JACO PASTORIUS

MODERN ELECTRIC BASS

by J aco Pastorius with Jerry Jemmott

REVISED EDITION

Interview and text jerry Jemmott

Revised edition transcriptions Lincoln Goines Additional transcriptions and introduction Mark Egan Initial transcriptions Jerry Jemmott and Kjell Benner

Produced by Manhattan Music

Editor Dan Thress

Cover design and Layout Jack Waltrip Music engraving Bob Sherwin Cover/Inside photographs Ebet Roberts

CD TRACKING INFORMATION

1 Introduction 20 Example 17
2 Interview 21 Example 18
3 Example 1 22 Example 19
4 Example 2 23 Example 20
5 Example 3 24 Example 21 CLAS$RC CENTER
6 Example 4 25 Interview i
7 Example 5 26 Example 22 42, avo Padovani Le Lidurat
8 Example 6 27 Example 23 131 Z7 VHROLLES
9 Example 7 28 Example 24 "it 04 4:t89:90 92
10 Example 8 29 Example 25 Fax; 0442·8990 71
11 Example 9 30 Example 26 Siret 408~688 638 000 1 9
12 Example 10 31 Example 27
13 Example 11 32 Example 28
14 Example 12 33 "Naima"
15 Example 13 34 Interview
16 Example 14 35 Example 29
17 Example 15 36 "Reggae"
18 Example 16 37 "Funky Blues"
19 Interview 38 "America" PUBLISHED BY MANHAITAN MUSIC, INC.TM © 1991 MANHATTAN MUSIC, INC.

All Rights Controlled and Administered by CPP Media Group, a division of CPP/Belwin, INC. All Rights Reserved International Copyright Secured Made in U.S.A.

DISTRIBUTED BY:

CPP MEDIA

15800 N.\V. 48TH AVENUE MIAMI, FL 33014

ANY USE OR COPYING OF THIS MATERIAL IN WHOLE OR IN PART IS PROHIBITED BY LAW.

FOREWORD

goal of this

visation, Through the

the book, you will U'--~U>1J"\.: tance of thinking, of music. Then you stand and interpret learning or re-Iearning .'

in a very musical way.

The playing of random 1,;~},?y"<l,!:~:'IW doesn't requir much tli!jl1:gt);~.I;~;v specific patt rns does. l." '"",r'H"""""'l tern was created with ar~t:i,~~~~~th-IL'-'L"':L:"'."""", II::U(Jesn mean that you have Proceed at your metronome while

opposed to ys asking . times, what cending or

Knowledge of theory, H·,,~t4+i'h'ri'} struction and use of th

scale steps is a must "YI\H~''''''~!'''ft.,,-ough learning of you r t~'l ft?:t~rnlrjjle~nt. provided for the

ggio, part something te it flaw-

pr:~C*l).t'tng these exerput into . Use these to develop

2

BRIEF REVIE~r

music is based on the chromatic sale out of which the major scale is formed. The major scale is constructed with the following la: in ascending order; root (lst scale

Modal scales are derived from the major scale, but start on different degrees, using the same pattern of whole and half-steps as the major scale. Below are the differ-

degree), whole-step, whole-step, half-step to the 4th degree, three consecutive whole steps to the 7th degree, and a half-step to the octave to complete the scale.

ent modes with their relative chords and their major scale starting points and construction.

Ionian Dorian Phrgian Lydian Mixolydian Aeolian Locrian

I 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8--R-W-W-H-W-W-W-H n 2-3-4-5-6-7-8-2-R-W-H-W-W-W-H-W m 3-4-5-6-7-8-2-3---R-H-W-W-W-H-W-W IV 4-5-6-7-8-2-3-4-R-W-W-W-H-W-W-W V 5-6-7-8-2-3-4-5--R-W-W-H-W-W-H-W VI 6-7-8-2-3-4-5-6-R-W-H-W-W-H-W-W vn 7-8-2-3-4-5-6-7-R-H-W-W-H-W-W-W

Chords are built on every other note of a major scale such as 1-3-5-7-9-11-13-15 or 2-4-6-8-10-12-14-16. Notes above the first octave are the same as the notes in the first octave, except that they are an octave higher, so that 8=1, 9=2, 10=3, 11=4, etc.

