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Department of Mechanical Engineering

Consolidated Proposal for UG Curriculum
Based on the discussions held in a series of many DFB meetings, following is the proposal for
the two UG programs offered by the department.

1) Name of the Programs
4 year B.Tech program in Mechanical engineering (ME1)
4 year B.Tech program in Production and Industrial engineering (ME2)

2) Program structure

a) For ME1 Program:

L T P TOTAL
Departmental Core 43 4.5 32 64
Programme-linked 9 2 2 12
BS/EAS/HU 55
Departmental Elective 12
Open category 10
Grand Total 153

B) For ME2 Program:

L T P TOTAL
Departmental Core 49 2 31 66
Programme-linked 9 2 2 12
BS/EAS/HU 55
Departmental Elective 12
Open category 10
Grand Total 155

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3) Department core subjects
a) For ME1 Program:

S.
No. Course Name L T P Credits
Departmental Core
1 Manufacturing Processes I (DC) 3 0 0 3
2 Manufacturing Processes II (DC) 3 0 0 3
3 Manufacturing Lab I (DC) 0 0 2 1
4 Manufacturing Lab II (DC) 0 0 2 1
5 Manufacturing System Design (DC) 3 0 0 3
6 Introduction to Operations Research (DC) 3 0 0 3
7 Engineering Thermodynamics (DC) 3 1 0 4
8 Introduction to Fluid Mech (DC) 3 1 0 4
9 Energy systems and Technologies (DC) 3 0.5 1 4
10 Heat and Mass Transfer (DC) 3 1 0 4
11 Mechanical Engg Drawing (DC) 2 0 3 3.5
12 Solid Mech (DC) 3 1 0 4
13 Kinematics & Dynamics of Machines (DC) 3 0 2 4
14 Design of Machines (DC) 3 0 2 4
15 Control theory and applications (DC) 3 0 2 4
16 ME LAB 1 (DC) 0 0 3 1.5
17 ME LAB II (DC) 0 0 4 2
18 CAM & Automation (DC) 2 0 2 3
19 CAD & Finite Element Analysis (DC) 3 0 2 4
20 BTP I (DC) 0 0 8 4
DC total 43 4.5 32 64

b) For ME2 Program:
S.
No. Course name L T P credits
Departmental Core
1 Near Net Shape Manufacturing 3 0 0 3
2 Welding and Allied Processes 3 0 0 3
3 Metal Forming and Press Tools 3 0 0 3
4 Material Removal Processes 3 0 0 3
5 Production Engineering Lab 1(DC) 0 0 2 1
6 Production Engineering Lab 2 (DC) 0 0 2 1
7 Micro and Nano Manufacturing (DC) 3 0 0 3
8 Manufacturing System Design (DC) 3 0 0 3

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9 Introduction to Operations Research (DC) 3 0 0 3
10 Thermal Science for mfg. (DC) 3 1 0 4
11 Metrology and Quality Assurance 3 0 1 3.5
12 Stochastic Modelling and Simulation(DC) 3 0 0 3
13 Mechanical Engg Drawing (DC) 2 0 3 3.5
14 Kinematics & Dynamics of Machines (DC) 3 0 2 4
15 Design of Machines (DC) 3 0 2 4
16 Control theory and applications (DC) 3 0 2 4
17 Industrial Engineering LAB 1 (DC) 0 0 2 1
18 Industrial Engineering Lab 2 (DC) 0 0 2 1
19 CAM & Automation (DC) 2 0 2 3
20 CAD & Finite Element Analysis (DC) 3 0 2 4
21 Solid Mech (DC) 3 1 0 4
22 BTP I (DC) 0 0 8 4
DC total 49 2 31 66

3) Program Linked courses for ME1 and ME2 Programs
Introduction to Statistics (MAL 215): 4 Credits (3-1-0)
Introduction to Material science and engineering (AML 120): 4 Credits (3-0-2)
Numerical methods and computation (MAL 230): 4 Credits (3-1-0)

Total credits: 12

4) Semester schedule
Students of ME1 and ME2 do 34 credits of the Institute core courses in the first two semesters.
The schedule of courses for the next six semesters is given below.

