at the earliest time possible; (GOCCs), with or without subsidy or equity contribution from the
d. Capturing lessons learned in program and project implementation that national government;
then feed into the planning and implementation of future initiatives; and • those implemented by LGUs, with or without budgetary assistance
e. Designing, contracting and managing an independent evaluation to assess from the national government, specifically including those funded
the relevance, efficiency, effectiveness, impact and sustainability of the from the internal revenue allotment (IRA) share appropriated for
RPRH program, including the conduct of operational researches on the development projects; and
implementation of the individual components/elements of the program to • those funded by CSOs and FBOs or by donor agencies.
determine and address specific bottlenecks.
Planning, monitoring, reporting and evaluation for RPRH Law implementation
B. Scope will primarily be aligned to the Results Monitoring and Evaluation Framework (shown
This Guide will apply to: in Figure 1 below) and Indicator Matrix (attached as Annex A) approved by the NIT on 3
a. Unified work planning, monitoring, reporting and evaluation under the NIT July 2015.
and RIT of all programs, projects and activities of various agencies (NGAs,
LGUs and CSOs) to implement the RPRH Law at the national, regional,
provincial, city and municipal levels;
b. Harmonization of different actions of NIT and RIT member-organizations

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III. OPERATIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR CONDUCTING IV. PLANNING GUIDE
PLANNING, MONITORING AND EVALUATION The Unified Work and Financial Plan (UWFP) aims to capture and reflect programs,
projects, and activities (PPAs) of the different agencies and organizations along the
implementation of RPRH Law at the level of inputs and processes. The PPAs may be funded
by the National Government with or without foreign assistance, or financed purely from
local revenues of LGUs or financed by CSOs and faith-based organizations (FBOs). More
specifically, these PPAs include:
a. those under the General Appropriations Act for the current fiscal year;
b. those which comprise the approved National Infrastructure Program;
c. those undertaken by government-owned and controlled corporations
(GOCCs), with or without subsidy or equity contribution from the national
government;
d. those implemented by LGUs, with or without budgetary assistance from the
national government, specifically including those funded from the internal
revenue allotment (IRA) share appropriated for development projects;
e. those funded by CSOs and FBOs; and
f. those funded through Official Development Assistance (ODA).

Following the format at the national level, a unified WFP shall also be developed
by the RITs. Joint project proposals may be developed based on the unified WFP. To
ensure funding support, the WFP shall be integrated into the Province-wide, City-wide and
Municipality-wide Investment Plans for Health (P/C/MIPHs). The UWFP shall also become
the Regional TA Plan (RTAP) for LGUs to operationalize the IRR of RPRH Law at the local level.
Table 1 shows the format of the Unified WFP. Detailed steps for its preparation are
as follows:
A. General Guidelines
• The UWFP shall primarily reflect PPAs that are at the level of Inputs and Process
in the Monitoring and Evaluation Framework shown in the previous section.
The PPAs shall be categorized according to their link or contribution to the
following Key Result Areas of the RPRH Law M&E Framework:
KRA 1: Maternal and Neonatal Health
KRA 2: Family Planning
KRA 3: Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health
KRA 4: STI and HIV/AIDS
KRA 5: Gender-Based Violence
• A sixth category will be for other PPAs contributing to RPRH law implementation
which cannot be solely attributed to any of the 5 KRAs or which address other
elements of the RPRH Law outside of the five priority KRAs.
• Each NIT and RIT member-agency will accomplish the UWFP which will then be
the basis of the monitoring of progress and evaluation of accomplishments of
agency committed PPAs.
• The agencies may also look into Annex B of this Guide for examples of possible
PPAs (as lifted from the RPRH Law and its IRR) for purposes of ascertaining
whether or not a program, project and activity planned or implemented
contributes to the Law’s intent.

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• In terms of process flow:
o For the RIT, LGU UWFPs will emanate from the provincial level,
including from highly urbanized cities (HUCs) and independent
component cities (ICCs). The Provincial Health Team Leader (PHTL)/
Development Manager Officer (DMO) of the DOH assigned to the
LGU will primarily be accountable for completing the UWFP template
for the Provincial/City LGU. In doing so, he/she will maximize the use
of existing LGU plans such as the Provincial/City Investment Plan for
Health (P/CIPH) which is assumed to have already been vetted by
the Local Health Board. He/she will be assisted by the Provincial/City
Population Officer (P/CPO) in collecting RPRH-related plans from non-
exclusively health sectors in the LGU such as from the Provincial/City
Social Welfare and Development Office (P/CSWDO) and the Philippine
National Police (PNP) in the case of Gender-Based Violence and
from the Department of Education (DepEd) Schools/City Division in
the case of Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health.
o For RPRH national agencies and CSOs with regional presence and
are represented in the RIT, they will designate an agency focal
responsible for preparing a UWFP for their organization outlining
their PPAs for the region as a whole and for the assistance their
organization is providing to individual provinces/HUCs/ICCs.
o All these local-level UWFPs from the LGUs, regional offices and
CSOs should be signed by their respective heads of agencies and
submitted to the RIT Secretariat no later than 31 January of every
year for consolidation. The RIT will then convene to review and
endorse the consolidated regional UWFP to the NIT Secretariat no
later than 28 February.
o For the NIT, member-agencies will complete their respective UWFP
templates outlining their RPRH-related PPAs that are national in
scope/scale. Due diligence should be taken by national agencies
that their UWFPs do not duplicate the PPAs already reflected in
the ones submitted by their regional offices through the RITs.
All NIT members shall submit their UWFPs, signed by the head
of agency, to the NIT Secretariat no later than 28 February for
consolidation. The NIT will then convene to review and endorse the
overall consolidated UWFP, which incorporates national and local
submissions, to the Secretary of Health no later than 31 March of
every year.
o In the course of reviewing the UWFPs submitted by member-
agencies, the NIT and RIT may opt to provide feedback and
suggestions to the head of agency on how their PPAs could be better
coordinated/harmonized with the PPAs of other organizations to
optimize efficiency, effectiveness and impact. Feedback may also
be given as to the preparation of PPAs for the succeeding year.

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B. Format for the Unified Work and Financial Plan of the RPRH Law National Implementation Team (NIT)
and Regional Implementation Teams (RITs)

Budget and
Financing Secured

A.
B.
C.

D.

E.
F.

G.

C. Format for the Unified Accomplishment Report of the RPRH Law National Implementation Team (NIT)
and Regional Implementation Teams (RITs)

Budget and Financing Secured

Accomp.
Expend.
(2b)
(4b)

A.
B.
C.

D.

E.
F.

G.
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A. Accomplishing the Tables D. Commodities procured/delivered – refers primarily to
commodities procured and delivered under the KRA of Family
Column 1: Program/Project/Activities Planning.
E. Service Delivery – refers to actual number of clients served
1. This should contain PPAs which address a specific Key Result Area (KRA) addressing the KRAs and the 12 elements of RH care as defined
of RPRH as enumerated in the General Guidelines above. For other PPAs under Sec. 3.01 of the RPRH Law’s IRR.
which cannot be solely attributed to any of the five KRAs or which address F. Governance Mechanism – refers but is not limited to efforts in
other elements of the RPRH Law outside of the five priority KRAs, a sixth the establishment and maintenance of intra-agency, inter-agency,
category which will be labelled “Others” shall substitute for the KRA. and multi-sectoral coordinative bodies and arrangements which
2. Further breakdown or classification of PPAs is reflected in Column 1 as contribute to the implementation of the RPRH Law.
follows: G. Others – refers to other PPAs which may not be attributed to the
A. Policies Issued –pertains to policies issued by various agencies 6 classifications provided above.
related to RP and RH at various levels in order to align with 3. The particular, comprehensible, and identifiable program, project, and
and ensure the implementation of the RPRH Law. Aside from activities (PPAs) shall be specified and enumerated under each of the
accomplishing the corresponding columns identified in this classifications above.
endeavor such as Column 2: Target, Column 3: Accomplishment
etc. as it may be applicable the Agency/Organization should attach Columns 2a & 2b: Target and Accomplishment
a supporting document which gives the name of the policy and 1. These are the objectives translated into measurable and/or quantifiable
a brief description. The supporting document should contain at results.
least the following details: 2. Each program, project, activity would have a specific quantifiable target
ex. (Policy Code) Administrative Order No. xx. Series of 20xx; output (column 2a);
(Title/Subject) “Creation of the NIT and RIT for R.A. 10354”; (Brief ex. No. of Nurses Trained on FPCBT 1; No. of Health Events Conducted; No.
Description) “The administrative order creates an oversight body of IEC and advocacy materials produced; No. of IEC and advocacy
for the implementation of RPRH Law and provides for its functions. materials distributed; No. of clients provided with FP counselling;
It contributes to the implementation of RPRH Law by creating a etc.
governance mechanism which will further enable the Department 3. The accomplishment (column 2b) corresponding to the previously
to address issues arising on the law’s implementation.” submitted targets shall be shall be filled in during each quarterly
B. Demand Generation – refers to communication campaigns reporting round.
aimed at raising the level of public awareness on the protection 4. The identification of corresponding outputs leads to the quantifiability
and promotion of RPRH and reproductive rights. This may include of the objective and is useful in the monitoring and evaluation of
campaigns delivered through mass media (radio, TV, print), accomplishment.
social media, mobile media, or mobilization, health events and
engagements organized by service providers and volunteers in Column 3: Time Frames
the school, workplace, and community settings. The production 1. Timeframes for each PPA refer to the duration of action at which end the
and distribution of various IEC and advocacy materials will also fall desired output or outcome should be realized.
under this classification. 2. Indicating the time frame for each PPA is useful in providing a good sense
C. Capacity Building/Development Activities – refers to activities of sequencing and distribution of action over the implementation year. It
which aim to ensure an adequate supply of service providers who is also needed for monitoring purposes.
are competent and equipped with adequate skills and knowledge 3. A detailed action or implementation plan for each PPA will specify the
in ensuring the implementation of the RPRH law. These include but actual quarter of the year when the PPA is to be conducted.
are not limited to capacity building activities for service providers, 4. This will also assist the NIT in being informed as to programs, projects, and
capacity building for demand generation activities, and capacity activities falling behind schedule and needing assistance/intervention
building activities for other elements of the RPRH Law. among partner agencies and organizations for efficient implementation.

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Columns 4a, 4b, & 4c: Budget and Financing Secured: V. MONITORING, ANALYSIS AND REPORTING GUIDE
1. Budget allocation (column 4a) includes the monetary equivalent of The coordination, harmonization, monitoring and reporting processes take off
resources allocated in order to produce the given output. The cost for from the planning (preparation of UWFP), programming and scheduling of meetings
each resource that is required for the conduct of an activity may have and monitoring activities to be undertaken by the members of the NIT and RIT for the
to be estimated considering the following: target population for the year. Following are the guidelines to operationalize these:
activity, the task itself, the duration or frequency of conduct.
A. Preparation of NIT and RIT Monitoring Plans
2. Budget Expenditure (column 4b) includes the actual resources expended
in order to produce the given output. The said item is necessary in order The NIT and RIT Secretariats will prepare their respective Monitoring Plans
to assess the efficiency in the delivery of the desired output. (template shown in Table 2 below) for approval by the NIT and RIT no later than 15
3. Budget Sources (column 4c) should reflect all financial sources such as days after the UWFP has been endorsed by the NIT/RIT. The Monitoring Plan shall
those coming locally such as from the LGU’s IRA; national sources such as contain adequate information such as particular projects to be inspected based on
NIT member-agencies; grants and/or loans from development partners the endorsed UWFP, responsibilities, timetables, performance standards and targets,
(e.g. European Union, ADB, USAID, Global Fund, JICA, World Bank, budgets, etc. The Plan will be distributed to all units involved in RPRH M&E, specifically
UNFPA, etc.). This is to show the extent of financial resources that each DOH, POPCOM and CSO representatives.
of these partners/donors have contributed in terms of interventions/
activities in the implementation of the RPRH Law. On the other hand,
provincial, city and municipal investments on local health priorities or
thrusts need to reflect support (e.g. budgetary, drugs and medicines,
technical, etc.) to provincial health offices.

Column 5: Coverage of Project


1. Geographic location of the activities identified should be reflected in this
column.
2. This will assist the RIT and NIT in coordinating activities in order to
coincide with priority areas of conduct or in order to avoid duplication
of interventions in areas wherein programs, projects and activities are
already saturated.
3. This will also serve as a guide for the monitoring activities to be conducted
by the NIT.

Column 6: Office/Bureau/Division to Report


1. The Office/Bureau/Division responsible for reporting on the particular
PPA within the agency/organization shall be reflected in this column.
2. This is necessary to assist the agency/organization in tracking the unit
responsible for report consolidation.
3. This will also assist the NIT in ascertaining which particular office/
bureau/division to contact and request in case issues would arise and
the body seeks deeper understanding and clarification.
From the list of PPAs to be monitored for the current year, the NIT or RIT may
schedule regular project field visits/inspections for a particular reporting period for
Column 7: Remarks
inclusion in the Monitoring Plan. Detailed Programs of Work (POWs) on those projects
Matters of concern which result to deviation from the Work and Financial Plan
to be visited must be secured prior to the actual visit. The conduct of ocular inspection
as opposed to the accomplishment should be provided in this column.
at project sites may be done to verify or validate progress reports especially if the

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program or project encountered problems or delay to determine the magnitude of the
problem encountered. The monitoring visit may include:

i. Conducting key informant interviews and/or focus group discussions


with project implementers, local officials, and reputable residents of the
locality to validate status of projects, reported problems/findings and
to verify whether the project is being implemented in accordance with
approved conditions, plans and specifications;
ii. Comparing reported accomplishments against approved project
schedules to determine whether the project is behind or ahead of
schedule; and
iii. Ascertaining whether the delay in project implementation is justifiable
or not, among others.

All monitoring activities should have as a primary output the Unified Work and
Financial Plan (UWFP) Monitoring Report (template attached as Annex C). This report
will serve to document the findings and recommendations arising from the monitoring
visits and shall be submitted to the NIT and RIT for discussion and appropriate action
during their regular meetings.

B. Preparation of Quarterly Accomplishment/Progress Reports


vis-à-vis PPAs in the UWFP and Conduct of Sessions to Analyze
and Resolve Bottlenecks
Where reports submitted need to be further validated, monitoring visits may
At the national level, the NIT Secretariat will gather on a quarterly basis the
be conducted by the NIT/RIT Secretariats. The NIT Secretariat will then consolidate all
accomplishment reports of implementing agencies and organizations based on the
regional reports (quarterly/annual) into an Annual Report which will be submitted to
unified AWFP. In the same manner, the RIT Secretariat will prepare its quarterly report
the Congress Oversight Committee and to the Office of the President every April of the
based on the individual progress reports of local implementing agencies. The quarterly
following year upon endorsement by the Secretary of Health. The Annual Report may
progress report shall follow the same UWFP template (described in detail in Section IV.
also be disseminated to a wider spectrum of stakeholders through various public fora.
above) to capture progress and utilization vis-à-vis targets and budgets, respectively.
Using the consolidated quarterly reports as inputs, the NIT and RITs will
Each implementing agency in the region is responsible for gathering,
include as agenda in their regular quarterly meetings the analysis of bottlenecks in
consolidating and submitting the progress reports of their own organization, including
PPA implementation and the identification of remedial actions that can be undertaken
reports of agencies or organizations that they are assisting either through technical,
at their level. It will take the form of a problem-solving session with the concerned
financial or a combination of both technical and financial support. Reports to the RIT
implementing agencies invited as necessary. If the problems/issues cannot be resolved
may also include accomplishments at the regional, provincial, city and municipal levels
at their level, these issues may be elevated to other structures such as the Social
that were not necessarily captured in the UWFP.
Development Committee and/or RDC of NEDA.
To reiterate, care should be taken by national agencies that their progress
reports do not duplicate the progress already reflected in the ones submitted by their
regional offices through the RITs. The NIT and RIT Secretariats will closely review,
the national- and local-level reports to avoid duplications (e.g. double reporting of
accomplishments, expenditures, fund sources) when the overall report is consolidated.