\Vrite out the scales, modes and chord constructions in reverse order. When transposing to other keys, don't forget to give the proper accidental which will agree with the scale formula you are using.

Chord construction for ascending 7th chords:

Major root-major 3rd-minor 3rd-major 3rd

Minor root-minor3rd-major 3rd-minor 3rd

Dominant root-major 3rd-mulor 3rd-minor 3rd

Diminished root-minor 3rd-minor 3rd~minor 3rd

Half-Diminished root-minor 3rd-minor 3rd-major 3rd Augmented root-rnajor 3rd-. -major 3rd~:minor 3rd

If the distance between the root and the third scale degree is two whole-steps (major 3rd), the scale or chord quality is major. If the distance between the root and the third is one and a half-steps (minor

third), then the chord or scale is minor.

Diminished chords employ all minor thirds and the scale construction is W-H-W-H-W-H-W or H-W-HW-H-\V-H-'W-H.

a - Let harmonic ring. x - Playas dead note.

r - Open diamonds indicate natural harmonics-where they occur indicates finger placement.

r - Filled notes denote standard notes.

D - Strings used are shown below staff.

umbers used are laco's left hand fingering.

3

MAJOR SCALE MODES

c Ionian (lst degree) J
(Ll7
9 11 13
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
(9) (11) (13) c-i
9 II 13
1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7
(9) (11) (3)
C Phrygian (3rd degree)
(-7
h9 II hl3
6 2 b3 4 5 b6 67
(b 9) (1) ( b13)
C Lydian (4th Degree)
~ e~7
9 ~1I 13
1 2 3 ~4 5 6 7
(9) (11) (13)
C Mixolydian (5th Degree) ,j
b- e7
9 II 13
1 2 3 4 5 6 67
(9) (11) (3)
C Aeolian (6th Degree)
c-:
9 II hl3
2 63 4 5 66 67
(9) (11) (b13)
C Locria n Oth degree)
J c-: (~5) (C"'?)
b9 II J
1 b2 b3 4 65 66 b7
Cb9) (11) (bl3) "MELODIC MINOR SCALE MODES

C Melodic Minor
e-u7
9 II 13
1 2 63 4 5 6 ..,
!
(9) (11) (3)
C Dori<ln 62 eBb Melodic)
e-7
69 II 13
b 2 63 4 5 6 67
(b9) (1) (3)
4 C Lydian ~5 (A Melodic)
CD.1~5
9 #11 13
1 2 3 #4, #5 6 7
(9) ( ~JJ) (13)
,
C Lydian h7 (G Melodic)
C7
9 #11 13
2 3 #4 5 6
(9) (#11) (3)
c Mixo I yd ia n ·6 (F Melodic)
C7
9 11m
1 2 3 4 5 [,6 [,7
(9) (] 1) ( 1,13)
C Locrian #2 (Eb Melodic)
C-ns
9 II hl3
1 2 [,3 4 65 [,6 67
(9) (1) ( 1,1:3)
\ C Super Locrian (Dh Melodic)
C7alt
['9 #9 #11 hl3
1 [,2 [,3 4 65 66 [,7
(1,9) ( ~9) CQ3) (#11 ) ( 1,13) SYMETRICAL SCALES

Diminished
1. C (half-step/whole-step)
C7
['9 #9 #11 13
1 [,2 63 ~3 # 5 6 b7
(h9) (#9) (#11) (3)
2_ C (whole-step/half-step)
C07
7 9 11 bl3
2 63 65 ['6 q6 7
(9) (1) ( b13) (~~ 7)
Wholetone
(whole-step/whole-step)
C 7
9 #11
1 2 :3 #4 #5 67
(9) ( #11)
5; Example I-Finger spacing--one finger per fret

The chromatic scale is one of the hardest things to play on the bass. Playing it will help teach you where all the notes are through correct finger spacing. Play this scale and all other scales in the following 111an-

ner: beginning on your Imv E string, play through one octave and back down; then go through the entire middle and upper register and back down again slowly.