5) (CEL140) (4) Extra1(4/3) 19.Tech. 119 VIII Credits I-II 34 Total 153 . 4 Semester Schedule of Courses for B.5 3-0-0 (3) Analysis 0-0-2 (1) 3-0-2 (4) (DC) 2-0-0 (2) (DC) 3-0-2 (4) (DC) (DC) (EAS) (DC) CAM & ME LAB II Automation BTP I (4) VII DE1 (3) OC1(3/4) 0-0-4 (2) DE2 (3) Extra2(3/4) 18/19 2-0-2 (3) (DC) (DC) (DC) DE3 (3) or BTP II DE4 (3) (if no HU4 Extra 3 16/15 VIII OC2 (3) OC3 (4/3) (6) BTP II) (3) (4/3) Credits III.5 3-0-2 (4) 3-0-0 (3) 3-1-0 (4) 3-0. Fluid Dynamics of and engineering Mechanics Thermodynamics 0-0-2 III Mechanics 3-1-0 (4) Machines 20 (AML 120) 3-1-0 (4) 3-1-0 (4) 3-0-2 (4) 3-0-2 (4) (DC) (DC) (Non-graded (DC) (DC) (PL) Core) Introduction to Energy Mechanical Design of Manufacturing Statistics (MAL systems and Engineering HU1 Machines Processes I 215) IV Technologies Drawing (4) 22.5) (DC) (DC) (PL) (DC) (DC) Numerical Introduction to Heat and Introduction to Manufacturing methods and Manufacturin Operations Mass Biology for HU2 Processes II computation g Lab I V Research Transfer engineers SBL100 (4) 23 3-0-0 (3) (MAL 230) 0-0-2 (1) 3-0-0 (3) 3-1-0 (4) 3-0-2 (4) (DC) 3-1-0 (4) (DC) (DC) (DC) (EAS) (PL) CAD & Control theory Environment Manufacturing Finite Manufacturing and ME LAB I al science HU3 System Design Element Lab II VI applications 0-0-3 (1.5-1 (4) 2-0-3 (3. (Mechanical Engineering) HU Extra courses Total Sem Course-1 Course-2 Course-3 Course-4 Course-5 Course-6 course needed for credits s specialization Introduction to Introduction Introduction to Kinematics & Material science Solid Engineering to Dept.

Machines 0-0-2 20 (AML 120) (4) (DC) 3-1-0 (4) 3-1-0 (4) (Non-graded 3-0-2 (4) (DC) (DC) Core) (PL) Introduction to Mechanical Environme Design of Metal Forming Near Net Statistics (MAL Engineering ntal science Machines and Press Tools Shape Mfg. (Production and Industrial Engineering) HU Total Sem Course-1 Course-2 Course-3 Course-4 Course-5 Course-6 Course-7 courses credits Introduction to Thermal Kinematics & Introduction to Material science Solid Mechanics Science for Dynamics of Dept.Tech. 5 Semester Schedule of Courses for B.5) 3-0-0 (3) 3-0-2 (4) 0-0-2 (1) 3-0-0 (3) 3-1-0 (4) (DC) (DC) (DC) (EAS) (DC) (DC) (PL) CAD & Material Manufacturing Control theory Finite Industrial Engg. 121 VIII Credits I-II 34 Total 155 . and engineering HU1 III 3-1-0 (4) mfg. LAB II HU3 VII OC1(3/4) DE2 (3) 18/19 2-0-2 (3) (DC) 0-0-2 (1) (4) (DC) (DC) DE3 (3) or BTP DE4 (3) (if no HU4 VIII OC2 (3) OC3 (4/3) DE1 (3) 19/18 II (6) BTP II) (3) Credits III.5 3-0-2 (4) 3-0-0 (3) 3-0-0 (3) 3-1-0 (4) (4) 2-0-3 (3.5) 2-0-0 (2) (DC) (DC) (DC) (PL) (DC) (EAS) Numerical Stochastic Introduction to Metrology and Welding and Introduction to Production methods and Modelling Operations Quality Allied Biology for Engg. Production Engg. Lab computation and V Research Assurance Processes engineers SBL100 I (DC) Simulation 21. Micro and Removal System Design and applications Element LAB I Lab II Nano Mfg. VI Processes 19 3-0-0 (3) 3-0-2 (4) Analysis 0-0-2 (1) 0-0-2 (1) 3-0-0 (3) 3-0-0 (3) (DC) (DC) 3-0-2 (4) (DC) (DC) (DC) (DC) (DC) CAM & Industrial Automation BTP I (4) Engg. 215) HU2 IV Drawing (CEL140) 23.5 (MAL 230) 3-0-0 (3) 3-0-1 (3.