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VI. EVALUATION AND RESEARCH GUIDE C. Outcome and Impact Evaluation
A. Annual Results-Level Assessment Section 13.01 of the Law’s IRR state that “…The Congressional Oversight
Committee (COC) shall monitor and ensure the effective implementation of the RPRH
To be able to assess whether the PPAs of RPRH implementing organizations Act, recommend the necessary remedial legislation or administrative measures, and
translate into concrete and significant results, the most updated data on the status shall conduct a review of the RPRH Act every five (5) years from its effectivity…” To
of the M&E Framework result indicators need to be collected and analysed for the ensure that the policy review to be undertaken by Congress is based on solid evidence
national, regional, and provincial/HUC/ICC levels. For this purpose, the M&E Framework of performance, the NIT, working through DOH and/or POPCOM, shall commission an
Indicator Monitoring Template (attached as Annex D) will need to be accomplished on an independent, third party evaluation of the overall RPRH program on the fifth year of
annual basis and submitted by each LGU (province, highly urbanized city, independent the Law’s effectivity (e.g. 2019). At the minimum, the evaluation shall respond to the
component city) and by relevant national agencies (e.g. Philippine Statistics Authority) following criteria :
mentioned in the approved M&E Framework Indicator Matrix (Annex A), specifically
those cited in the column “Unit Responsible for Data Collection and Reporting”.
i. Relevance
Relevance is the extent to which the policy and the program are suited to the
National agencies and LGUs reporting on the result indicators shall be guided
country context and the needs of the population. In evaluating the relevance
by the standard definitions and methods of computation specified in Annex A. The
of a programme or a project, it is useful to consider the following questions:
M&E Framework Indicator Monitoring Report shall be consolidated and submitted to
the RIT and then to the NIT following the schedule of submission of the 4th quarter
• To what extent are the objectives of the policy and program still valid?
progress report shown in Section V B. above. In other words, data collected from the
• Are the outputs and PPAs of the program consistent with the overall
M&E Framework Indicator Monitoring Report will directly feed into the Annual Report
goal and the attainment of its objectives?
to be submitted to Congress and the President.
• Are the outputs and PPAs of the program consistent with the intended
outcomes and impacts?
The NIT, collaborating closely with the knowledge management/information
system units of the DOH and POPCOM, will work towards establishing and maintaining
a database and dashboard (possibly online) where data from the Indicator Monitoring ii. Effectiveness
Report can be entered, stored and analysed (e.g. trends over time, benchmarking of Effectiveness is a measure of the extent to which the policy and programme
LGU performance vis-à-vis regional performance vis-à-vis national status) to enable attained their objectives.
results-oriented planning and M&E. • To what extent were the objectives achieved / are likely to be achieved?
• What were the major factors influencing the achievement or non-
achievement of the objectives?
B. Operational Researches on Individual RH Components
iii. Efficiency
As part of formulating the UWFPs, the NIT/RITs shall discuss areas where
Efficiency measures the outputs – qualitative and quantitative – in relation to
operational researches are necessary to generate the evidence for where specific
the inputs or investments poured in. It is an economic term which signifies
bottlenecks exist in the implementation of individual RH components (e.g. Why are
that the PPAs implemented used the least costly resources possible in order
results from demand generation on family planning difficult to translate to service
to achieve the desired results. This generally requires comparing alternative
delivery? What are the bottlenecks to young people’s access to SRH services? Why
approaches to achieving the same outputs, to see whether the most efficient
are LCAT-VAWCs not functional?). The researches will also come up with concrete and
process has been adopted.
actionable solutions to address the identified bottlenecks. These operational researches
• Were PPAs cost efficient?
shall be included in the UWFP of the implementing agency under whose mandate the
• Were objectives achieved on time?
issue being studied falls.
• Was the programme or project implemented in the most efficient way
compared to alternatives?

20 21
iv. Impact Annex A: Indicator Matrix for the Responsible Parenthood and
Impact is about the positive and negative changes produced by a development Reproductive Health Law Monitoring and Evaluation
intervention, directly or indirectly, intended or unintended. This involves the Framework
main impacts and effects resulting from the PPA on the local social, economic,
environmental and other development indicators. The examination should be 1. The Indicator Matrix contains identified, agreed upon, and approved
concerned with both intended and unintended results and must also include indicators for each of the five priority key result areas: 1. Maternal
the positive and negative impact of external factors, such as changes in terms and Neonatal Health; 2. Family Planning; 3. Adolescent Sexual and
of conditions outside of the RPRH sector. Reproductive Health; 4. STI and HIV/AIDS; and 5. Gender-Based
• What has happened as a result of the PPAs? Violence.
• What real difference have the PPAs made to the target clients? 2. The identified indicators are at the level of results in terms of Impact,
• How many people have been affected? Outcomes, and Outputs expected.
3. The Indicators which are of concern to the particular agency will be
v. Sustainability accomplished based on the available data. In cases where multiple
Sustainability is concerned with measuring whether the benefits of the PPAs data sources are available, the following hierarchy of sources shall
are likely to continue over the long-term (e.g. after external funding has be followed: 1st Civil Registration and Vital Statistics or Census; 2nd
been withdrawn). PPAs also need to be environmentally as well as financially Surveys; 3rd Administrative or Program Data.
sustainable.
• To what extent did the benefits of the PPAs continue over the long-
term and even after external funding has ceased?
• What were the major factors which influenced the achievement or
non-achievement of sustainability of the gains made from the PPAs?

1Source: The DAC Principles for the Evaluation of Development Assistance, OECD (1991), Glossary of Terms Used in
Evaluation, in ‘Methods and Procedures in Aid Evaluation’, OECD (1986), and the Glossary of Evaluation and Results Based
Management (RBM) Terms, OECD (2000).

22 23
Indicator  Matrix  for  the  RPRH  Law  MIndicator  
&E  Framework  
Matrix  f(or  
as  tohe  
f  3R  PRH  
July  L2aw  
015) M&E  Framework  (as  of  3  July  2015)

Criteria  for  Identification  and  Selection   of    Indicators


Criteria   for  Identification  and  Selection  of    Indicators Possible  Dimensions  for   Disaggregation
Possible   Dimensions  for  Disaggregation

Indicator   Matrix  
1.  Limited   in  fnor  umber  
the  RPRH   Law  
but   a  M &E  Framework  
proxy   for  1.   (as  of  3issues  
broader  
Limited   i  Jn  uly   2015) Indicator  
or  cMonditions  
atrix  for  the  RPRH  Law  M&E  Framework  
or  conditions  (An  indicator  must  adequately  encompass  all  the  issues  or  population  groups  it  is  expected
number   but  a  proxy  for  broader  issues   (An   indicator   must   (as  of  e3ncompass  
adequately    July  2015) all  the  issues  or  population  groups  it  is  expected 1.  Sex  and  gender 1.  Sex  and  gender
to  cover.  For  national-­‐
Criteria   level  indicators,  the  group  of  interest  is  the  population  as  a  whole,  including  minority  groups  and  adolescents.)
for  Identification  and   to  cover.  For  national-­‐level  indicators,  the  group  Criteria  
Selection  of    Indicators of  interest   is  the  population  as  a  whole,  including  minority  groups  and  adolescents.)
for  Identification  and  Selection  of    Indicators Possible  Dimensions  for  Disaggregation 2.  Age 2.  Age Possible  Dimensions  for  Disaggregation
2.  Simple,  single-­‐variable  indicators,  2.   with   straightforward  
Simple,   single-­‐variable   policy   implications
indicators,   with  straightforward  policy  implications 3.  Income  quintiles/deciles 3.  Income  quintiles/deciles
1.  
3.  Limited   in  number  rbobust,  
Scientifically   ut  a  proxy   for  broader  
evidence-­‐ issues  
based   ond  
r  conditions  (An  indicator  must  adequately  encompass  all  the  issues  or  population  groups  it  is  expected
3.  Sacientifically  
forward-­‐ looking  (an  indicator  must  be  a  valid,  specific,  sensitive  and  reliable  reflection  of  that  which  it
robust,   evidence-­‐based  and  forward-­‐ looking  
1.  Limited   (an  indicator  
in  number   mfust  
but  a  proxy   or  bb e  a  valid,  
roader   specific,  
issues   1.  Sex  and  gender
sensitive  and  reliable  reflection   of  that  which  it
or  conditions  (An  indicator  must  adequately  encompass  all  the  issues  or  population  groups  it  is  expected 4.  Disability 4.  Disability 1.  Sex  and  gender
to  cover.  For  national-­‐level  indicators,  the  group  of  interest  is  the  population  as  a  whole,  including  minority  groups  and  adolescents.) 2.  Age
to  cover.  For  national-­‐level  indicators,  the  group  of  interest  is  the  population  as  a  whole,  including  minority  groups  and  adolescents.) 2.  Age
purports  to  measure) purports  to  measure) 3.  Income  quintiles/deciles
5.  Ethnicity  and  indigenous  status
5.  Ethnicity  and  indigenous   status
2.  Simple,  single-­‐variable  indicators,  with  straightforward  policy  implications 2.  Simple,  single-­‐variable  indicators,  with  straightforward  policy  implications 3.  Income  quintiles/deciles
4.  Scientifically  
3.   Sensitive  (an  indicator  must  be  able  to  reveal  important  changes  in  the  factor  of  interest)
robust,  evidence-­‐based  and  forward-­‐ 4.  Sensitive   (an  indicator  must  be  able  to  reveal  3.   important   changes  
robust,  ien  
looking  (an  indicator  must  be  a  valid,  specific,  sensitive  and  reliable  reflection  of  that  which  it
Scientifically   the  factor  
vidence-­‐ of  and  
based   interest) 4.  Disability
forward-­‐looking  (an  indicator  must  be  a  valid,  specific,  sensitive  and  reliable  reflection  of  that  which  it
6.  Economic  activity 6.  Economic  activity 4.  Disability
5.  Allows  for  high  frequency  monitoring,  
purports  to  measure) reliable  (an  indicator  must  give  the  same  value  if  its  measurement  were  repeated  in  the  same  way
5.  Allows   for  high  frequency  monitoring,  reliable   (an  indicator  must  give  the  same  value  if  its  measurement  were  repeated  in  the  5.  Ethnicity  and  indigenous  status
purports  to  measure) same  way 7.  Location  or  spatial  disaggregation
7.  Location  or  spatial   disaggregation
5.  Ethnicity  and  indigenous  status
4.   Sensitive  (an  indicator  must  be  able  to  reveal  important  changes  in  the  factor  of  interest) 6.  Economic  activity 6.  Economic  activity
on  the  same  population  and  at  almost  the  same  time) on  the  same  population  and  at  almost  the  same  4.   Sensitive  (an  indicator  must  be  able  to  reveal  important  changes  in  the  factor  of  interest)
time)          (e.g.  by  regions,  provinces,  urban/rural)
         (e.g.  by  regions,   provinces,  urban/rural)
5.  Allows  for  high  frequency  monitoring,  reliable  (an  indicator  must  give  the  same  value  if  its  measurement  were  repeated  in  the  same  way 7.  Location  or  spatial  disaggregation
6.  Consensus  based,  in  line  with  international  
on  the  same  population  and  at  almost  the  same  time) 6.  Consensus   standards   (where  
based,  in   applicable)  
line  with   international  
5.  Allows  for  high  frequency  monitoring,  reliable  (an  indicator  must  give  the  same  value  if  its  measurement  were  repeated  in  the  same  way
and  son  the  same  population  and  at  almost  the  same  time)
constructed  
tandards   from  
(where   well-­‐established  
applicable)   data  sources  (data  required  should  be  available
and  constructed   from  well-­‐established  data  sources   (data  required  should  be  available
         (e.g.  by  regions,  provinces,  urban/rural)
8.  Migrant  status 8.  Migrant  status 7.  Location  or  spatial  disaggregation
         (e.g.  by  regions,  provinces,  urban/rural)
or  relatively  easy  to  acquire  by  feasible  data  collection  methods  that  have  been  validated  in  field  trials)
or   r elatively   e asy   to   a cquire   by   feasible  d
6.  Consensus  based,  in  line  with  international  standards  (where  applicable)  and  constructed  from  well-­‐6.  ata   collection   m ethods  
established  
Consensus  dbata   t hat   h ave   b een   v alidated  
sources  (data  required  should  be  available
ased,   i n  field   t rials) 8.  Migrant  status
in  line  with  international  standards  (where  applicable)  and  constructed  from   well-­‐established  data  sources  (data  required  should  be  available 8.  Migrant  status
7.  Disaggregated 7.  Disaggregated
or  relatively  easy  to  acquire  by  feasible  data  collection  methods  that  have  been  validated  in  field  trials) or  relatively  easy  to  acquire  by  feasible  data  collection  methods  that  have  been  validated  in  field  trials)
7.   D isaggregated 8.  Useful  (At  national  level,  an  indicator  must  be  7.  aDble   isaggregated
8.  Useful  (At  national  level,  an  indicator  must  be  able  to  act  as  a  “marker  of  progress”  towards  improved  reproductive  health  status,  either  as  a  direct
to  act  as  a  “marker  of  progress”  towards  improved  reproductive  health  status,  either  as  a  direct
8.  Useful  (At  national  level,  an  indicator  must  be  able  to  act  as  a  “marker  of  progress”  towards  improved  reproductive  health  status,  either  as  a  direct
or  proxy  measure  of  impact  or  as  a  measure  of  p8.  
or  proxy  measure  of  impact  or  as  a  measure  of  progress  towards  specified  process  goals.  Since  computation  of  national-­‐
or  proxy  measure  of  impact  or  as  a  measure  of  progress  towards  specified  process  goals.  Since  computation  of  national-­‐
Useful  (At  national  level,  an  indicator  must  be  able  to  act  as  a  “marker  of  progress”  towards  improved  reproductive  health  status,  either  as  a  direct
rogress   towards   specified  process  goals.  Slevel  indicators  usually  requires
level  indicators  usually  requires
ince  computation  of  national-­‐level  indicators  usually  requires
or  proxy  measure  of  impact  or  as  a  measure  of  progress  towards  specified  process  goals.  Since  computation  of  national-­‐ level  indicators  usually  requires
aggregation  of  data  collected  at  a  local  level,  the  data  should  also  be  useful  locally,  i.e.  follow-­‐
aggregation  of  data  collected  at  a  local  oln  action  should  be  immediately  apparent.)
aggregation  of  data  collected  at  a  local  level,  the  data  should  also  be  useful  locally,  i.e.  follow-­‐ data  should  oan  action  should  be  immediately  apparent.)
evel,  the  aggregation  of  data  collected  at  a  local  level,  the  data  should  also  be  useful  locally,  i.e.  follow-­‐
lso  be  useful  locally,  i.e.  follow-­‐on  action  should  be  immediately  aopparent.) n  action  should  be  immediately  apparent.)
9.  Ethical  (complies  with  basic  human  rights  and  must  require  only  data  consistent  with  the  morals,  beliefs  or  values  of  the  local  population)
9.   Ethical  (complies  with  basic  human  rights  and  must  require  only  data  consistent  with  the  morals,  beliefs  or  values  of  the  local  population)
9.  Ethical  (complies  with  basic  human  rights  and  9.  mEust   require  only  data  consistent  with  the  morals,  beliefs  or  values  of  the  local  population)
thical  (complies  with  basic  human  rights  and  must  require  only  data  consistent  with  the  morals,  beliefs  or  values  of  the  local  population)