Example 2-Major scale exercise in one-stretch position, using 16th-notes This exercise utilizes a descending four-note pattern going down the scale in 2nds.

=ry: rfUffr;Ettr fF r; E r [1 E E FJ r b [~ [ Et$1

-421421421421 -42142142 1421 d

42142142

\

\

1 4 1

1 4 2 1

3 4

1

Example 3--One octave major scale in ascending and descending 2nds

Freely
9: j r r ~ F r r E E r r F r F f Jg
I
2 4 1 2 4 2 2 1 2 1 4 2 /

6

Example 4-Major scale in consecutive 3rds and 2nds

The numbers at the top of each note represent the degrees used in this pattern. Memorizing the numbers will allow you to "run" the pattern through different keys.

1 <1 1 4

Example 5--Major scale in broken 3rds

This is the "normal" way of playing the scale in 3rcls. It is a slower asc nt than Iaco's "3rd-2ncl" pattern used in example 4.

Example 6-Ascending major scale in 2nds---descending in 3rds--followed by ascending and descending in 3rds

Notice the pattern used in the first bar, consisting of an ascending major scale in 2nds. The last note of heat 1, bar two, is the beginning of another series of four-note patterns utilizing descending 7th chord

arpeggios (3rds), moving down the scale in 2nds . . otice how the fourth note of this four-note pattern serves as a pickup, so that the feeling is 4-1-2-3, 4-1- 2-3, etc.

2 <1 1 2

~ f t .l ~l I r

E E F r ~ r F; r r Eil ~ r C;,L [ [ F r [ fEr [

r fr

0:

J] J J ia J ~ Jj J j j J J JI~ r [; dc; ij lJ fJ J~ I

{ l # I l (" I

7

9:

3

=

1";'\

, Harmonic

II

9: J

II

1 3

1 4 3 4

1 1

Example 7-Major scale in 6ths

Scale intervals are used to create sound patterns, and to gain awareness of skipping strings and harmonic propulsion.

9: 4 F J f !-- I [ f f f E f r :E II
E f E f J ;o:t-

4 3 4 4 4
2 4 3 1 4 2 John Scofield, Kenwood Dennard and Iaco Pastorius Q

Example 8-"Jam in E"

Thinking ahead with specific ideas is the only way to achieve this level of improvisational clarity and direc-

tion.

9: -r. 4 ~-r : ~=mFfr E ¥ AAf #HfFfP d~r f fjf

1 1 4· 2 1

4 1 1 4

#. r.--

Wotr].

"): ·##UU.p rJ J J J±J hllH#tft rtF" J I 1) 3pJJ j b

1 1 4 1 4

9

Q_
iI[
,1 I r I ~ .~ -
,. ~ _ - I!r _
•• I!r -I!r ~ ... _I!t __ ,
- ..01 I "
- - - - '[.,- • -
4 1 --41 --411 __. 4 4 1 I 2--411' .... --411 .. f_f ___ . ___ '----"
3
2 :I 4 Slap fingerboard with

palm of right hand - - - - - - - - -. ~--,

IT ( IQq ~ r I f ~ ¥ 51

10

3 214

u

~

9: #### g

II

11

Example 9-Arpeggios---fingerboard memorization

After you've found where the notes are on the fingerboard-play this exercise without looking to help with memorization of the fingerboard. [\X!ith the exception of the octave, the 3rd finger can be substituted for the 4th when playing examples 9 and 10.1

~ 2 II
J 1
4 1 1

Example 10--Arpeggios--ascending chromatically

This is the same pattern as example 9-moving up the chromatic scale.