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L-T-P structure 3-0-2 4. Faculty who will teach the course Sudipto Mukherjee. Course number MEL 211 6. Rigid body dynamics in the plane is used for estimation of parasitic motion due to mass imbalance.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept. The student is introduced to the characteristics of one and two-body lumped mass systems with compliant elements and some application in design of machines. Gupta and other faculty from design group 12./Centre None 8. Pre-requisites AML110 (course no. kinematics is used to design the geometry of rigid body elements of machines and their interconnections needed to obtain specified output motion in a plane. 14. Classical arrangements of rigid body systems to suppress and regulate the resulting motion are discussed. Department/Centre Mechanical Engg proposing the course 2. Course objective (about 50 words): Starting with revolute and linear actuator primitives./title) 8. Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11. K. Course Title Kinematics and Dynamics of (< 45 characters) Machines 3. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13..2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept./Centre None 8. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): . J. K. Credits 4 5.3 Supercedes any existing course None   9. Dutt. Not allowed for Nil (indicate program names) 10. Status vis-à-vis other courses (give course number/title) 8. COURSE TEMPLATE 1. Status Core for ME1 and ME2 (category for program) 7.

steering mechanisms 2 11 Inertia forces and their balancing for rotating and reciprocating 4 machines 12 Introduction to balancing of planar mechanisms 1 13 Free and forced vibration of SDOF and 2 DOF system 6 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 42 16. Displacement. hours 1 Kinematic pairs. graphical and analytical method. graphical and analytical methods 5 7 Gear tooth profile. interference in gears 2 8 Gear types. interference in gears. dynamic force and motion analysis 4 5 Synthesis of cam profiles by graphical and analytical methods 4 6 Standard and non-standard involute gear teeth. Introduction to 2 DOF systems. Force analysis of planar mechanisms. and DOF. joints. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. 2 Velocity and acceleration analysis of planar mechanisms by graphical 2 and analytical methods 3 Synthesis of linkages 2 4 Inertia forces in mechanisms. Kinematic pairs. Mobility and range of movements. graphical and analytical methods. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)   Module Topic No. mobility. Kinematic diagram and inversions 2 2 Mobility and range of movements 2 3 Displacement. function and path generation 5 5 Force analysis of planar mechanisms 3 6 Cam profile synthesis. of no. interference and 2 . graphical and analytical methods 4 Dimensional synthesis for motion. Inversions. gear trains including compound epicyclic gears. velocity and acceleration analysis of planar 5 Linkages. hours 1 Study of mechanisms – identification of links. Dimensional synthesis for motion. vibration absorbers. Gear types. Gear tooth profile. Free and forced vibration of SDOF system. Kinematic diagram and inversions. 15. of no. range of movement. Design of flywheel and governors. Cam profile synthesis. equivalent linkages. function and path generation. 2 Grashoff and non-Grashoff mechanisms. gear trains including compound epicyclic 4 9 Gears dynamic force analysis 1 10 Flywheel. Brief description of tutorial activities NA 17. Inertia forces and their balancing for rotating and reciprocating machines. velocity and acceleration analysis of planar linkages.

1 Software Software for analysis of mechanisms 19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements. Joseph Edward Shigley 19. Mechanisms and Dynamics of Machinery. Asok Kumar Mallik 2. Design content of the course (Percent of student time with examples.6 Classroom infrastructure LCD . R.3 Project-type activity - 20. 3. V. vibration absorber 2 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 28 18.  1.4 Open-ended laboratory work - 20. Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials. Hamilton Horth Mabie. if possible) 20.3 Teaching aides (videos. G. Dukkipati.1 Design-type problems 20 20.) Models of automotive systems and components 19. Reinholtz 4. John Joseph Uicker. Mechanism and Machine Theory. Rao and R. Pennock. Edition.5 Others (please specify) - Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department)   . Year. Theory of Mechanisms and Machines. Applications of flywheel 4 9 Balancing of reciprocating machinery with emphasis on IC Engines 2 10 Free and forced vibration of single degree freedom system 2 11 Vibration of 2 DOF system.2 Hardware Experimental setups for demonstration 19. etc. Title.7 Site visits - 20. Charles F.4 Laboratory 19. estimation of holding torque 2 8 Balancing of rotating masses/rotors. S. OHP projectors and board 19. Publisher. Amitabha Ghosh. if any) 19.5 Equipment PC 19. Theory of Machines and Mechanisms. undercutting 7 Kinematic analysis of epicylic gear trains. J.2 Open-ended problems - 20.