Indicator   Baselines   Indicator   Baselines   Disaggregation   Unit  Responsible  for  Data   Frequency  of   Disaggregation   Unit  Responsible  for  Data   Frequency  of  
Key  Results Indicators Targets  (Year) Data  SRources
Key   esults Definitions  /  Method  of  Computation
Indicators Targets  (Year) Data  Sources Definitions   /  Method  of  Computation
Hierarchy Indicator  
(Year) Baselines   Indicator   Baselines   Required Collection  and  Reporting Disaggregation  
Monitoring Disaggregation  
Unit   or  Unit  
Responsible  fRequired
Data   Responsible   for  Data  
Frequency   Frequency  
of  Reporting of  
Key  Results IndicatorsKey  Results Indicators Family  Health  Survey   Targets  (Hierarchy
Year) (Year)
Data  Sources
Targets  (Year) Number  of  maternal  deaths  per  100,000  live  births  for  a  specified  
Data  Sources Definitions  Location/  spatial, Definitions  
/  Method  of  Computation /  Method  of  Computation Collection   and   Monitoring
Maternal  and  Neonatal   Maternal  mortality  ratio Impact Hierarchy 50/100,000
221/100,000 (Year) Hierarchy
Maternal   (Year)
and  Neonatal   Maternal  mortality  ratio Impact 221/100,000 50/100,000 Philippine  Statistics  Authority  
Family  Health  Survey   Required
Every  5  years   Requiredand  Location/  spatial,
Collection  
Number  of  maternal  deaths  per  100,000  live  births  for  a  specified   Collection  aPhilippine  Statistics  Authority  
Reporting nd   Reporting
Monitoring Monitoring
Every  5  years  
(2011)   (2016) (FHS) year  
Health Health  Survey  (2016) Age,  Income  
(2011)   (FHS)of  maternal  deaths  (PSA) per  100,000  live  b(2011,  2016)
year   Location/  spatial,Age,  Income   (PSA) Every  5  y(2011,  2016)
1

Maternal  and  Neonatal   Maternal  mortality  ratio Impact


Maternal  and  Neonatal   Maternal   Health50/100,000
mortality  ratio
221/100,000 Impact 221/100,000 50/100,000 Number  of  maternal  deaths  per  100,000  live  births  for  a  specified  
Family  Health  Survey   Family   Number   irths  
1
for  a  specified   Philippine  Statistics  Authority  
Location/  spatial, Philippine  Statistics   Authority  
Every  5  years   ears  
[with  a   [National   [with  a   [National  quintiles,   quintiles,  
Health
1.  By  2016,  reduce  the   Health confidence   (2011)   Civil  Registration  System  
Objectives  for   (2016)
1.  By  2016,  reduce  the  
(2011)  
(FHS) (2016) (FHS)
year   1
*Maternal  death  is  the  death  of  a  woman  during  pregnancy,  
confidence   year  
Disability
Objectives  for  
1
Civil  Registration  System   Age,  Income   Age,  
*Maternal  death  is  the  death  of  a  woman  during  pregnancy,   I ncome  
(PSA) Disability (PSA)
(2011,  2016) (2011,   2016)
maternal  mortality  ratio   [with  a   [PSA  to  provide  guidance  
interval  of  182-­‐ Health  (NOH)   [National  
maternal  mortality  ratio   [with  a   [National  
childbirth,  or  within  42  days  of  termination  of  pregnancy,  irrespective   quintiles,   quintiles,  
interval  of  182-­‐ Health  (NOH)   [PSA  to  provide  guidance   childbirth,  or  within  42  days  of  termination  of  pregnancy,  irrespective  
to  less  than  50  per  
1.  By  2016,  reduce  the   260]
1.  By  2016,  reduce  the   2011-­‐ 2016]
confidence   on  how  data  can  be  
to  less  than  50  per   of  the  duration  and  site  of  the  pregnancy,  from  any  cause  related  to  
Objectives  for   confidence  Civil  Registration  System   Civil  Registration  
260] System  
Objectives  for   *Maternal  death  is  the  death  of  a  woman  during  pregnancy,  
2011-­‐2016]*Maternal   death  is  the  death  
on  how  data  can  be   of  a  woman  during   pregnancy,  
Disability Disability
of  the  duration  and  site  of  the  pregnancy,  from  any  cause  related  to  
100,000  live  births extracted  and  analyzed  at   or  aggravated  by  pregnancy  or  its  management,  but  not  from   extracted  and  analyzed  at   or  aggravated  by  pregnancy  or  its  management,  but  not  from  
maternal  mortality  ratio   maternal  mortality  ratio   interval  of  182-­‐ 100,000  live  births
Health  (NOH)  interval   of  182-­‐ Health  (NOH)   childbirth,  or  within  42  days  of  termination  of  pregnancy,  irrespective  
[PSA  to  provide  guidance   [PSA  to  provide  guidance   childbirth,   or  within  42  days  of  termination  of  pregnancy,  irrespective  
the  local  level] accidental  or  incidental  causes. the  local  level] accidental  or  incidental  causes.
to  less  than  50  per  
2.  By  2016,  reduce  the   to  less  than  50  per   260] 2011-­‐ 2 016]
2.  By  2016,  reduce  the  
260] 2011-­‐
on  how  data  can  be   2 016] on   h ow   d ata   can  b e   of   t he  duration  and  site  of  the  pregnancy,  from  any  cause  related  to  
of  the  duration  and  site  of  the  pregnancy,  from  any  cause  related  to  
100,000  live  births
neonatal  mortality  rate   100,000  live  births extracted  and  analyzed  at   or  aggravated  by  pregnancy  or  its  management,  but  not  from  
neonatal  mortality  rate   extracted  and  analyzed  at   or  aggravated  by  pregnancy  or  its  management,  but  not  from  
to  less  than  10  per   to  less  than  10  per   the  local  level] the  local  level]
accidental  or  incidental  causes. accidental  or  incidental  causes.
1,000  live  births 1,000  live  births
2.  By  2016,  reduce  the   2.  By  2016,  reduce  the  
neonatal  mortality  rate   Neonatal  mortality  rateneonatal  
Impactmortality   rate  
13/1,000 10/1,000 National  Demographic   Number  of  infant  deaths  during  the  first  28  days  of  life  per  1,000  live  
Neonatal  mortality  rate Impact 13/1,000 10/1,000Location/  spatial,  
National  Demographic   PSA Every  5  years  
Number  of  infant  deaths  during  the  first  28  days  of  life  per  1,000  live   Location/  spatial,   PSA Every  5  years  
to  less  than  10  per   to  less  than  10  per  (2013) (2016) and  Health  Survey  (NDHS) births  for  a  specified  year   (2013) 2
(2016) Income  quintiles,  
and  Health  Survey  (NDHS)
Maternal Mortality Ratio Number of Maternal Deaths(2008,  2013,  
births  for  a  specified  year  
x100,000
2
Income  quintiles,   (2008,  2013,  
[NOH  2011-­‐2016] [NOH  2011-­‐2Mother's  age  at  
016] 2018) Mother's  age  at   2018)
1,000  live  births 1,000  live  births 16/1,000   Neonatal  Mortality  Rate  =  (Number  of  Neonatal  Deaths/Number  of   birth,  Birth   16/1,000   Number of Live Births Neonatal  Mortality  Rate  =  (Number  of  Neonatal  Deaths/Number  of   birth,  Birth  
(2008) Live  Births)  x  1,000 (2008) intervals Live  Births)  x  1,000 intervals
Neonatal  mortality  rate Impact Neonatal  13/1,000
mortality  rate Impact
10/1,000 13/1,000
National  Demographic   10/1,000 Number  of  infant  deaths  during  the  first  28  days  of  life  per  1,000  live  
National  Demographic   Number  of  infant  deaths  during  the  first  28  days   of  life  per  1,000  live   Location/  spatial,  
Location/  spatial,   PSA PSA
Every  5  years   Every  5  years  
(2013) (2016) (2013) (2016)
and  Health  Survey  (NDHS) and  Health  Survey  (NDHS)2 births  for  a  specified  year   2
births  for  a  specified  year   Income  quintiles,   Income  quintiles,   (2008,  2013,   (2008,  2013,  
Percentage  of  births   Outcome 73  (2013) 90  (2016) [NOH  2011-­‐2016] Percentage  of  births  
NDHS  [for  2008,  2013,   [NOH  2011-­‐ 2016]
Percentage  of  births  attended  by  skilled  health  personnel  (doctor,  
Outcome 73  (2013) 90  (2016)Location/  spatial,  
NDHS  [for  2008,  2013,   PSA Mother's  age  at  
Every  5  years   Mother's  age  at   Location/  spatial,   2018)
Percentage  of  births  attended  by  skilled  health  personnel  (doctor,   PSA 2018) Every  5  years  
attended  by  skilled  health   72  (2011) 16/1,000   2018]
85  (2015) 16/1,000  
nurse,  or  midwife,  excluding  trained  or  untrained  traditional  birth  
attended  by  skilled  health   72  (2011) Neonatal  
2018] Mortality  Rate  =  (Number  
Neonatal  Mortality  Rate  =  (Number  of  Neonatal  Deaths/Number  of  
85  (2015)Income  quintiles,   of  Neonatal   Deaths/Number  of   birth,  Birth  
birth,  Birth  
nurse,  or  midwife,  excluding  trained  or  untrained  traditional  birth   Income  quintiles,  
personnel 62  (2008) [NOH  2011-­‐2016] attendants),  for  reasons  relating  to  pregnancy  
personnel 62  (2008) [NOH  2011-­‐2Mother's  age  at  
016] 3
NDHS  (for  
attendants),  for  reasons  relating  to  pregnancy   Mother's  age  at   NDHS  (for  
(2008) (2008) Live  Births)  x  1,000 Live  Births)  x  1,000 intervals intervals
3

FHS  [for  2011,  2016] birth,  Place  of  


FHS  [for  2011,  2016] 2008,  2013,   birth,  Place  of   2008,  2013,  
Skilled  Birth  Attendance  =  (Number  of  births  attended  by  skilled   delivery  (health   2018)
Skilled  Birth  Attendance  =  (Number  of  births  attended  by  skilled   delivery  (health   2018)
health  personnel  during  the  period  /  Total  number  of  live  births   facility,   health  personnel  during  the  period  /  Total  number  of  live  births   facility,  
during  the  period)  x  100 elsewhere) FHS  (for  2011,  
during  the  period)  x  100 elsewhere) FHS  (for  2011,  
Percentage  of  births   Outcome Percentage   of  births  
73  (2013) Outcome
90  (2016) 73   (2013) 90  (2016)
NDHS  [for  2008,  2013,   NDHS  [for  2008,  2013,   Percentage  of  births  attended  by  skilled  health  
Percentage  of  births  attended  by  skilled  health  personnel  (doctor,   p ersonnel   ( doctor,  
Location/  spatial,  
2016) Location/  
PSA s patial,  
PSA
Every  5  years   Every  5  y2016)
ears  
attended  by  skilled  health   attended  72  (2011)
by  skilled  health   85  (2015) 72  (2011)
2018] 85  (2015) nurse,  or  midwife,  excluding  trained  or  untrained  traditional  birth  
2018] nurse,  or  midwife,  excluding  trained  or  untrained   traditional  birth  
Income  quintiles,   Income  quintiles,  
personnel 61  (2013)personnel [NOH  2011-­‐2016] 62  
62  (2008) NDHS  [for  2008,  2013,   (2008) [NOH  2011-­‐ 2016]attendants),  for  reasons  relating  to  pregnancy  
attendants),   for  reasons   relating  
PSA to  pregnancy  Every  5  years  
Mother's  age  at   Mother's  age  at   Location/  spatial,   NDHS  (for  PSA NDHS  (for  
3 3
Percentage  of  births   Outcome 90  (2016) Percentage  of  births  delivered  in  health  facilities  during  the  current  
Percentage  of  births   Outcome 61  (2013) 90  (2016)Location/  spatial,  
NDHS  [for  2008,  2013,   Percentage  of  births  delivered  in  health  facilities  during  the  current   Every  5  years  
delivered  in  health   55  (2011) 85  (2015) 2018] FHS  [for  2011,  2016]
year  
delivered  in  health   FHS  55  (2011)
[for  2011,  2016]85  (2015)Income  quintiles,  
4
2018] year   birth,  Place  of   birth,  Place  of   Income  quintiles,   2008,  2013,  
4
2008,  2013,  
facilities 44  (2008) [NOH  2011-­‐2016] facilities 44  (2008) Skilled  Birth  Attendance  =  (Number  of  births  aNDHS  (for  
[NOH  2011-­‐2Mother's  age  at  
016]
Skilled  Birth  Attendance  =  (Number  of  births  attended  by  skilled   ttended   by  skilled  
delivery  (health   delivery  (health   Mother's  age  at   2018) 2018) NDHS  (for  
FHS  [for  2011,  2016] Facility-­‐Based  Deliveries  =  (Number  of  births  registered  in  health   birth FHS  [for  2011,  2016] 2008,  2013,  
health  personnel  during  the  Facility-­‐
health  personnel  during  the  period  /  Total  number  of  live  births  
facilities  during  the  period  /  Number  of  Live  Births  during  the  period)  
period  Based  Deliveries  =  (Number  of  births  registered  in  health  
/  Total  number   of  live  births  
facility,  
2018)
facility,   birth 2008,  2013,  
facilities  during  the  period  /  Number  of  Live  Births  during  the  period)   2018)
x  100 during  the  period)  x  100 during  the  period)  x  100 x  100 elsewhere) elsewhere) FHS  (for  2011,   FHS  (for  2011,  
FHS  (for  2011,   2016) 2016) FHS  (for  2011,  
2016) 2016)

Percentage  of  births   Percentage  


Outcome of  births  
61  (2013) Outcome
90  (2016) 61   (2013) 90  (2016) Percentage  of  births  delivered  in  health  facilities  during  the  current  
NDHS  [for  2008,  2013,   NDHS  [for  2008,  2013,   Percentage  of  births  delivered  in  health  facilities   during  the  current  
Location/  spatial,   Location/  spatial,  
PSA PSA
Every  5  years   Every  5  years  
delivered  in  health   delivered  55  (2011)
in  health   85  (2015) 55  (2011)
2018] 85  (2015) year  
2018]
4
year   4 Income  quintiles,   Income  quintiles,  
facilities facilities 44  (2008) [NOH  2011-­‐2016] 44  (2008) [NOH  2011-­‐2016] Mother's  age  at   Mother's  age  at   NDHS  (for   NDHS  (for  
FHS  [for  2011,  2016] FHS  [for  
Facility-­‐ 2011,  2016] Facility-­‐Based  Deliveries  =  (Number  of  births  registered  
Based  Deliveries  =  (Number  of  births  registered  in  health   birth in  health   birth 2008,  2013,   2008,  2013,  
facilities  during  the  period  /  Number  of  Live  Births  during  the  period)  
facilities  during  the  period  /  Number  of  Live  Births  during  the  period)   2018) 2018)
x  100 x  100
FHS  (for  2011,   FHS  (for  2011,  
2016) 2016)