3 IIL~~. 3 ..".. ~ - IlL
.. - = f:.."..
~ I • ~ I ,1
.
. -r ..,j - • • /If
L ,. - - •
. 3 I 3 ~ I
1 4 1 3 etc. --
- 3 141

9: .• ## f1 J c BY E fI E G~ ~& C r; E:ft f ft [ [:f II .##.#

3 3 3

.1

12

Example II-Double stops

This next example is a very musical approach to playing double stops via spelling out a cbord and harmonizing the major scale.

Example I2-"Tbe Real Deal"

This next example is based on the ability to create ideas based upon different types of scales, broken arpeggios, chords and song fragments, all played in patterns utilizing rhythmic groupings.

9:

1 2 ] 2

1 2 1 4

121 2

13

A~-

R7 :111

B-

Example 13--Major 7th arpeggios

Hvrcx .t good l'Xl'rciSL': :trpeggi;l[c lip ih« I chord. clown on the [I, up on the III, clown on [he [V, etc.

A-7 Ci\7

0-7 F~7 E- IP i=tk

' 7 7 G7· - -

='f=J E~[f~rf=fEtl€fs- n~

) 1 -I· ) )., I ) ;) I, :>

2 II 2 -)1 ! 2 - - - -

2 II :~ 2 ·1 1 2 '

14

Example 14-Whole tone scale-alternating fingers

Try going down the scale in seconds on the downbeat (l-e-an-a)-up the scale in seconds on the offbeat (e-an-a-1)-clown again on the downbeats.

421321421421

! E S1 I [be r F b FEr [ r r rt F f IT I

Example 15-Alternating fingers with different numbers

This example shows the division of the beat into five parts-five notes down the scale and up a flatted 5th to the next scale note, a 2nd from the previous starting note.

~ r t g • r • II
i 5 I j
5
continue ... 15

1

Example 16--0uet

The use of modes, fingering patterns, rhythm and chords all become dear when seen on paper. The speed at which it is conceived and executed makes for an ex iring sensation for the mind and body.

sua - -- ---- ----

.

-

4

9:

I 2 3 2 ]

12IJ: 3 412

3 3 3 2 3 S

I 2

2 ] -I

41241232

1 21 4 1 4 1 2 1 4 1 4 1 3 1 4 I 4 1 2

414

16

'):

-'):

3 11 3 3 3 3 13 1 23132

1 1 1 1 1

11)44221

:} r nfffff(p I

j):

1414121

3123443223132

2 1

1

9:

H H

rr rr I

1 2 1 2 1 2

o

r 1

4 J.

3

2 3 4

412

9: frr[ffff !f' ¥

41241241.

412424 3

413

4 3 2

1 1 4

9:

: ] 1

.. 4 1 "

2 1 ) f 2

- 1

I I

18

4 sirn,

1

o 4 1 4 3

] 4 1

:3 ry ,~:3 3

.:> .:.>'14: 1 3 .' 3 , 4

414241414 4241424J43

242

2 121414121

4 12 . 14

1 2

81)(,7, - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ,- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

:;>: - W~6:Ef¥ I - , !( tu~
:3 . 3 4
1 3 1 c ......

•• f..f_.

,

lilt

--"_ .

-1----.

-I---~

19

=9:

3 1 1

123

G

1 2 2 4

G

~.
9: r- I
2 3 3 3

() 1 4 2 E

20

Example 17-Right hand raking with left hand muting

Practice this example with multiple patterns on even strings. For example: second finger on E, first on A, second on D, first on G, first on E, third on A, second on D, thir Ion G, etc.

Freely
9: 1 J r r r j 1 II __'_9:~4~r----r --+--J -1-1 -~

o

o

o

o

Example 18--- Two hand muting via scale in 3rds

Be conscious of this very important technique when crossing strings.