/title) 8. Status vis-à-vis other courses (give course number/title) 8. L-T-P structure 3-0-2 4. Not allowed for Nil (indicate program names) 10. 14. students shall be able to conceptualize a machine in terms of geometrical requirements and synthesize an assembly of machine components to meet the functional requirements. Credits 4 5. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept. MEP 201 (??) (course no. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Conceptualization a machine in terms of geometrical requirements specified in terms of functional degrees of freedom.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept. Course objective (about 50 words): This course introduces the student to first level methods to design mechanical machinery. Course number 6. Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11. Faculty who will teach the course Prof AChawla. Status Core for ME1 and ME2 (category for program) 7. Department/Centre Mechanical Engg proposing the course 2. Synthesis of an assembly of machine components to meet the functional requirements. Course Title DESIGN OF MACHINES (< 45 characters) 3. Students shall be able to size machine components and select material using software. Pre-requisites AML140/150. Dr H Hirani. Dr R K Pandey and other design group faculty 12. degrees of constraints and stiffness. COURSE TEMPLATE 1. MEP 100. Sizing ./Centre 8.3 Supercedes any existing course   9./Centre 8. At the end of this course. Prof S Mukherjee.

physical 6 models. Understanding failure theories. hours 1 Introduction of machine elements (Video presentation. machine components and selecting material through use of free body diagrams. 6 Design/select machine components 12 7 Parameterization: Tuning the dimensions of machine elements to 2 provide efficient design 8 Material and Process selection 4 9 Assembly of components: Understanding the effect of tolerances on 3 assembly of conceived machine. springs. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. 2 Force analysis: Concept of free body diagram. plates. 10 Case Studies 4 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 42 16. Conceptualizing the geometric shape to fulfill the functions. failure theories in static and repeated loading. nuts and bolts. shaft/axle. Final assembly drawings of machine required to manufacture the conceived machine. belt-pulleys. Design and selection of certain machine elements (i. 5 Stress analysis: Estimating various stresses under static and 5 dynamic load conditions. Case studies (like Gearbox driven by motor using belt drive) through use of parametric software to carry out iteration in the design space. of no. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)   Module Topic No. gears. Brief description of tutorial activities NA 17. 4 Solid Modelling: Making three dimensional model of the conceived 2 machine for verification. discussion) 2 Disassembly of machines 2 3 Measurement and assembly of machine parts 2 4 Fitment and alignment of Bearing 2 5 Conceptualization of machine for given problem 4 . hours 1 Conceptualizing a machine: Understanding the need of high 5 performance and efficient machines. Identification of functional requirements. 15. Identification of 3 internal and external forces and moments on each element of conceptualized machine. of no. cams. 3 Rigidity analysis: Identification of static and dynamic deflections of 2 each element. bearings. brake/clutch) as exemplars.e. Understanding the need to additional elements required to improve the rigidity.

1 Design-type problems 10 20. Design content of the course (Percent of student time with examples.edu/resources/FUNdaMENTALS.7 Site visits Mech equipment manufacturing sites. Material Selector..4 Laboratory CAGI 19.. Title.2 Open-ended problems 10 20.3 Project-type activity 10 20. MCGRAW-HILL Higher Education. Ashby M F. PCs / Workstations 19.html 19. Mischke C.3 Teaching aides (videos.2 Hardware Physical models of machine elements. and Budynas R. 6 Identification of machine elements 4 7 Sizing of machine elements 4 8 Material selection 2 9 Project submission & Viva voce examination 2 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 28 18. etc. Mechanical Engineering Design.L. and Schmidt L. Elsevier. http://pergatory.‐ Machine Design: An integrated approach.4 Open-ended laboratory work 20.5 Equipment PCs / Workstations 19. Edition.. Autodesk Inventor.mit. if possible) 20. 19. Publisher. 20.) - 19. 2005.5 Others (please specify) Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department)   . McGraw- Hill. Year. Norton R. DFMA. 2004. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements.6 Classroom infrastructure LCD projectors 19. 3rd Ediiton  Dieter G.E.1 Software TKSolver. E.. Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials. Engineering Design.G. if any) 19..R.  Shigley J. May- 2012. Material Selection in Mechanical Design. Third Edition.