24 25
Indicator   Baselines   Indicator   Baselines   Disaggregation   Unit  Responsible  for  
Disaggregation   Data  
Unit   Frequency  
Responsible   for  Data  of   Frequency  of  
Key  Results IndicatorsKey  Results Indicators Targets  (Year) Data  Sources
Targets  (Year) Definitions  /  Method  of  CDefinitions  
Data  Sources omputation /  Method  of  Computation
Hierarchy (Year) Hierarchy (Year) Required Collection  
Required and  Reporting
Collection  and  Monitoring
Reporting Monitoring
Maternal  and  Neonatal   Percentage  of:  Maternal  and  Neonatal  
OutcomePercentage   60  (2013)
of:   85  (2015)
Outcome NDHS  [for  2008,  2013,  
60   (2013) 85  (2015) Percentage  of  births  seen  by  skilled  health  personnel  within  the  first  
NDHS  [for  2008,  2013,   Percentage  of  births  seen  by  skilled  health  personnel   Location/  spatial,   PSA
within  the  first   Location/  spatial,   Every  5  years  
PSA Every  5  years  
Health Health 56  (2008) [UHC-­‐HI-­‐5] 2018]
56  (2008) [UHC-­‐HI-­‐5] 24  hours  following  delivery  
2018] 24  
5
hours  following  delivery   5 Income  quintiles,   Income  quintiles,  
a.  mothers  receiving   a.  mothers  receiving   Mother's  age  at   Mother's  age  at   NDHS  (for   NDHS  (for  
1.  By  2016,  reduce  the   postpartum  care  by  skilled  
1.  By  2016,  reduce  the   postpartum  care  by  skilled   FHS  [for  2011,  2016] Post  Partum  Care  =  (Number  of  women  attended  within  the  first  24  
FHS  [for  2011,  2016] Post  Partum  Care  =  (Number  of  women  attended   birth,  Place  of  
within  the  first  24   birth,  Place  of   2008,  2013,   2008,  2013,  
maternal  mortality  ratio   health  personnel  (within  
maternal  mortality  ratio   health  personnel  (within   hours  postpartum  by  skilled  personnel  during  the  period  /  Number  of  
hours  postpartum  by  skilled  personnel  during  the   delivery  (health  
period  /  Number  of   delivery  (health   2018) 2018)
to  less  than  50  per   24  hours) to  less  than  50  per   24  hours) Live  Births  during  the  period)  x  100  
Live  Births  during  the  period)  x  100   facility,   facility,  
100,000  live  births 100,000  live  births elsewhere) elsewhere) FHS  (for  2011,   FHS  (for  2011,  
b.  newborns  receiving   b.  newborns  receiving   2016) 2016)
2.  By  2016,  reduce  the   postnatal  care  by  SHPs  
2.  By  2016,  reduce  the   postnatal  care  by  SHPs  
neonatal  mortality  rate   (within  24  hours)
neonatal  mortality  rate   (within  24  hours)
to  less  than  10  per   to  less  than  10  per  
Ratio  of  at  least  Level  1   Output Ratio  of  ac/o  DOH 1:100,000
t  least  Level  1   Output Program  Data/  Reports
c/o  DOH 1:100,000 Ratio  =  1  :  (Population  /  Number  of  at  least  Level  1*  health  facilities)
Program  Data/  Reports Location/  spatial,  
Ratio  =  1  :  (Population  /  Number  of  at  least  Level   1*  health  facilities) Department  of  Health  (DOH),  
Location/   Annual
spatial,   Department  of  Health   (DOH),   Annual
1,000  live  births 1,000  live  births
health  facilities  to   health  facilities  to   Type  of  facility   Philipine  Health  Insurance  
Type   of  facility   Philipine  Health  Insurance  
population population *  based  on  facility  classification  provided  for  under  
*  based  on  facility  classification  provided  for  under  DOH  AO  2012-­‐ DOH  AO  2012-­‐
(e.g.  hospital   (e.g.  Corporation  (Philhealth)
hospital   Corporation  (Philhealth)
0012 0012 level) level)
Proxies  (or  associated   Proxies  (or  associated  
indicators): indicators): *  by  type  of   *  by  type  of  
a.  No.  of  cities/   a.  No.  of  cities/   facility  (RHU,   facility  (RHU,  
municipalities  with  at   municipalities  with  at   infirmary)  for   infirmary)  for  
least  1  Philhealth-­‐ least  1  Philhealth-­‐ MCP/PCB   MCP/PCB  
accredited  (MCP  and  PCB)   accredited  (MCP  and  PCB)   accreditation accreditation
lying-­‐in  facility lying-­‐in  facility

b.  PhilHealth   b.  PhilHealth  
reimbursement  for  MCP,   reimbursement  for  MCP,  
newborn  care,  cesarean   newborn  care,  cesarean  
section section

Ratio  of  public  health   Output Ratio  o62.3  :  10,000


f  public  health   Output
To  achieve  MDGs   62.3  :  10,000 To  achieve  MDGs  Ratio  =  1  :  (Population  /  Number  of  type  of  health  professional)
Program  Data/  Reports,   Program  Data/  Reports,   Ratio  =  1  :  (Population  /  Number  of  type  of  health   professional)
Location/  spatial,   Location/  
DOH-­‐Hspatial,   DOH-­‐HHRDB,  Philhealth
HRDB,  Philhealth Annual Annual
professionals  to   professionals   to  
(2010) 4  and  5  =  23   (2010) 4  and  5  =  23  
Field  Health  Services   Field  Health  Services   Type  of  Health   Type  of  Health  
population population[WHO  and   (composite  of   [WHO   and   (composite  of  
Information  System   Information  System   Professional Professional
Global  Health   doctors,  nurses,   Global  
(FHSIS)Health   doctors,  nurses,   (FHSIS)
Workforce   midwives)  :10,000  Workforce   midwives)  :10,000  
Alliance   14
Alliance   14

Report]   13 Report]   13
DOH's  current   DOH's  current  
general   general  
population   population  
targets: targets:

Doctors  =   Doctors  =  
1:20,000 1:20,000

Nurses  =  1:20,000 Nurses  =  1:20,000

Midwives  =   Midwives  =  
1:5,000 1:5,000

BHWs  =  1:20  HHs BHWs  =  1:20  HHs

26 27
Indicator   Baselines   Indicator   Baselines   Disaggregation   Disaggregation   Unit  
Unit  Responsible  for   Responsible  
Data   for  Data  of  
Frequency   Frequency  of  
Key  Results IndicatorsKey  Results Indicators Targets  (Year) Targets  (Year)
Data  Sources Data  Sources
Definitions  /  Method  of  CDefinitions  
omputation /  Method  of  Computation
Hierarchy (Year) Hierarchy (Year) Required Collection   Collection  and  Monitoring
Required and  Reporting Reporting Monitoring
Maternal  
Family   and  Neonatal  
Planning Maternal  
Wanted  fertility   rate  
Family   vas.  
nd  Neonatal  
Planning Impact Wanted  f2.2   ertility  
vs.  3rate  
.0   vs.   Impact
None 2.2   vs.  3.0  
NDHS   [for  2008,  2None
013,   NDHS  
Total   [for  2008,  
fertility   rate  2(013,   Total  fertility  
TFR)  is  defined   as  the  rate   (TFR)  
total   is  defined  
number   as  the  at  otal  number  
of  births   of  births  
Location/   a  
spatial,   Location/  spatial,  
PSA PSA
Every  5  years   Every  5  years  
Health Total  fertility  Health
rate Total  fertility  
(2013)rate (2013)
2018] 2018] would  have  by  the  ewoman  
woman   nd  of  hwer  
ould   have  by  the  peeriod  
childbearing   nd  of  ihf  er  
she  childbearing   period  
were   Income   if  she  were   Income  quintiles
quintiles
By  2016,  ensure   By  2016,  ensure   to  pass  through  those  years  to  bpearing  
ass  through  
children  those  
at  ythe  
ears  currently  
bearing  children  at  the  currently   NDHS  (for   NDHS  (for  
1.  By  2016,  
universal   reduce  
access   to  the   1.  By  2016,  
universal   reduce  
access   to  the   2.4  vs.  3.3 2.4   vs.  [3for  
FHS   .3 2011,  2016] FHS  [for  2a011,  
observed   2016] fertility  
ge-­‐specific   observed  
rates  (aASFRs).  
ge-­‐specific  
The  fertility  
TFR  is  roates   (ASFRs).  
btained   by   The  TFR  is  obtained  by   2008,  2013,   2008,  2013,  
maternal   mortality  
comprehensive   ratio  
family   maternal   mortality  
comprehensive   ratio  
family   (2008) (2008) summing  the  ASFRs  and  multiplying  summing  tbhe  y  fAive.  
SFRs  6 and  multiplying  by  five.   6 2018) 2018)
to  less  than  
planning   50  per  
information   to  less  than  
planning   50  per  
information  
100,000  
and   live  beirths
services,   specially   100,000  
and   live  beirths
services,   specially   Total  wanted  
Total  wanted  fertility  rate  represents   fertility  
the   level  orate   represents  
f  fertility   that  the  level  of  fertility  that   FHS  (for  2011,   FHS  (for  2011,  
among  population   among  population   theoretically  would  result  if  theoretically  
all  unwanted   would   result  
births   if  apll  revented  
were   unwanted  (i.e.  
births  were  prevented  (i.e.   2016) 2016)
2.   By  2016,  
groups   with  rheduce   the  
igh  unmet   2.   By  2016,  
groups   with  rheduce   the  
igh  unmet   excluded  
excluded  from  the  numerator).   from  the  numerator).  
A  comparison   of  the  TFR  Aw  cith  
omparison  
wanted  of  the  TFR  with  wanted  
neonatal  
need mortality  rate   neonatal  
need mortality  rate   fertility  indicates  the  potential   demographic  
fertility   indicates  the   impact   of  tdhe  
potential   emographic  impact  of  the  
to  less  than  10  per   to  less  than  10  per   elimination  of  all  unwanted  elimination  
births.  For  otf  his  
all  upnwanted  
urpose,  ubnwanted  
irths.  For  tbhis  
irths  
purpose,  unwanted  births  
1,000  live  births 1,000  live  births are  defined  as  those  that  exceed   the  naumber  
are  defined   s  those  ctonsidered  
hat  exceed  itdeal   by  the  considered  ideal  by  the  
he  number  
respondent.  Women  who  drespondent.  
id  not  report   a  numeric  
Women   who  dideal  
id  not  family  
report  size  
a  numeric  ideal  family  size  
were  assumed  to  want  all  their  
were  bairths.
ssumed  to  want  all  their  births.

Contraceptive  prevalence   OutcomeContraceptive  


Currently   Currently  
prevalence   Outcome married  Currently  
NDHS  [for  2Currently  
008,  2013,  
married  Proportion  
NDHS  [for  2o008,  
f  women  
2013,  of  reproductive  
Proportion  oaf  ge   (15-­‐4o9)  
women   f  rweproductive  
ho  are  using   age  (or   Age,  
(15-­‐49)   Location/  
who   are  using  (or   Age,  Location/  PSA Every  5  years  
PSA Every  5  years  
rate  (modern  methods) married  
rate  (modern   methods) women:   2018]
married   women:   whose  2018] partner  is  using)  a  mwhose  
odern  pcartner  
ontraceptive  
is  using)  ma  ethod  
modern   at  contraceptive  
a  given   spatial,  
method  Taype  t  a  goiven  
f   spatial,  Type  of  
women:   65  (2016) women:   65  (2016) point  in  time  7   point  in  time  7   Modern  Method,   Modern  Method,   NDHS  (for   NDHS  (for  
37.6  (2013) 63  (2015) 37.6  FHS   [for  2011,  263  
(2013) 016](2015) FHS  [for  2011,  2016] Source  of  method,   Source  of  method,   2008,  2013,   2008,  2013,  
34.0  (2008) [NOH  2011-­‐2016]34.0  (2008) [NOH  2011-­‐2016]CPR  =  (Number  of  women  oCPR   f  reproductive  
=  (Number  oaf  ge   at  risk  
women   f  pregnancy  age  aIncome  
of  oreproductive   t  risk  of  pqregnancy  
uintiles Income  quintiles 2018) 2018)
who  are  using  [or  whose  partner  
who  are  is  uusing  
sing]   a  w
[or   mhose  
odern   contraceptive  
partner   is  using]  a  modern  contraceptive  
All  women:   All  women:   method  at  a  given  point  in  tmethod  
ime  /    Naumber  
t  a  given  opf  oint  
women   of  r/eproductive  
in  time      Number  of  women  of  reproductive   FHS  (for  2011,   FHS  (for  2011,  
23.5  (2013) 23.5  (2013) age  at  risk  of  pregnancy  at  tage  
he  asame  
t  risk  pooint   in  time)  
f  pregnancy   at  xt  he  
100same  point  in  time)  x  100 2016) 2016)
21.8  (2008) 21.8  (2008)

Unmet  need  for  family   OutcomeUnmet  n17.5  


eed  f(or  
2013)family   Target  
Outcomeno.  of   17.5  
NDHS   [for  2008,  
(2013) 2013,  
Target   no.  of   Refers  
NDHS  to  
[for   2008,  2013,  
currently   married  fRefers  
ecund  tw o  omen   (15-­‐m4arried  
currently   9)  who   are  nwot  
fecund   (15-­‐49)  Age,  
using  
omen   who  Laocation/  
re  not  using   Age,  Location/  PSA Every  5  years  
PSA Every  5  years  
planning planning19.3  (2011) reduction  in   19.3  
2018]
(2011) reduction  in   contraception  
2018] but  who  wish  contraception  
to  postpone  tbhe   ut  nwext  
ho  wbish  
irth  to  (spacing)  
postpone  otr  he   next  spatial,  
stop   Income  
birth  (spacing)   or  stop   spatial,  Income  
22.3  (2008) unmet  need  for  22.3  (2008) unmet  need  for   childbearing  altogether  (limiting).   Specifically,  
childbearing   women  
altogether   are  considered  
(limiting).   Specifically,  to   quintiles
women   are  considered  to   quintiles NDHS  (for   NDHS  (for  
FP  among  poor   FHS  [for  2011,   FP  2a016]
mong  poor   have  
FHS  u[for  
nmet  2011,   2016]
need   for  spacing  have  
if  they   are:  need  
unmet   8
for  spacing  if  they  are:  8 2008,  2013,   2008,  2013,  
WRA  =  2,253,999   WRA  =  2,253,999   2018) 2018)
(2015)   (2015)   •  At  risk  of  becoming  pregnant,  
•  At  nrot  
isk  uosing   contraception,  
f  becoming   pregnant,  annd   ot  uesing  
ither  contraception,  
do   and  either  do  
[UHC-­‐HI-­‐5] [UHC-­‐HI-­‐5] not  want  to  become  pregnant   not  wwithin  
ant  tto  he   next  two  
become   years,  woithin  
pregnant   r  are  the  
unsure  
next  tiwo  
f   years,  or  are  unsure  if   FHS  (for  2011,   FHS  (for  2011,  
or  when  they  want  to  become   or  pwregnant.
hen  they  want  to  become  pregnant. 2016) 2016)
•  Pregnant  with  a  mistimed  p•  regnancy.
Pregnant  with  a  mistimed  pregnancy.
•  Postpartum  amenorrheic  for   •  Puostpartum  
p  to  two  yaears   following  
menorrheic   for  uap    mto  
istimed  
two  years  following  a  mistimed  
birth  and  not  using  contraception.
birth  and  not  using  contraception.

Women  are  considered  to  have   unmet  


Women   are  nceed   for  limiting  
onsidered   to  have  if  utnmet  
hey  anre: eed  for  limiting  if  they  are:
•  At  risk  of  becoming  pregnant,  
•  At  nrot  
isk  uosing   contraception,  
f  becoming   pregnant,  annd   ot  uwsing  
ant  cnontraception,  
o   and  want  no  
(more)  children. (more)  children.
•  Pregnant  with  an  unwanted  •  Ppregnant  
regnancy. with  an  unwanted  pregnancy.
•  Postpartum  amenorrheic  for  •  Puostpartum  
p  to  two  yaears   following  
menorrheic   for  uap  n  tuo  nwanted  
two  years  following  an  unwanted  
birth  and  not  using  contraception.
birth  and  not  using  contraception.