:} ~6 t ?,II ftTfPrFf RPrrr[rrr I [CCrrF[r I frEfFrm

12412424 ........ ..,j

. 1 2 4 1

9: &b [r [f F r f F If r FrEE [J I UrI F r r; In fJ [f [j

1 4 1 4

1 2

3

21

/

Kenwood, J rry Jemmott: nd _)aco

Example 19- Two hand muting-extended

3§bg Jl a II E f H Lfe fJ I fEffrfEtffEEErfF I

1 4 1 4 1 41 2 2 4 2

1 4 1

~} ~bb tf£frrrrPrrFtrffl ffEfffr Err r mfr I

9: &bb tffEfr r r [f e r f errl frr [fIr Gf f r rtf r [fJ

1 2 1 3 AEG

22

9: &bb f f F r r f F r [ [ r r [ r [ r I r [ r r [ r r f [ [ f F J J J J I

9: &b6 [r r f r r r r [r r f r r r r I r r r fEr FrfRF~~ ~

Freely E

9: b fEr 6 Fer" tJd ] r

II

1 2 1 4

=0: frrfCrrfrErfrc rrcfEvRf!"ffU d f .~ f II

41. 22 12121-= - - ----

Example 20--String crossing via minor to major chords

Here's something to think about for the left hand and something to do 'with the right. Try playing this as an open string exercise based on a particular string attack pattern, like in example 17.

fvIin-J-b 3 - 5- 7 -9-11

Maj-1-3-5-7 -9-+ 11

o-u ~ A btl 7~1I .~._ .
0 - • •
_._0 rJ ""I -
_L_ , ... _
. ~ v -. I"" __ ...
r I r I I I I -I
- - 6

6

6

6

A -11 :!=

C f f r [f [ [ f r fJ

B6tl7~1l ~

II &6 C F r } PI [ r [ F [j

6 6

6

23

B-lI - _"- r:. ~ _ Ct..7#1l • ~Je: ,,_ • ,J
. - - ~ .- -.- jIf '[l,
. • -
I'"'
I I I - I I I I I I I

- . - 6

6

6

6

Sua - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

F-ll G~t..7~11 ~

til bbbb [r f [ r1 [[ f r U II frWb r Err EV [ [ r r [ r II b6:

6 6 6. 6

Sua - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

G-ll ~ - A\'t..7~11 . ~,,_ .
-
. - ,. ,.
. - - • --
I'"' • -;;;; . • I'"'
r I r I I I I -I

> 6 6

6

6

Sua - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

A-II -f'- Bbt..7~11 ~

:} L f f [ [J [ f r f [J II bb EM [ r t4f [ [ f J II

6 6 6 6

24

Example 21-String crossing in 4ths

Jaco is actually playing arpeggiated II-v chord progressions-first in 4ths, then chromatically and again in 4ths.

9:

BbLl.7

be f f

333 3

3

Eb7SUS

3

3

3

3

3

CLl.7 ~ F#7sus f B 7 f F7 t f BbLl.7 ~ E7 SllS f#
t t Ie f r t br t f
9: E J E

3 3
3 3 3 E7SUS

07SUS GLl.7

C7SUS

Ab

._ ~~ b ~i: ~ 6~== ~ L~
.:: ~ ...
i-
. .. I I
. II
, ..
~ 25

Example 22-"Barbary Coast"

The choice of notes gives it that distin tive sound.

Example 23--Tuning the bass with harmonics

This technique insures accuracy in tuning the bass owing to the audibility of the notes in this register.

"Portrait of Tracy" (Intro)

This example uses harmonics to create a melody.

II II

r

- -41

II

Example 24--False harmonics--overtone series

This is the division of the string length in halves, quarters and eighths.

-e- _ll
-e-
~
_£!""\ ...
e.J 1'7"-
_o_
c,.
_.t.
Hold "A" Divide string in: 112 1/3 1/4 1/5 1/6 1/7 1/8
with left hand
26 Example 25--False harmonics--scaIe in 3rds

Divide the string exactly one octave above the fingered noll' to achieve the hu rmonir sound qualiry.