 dimensioning. notes and version control in drawings. Frequency of offering Every sem 1stsem 2ndsem Either sem 11. Status Core for ME1 and ME2 (category for program) 7. H Hirani.  Sectioning. Pre-requisites MEP100 (course no. in a manner consistent with BIS  standards. Status vis-à-vis other courses(give course number/title) 8.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept.V. Department/Centre Mechanical Engg proposing the course 2. The course also aims to enable students to interpret manufacturing and assembly  drawings. COURSE TEMPLATE 1. 14. Singh./Centre None 8.S. A K Darpe. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13.  . L-T-P structure 2-0-3 4.5 5. R K Pandey and other mechanical engineering faculty 12. Faculty who will teach the course S. Course number MEP201 6./Centre None 8. Mukherjee./title) 8.P. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Introduction to generation of drawings as a design process for machine assembly. Modak. Not allowed for Nil (indicate program names) 10.3 Supercedes any existing course -   9. Use of  datum planes to locate features and machine elements uniquely in assemblies.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept. Credits 3. Course objective (about 50 words): Introduce students to convert functional specification of mechanical engineering parts and  assembly requirements into manufacturing drawing. Course Title Mechanical Engineering Drawing (< 45 characters) 3. S.

 springs and related  components.  Representation of springs and related components 6 Detailing of components involving shafts. fasteners.  3 notes. Review of dimensioning. belts. 3 Introduction  to  limits. Types of sectioning and use. Schematic drawings  1 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 28 16. Need and significance of version control  in drawings. gears. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. Standardized representation of threads. Understanding use of such assembly . 3 5 Introduction to important machine elements such as bearings  (rolling  2 contact/sliding  contact). welds. fasteners.  fits  and  tolerances. dimensional and geometric tolerances. bearings. pulleys. pulleys. 9 Introduction to Layout.  Generation of assembly drawings including sectioning and bill of materials. Brief description of tutorial activities NA 17. belts. bearing. methods of recording modifications in typical drawings  2 Introduction to generation of drawings as a design process for machine  2 assembly.  dimensional  and  geometric  4 tolerances.    Introduction to limits. surface  finish symbols.  Practical  examples  using  industrial  drawings 4 Standardized representation and types of threads. hours 1 Sketching and drawing of components of Hooke’s joint (or similar other 6 assembly) from actual assembly 1.   Evolving details of components from assembly considerations. of no. brackets for assembly.  surface  finish  symbols. hours 1 Introduction to Machine Element Drawing. gears.  7 Generation of assembly drawings using standard modeling software  4 including sectioning and bill of materials. Lecture Outline(with topics and number of lectures)   Module Topic No.  Solid modeling of above assembly and incorporating assembly constraints for animation of  motion of machine assemblies. bearing. of no. Use of datum planes to locate features and machine elements  uniquely in assemblies.  Use  of  appropriate  fits  for  correct  functioning. welds. fits and tolerances. Evolving details of components  from assembly considerations  8 Solid modeling of above assembly and incorporating assembly constraints  4 for animation of motion of machine assemblies. Detailing of components  involving shafts.   15.  5 brackets for assembly.