%  Unmet  Need  for  FP  =  %  Unmet  Need  


%  Unmet   for  fLor  
Need   imiting  
FP  =  %+  U  %nmet  
 Unmet   Nfeed  
Need   for   +  %  Unmet  Need  for  
or  Limiting  
Spacing Spacing

28 29
Indicator   Baselines   Indicator   Baselines   Disaggregation   Unit  Responsible  for  
Disaggregation   Data  
Unit   Frequency  
Responsible   for  Data  of   Frequency  of  
Key  Results IndicatorsKey  Results Indicators Targets  (Year) Targets  (Year)
Data  Sources Data  Sources
Definitions  /  Method  of  CDefinitions  
omputation /  Method  of  Computation
Hierarchy (Year) Hierarchy (Year) Required Collection  and  Monitoring
Required and  Reporting
Collection   Reporting Monitoring
Maternal  and  Neonatal   Maternal  and  Neonatal  
Percentage  of  RHUs  (with   Output Percentage   of  RHUs  (with   Output
65%  with  no   c/o  DOH 65%  Family  Planning  Logistics  
with  no   c/o  DOH Family  Planning  Logistics   Pertains  to  the  total  number  and  proportion  of  fLocation/  spatial,  
Pertains  to  the  total  number  and  proportion  of  functioning   unctioning   Location/  spatial,  
DOH DOH Annual Annual
Health Health
possible  expansion  to   possible   expansion  to  
stock  out  of   stock  Management  and  Stock  
out  of   Management  and  Stock   facilities/service  
facilities/service  sites  with  no  stock-­‐ sites  with  no  stock-­‐outs  of  at  least  
outs  of  at  least  four  modern   four  modern  
Type  of   Type  of  
include  hospitals)  with  no   include   hospitals)  with  
DMPA  (2011) 9
no   DMPA   (2011) 9
Status  Report Status  Report contraceptives  (pills,  IUD,  DMPA,  
contraceptives  (pills,  IUD,  DMPA,  condom)  [with  sub-­‐ condom)  [with  commodity
dermal  implants   sub-­‐dermal  implants   commodity
1.  By  2016,  reduce  the   stock-­‐out  of  1.  By  2016,  reduce  the   stock-­‐out  of   for  inclusion  in  future  monitoring]  within  
for  inclusion  in  future  monitoring]  within  the  past  6  months   10
the  past  6  months   10
maternal  mortality  ratio   maternal  mortality  ratio   contraceptives  
contraceptives  in  the  last   in  the  last  
70%  with  no   70%  with  no  
to  less  than  50  per   to  less  than  50  per  
six  months  (pills,  IUD,   six  months   (pills,  IUD,  
stock  out  of   stock  out  of   Numerator:  Total  number  of  functioning  facilities/  service  sites  with  
Numerator:  Total  number  of  functioning  facilities/  service  sites  with  
100,000  live  births DMPA,  condom) 100,000  live  births DMPA,   condom)
COC  and   COC  and   no  stock-­‐outs  of  at  least  four  modern  contraceptives  within  the  past  
no  stock-­‐outs  of  at  least  four  modern  contraceptives  within  the  past  
condoms   condoms   6  months 6  months
2.  By  2016,  reduce  the   2.  By  2016,  reduce  the   (2011) 9 (2011) 9
neonatal  mortality  rate   neonatal  mortality  rate   Denominator:  Total  number  of  health  facilities  where  these  
Denominator:  Total  number  of  health  facilities  where  these  
to  less  than  10  per   to  less  than  10  per   contraceptives  should  be  accessible
contraceptives  should  be  accessible
1,000  live  births 1,000  live  births

No.  of  new  FP  acceptors Output No.  of  new  FP  acceptorsTarget  no.  of  
Output Target  no.  of  
*  Program  Data/  Reports *  Program  Data/  Reports Number  of  clients  using  a  family  planning  method  
Number  of  clients  using  a  family  planning  method  for  the  first  time  or   for  the  first  time  or   Age,  Location/  DOH
Age,  Location/   DOH Annual Annual
modern  FP   modern  FP   a  client  who  has  never  accepted  any  moden  method  
a  client  who  has  never  accepted  any  moden  method  at  any  clinic   at  any  clinic  
spatial,  Income   spatial,  Income  
method  users   FHSIS method  users   before
FHSIS before quintiles,  Type  of   quintiles,  Type  of  
among  poor  WRA   among  poor  WRA   method,  Source  of   method,  Source  of  
=  2,253,999   =  2,253,999   method/   method/  
(2015)   (2015)   commodity  (e.g.   commodity  (e.g.  
[UHC-­‐HI-­‐5] [UHC-­‐HI-­‐5] public,  private) public,  private)

Adolescent  Sexual  and   Adolescent  birth  rate Impact


Adolescent  Sexual   and   Adolescent   birth  rate
57/1,000   Impact
50   57/1,000   50  
NDHS  [for  2008,  2013,   NDHS  [for  2008,  2013,   Annual  number  of  live  births  to  adolescent  women  
Annual  number  of  live  births  to  adolescent  women  per  1,000   per  1,000  
Age,  Location/   Age,  Location/  PSA PSA
Every  5  years   Every  5  years  
Reproductive  Health Reproductive  Health (2013) (2018) (2013)
2018] (2018) 2018] adolescent  women.  The  adolescent  birth  rate  is  spatial,  Income  
adolescent  women.  The  adolescent  birth  rate  is  also  referred  to  as   also  referred  to  as   spatial,  Income  
54/1,000   [based  on   54/1,000   [based  on   the  age-­‐specific  fertility  rate  for  women  aged  15–19.  
the  age-­‐specific  fertility  rate  11for  women  aged  15–19.  
quintiles
11
quintiles NDHS  (for   NDHS  (for  
Increased  priority  on   Increased  priority  on   (2011) discussions  during   (2011) discussions  during   FHS  [for  2011,  2016]
FHS  [for  2011,  2016] 2008,  2013,   2008,  2013,  
adolescents,  especially   adolescents,  especially   54/1,000   RPRH  Law  M&E   54/1,000   RPRH  Law  M&E   2018) 2018)
on  very  young   on  very  young   (2008) Framework   (2008) Framework   Civil  Registration  System  
Civil  Registration  System   Number of live births to adolescent women
Adolescent birth rate x1,000
adolescents,  in  national   adolescents,  in  national   Workshop,  16   [PSA  to  provide  guidance  
Workshop,  16   [PSA  to  provide  guidance   Number of adolescent women FHS  (for  2011,   FHS  (for  2011,  
development  policies   development  policies   June  2015] June  2015]
on  how  data  can  be   on  how  data  can  be   2016) 2016)
and  programmes,   and  programmes,   extracted  and  analyzed  at   extracted  and  analyzed  at  
particularly  increased   particularly  increased   the  local  level] the  local  level] Annual  for  the   Annual  for  the  
availability  of   availability  of   Civil   Civil  
comprehensive   comprehensive   Registration   Registration  
sexuality  education  and   sexuality  education  and   System System
sexual  and  reproductive   sexual  and  reproductive  
health  services health  services
Percentage  who  had   Outcome Percentage   who  had  
2.2  (2013) Outcome
2.0   2.2   (2013) 2.0  
NDHS  [for  2008,  2013,   NDHS  [for  2008,  2013,   Percentage  24  who  had  sexual  intercourse  
Percentage  of  young  women  age  15-­‐ of  young  women  age  15-­‐24  who  had  Age,  Location/  
sexual  intercourse   Age,  Location/  PSA PSA
Every  5  years   Every  5  years  
sexual  intercourse  before   sexual  intercourse  
2.1  (2008)before   (2018) 2.1   (2008)
2018] (2018) 2018]
before  age  15 before  age  15 spatial,  Income   spatial,  Income  
age  15 age  15 [based  on   [based  on   quintiles,   quintiles,   NDHS  (for   NDHS  (for  
discussions  during   discussions  during   Knowledge  of   Knowledge  of   2008,  2013,   2008,  2013,  
RPRH  Law  M&E   RPRH  Law  M&E   condom  source condom  source 2018) 2018)
Framework   Framework  
Workshop,  16   Workshop,  16  
June  2015] June  2015]

Percentage  o78
Percentage  of  adolescent   Outcome f  adolescent   Outcome
60   78 60  
Young  Adult  Fertility  and   Young  Adult  Fertility  and   Percentage  of  youth  who  did  not  use  any  form  oSex,  Age,  
Percentage  of  youth  who  did  not  use  any  form  of  protection  during   f  protection  during   Sex,  DOH,  POPCOM,  DepEd
Age,   DOH,  POPCOM,   DepEd
Every  5  years Every  5  years
(15-­‐19)  who  did  not  use   (15-­‐19)  who   did  n12ot  use  
(2013) (2018) (2013) (2018)
Sexuality  Study  (YAFS)
12
Sexuality  Study  (YAFS)
sexual  initiation sexual  initiation Location/  spatial Location/  spatial
any  form  of  protection   any  form  of  protection  
during  first  sexual   during  first  sexual  
intercourse intercourse

30 31
Indicator   Baselines   Indicator   Baselines   Disaggregation   Unit  Responsible  for  
Disaggregation   Data  
Unit   Frequency  
Responsible   for  Data  of   Frequency  of  
Key  Results IndicatorsKey  Results Indicators Targets  (Year) Data  STargets  
ources (Year) Definitions  /  Method  of  CDefinitions  
Data  Sources omputation /  Method  of  Computation
Hierarchy (Year) Hierarchy (Year) Required Collection  
Required and  Reporting Collection  and  Monitoring
Reporting Monitoring
Maternal  and  Neonatal   No.  of  schools  and  other  
Maternal  and  Neonatal  
Output No.  of  schools  0  and  other   Pilot-­‐
OutputSchools   0   Annual  Reports
Pilot-­‐Schools   No.  of  schools  and  other  alternative  learning  facilities  including  teen  
Annual  Reports No.  of  schools  and  other  alternative  learning  facilities   -­‐  (Schools)  Public  
including  teen   -­‐  (DepEd-­‐
Schools)  BPureau  of  Secondary  
ublic   DepEd-­‐Bureau  of  SAnnual
econdary   Annual
Health Health
alternative  learning   alternative  (2015)
learning   (2016)     (2015) (2016)     centers    that  provide  CSE  minimum  standards  
centers    that  provide  CSE  minimum  standards   and  Private  School            and   Education,  POPCOM,  TESDA-­‐
Private  School             Education,  POPCOM,  TESDA-­‐
facilities  including  teen   facilities  including  teen   DOLE,  CSOs DOLE,  CSOs
1.  By  2016,  reduce  the   centers    that  provide  CSE  
1.  By  2016,  reduce  the   centers    that  provide  CSE   100%  (2017) 100%  (2017) -­‐  (Teen  Centers)   -­‐  (Teen  Centers)  
maternal  mortality  ratio   minimum  standards  
maternal  mortality  ratio   minimum  standards   School-­‐based,   School-­‐based,  
to  less  than  50  per   to  less  than  50  per   Community-­‐ Community-­‐
100,000  live  births 100,000  live  births Based,  CSO-­‐ Based,  CSO-­‐
initiated initiated
2.  By  2016,  reduce  the   2.  By  2016,  reduce  the  
neonatal  mortality  rate   neonatal  mortality  rate  
to  less  than  10  per   to  less  than  10  per  
1,000  live  births 1,000  live  births
No.  of  adolescents  (10-­‐ 19)   Output No.  of  aDesk  Review 20%  yearly   Desk  
dolescents  (10-­‐19)   Output Program  reports,clinic  
Review 20%  yearly   No.  of  adolescents  (10-­‐
Program  reports,clinic   19)    receiving  ASRH  services,  including  
No.  of  adolescents  (10-­‐19)    receiving  ASRH  services,   Sex,  Age,  ISY  or  
including   DepEd-­‐ Bureau  of  Learner  Support  
Sex,  Age,   ISY  or   DepEd-­‐Bureau  of  Learner   Annual Support   Annual
receiving  ASRH  services,   receiving  ASRH  services,   increase reports,  hospital  records,  
increase counselling
reports,  hospital  records,   counselling OSY OSY services,  DOH services,  DOH
including  counselling including  counselling etc. etc.
-­‐DOH  minimum  package  for  ASRH,  HPV  vaccination,  referral
-­‐DOH  minimum  package  for  ASRH,  HPV  vaccination,  referral
-­‐  Profiling  using  the  HEADSS  Tool  (Home,  Education  and  employment,  
-­‐  Profiling  using  the  HEADSS  Tool  (Home,  Education  and  employment,  
Activities,  Drugs,  Sexuality,  Suicide/Depression,  Safety)
Activities,  Drugs,  Sexuality,  Suicide/Depression,  Safety)

STI  and  HIV/AIDS HIV  incidence  among  


STI  and  HIV/AIDSImpact HIV  incidence  
21  cases  a  day  
among   Impact Philippine  HIV  and  AIDS  
21  cases   a  day   Number  of  new  HIV  cases  reported  at  a  given  time
Philippine  HIV  and  AIDS   Number  of  new  HIV  cases  reported  at  a  given  time Location,  sex,  age,   Department  of  Health  -­‐  
Location,  sex,  age,   Department   Monthly
of  Health   -­‐   Monthly
population reported  (with  
population Registry
reported   (with   Registry mode  of   Epidemiology  Bureau
mode  of   Epidemiology  Bureau
By  2016,  reduce  the   By  2016,  reduce  the   current   current   transmission transmission
spread  of  HIV  esp.   spread  of  HIV  esp.   prevalence  at   prevalence  at  
among  key  affected   among  key  affected   72  per   72  per  
population  by   population  by   100,000) 100,000)
increasing  the   increasing  the   Outcome
Condom  use  at  last  higher   Condom   use  1a3.4%;  
PWID-­‐ t  last  higher   Outcome
80%   PWID-­‐ 13.4%;  
Integrated  HIV  and   80%   Integrated  HIV  and   Percentage  of  respondents  who  say  they  have  uLocation,  age,  sex,  
Percentage  of  respondents  who  say  they  have  used  a  condom  the   sed  a  condom  the   Location,   age,  sex,   Department  
Department  of  Health  -­‐   oEvery  2  years
f  Health  -­‐   Every  2  years
availability,  coverage   availability,  coverage   risks  sMSM-­‐
risks  sex  among  key   ex  among   key  
40.7%;   (2015) MSM-­‐Behavior  Serologic  
40.7%;   (2015) Behavior  Serologic   last  time  
last  time  they  had  sex  with  a  non-­‐ mtarital,  non-­‐
hey  had  sex  cw ith  a  non-­‐marital,  non-­‐ckey  population
ohabiting  partner,  of   ohabiting  partner,  of   key  pEpidemiology  Bureau
opulation Epidemiology  Bureau
and  impact  of  key   and  impact  of  key  
affected  populations affected  
SW-­‐p4opulations
7.4% SW-­‐4Surveillance  (IHBSS)  
[National  Sector   7.4% [National  Sector   those  who  have  had  sex  with  such  a  partner  in  the  last  12  months
Surveillance  (IHBSS)   those  who  have  had  sex  with  such  a  partner  in  the  last  12  months
interventions  (i.e.   interventions  (i.e.   Plan  for  HIV/AIDS,   Report Plan  for  HIV/AIDS,   Report
prevention,  testing,   prevention,  testing,   NASPCP] NASPCP]
ART,  and  care)     ART,  and  care)    

HEALTH  SECTOR  PLAN   HEALTH  SECTOR  POutput


Key  affected  populations   LAN   Key  affected  
PWID-­‐populations  
6.3%;   Output
40%   PWID-­‐
IHBSS 6.3%;   40%   IHBSS Percentage  of  key  affected  populations  accessing  
Percentage  of  key  affected  populations  accessing  voluntary   voluntary  
Key  population,   Key  pDepartment  of  Health  -­‐
opulation,   Department  
  oEvery  2  years
f  Health  -­‐   Every  2  years
2015-­‐2017:  BY  2017,   2015-­‐2017:  BY  2017,   accessing  
accessing  voluntary   voluntary  
MSM-­‐ 9.3%;  SW-­‐ (2015) MSM-­‐9.3%;  SW-­‐ (2015) counseling  and  testing  (VCT)  services
counseling  and  testing  (VCT)  services sex,  age,  location sex,  aEpidemiology  Bureau
ge,  location Epidemiology  Bureau
THE  COUNTRY  WILL   THE  COUNTRY  WILL  
counseling  and  testing   counseling  12.6%
and  testing   12.6%
HAVE  MAINTAINED  A   HAVE  MAINTAINED  A   (VCT)  services
(VCT)  services
PREVALENCE  OF  LESS   PREVALENCE  OF  LESS  
THAN  66  CASES  PER   THAN  66  CASES  PER  
100,000  POPULATION   100,000  POPULATION  
Percentage  of  population   Output Percentage  86% of  population   Output
90%   86% 90%  
Philippine  HIV  and  AIDS   Philippine  HIV  and  AIDS   Percentage  of  population  with  advanced  HIV  infection  
Percentage  of  population  with  advanced  HIV  infection  with  access  to   with  access  to   Key  pDepartment  of  Health  -­‐
Key  population,   opulation,   Department  
  of  H ealth  -­‐  
Monthly Monthly
BY  PREVENTING  THE   BY  PREVENTING  THE  
with  advanced  HIV   with  advanced  
(2014) HIV   (2016) (2014)
Registry (2016) Registry
antiretroviral  drugs antiretroviral  drugs sex,  age,  location sex,  aEpidemiology  Bureau
ge,  location Epidemiology  Bureau
FURTHER  SPREAD  OF   FURTHER  SPREAD  OF  
infection  with  access  to   infection  with  access  to  
HIV  INFECTION  AND   HIV  INFECTION  AND  
antiretroviral  drugs antiretroviral  drugs
REDUCING  THE  IMPACT   REDUCING  THE  IMPACT  
OF  THE  DISEASE  ON   OF  THE  DISEASE  ON  
INDIVIDUALS,  FAMILIES,   INDIVIDUALS,  FAMILIES,  
SECTORS,  AND   SECTORS,  AND   Output Percentage  of  Social  
Percentage  of  Social   Output *Program  Data *Program  Data Availability  of  condom  for  the  past  six  (6)  months.  
Availability  of  condom  for  the  past  six  (6)  months.   Location/  spatial Location/  DOH  -­‐
spatial  NASPCP DOH  -­‐  NASPCP
Annual Annual
COMMUNITIES COMMUNITIES
Hygiene  Clinics  with  no   Hygiene  Clinics  with  no  
stock-­‐out  of  condom  in   stock-­‐out  of  condom  in  
the  last  six  months   the  last  six  months  