8/'(/ tb rougbou:

g[ll]J j J ~8Jk[F rJ!I1c_ t cHfEfff t na] j JJ J In_~. _- "-AI

Example 26-False harmonics using scale patterns and arpeggios Follow the same instructions as in example 2,).

HI 'a ! h n IlIp,/J(J1I1

tLf-rHJJ~J lJilJJlJlt~rCCC1fffTft t1t{ [rfl

.1

:lfJ lJ jWH--~u[ FflCffFtrrrtJ T----'3

Example 27-False harmonics

Again, follow the sumc instructions as in example 2')

SU{/ - - - - - - - - - - - _. - - - - - - - - - -- -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- -- - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - -

27

Natural bass harmonics

E A DG

















• 28

/D G C F (Sva) ~. B E A D (Sva)

~. G~ C~ F~ B

-EADG

-BEAD

_. G~ C~ F~ B

- E A D G (Svb)

Same as lower octave

Example 28--Remembering "Tracy"

[refer t key on page 3, for notation of harmonics]

Freely

C. G

G

D D

A D A G

D D
F
-
1> j n ~
~ r i1 ~ ..
..... ~'" /If A
.. ~v V
, ,-
~ or
1 G D G r A D A G G I
D E
D
E E D

E A

A

E

D A

. ..., .c ~ .c ~ c ~ .c ~_(;
I I
~. JA
I. JA'v /If' u. p,
, . I"!"
'1"- ---~ I ~- 1-- --V 1'-- ---V E G

D

D A

G D

D A

29

.

.. ~ "

I

~ n-h<> r--- f'7',
h 17_ f'7', I b <> I T I
. -'I':
. IV 1/1 '''' I~ v AI A 'v Ji5. , - __ .J
v
0 .. LJ ~ T oj'\' V -:v ,--"V
G G ..... .1..,1
3
- 3 3

D ]) A

3

3

3 Bend bas,'; neck

.,

r-

30

o

o 0

o

o

o

o

o

o

a 0

6·{) () lot> , (') ilrA Ibe> () (). () -F>
c,., II!II'j I!r J' IJiIJifrJ _lj, _I!II" 1!!r.'V _1iIII Jill.,; ItII J Iff j .. J /IIt-,,, Mf'~A A
.... II,,, , 1!iIII -'" If " lI!IIl " I!!_ '" ~ ''[]I ,2 ItI!I ... _lit -'" ItI!I · ... ,,'t .... !.Ii; ",~ l1l\I ',". _If!! r» !III '" I/Ir' -", U. IIf 'if IfV
, , '[J,; ~.'[I , , I _0 LX. I " 'r..JuX I I :I
-: " I I 'pi , ,-1 ill I I
I , I
I I I , I I
I I I
, , lV1iddJe (If fret

LJ '1 iddl

f fret

~fz_ # #~~ .
I r";\ I~ r-. r-.
I .. - . ,JI .•
L'. .,Jt!f'/',. -II'lIA ) I JI!f'-11 A II JIf. r.-, Iff v
I· ,,,,' f'."'L 1iIIrV' I L.Ii L , ,,,,' v 10' _. _I Jlflr-
, [J' » u-{ [J( I
""' ""I I 'f! /'J --~ jtt'.,6 /<iro. I I
--v fI"'-<' '''' --6
G E D A

Fretted Hartttoni . 1 st finger 4th inger -.._...r

Play' imultaneously

Example 2~Je'rry's Time with B.B. King

............. .- -"- -- ~iI_~. _~ ._._1.
,.:,. I I I .. I ... - 'I""" r- I rr-'k __ I
~
I· I o- k.. , .- _, ifJp .. " - .- jf:.f. :'Ii; .- --, - I"""'" I VIr- • J
, ko. - I VII I rr-' - I 1_1,' r- I""" f 1 __ ' I""" I I
,.- v fI ~ I '. , • -r I ._ , 1
V l-
I I

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