Engineering Drawing Practice for Schools and Colleges: Bureau of Indian standards Luzadder and Duff. retainers. fuel pump. 19.3 Teaching aides (videos. Blue Print Reading Basics.2 Hardware Good Networked lab with 50 terminals 19. Actual sketching with sensitization of adhering to IS standards 2 Revisiting the drawing in the previous step. 2012 19. etc.1 Software SolidWorks 19. tailstock. COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 28 18.6 Classroom infrastructure LCD . A text book of Machine Drawing. etc. S K Kataria & Sons. Modifying the drawings to account for the same. etc. Publisher. SP-46. fasteners. 3 Exercise on similar other mechanical assembly (screw jack. Title. Edition. such as gear box. OHP projectors 19.) - 19. 17th Edition. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements. Ltd. Study of each component and its role in the functioning 3. Design content of the course(Percent of student time with examples. if any) 19. clutch assembly.5 Equipment Simple machine assemblies. 3rd Edition.4 Laboratory CAGIL or similar 19. 2004 P S Gill. Prentice Hall of India Pvt.  Warren Hammer. acknowledging the 3 variation in dimension (done through actual measurements on set of components across the class). if possible) . Consideration of surface finish and its recording on drawing.7 Site visits - 20.) 4 Discussion of significance and recording of geometric tolerances on all 3 drawings 5 Solid modeling of the components and assembly in Activity 1 and 2 6 6 Making a complete part and assembly drawing (both sheet work and 9 solid model) for a gear box with emphasis on basis and significance of use of variety of machine elements (such as keys. 2. 11th Edition. Fundamentals of Engineering Drawing. Industrial Press Inc. The activity involves animating the functioning of gear-shifter 7 Conceptualizing and building a test rig for some functional requirement 9 Variety of simple rigs will be developed on sketch and solid model by group work and will involve use of various machine element decided by their use. 6 bicycle frame. etc). Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials. Year..

2 Open-ended problems 20.20.3 Project-type activity 2 20.5 Others (please specify) Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department)   .4 Open-ended laboratory work 20.1 Design-type problems 20.

Modak 12. Transfer function. Status Core for ME1 and ME2 (category for program) 7. Department/Centre Mechanical Engg proposing the course 2.V. Course number MEL312 6. Signal flow graph. Not allowed for Nil (indicate program names) 10. Mathematical Modeling of simple physical systems. Credits 4 5. L-T-P structure 3-0-2 4. Faculty who will teach the course S.P. Dutt. Saha. Status vis-à-vis other courses(give course number/title) 8. J.K.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Introduction. Course objective (about 50 words): The objective of the course is to introduce methods of feedback control of dynamic  systems primarily using classical control approaches 14./title) 8. S. Pre-requisites First year Mathematics courses (course no.3 Supercedes any existing course No   9. COURSE TEMPLATE 1. Transient response analysis using Laplace transform.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept. Singh. Fourier and Laplace transforms. Mukherjee. Frequency of offering Every sem 1stsem 2ndsem Either sem 11. Course Title Control theory and applications (< 45 characters) 3./Centre None 8.K./Centre 50-60% with EEL301 and CHL261 8. Design/performance specifications in time and frequency domain. Steady state error and error constants. Frequency response. Block diagrams. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13. S. S. .

Engine Governing. Frequencydomain design: Lead and lag compensator design using Bode Plots 11 Introduction to Modern control: State space representation. poles/ zeros. Standard feedback controllers: on/off. flow and motion control systems. Signal flow graph 3 Transient response analysis using Laplace transform. Transfer function models. state observer. PD and PID control. Delay and its influence on control system performance 8 Frequency response. gyros. Pole 5 placement. hydraulic amplifier. pneumatic. Lead and lag compensation. Active vibration control 15. Nyquist stability criterion. Nyquist stability 4 criterion 9 Control system design Root Locus: Root locus method of design. integral. heat transfer. Design/performance specifications in time domain 4 Characteristics of feedback control systems: Disturbance 3 rejection. Nyquist plot. Linear system. Routh’s 2 criterion. Phase margin. tachogenerator. Proportional. pneumatic 6 and vibration systems. Control system design using Root Locus and Frequency response. pressure. of no. Introduction to Modern control: State space representation. pressure. 10 Control system design using Frequency response:Frequency domain 3 specifications: Gain margin. accelerometers. Stability. Realization of standard controllers using hydraulic. electrical. Aerospace. 6 Realization of standard controllers using hydraulic. Control with state feedback. Higher order systems. potentiometers.Steady state error and error constants. Linearization. 4 flow and motion control. Proportional. derivative. 3 electronic. Lead 4 and lag compensation. encoders. Control with state feedback . Boiler. First and second 4 order systems and their characteristics. hours 1 Introduction 2 Fourier and Laplace transforms description of systems 2 Mathematical Modeling of flow. Lecture Outline(with topics and number of lectures)   Module Topic No. Bode plots. Routh’s criterion. electro-hydraulicand electro-pneumatic systems 7 Stability of control systems. DC motor. Bode plots. solenoids. integral. complex plane. Phase margin. pneumatic. Review of applications of control in: Machine tools. Correlation of Frequency and time domain specifications.sensitivity. Block diagram representation. Gain margin. stepper motors etc.. derivative. electronic. electro-hydraulic and electro- pneumatic systems. Sensors and actuators for temperature. PD and PID 5 Sensors and actuators for control systems: sensors for temp.