32 33
Indicator   Baselines   Indicator   Baselines   Disaggregation  
Unit  Responsible  for  
Disaggregation   Data  
Unit   Frequency  
Responsible  for  Data  of   Frequency  of  
Key  Results IndicatorsKey  Results Indicators Targets  (Year) Data  Sources
Targets  (Year) Definitions  /  Method  of  CDefinitions  
Data  Sources omputation /  Method  of  Computation
Hierarchy (Year) Hierarchy (Year) Collection  
Required and  Reporting
Required Collection  and  Monitoring
Reporting Monitoring
Maternal  
Gender-­‐ and  NVeonatal  
Based   Maternal  
iolence Prevalence  of  physical  
Gender-­‐ and  NVeonatal  
Based   Impact Prevalence  of  physical  
iolence 7.1   Decrease  
Impact NDHS  [for  2008,  2013,  
7.1   Decrease   Percentage  of  ever-­‐ married  women  (15-­‐
NDHS  [for  2008,  2013,   49)  who  have  experienced  
Percentage  of  ever-­‐ Age,  Residence  
Age,  Residence  PSA
married  women  (15-­‐49)  who  have  experienced   Every  5  years  
PSA Every  5  years  
Health Health
and/or  sexual  violence  by   (2013)
and/or  sexual  violence  by   2018]
(2013) physical  or  sexual  violence  by  husband/  partner  in  the  past  12  
2018] (urban/rural),  
physical  or  sexual  violence  by  husband/  partner  in  the  past  12  
(urban/rural),  
Reduce  physical  and   intimate  partner
Reduce  physical  and   intimate  partner months months Region,  Marital  
Region,  Marital   NDHS  (for   NDHS  (for  
1.  By  2016,  reduce  the  
sexual  forms  of  gender-­‐ 1.  By  2016,  reduce  the  
sexual  forms  of  gender-­‐ status,  No.  of  
status,  No.  of   2008,  2013,   2008,  2013,  
maternal  mortality  ratio  
based  violence maternal  mortality  ratio  
based  violence children,  
children,   2018) 2018)
to  less  than  50  per   to  less  than  50  per   Employment,  
Employment,  
100,000  live  births 100,000  live  births Education,  Wealth  
Education,  Wealth  
quintile,  during  
quintile,  during  
2.  By  2016,  reduce  the   2.  By  2016,  reduce  the   pregnancy
pregnancy
neonatal  mortality  rate   Prevalance  of  sexual  
neonatal  mortality  rate  
Impact Prevalance  of  sexual  
18.4%  (2013)   Decrease   18.4%  (2013)  
Impact NDHS  [for  2008,  2013,  
Decrease   Proportion  of  women  (15-­‐
NDHS  [for  2008,  2013,   4Proportion  of  women  (15-­‐
9)  who  have  experienced  sexual  violence   By  perpetrator,  
By  perpetrator,  PSA
49)  who  have  experienced  sexual  violence   Every  5  years  
PSA Every  5  years  
to  less  than  10  per   to  less  than  10  per  
violence  by  a  non-­‐ partner 39.2%(2008)
violence  by  a  non-­‐ partner 2018]
39.2%(2008) by  non-­‐
2018] partner   by  non-­‐partner   marital  status  
marital  status  
1,000  live  births 1,000  live  births NDHS  (for   NDHS  (for  
2008,  2013,   2008,  2013,  
2018) 2018)
Percentage  of  women  (15-­‐ Outcome 13%  (2013)  
Percentage  of  women  (15-­‐ Decrease   13%  (2013)  
Outcome NDHS  [for  2008,  2013,  
Decrease   Percentage  of  women  age  15-­‐
NDHS  [for  2008,  2013,   49  who  agree  with  at  least  one  
Percentage  of  women  age  15-­‐ Age,  Residence  
49  who  agree  with  at  least  one   Age,  Residence  PSA Every  5  years  
PSA Every  5  years  
49)  who  agree  that  a   14.1  %(2008)
49)  who  agree  that  a   2018]
14.1  %(2008) specified  reason  
2018] specified  reason   (urban/rural),   (urban/rural),  
husband  is  justified  in   husband  is  justified  in   Region,  Marital   Region,  Marital   NDHS  (for   NDHS  (for  
hitting  or  beating  his  wife   hitting  or  beating  his  wife   status,  No.  of   status,  No.  of   2008,  2013,   2008,  2013,  
for  specific  reasons for  specific  reasons children,   children,   2018) 2018)
Employment,   Employment,  
Education,  Wealth   Education,  Wealth  
quintile,  by   quintile,  by  
reason reason

Percentage  of  VAWC  cases   Outcome 51%  (9,286)  of  


Percentage  of  VAWC  cases   Increase   51%  (9,286)  of  
Outcome PNP,  DOJ,  DILG  (for  
Increase   No.  of  VAWC  cases  filed  in  court/  No.  of  reported  VAWC  cases
PNP,  DOJ,  DILG  (for   By  region
No.  of  VAWC  cases  filed  in  court/  No.  of  reported  VAWC  cases Philippine  National  Police,  
By  region Annual
Philippine  National  Police,   Annual
filed  in  court   the  18,215  
filed  in  court   Barangay  Protection  
the  18,215   Barangay  Protection   Department  of  Justice,  
Department  of  Justice,  
VAWC  cases   Orders),  PCW  Reports,  
VAWC  cases   Orders),  PCW  Reports,   Department  of  Interior  and  Local  
Department  of  Interior  and  Local  
that  reached   Court  Records  (for  
that  reached   Court  Records  (for   Government,  Philippine  
Government,  Philippine  
the  DOJ  for   Temporary/  Permanent  
the  DOJ  for   Temporary/  Permanent   Commission  on  Women,  Court  
Commission  on  Women,  Court  
investigation   Protection  Orders)
investigation   Protection  Orders) Records/Reports  (Supreme  Court)
Records/Reports  (Supreme  Court)
were  filed  in   were  filed  in  
court   court  

Percentage  of  LGUs  with   Output Percentage  of  LGUs  with  


70%  (1,051   100%
Output DILG  and  IAC-­‐VAWC  
70%  (1,051   100% No.  of  existing/  functional  C/MCAT-­‐
DILG  and  IAC-­‐VAWC   VAWC  /  LGUs  (Cities,   VAWC  /  LGUs  (Cities,  
No.  of  existing/  functional  C/MCAT-­‐ By  region DILG,  DSWD,  DOJ,  IAC-­‐
By  region VAWC   Annual
DILG,  DSWD,  DOJ,  IAC-­‐ VAWC   Annual
functional  Local   LGUs  with  
functional  Local   Reports
LGUs  with   Municipalities)  /  Total  No.  of  Cities  and  Municipalities
Reports Municipalities)  /  Total  No.  of  Cities  and  Municipalities (with  PCW  as  Secretariat)
(with  PCW  as  Secretariat)
Committee  on  Anti-­‐   existing  MCAT-­‐
Committee  on  Anti-­‐   existing  MCAT-­‐
Trafficking  and  Violence   VAWC,  out  of  
Trafficking  and  Violence   VAWC,  out  of  
Against  Women  and  their   1,491  total  
Against  Women  and  their   1,491  total  
Children  (LCAT-­‐VAWCs) LGUs),  74%  
Children  (LCAT-­‐ VAWCs) LGUs),  74%  
(106  LGUs  with   (106  LGUs  with  
existing  CCAT-­‐ existing  CCAT-­‐
VAWC  out  of   VAWC  out  of  
143  cities   143  cities  
(2013) (2013)

Percentage  of  Barangays   Output Percentage  of  Barangays  


As  of   Output
100% As  of  
DILG  and  IAC-­‐ 100%
VAWC   DILG  and  IAC-­‐VAWC   No.  of  functional  VAW  desks  /  Total  No.  of  Barangays
No.  of  functional  VAW  desks  /  Total  No.  of  Barangays By  region By  region DILG DILG Annual Annual
with  functional  VAW   with  functional  VAW  
December   December  
Reports Reports
Desks Desks 2014,  79%  or   2014,  79%  or  
33,321  of   33,321  of  
42,028   42,028  
barangays  have   barangays  have  
established   established  
VAW  Desks VAW  Desks

1 1
 World  Health  Organization  (2006).  Reproductive  Health  Indicators:  Guidelines  for  their  Generation,  Interpretation  and  Analysis  for  Global  Monitoring.  Department  of  Reproductive  Health  and  Research.  Geneva:  WHO  Press.  Retrieved  25  September  2012  from  
 World  Health  Organization  (2006).  Reproductive  Health  Indicators:  Guidelines  for  their  Generation,  Interpretation  and  Analysis  for  Global  Monitoring.  Department  of  Reproductive  Health  and  Research.  Geneva:  WHO  Press.  Retrieved  25  September  2012  from  
34 http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/924156315X_eng.pdf
http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/924156315X_eng.pdf 35
Desks 33,321  of  
2014,  79%  or  
42,028  
33,321  of  
barangays  have  
42,028  
barangays  have  
established  
VAW  Desks
established  
VAW  Desks

1
KRA 1 Maternal and Neonatal Health
 World  Health  Organization  (2006).  Reproductive  Health  Indicators:  Guidelines  for  their  Generation,  Interpretation  and  Analysis  for  Global  Monitoring.  Department  of  Reproductive  Health  and  Research.  Geneva:  WHO  Press.  Retrieved  25  September  2012  from  
http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/924156315X_eng.pdf Indicator   Baselines  
nterpretation  and  Analysis  for  Global  Monitoring.  Department  of  Reproductive  Health  and  Research.  Geneva:  WHO  Press.  Retrieved  25  September  2012  from  
1
 World  Health  Organization  (2006).  Reproductive  Health  Indicators:  Guidelines  for  their  Generation,  Interpretation  and  Analysis  for  Global  Monitoring.  Department  of  Reproductive  Health  and  Research.  Geneva:  WHO  Press.  Retrieved  25  September  2012  from   Disaggregation   Unit  Responsible  for  Data   Frequency  of  
Key  Results Indicators Indicator   Baselines   Targets  (Year) Unit  Responsible  
Data  Sources Definitions  /  Method  of  Computation Disaggregation   Unit   Responsible   for  Data   Frequency  
r) Data  Sources http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/924156315X_eng.pdf
Key  Results Definitions  Indicators Hierarchy
/  Method  of  Computation (Year) Disaggregation  
Targets   (Year) Data   S ources
f or   D ata   Frequency   o f  
Definitions   /   M ethod   o f   C omputation Required Collection   and  Reporting Monitoringof  
Maternal   aRnd   Neonatal  
 http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/9241563206_eng.pdf Indicator   Baselines  
Indicator  
Hierarchy
Indicator   Baselines  
(Year)Disaggregation  
Baselines   Required Unit   Responsible  
Collection   and  fSR
or   Data  
eporting Frequency  
Monitoring of   Disaggregation  
Disaggregation  
Disaggregation   Unit  
Required Unit  Responsible   RR esponsible  
for  
Collection  
Unit   Data  
and  
esponsible   for  
Reporting
for   DD ata   Frequency  
Frequency  
ata   of  
Monitoring
Frequency   oo
f  f  
Data  Sources
22
Key  
Key   R esults
esults
Key  Results Definitions   /   M ethod  
Indicators
Indicators
Indicators o f   C omputation Targets  
Targets   (Year)(Year) Data  
Data  
Targets  (Year)Collection  aData   Sources ources Definitions   Definitions  
/   M /
ethod     Moethod  
f   C o f  
omputation C omputation Input/ Process
3Maternal  
Health
23
and  Neonatal  
 http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/9241563206_eng.pdf
 http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/924156315X_eng.pdf Hierarchy (Year)
Hierarchy
Hierarchy (Year) Required
(Year) nd  RSeporting
ources Monitoring Definitions  /  Method  of  Computation RequiredRequired
Required Collection  Collection   and  
and  Reporting
Collection   and   RR eporting
eporting Monitoring Monitoring
Monitoring
Indicator   Disaggregation  
Baselines   Unit   R esponsible   f or   D ata   Frequency   o f   Disaggregation   Unit   R esponsible   f or   D ata   Frequency   o f  
Data  Sources 2234 2Maternal  
Maternal   aesults
nd  
Key  aaRnd   N Definitions  
eonatal   /  MIndicators
NNeonatal   ethod  of  Computation
 http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/9241563206_eng.pdf
4  http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/9241563206_eng.pdf
Health  http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/924156315X_eng.pdf Targets   (Year)facilities Data  Sources Definitions  /  Method  of  Computation
Maternal  
3435 Health
nd   eonatal  
 http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/9241563206_eng.pdf
 http://www.cpc.unc.edu/measure/prh/rh_indicators/specific/sm/percent-­‐ Hierarchy (Year) of-­‐Required
births-­‐ in-­‐health-­‐ Collection  and  Reporting Monitoring Pillars IndicatorsCollection  and  Reporting
Required Targets
Monitoring
ilities Health
2Health
3
 http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/924156315X_eng.pdf
5  http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/924156315X_eng.pdf
 http://www.cpc.unc.edu/measure/prh/rh_indicators/specific/sm/percent-­‐
 http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/924156315X_eng.pdf
1.  By  2016,  reduce  the  
 http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/97603/1/9789241506649_eng.pdf of-­‐births-­‐in-­‐health-­‐facilities
Maternal   and  Neonatal  
 http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/9241563206_eng.pdf
es 4 4
 http://www.cpc.unc.edu/measure/prh/rh_indicators/specific/sm/percent-­‐
 http://www.cpc.unc.edu/measure/prh/rh_indicators/specific/sm/percent-­‐
4661.  By  2016,  reduce  the  
5
 http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/97603/1/9789241506649_eng.pdf
 http://www.cpc.unc.edu/measure/prh/rh_indicators/specific/sm/percent-­‐
3maternal  mortality  ratio  
 http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/924156315X_eng.pdf o
of-­‐obf-­‐f-­‐ births-­‐
irths-­‐ in-­‐
in-­‐hin-­‐
births-­‐ health-­‐
ealth-­‐ facilities
facilities
health-­‐ facilities National and local policies issued Executive Orders, Administrative
Health  http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/924156315X_eng.pdf
s
5567 51.  By  2016,  reduce  the  
 http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/97603/1/9789241506649_eng.pdf
41.  By  2016,  reduce  the  
7  http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/97603/1/9789241506649_eng.pdf
maternal  mortality  ratio  
 http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/924156315X_eng.pdf
1.  By  2016,  reduce  the  
 http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/97603/1/9789241506649_eng.pdf
to  less  than  50  per  
 ibid.
 http://www.cpc.unc.edu/measure/prh/rh_indicators/specific/sm/percent-­‐ o f-­‐ b irths-­‐ i n-­‐ h ealth-­‐ facilities
Policies supporting and hindering maternal Orders, Memorandum Circulars,
6678 maternal  mortality  ratio  
 http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/924156315X_eng.pdf and neonatal health Ordinances, etc.
6
maternal  mortality  ratio  
 http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/924156315X_eng.pdf
8to  less  than  50  per  
 ibid.
5maternal  mortality  ratio  
 http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/924156315X_eng.pdf
100,000  live  births
 Philippine  Statistics  Authority  (PSA)  [Philippines],  and  ICF  International.  2014.  Philippines  National  Demographic  and  Health  Survey  2013.  Manila,  Philippines,  and  Rockville,  Maryland,  USA:  PSA  and  ICF  International.
1.  By  2016,  reduce  the  
 http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/97603/1/9789241506649_eng.pdf
7789 7to  less  than  50  per  
 ibid.
6to  less  than  50  per  
 ibid.
9100,000  live  births
 Philippine  Statistics  Authority  (PSA)  [Philippines],  and  ICF  International.  2014.  Philippines  National  Demographic  and  Health  Survey  2013.  Manila,  Philippines,  and  Rockville,  Maryland,  USA:  PSA  and  ICF  International.
al  Demographic  and  Health  Survey  2013.  Manila,  Philippines,  and  Rockville,  Maryland,  USA:  PSA  and  ICF  International.
to  less  than  50  per  
 USAID  |  DELIVER  PROJECT,  Task  Order  1.  2011.  Philippines:  Family  Planning  and  Maternal,  Newborn,  and  Child  Health  Logistics  Management  and  Stock  Status  Report  September  2011.
maternal  mortality  ratio  
 http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2006/924156315X_eng.pdf No. of municipalities that have All municipalities to have at least 1
889 8100,000  live  births
Demographic  and  Health  Survey  2013.  Manila,  Philippines,  and  Rockville,  Maryland,  USA:  PSA  and  ICF  International.
 Philippine  Statistics  Authority  (PSA)  [Philippines],  and  ICF  International.  2014.  Philippines  National  Demographic  and  Health  Survey  2013.  Manila,  Philippines,  and  Rockville,  Maryland,  USA:  PSA  and  ICF  International.
7100,000  live  births
 Philippine  Statistics  Authority  (PSA)  [Philippines],  and  ICF  International.  2014.  Philippines  National  Demographic  and  Health  Survey  2013.  Manila,  Philippines,  and  Rockville,  Maryland,  USA:  PSA  and  ICF  International.
 USAID  |  DELIVER  PROJECT,  Task  Order  1.  2011.  Philippines:  Family  Planning  and  Maternal,  Newborn,  and  Child  Health  Logistics  Management  and  Stock  Status  Report  September  2011.
orn,  and  Child  Health  Logistics  Management  and  Stock  Status  Report  September  2011.
100,000  live  births
 Philippine  Statistics  Authority  (PSA)  [Philippines],  and  ICF  International.  2014.  Philippines  National  Demographic  and  Health  Survey  2013.  Manila,  Philippines,  and  Rockville,  Maryland,  USA:  PSA  and  ICF  International.
2.  By  2016,  reduce  the  
Arlington,  Va.:  USAID  |  DELIVER  PROJECT,  Task  Order  1.
to  less  than  50  per  
 ibid.
,  and  Child  Health  Logistics  Management  and  Stock  Status  Report  September  2011.
9910 9  USAID  |  DELIVER  PROJECT,  Task  Order  1.  2011.  Philippines:  Family  Planning  and  Maternal,  Newborn,  and  Child  Health  Logistics  Management  and  Stock  Status  Report  September  2011.
 USAID  |  DELIVER  PROJECT,  Task  Order  1.  2011.  Philippines:  Family  Planning  and  Maternal,  Newborn,  and  Child  Health  Logistics  Management  and  Stock  Status  Report  September  2011.
2.  By  2016,  reduce  the  
Arlington,  Va.:  USAID  |  DELIVER  PROJECT,  Task  Order  1.
 USAID  |  DELIVER  PROJECT,  Task  Order  1.  2011.  Philippines:  Family  Planning  and  Maternal,  Newborn,  and  Child  Health  Logistics  Management  and  Stock  Status  Report  September  2011.
8neonatal  mortality  rate  
10
 World  Health  Organization  (2008).  Toolkit  on  Monitoring  Health  Systems  Strengthening  Service  Delivery.  Retrieved  26  Sep  2012  from gathered WRAs for maternal & gathering of WRA for maternal &
mographic  and  Health  Survey  2013.  Manila,  Philippines,  and  Rockville,  Maryland,  USA:  PSA  and  ICF  International.
100,000  live  births
 Philippine  Statistics  Authority  (PSA)  [Philippines],  and  ICF  International.  2014.  Philippines  National  Demographic  and  Health  Survey  2013.  Manila,  Philippines,  and  Rockville,  Maryland,  USA:  PSA  and  ICF  International.
Delivery.  Retrieved  26  Sep  2012  from 2.  By  2016,  reduce  the  
10 Arlington,  Va.:  USAID  |  DELIVER  PROJECT,  Task  Order  1.
2.  By  2016,  reduce  the  
9Arlington,  Va.:  USAID  |  DELIVER  PROJECT,  Task  Order  1.
neonatal  mortality  rate  
 World  Health  Organization  (2008).  Toolkit  on  Monitoring  Health  Systems  Strengthening  Service  Delivery.  Retrieved  26  Sep  2012  from
2.  By  2016,  reduce  the  
Arlington,  Va.:  USAID  |  DELIVER  PROJECT,  Task  Order  1.
to  less  than  10  per  
http://www.who.int/healthinfo/statistics/toolkit_hss/EN_PDF_Toolkit_HSS_ServiceDelivery.pdf
and  Child  Health  Logistics  Management  and  Stock  Status  Report  September  2011.
 USAID  |  DELIVER  PROJECT,  Task  Order  1.  2011.  Philippines:  Family  Planning  and  Maternal,  Newborn,  and  Child  Health  Logistics  Management  and  Stock  Status  Report  September  2011. Demand Generation neonatal care campaign neonatal care campaign
ivery.  Retrieved  26  Sep  2012  from
10 neonatal  mortality  rate  
10
 World  Health  Organization  (2008).  Toolkit  on  Monitoring  Health  Systems  Strengthening  Service  Delivery.  Retrieved  26  Sep  2012  from
neonatal  mortality  rate  
 World  Health  Organization  (2008).  Toolkit  on  Monitoring  Health  Systems  Strengthening  Service  Delivery.  Retrieved  26  Sep  2012  from
to  less  than  10  per  
http://www.who.int/healthinfo/statistics/toolkit_hss/EN_PDF_Toolkit_HSS_ServiceDelivery.pdf
neonatal  mortality  rate  
10
11
11
 World  Health  Organization  (2008).  Toolkit  on  Monitoring  Health  Systems  Strengthening  Service  Delivery.  Retrieved  26  Sep  2012  from
1,000  live  births
 UNFPA  (2014).  IRF  Indicators  Metadata.
2.  By  2016,  reduce  the  
Arlington,  Va.:  USAID  |  DELIVER  PROJECT,  Task  Order  1.
to  less  than  10  per  
http://www.who.int/healthinfo/statistics/toolkit_hss/EN_PDF_Toolkit_HSS_ServiceDelivery.pdf
to  less  than  10  per  
http://www.who.int/healthinfo/statistics/toolkit_hss/EN_PDF_Toolkit_HSS_ServiceDelivery.pdf
1,000  live  births
 UNFPA  (2014).  IRF  Indicators  Metadata. Percentage of women who delivered 100% of women of delivered tracked
ery.  Retrieved  26  Sep  2012  from to  less  than  10  per  
http://www.who.int/healthinfo/statistics/toolkit_hss/EN_PDF_Toolkit_HSS_ServiceDelivery.pdf
11
12
12
 Demographic  Research  and  Development  Foundation  (DRDF)  and  University  of  the  Philippines  Population  Institute  (UPPI).  2014.  2013  YAFS4  Key  Findings.  Quezon  City:  DRDF  and  UPPI.
neonatal  mortality  rate  
 World  Health  Organization  (2008).  Toolkit  on  Monitoring  Health  Systems  Strengthening  Service  Delivery.  Retrieved  26  Sep  2012  from w/ pregnancy tracking and birth plan per municipality
10
11 1,000  live  births
11
 UNFPA  (2014).  IRF  Indicators  Metadata.
1,000  live  births
13  UNFPA  (2014).  IRF  Indicators  Metadata.
 Demographic  Research  and  Development  Foundation  (DRDF)  and  University  of  the  Philippines  Population  Institute  (UPPI).  2014.  2013  YAFS4  Key  Findings.  Quezon  City:  DRDF  and  UPPI.
opulation  Institute  (UPPI).  2014.  2013  YAFS4  Key  Findings.  Quezon  City:  DRDF  and  UPPI.
1,000  live  births
12
11
13
 UNFPA  (2014).  IRF  Indicators  Metadata.
 http://www.who.int/workforcealliance/knowledge/resources/GHWA_AUniversalTruthReport.pdf
to  less  than  10  per  
http://www.who.int/healthinfo/statistics/toolkit_hss/EN_PDF_Toolkit_HSS_ServiceDelivery.pdf
ulation  Institute  (UPPI).  2014.  2013  YAFS4  Key  Findings.  Quezon  City:  DRDF  and  UPPI.
df 12 13 12
 Demographic  Research  and  Development  Foundation  (DRDF)  and  University  of  the  Philippines  Population  Institute  (UPPI).  2014.  2013  YAFS4  Key  Findings.  Quezon  City:  DRDF  and  UPPI.
11  Demographic  Research  and  Development  Foundation  (DRDF)  and  University  of  the  Philippines  Population  Institute  (UPPI).  2014.  2013  YAFS4  Key  Findings.  Quezon  City:  DRDF  and  UPPI.
14  http://www.who.int/workforcealliance/knowledge/resources/GHWA_AUniversalTruthReport.pdf
 Demographic  Research  and  Development  Foundation  (DRDF)  and  University  of  the  Philippines  Population  Institute  (UPPI).  2014.  2013  YAFS4  Key  Findings.  Quezon  City:  DRDF  and  UPPI.
 http://www.who.int/hrh/workforce_mdgs/en/ No. of municipalities with service
12
14
1,000  live  births
 UNFPA  (2014).  IRF  Indicators  Metadata.
13 14 13  http://www.who.int/workforcealliance/knowledge/resources/GHWA_AUniversalTruthReport.pdf
12  http://www.who.int/workforcealliance/knowledge/resources/GHWA_AUniversalTruthReport.pdf
13  http://www.who.int/hrh/workforce_mdgs/en/
 http://www.who.int/workforcealliance/knowledge/resources/GHWA_AUniversalTruthReport.pdf All municipalities to have completed
ation  Institute  (UPPI).  2014.  2013  YAFS4  Key  Findings.  Quezon  City:  DRDF  and  UPPI.
 Demographic  Research  and  Development  Foundation  (DRDF)  and  University  of  the  Philippines  Population  Institute  (UPPI).  2014.  2013  YAFS4  Key  Findings.  Quezon  City:  DRDF  and  UPPI.
14  http://www.who.int/hrh/workforce_mdgs/en/
Capacity Building providers that have completed ICD 10
ICD 10 training
14
13  http://www.who.int/hrh/workforce_mdgs/en/
14
 http://www.who.int/hrh/workforce_mdgs/en/
 http://www.who.int/workforcealliance/knowledge/resources/GHWA_AUniversalTruthReport.pdf training
14
 http://www.who.int/hrh/workforce_mdgs/en/
No. of municiplaities with no stock out All municipalities with no stock out
Commodities of maternal & newborn emergency of maternal & newborn emergency
Procured supplies (MgSO4, IVF, Oxytocin, supplies (MgSO4, IVF, Oxytocin,
Dexamethazone, Antibiotics) Dexamethazone, Antibiotics)
At least one Level 1 hospital per
No. of provinces with Level 1 hospitals province providing C-section services
providing C-section services (list of licensed hospitals and latest
annual reports from HFSRB)
Percentage of birthing facilty w/ MCP All municipalities to have at least 1
accreditation accreditedbirthing facility
Service Delivery
No. of provinces with functional (with 1 referral mechanism including
MOA) referral mechanism including provision of emergency transport for
provision of emergency transport for mothers & newborn per province (with
mothers & newborn local ordinance)
No. of private birthing homes licensed No. of private birthing homes licensed
and accredited and accredited per municipality
No. of provinces/cities (chartered) 100% of Provincial and City Review
Governance
that have conducted a maternal death Teams have submitted reports of
Mechanism
review Maternal Deaths Reviewed
"Percent of deliveries that have been
reimbursed by Philhealth

Budget & Financing to be disaggregated by: All deliveries that have been claimed
Secured have been reimbursed by Philhealth
No. of livebirths, No. of claims
submitted out of the total livebirths,
No. of reimbursed claims"

36 37
KRA 2 Family Planning KRA 3 Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health

Input/ Process Input/ Process


Pillars Indicators Target Pillars Indicators Target
No. of national and local policies Executive Orders, Administrative No. of national and local policies Executive Orders, Administrative
Policy Issued issued in support or hindering Orders, Memorandum Circulars, Policies Issued supporting and hindering ASRH Orders, Memorandum Circulars,
universal access to FP Ordinances, etc. services Ordinances, etc.
No. of LGUs with mechanism to track No. of municipalities conducting IEC
All LGUs (provinces, cities, All municipalities
or map unmet need FP in the public activities on ASRH
municipalities) Demand Generation
and private sector
Demand Generation No. of adolescents reached by IEC
Regional/ LGU-specific breakdown of activities on ASRH
No. of women of reproductive age
targeted WRAs based on the DOH CIP-
with unmet need on FP identified No. of municipalities w/ trained health
FP (provinces, cities, municipalities)
service provider on ASRH (AJA, Healthy All municipalities
Regional/ LGU-specific breakdown of Young ones)
No. of WRAs with unmet need on FP
targeted WRAs based on the DOH CIP-
provided post-partum FP services No of schools with trained guidance
FP (provinces, cities, municipalities) All Public High Schools
Service Delivery counsellor on ASRH
No. of WRAs with unmet need on FP Regional/ LGU-specific breakdown of
Capacity Building No. of schools w/ peer educators
provided services through FP outreach targeted WRAs based on the DOH CIP- All Schools
trained on ASRH
missions FP (provinces, cities, municipalities)
No. of municipality w/ peer educators
No. of municipalities with public and All municipalities
All municipalities trained on ASRH
private providers trained on FPCBT 1
No. schools w/ personnel trained on
No. of municipalities with public and All Schools
All municipalities CSE
Capability Building private providers trained on FPCBT 2
Commodities No. of RHus w/ no stock out of iron
No. of provinces with public and All RHUS
Procured supplement for girls
private hospitals providing BTL MLLA All provinces
services No. of adolescents who availed
of ASRH services (disagregated by
No. of municipalities that have
number referred by peeer educatior)
Commodities submitted commodity consumption LGU-specific breakdown of targeted Service Delivery
Procured and reports from public and private commodities based on the DOH CIP-FP No. of Municipalites w/ adolescent
Consumed providers (w/ detailed breakdown of (provinces, cities, municipalities) friendly health facility based on DOH All Municipalities
commodities consumed) standards
No. of provinces with functional SDN Governance No of Provinces with functional SDN
All Provinces
on FP services (w/referral mechanism All provinces Mechanism for ASRH information and Services
Governane & clients served)
Mechanism No. of municipalities whose FP data
All municipalities (provinces, cities,
have undergone data quality check
municipalities)
(DQC)
% of LGU budget allocation on FP all municipalities
No. of public and private facilities
Budget and Financing All RHUs
submitting claims for FP services
Secured
No. of public and private facilities'
All claims reimbursed
claims on FP reimbursed by Philhealth