J. PCs/Computer lab 19.1 Software MATLAB and its control system Tool box 19. Prentice Hall. 2006 Norman S.2010 Nakra B. 2002 I. Control Systems: Principles and Design. Modern Control Engineering.3 Teaching aides (videos. Nise. Tata McGraw-Hill Education. John Wiley & Sons.5 Equipment Experimental setups about control systems. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. Title. Brief description of tutorial activities NA 17.6 Classroom infrastructure LCD . Aerospace.4 Laboratory Instrumentation 19. Introduction to Automatic Control Engineering. Control Systems Engineering. level. OHP projectors 19. if any) 19.. Edition. Boiler. Publisher.  Katsuhiko Ogata. hours 1 Dynamic response of first/second order physical systems 6 2 Pneumatic/hydraulic/electronic controllers 4 3 Control of various parameters such asspeed. 2 Engine Governing. Active vibration control COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 42 16. 6th Edition. New Age Publishers 19..7 Site visits - . Year. etc. New Age International. temperature. Control Systems Engineering.C. 12 Review of applications of control in: Machine tools. Nagrath. PCs/Computer lab 19.) - 19. Gopal. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements.2 Hardware Experimental setups about control systems. 2010 M. Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials. 8 pressure 4 Computer based control 2 5 Simulation of control systems using SIMULINK 4 6 Design of control systems using MATLAB Control System Toolbox 4 7 8 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 28 18. of no.

Design content of the course(Percent of student time with examples.1 Design-type problems 20 20.2 Open-ended problems 40 20. if possible) 20.3 Project-type activity 20.4 Open-ended laboratory work 10 20.5 Others (please specify) Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department)   .20.

Faculty who will teach the course A. 706./Centre AML705. L-T-P structure 3-0-2 4. It is intended to be a first course on Finite Element Techniques and CAD tools like surface and solid modeling. Role . Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11. Status vis-à-vis other courses (give course number/title) 8. Course Title CAD AND FINITE ELEMENT (< 45 characters) ANALYSIS 3. Pre-requisites MEL 311. H Hirani 12. 14. Course number 6. 710 (course should be mutually exclusive w. Not allowed for Nil (indicate program names) 10.3 Supercedes any existing course MEL414   9./Centre MEL414 8. Department/Centre Mechanical Engg proposing the course 2. AML140 / AML150 for UG (course no.r. Course objective (about 50 words): The primary objective of the course is to introduce the student to working with discretised geometry in design of mechanical components and representations of shapes. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Introduction and overview. COURSE TEMPLATE 1.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept./title) 8. Status Core for ME1 and ME2 (category for program) 7. S Mukherjee. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13.t these courses) 8.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept. Credits 4 5. Chawla. Need and Scope of Computer Aided Machine Design.

Derivation of Stiffness and Mass matrices for a bar. cubics. 3 introduction to Non linear analysis. Introduction to Thermal analysis. Importance of Finite element mesh. CSG. feature based modeling. Interfacing with CAD software. and Non linear analysis. 3 7 Modeling of solids–b-rep. of no. a 4 beam. NURBS. 10 FEA using 2D and 3D elements. octree. NURBS. feature based modelin. Plain strain and plain stress problems. The Viewing pipeline. principles of minimization of 5 potential energy. a beam and a shaft. Application to Thermal problems 9 1D elements. Modelling of curves. Dynamic analysis using eigen values. Automatic meshing techniques. CSG. Limitations of FEM COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 42 16. FEA using 2D and 3D elements. hours 1 Introduction and overview. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. FE and Optimization. 11 Importance of Finite element mesh. 2 2D and 3D Geometric transformations. beziers and b-splines. 1D elements. of Geometric Modelling. octree. plates / shell elements. hours 1 Labs involving modeling using curves / NURBS 6 2 1D / beam problems using FE Solvers and convergence 2 3 2D problems (plates and shells) using FE solver 4 4 3D problems using FE 4 5 Problems involving interfacing CAD and FE packages 4 6 Optimization problems involving FE analysis 4 7 Determining natural frequencies and mode shapes in a simple 2 . splines. 5 8 Introduction to the Finite Element Method. FE and Optimization. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)   Module Topic No. Derivation of Stiffness and Mass matrices for a bar. Automatic meshing techniques. Geometric modeling. Modeling of surfaces. plates / shell elements. 3 12 Introduction to FE based vibration analysis using eigenvalues. Need and Scope of Computer Aided 2 Machine Design. Introduction to the Finite Element Method. projections 3 3 The Viewing Pipeline 1 4 Geometric modeling: Modelling of cubic curves 4 5 Modeling of Bezier and B-Spline Curves 4 6 Modeling of surfaces: B splines. Role of Geometric Modelling. Limitations of FEM 15. Brief description of tutorial activities NA 17. Modeling of solids–b-rep. principle of potential energy. Plain strain and plain stress 5 problems.2D and 3D Geometric transformations and projections. of no.