38 39
KRA 4 - STI/ HIV/AIDS KRA 5 Gender-Based Violence
Input/ Process
Pillars Indicators Targets Input / Process
Executive Orders, Pillars Indicator Target
Administrative
No. of national and local policies supporting and hindering STI/ Executive Orders,
Policies Orders, Memorandum
HV & AIDS services Administrative
Circulars, Ordinances, No. of national/ local policies that address VAW/ GBV/ issued /
Orders, Memorandum
etc. ammended
Circulars, Ordinances,
All public offices etc.
Percentage of public offices/government agencies with HIV/AIDS Policies
and governement
education in the workplace program No. of LGUs with ordinances that address VAW/ GBV e.g.
agencies
establishment of LCAT-VAWC / VAW desks, anti-discrimination 100% of LGUs
Percentage of private companies that reported to have HIV/AIDS (SOGIE), anti-prostitution, anti-street harassment
Demand All private companies
workplace program
Generation No. of LGUs with a GAD CODE All LGUs
Number of high risk LGU conducting vulnrability assessment 80 cities
No. of municipalities that have conducted IEC/ awareness
2016 – 70% campaign on VAW/ GBV (for example 18 day Campaign to End All NGAs and all LGUs
Percentage of KAP who received free condoms and lubricants Demand VAW)
2017 – 80%
Generation
No of women reached by the IEC/ awareness campaign on VAW
Percentage of HIV testing service-providing facilities with staff 2016 – 80%
trained on HIV counseling and testing (HCT) No of men reached by the IEC/ awareness campaign on VAW
2017 – 90%
Capacity No of municipalities w/ public and private providers trained on
2016 – 80% All LGUs
Percentage of high risk LGU with HIV Service Delivery Network Building 4Rs (recognizing, recording, reporting and referring) of VAWC
Capacity
2017 – 90%
Building No. of provinces with functional crisis intervention centers/
Percentage of hospitals with trained and functioning HIV/AIDS 2016 – 80% temporary shelters/ halfway houses/ centers for VAW/ GBV All LGUs
Core Teams (HACT) 2017 – 90% victim-survivors
Service
Percentage of schools with trained educators of HIV/AIDS courses All schools No of municipalities w/ established WCPP (w/ dedicated
Delivery All LGUs
coordinator, plan&budget, trained on 4Rs)
Percentage of treatment hubs and satellite treatment hubs with
ARV stock-out No. of provinces with public and private hospitals w/ functional All LGUs and all
WCPU (w/ coordinator, MDT trained provider,Plan&budget) hospitals
Percentage of social hygiene clinics with stock-out of HIV test kits
Commodities No. of municipal & provincial LGUs with functional LCAT--ACP-
Percentage of social hygiene clinics with stock-out of condoms Governance VAWC (A JMC will be issued by DSWD, DILG and DOJ on the All LGUs
Percentage of social hygiene clinics with stock-out of lubricants Mechanisms integration of ACP in the regional mechanism)

Percentage of social hygiene clinics with stock-out of STI drugs No. Public and Private Schools with Child Protection Committees All of schools

2016 – at least 3 per


city
Number of facilities that provide HIV testing per city
2017 – at least 5 per
Service city
Delivery 2017 – 1 per high
Number of satellite treatment hubs
risk city
Number of young key affected population tested and know their
status
Percentage increase in HIV related investment or expenditure
Budget/ per year
Financing
2016 – 80%
Secured Percentage of PLHIV on ART in treatment hubs enrolled in PHIC
2017 – 90%

40 41
Annex B: Examples of possible RPRH-related Programs, Projects, and and/or exceed the criteria set by DOH in the successful implementation
Activities of RP and RH care programs
(m) Age- and development-appropriate RH education, including curriculum
A. Policies Issued development, on RP and RH to adolescents and school-age children to
• Compilation of policies issued by various agencies related to RP and RH be taught by adequately trained teachers (and nurses) in formal and
at various level informal educational systems(,) and integrated in relevant subjects
• Policy review to align with the RPRH Law (n) Supportive school environments that will provide access, services and
B. Demand Generation information to address sexual and non-sexual risky behaviours
(a) Maternal health, proper birth spacing, use of modern FP methods (o) Integration of RPRH information into formal, non-formal, and
including NFP considering health, resources, moral and religious indigenous learning
convictions are promoted (p) Inclusion of RPRH education in during teacher-child-parent activities
(b) Social and behaviour change communication (SBCC) materials for LGUs to ensure that parents or guardians are likewise informed to RPRH
such as flip charts, brochures, pamphlets, modules, including audio- education .
visual aids (AVA) or technologies on RP and RH to be utilized by BHWs Community Mobilization and Networking
in their localities • Mobilization of NDPs, CHTs, NGOs, POs, FBOs and the private sector
(c) Provide information and access, without bias, to all modern FP • Mobilization of public health care providers – public health care
methods, including modern NFP institutions, public health care professionals, and public health care
(d) Promote the principles of Informed Choice and Voluntarism (ICV) workers, including CHTs, BHWs and BPVs
to ensure that clients are not coerced or bribed in the use of family • Engagement of institutions for RH research, including the academe,
planning among others, for the development of clinical practice guidelines,
(e) Disseminate information on the safety and efficacy of alternate treatment protocols, and implementing strategies to improve utilization
methods and medium for RH care development rates and reduce unmet need for RH care services.
(f) Use of SBCC as approach for social change, individual behaviour and • TA (Techinical Assistance) for engagement of private providers to meet
social norms targets
(g) Ensure that introductory materials are freely available to all clients
seeking information for RH. These materials shall be made available in C. Capacity Building (Development)
major local languages such as Tagalog, Cebuano, Ilocano, Hiligaynon, • Under the RPRH Law, the following capacity building (activities shall be
Bicol and Waray. These materials shall include scientifically correct, implemented:
evidence-based, and comprehensible information on mechanism of (a) Training on IPCC among service providers, community workers and
action and benefits, including effectiveness, contraindications, possible volunteers to improve client satisfaction, compliance and health
side effects, correct usage, availability at health care facilities and outcomes.
providers. (b) Training for counselling and referral of adolescents
(h) Inclusion of annual budget of DOH, other concerned agencies, and (c) Training on Male responsibility in support of RP and RH
LGUs for public awareness, health promotion and communication. (d) Capacity building for service providers to address unmet need for
(i) PHIC financing of RH care, to include financing and/or reimbursement modern FP at the community level
of RH care. (e) Clinical competency training for the SDN to ensure that skilled
(j) Development of Health Promotion and Communication Plan to raise health professionals within the SDN possess the clinical
level of public awareness on RP and RH(,) and protection of reproductive competencies required to deliver RH services
rights, which are evidence-based, values-based, culturally-sensitive (f) In-service training for resident physicians
and clear. (g) Training on Comprehensive emergency obstetric and newborn
(k) Private sector and CSO involvement in the promotion and care training for physicians
communication of RP and RH (h) Training for educators for age- and development-appropriate
(l) Awards and recognition of individuals, institutions and LGUs that meet sexuality education

42 43
D. Service Delivery 6) Elimination of VAWC and other forms of sexual and GBV
• Integrate RP and RH care services into established SDN or local health 7) Age- and development-appropriate education and counselling on
referral systems sexuality and RH
• RH care services at Barangay Health Stations 8) Treatment of breast and reproductive tract cancers and other
• RH care services at other primary care facilities gynecological conditions and disorders
• RH care services at hospitals within SDN 9) Male responsibility and involvement and men’s RH
• Engagement of privately owned health facilities and/or private skilled 10) Prevention, treatment and management of infertility and sexual
health professionals in the SDN dysfunction
• FP services at establishments or enterprises 11) Age- and development-appropriate RH education for adolescents
• Referral to facilities within the SDN in formal and non-formal education settings; and
• Mapping the available facilities in SDN (both public and private) that 12) Mental health aspect of RH care
are capable of delivering RH care services • Ensure that there is Maternal Death Review (MDR) and Fetal and Infant
• Identifying the needs of priority populations within SDN for RH care Death Review
• Designating populations to facilities within SDN
• Mobile health care services at the provincial, city, municipal and E. Governance Mechanism
district hospitals in the form of van or other means of transportation • Conduct studies to analyse demographic trends, including demographic
appropriate to its terrain and the health needs of each LGU dividends from sound population policies
• Upgrading of hospitals and facilities with adequate and qualified
personnel, equipment and supplies in support of RH care
• Hiring of skilled health professionals for MH care and SBA
• Inclusion of FP supplies such as drugs and devices in the Essential
Drugs List (EDL) of the Philippine National Drug Formulary (PNDF) to be
procured by DOH
• Procurement and distribution of FP supplies nationwide by the DOH
• Submission of utilization report by LGUs of RH supplies and products
provided by (the) DOH to guide future policy, procurement, and
allocation decisions.
• All accredited public health facilities shall provide a full range of FP
methods, which shall also include medical consultations, supplies
necessary and reasonable procedures for poor and marginalized
couples having infertility issues who desire to have children.
• All public health facilities shall provide full-, age- and development-
appropriate information on RP and RH care to all clients, regardless of
age, sex, disability, marital status, or background.
• Mobile clinic
• Making sure that the elements of RH care are made available at various
levels:
1) FP information and services
2) MNCHN
3) Proscription of abortion and management of abortion
complications
4) AYRH guidance and counselling at the point of care
5) Prevention, treatment and management of RTIs, HIV/AIDS and
other STIs

44 45
Annex C
Unified Work and Financial Plan (UWFP) Monitoring Report

46 47
Annex D Republic of the Philippines 8. Respond to all matters relative to the implementation of the law; and
Department of Health 9. Act on any additional tasks assigned by the Secretary of Health relevant
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY to the implementation of the RPRH Law and its IRR.

26 January 2015 In compliance with Section 12.01 (h) of the IRR which requires the participation and
cooperation of government agencies and civil society organizations, the NIT shall be
ADMINISTRATIVE ORDER composed of representatives from concerned government agencies and civil society
No. 2015 –002 organizations.

SUBJECT : Creation of National Implementation Team (NIT) and Regional The members of the NIT shall assign a representative to be designated by the heads of
Implementation Teams (RIT) for Republic Act 10354 (Responsible agencies concerned. A permanent representative preferably of Assistant Secretary rank
Parenthood and Reproductive Health Law of 2012) but not lower than Director rank shall be designated; an alternate representative of not
lower than Division Chief rank shall also be designated.
The Responsible Parenthood and Reproductive Health Law (RPRH) and its Implementing
Rules and Regulations (IRR) have been deemed effective with the lifting of the Status Individuals and representatives of civil society organizations will be invited by the DOH
Quo Ante Order (SQAO) by the Supreme Court last April 8, 2014. The Department to voluntarily participate in the work of the National Implementation Team.
of Health (DOH), as the implementing agency of the law and its IRR is in need of a
structure which will manage the implementation of the law. The members of the NIT for RPRH shall be composed of the following:

In compliance with the RPRH Law and its IRR, A National Implementation Team (NIT) for 1. Representative, Office of the Secretary, Department of Health (DOH);
the RPRH Law is hereby created with the following tasks and functions: 2. Representative, Central Office, DOH;
3. Representative, Commission on Population;
1. Manage the review, modification, development, consolidation, 4. Representative, Food and Drug Authority (FDA);
dissemination and operationalization of all DOH orders, guidelines and 5. Representative, of the Disease Prevention and Control Bureau (DPCB-
circulars issued relevant to the implementation of the RPRH Law and its DOH);
IRR;; 6. Representative of the National Economic and Development Authority
2. Coordinate the actions of the agencies implementing the law and its (NEDA);
IRR in the areas of policy development, capacity-building, advocacy, 7. Representative of the Department of Education (DepEd);
education, information, health service delivery, field operations and 8. Representative of the Department of Social Welfare and Development
monitoring and evaluation; (DSWD);
3. Craft a unified annual work and financial plan (WFP) for the national 9. Representative of the Department of Interior and Local Government
implementation of the law beginning with the 2015 RPRH Work and (DILG);
Financial Plan (WFP) and endorse such for approval by the heads of 10. Representative of the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation
agencies of the NIT for RPRH as necessary; (PhilHealth);
4. Set up a system to monitor the implementation and impact of the law 11. Representative of the National Anti-Poverty Commission (NAPC);
and provide regular quarterly reports to the Secretary of Health; 12. Representative of the Philippine Commission on Women (PCW);
5. Provide recommendations to the Secretary of Health to improve the 13. Representative of the National Council on Disability Affairs (NCDA);
implementation and impact of the RPRH Law and its IRR; 14. Representative of the Union of Local Authorities of the Philippines
6. Prepare an annual report on the implementation of the law for (ULAP); and
approval by the Secretary of Health for reporting purposes to Congress 15. Members of Civil Society Organizations and Individuals to be invited by
as required by law no later than April of every year; the Secretary of Health.
7. Liaise with the Congressional Oversight Committee on the RPRH Law
on behalf of the Secretary of Health;

48 49
From among the members of the NIT, the Secretary of Health shall designate a Annex E 8. Representative of Local Government Unit from Regional Development
Chairperson, a Co-Chair Person and a Vice Co-Chair Person and head of Secretariat. Council;
9. Representative (s) of Civil Society Organizations upon invitation of the
Under the supervision of the NIT, The Regional Implementation Team (RIT) shall have RIT Chair after due consultation.
the following task and functions:
The NIT and RIT Secretariat shall be lodged at POPCOM National and Regional Offices,
1. Manage the dissemination and implementation of all issuances respectively. The NIT secretariat shall be composed of program and support staff from
pursuant to RPRH Law and its IRR at the regional and field levels; POPCOM, DCPB’s Family Health Office (DOH) and a CSO representative.
2. Coordinate the actions of the regional agencies implementing the
law and its IRR in the areas of policy development, capacity-building, Financial and logistical support for the operations of the NIT and RIT shall be sourced
advocacy, education, information health service delivery, field from POPCOM, FHO (DOH) and other members of NIT and RIT.
operations and monitoring and evaluation;
3. Monitor the implementation and evaluate the impact of RPRH Law and This Administrative Order shall take effect immediately.
its IRR at the regional and field levels;
4. Organize, supervise and provide technical, financial and logistical
support for field operations and monitoring and valuation activities (Sgd.) Janette Loreto Garin, MD, MBA-H
region-wide; Acting Secretary of Health
5. Provide regular reports to the NIT as required;
6. Provide recommendations to the NIT to improve the implementation
and impact of the RPRH Law and its IRR in the region;
7. Craft an annual unified regional work and financial plan for RPRH Law
implementation integrating resources from all members of the RIT;
8. Harmonize all available resources for RPRH Law implementation,
including the NDP, CHT, 4Ps, DTTB, and other resources at the field
level; and
9. Perform additional tasks assigned by the Chair of the NIT relevant to
the implementation of the RPRH Law and its IRR.

The RIT will create as a sub-committee of the Regional Implementation Coordinating


Teams (RICT) and to be organized in every region will be composed of:

1. The DOH Regional Director as chair;


2. The POPCOM Regional Director as Co-Chair and Head of the RIT
Secretariat;
3. Regional Representative from the Department of Education (DepEd);
4. Regional Representative from the Department of Social Welfare and
Development (DSWD);
5. Regional Representative from the Department of Interior and Local
Government (DILG);
6. Regional Representative from the National Economic and Development
Authority (NEDA);
7. Regional Representative from the Philippine Health Insurance
Corporation (PhilHealth);

50 51
Republic of the Philippines
Department of Health
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY

21 January 2015

DEPARTMENT PERSONNEL ORDER


No. 2015 – 0200

SUBJECT : Designation of the Members of the National Implementation Team


(NIT) for RA 10354 (Responsible Parenthood and Reproductive
Health Law of 2012) created under Administrative Order No. 2015-
0002.

Members of the National Implementation Team (NIT) for the Responsible Parenthood
and Reproductive Health Law are the following:

1. Chairperson: Former Secretary of Health, Dr. Esperanza I. Cabral


2. Co-Chairperson: Assistant Secretary, Dr. Paulyn Jean Ubial
3. Vice-Chairperson and Head of Secretariat - Executive Director Dr. Juan
Antonio A. Perez III
4. Representative, Food and Drug Authority (FDA);
5. Disease Prevention and Control Bureau (DPCB-DOH);
• Permanent Representative – Dr. Irma Asuncion
• Alternate Representative – Dr. Rosalie Paje
6. Representative of the National Economic and Development Authority
(NEDA);
• Permanent Representative – Director Erlinda Capones
• Alternate Representative – Ms. Myrna Asuncion / Ms. Arlene Clara
B. Asuncion
7. Department of Education (DepEd);
• Permanent Representative – Director Ella Nalipoguit
• Alternate Representative – To be designated (TBD)
8. Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD);
• Permanent Representative – Director Margarita Sampang
• Alternate Representative – TBD
9. Representative of the Department of Interior and Local Government
(DILG);
10. Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PhilHealth);
• Permanent Representative – Senior Vice-President Ruben John
Basa
• Alternate Representative – TBD

52
COMMISSION ON POPULATION
Acacia Lane Ext., Welfareville Compound,
Brgy. Addition Hills, Mandaluyong City

Phone: 531.69.78, 531.70.51, 531.68.05


Facsimile: 533.51.22
Email: mainmail@popcom.gov.ph
commissiononpopulation
http://www.popcom.gov.ph

54