4 Laboratory CAGI 19. Principles of Computer Graphics. E.2 Hardware PCs / Workstations 19.2 Open-ended problems 10 20. etc. Publisher. 19.) - 19.6 Classroom infrastructure LCD . 1997 Chandrupatla T. Matlab / Visual C++ 19..7 Site visits Mech equipment manufacturing sites. 1990 Hearn D.3 Teaching aides (videos. 20.5 Others (please specify) Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department)   .. An Introduction to FE in Engineering. & Baker.1 Software ANsys / Abaqus. OHP projectors 19. Edition. F. structure 8 Lab test 2 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 28 18.  Mortenson M. 1985 Roger D. Prentice Hall. if any) 19.4 Open-ended laboratory work 10 20. if possible) 20. Title. Design content of the course (Percent of student time with examples. John Wiley and Sons. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements. Year. Geomtric Modeling.3 Project-type activity 20. Mathematical Elements of Computer Graphics. Tata Mc Graw Hill Publishing.5 Equipment PCs / Workstations 19. ProEngineer / SOlidWorks / Catia.. 1991. Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials. Prentice Hall.1 Design-type problems 10 20.

This basic course deals with laws of thermodyamics. A. Jain and other faculty from thermal engineering 12. boundary./Centre 8. Course objective (about 50 words): The purpose of this course is to present the fundamentals of classical thermodynamicsto students of all branches of Engineering. Status vis-à-vis other courses(give course number/title) 8. Basic concepts and definitions – system. Gupta. equilibrium. zeroth law. L-T-P structure 3-1-0 4.R. Heat Transfer.3 Supercedes any existing course 9. . Credits 4 5. Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11. Not allowed for ME2 (indicate program names) 10. Energy systems & technologies and other thermal engg courses such as Turbomachinery. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Introduction: microscopic and macroscopic points of view. Pre-requisites (course no. Page 1 COURSE TEMPLATE 1./Centre 8.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept. Department/Centre ME proposing the course 2. S. 14. Course Title ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS (< 45 characters) 3. Refrigeration And Air Conditioning. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept. etc. Kale. Faculty who will teach the course S. steady state. Course number 6./title) 8. energy and its relation to matter and lays the foundation for subsequent courses in Fluid Mechanics. Status CORE FOR ME1 (category for program) 7. Power Plant Engg.

Work and heat – definition and applications. . Thermodynamic Relations. Enthalpy. The SSSF and USUF Processes. Vapor power cycles – Rankine cycle and its modifications. Thermodynamic properties of a pure substance – saturated and other states. Vapor compression refrigeration cycle. various forms of work. entropy. psychrometry. Page 2 temperature scale. compressibility chart. Carnot cycle. Irreversibility and exergy analysis. Internal Energy. Second Law – corollaries.Thermodynamics of non-reacting mixtures. Clausius inequality. Brayton/ Otto/ Dual cycles. real gases. The First Law of Thermodynamics for control mass/ volume.

boundary. Title. Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials. Year. N. temperature scale.K Thermodynamics : An Engg. of no. historical perspective 2 Basic concepts and definitions – system. zeroth law. hours 1 Introduction: microscopic and macroscopic points of view. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. Brief description of tutorial activities Problem solving on various topics of Thermodynamics covered in the lectures 17.A Generalised Approach -.E.Dhar P. 3 steady state. real gases.Sonntag R.R. psychrometry 4 12 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 42 16.F. .Rogers G. 11 Thermodynamics of non-reactive mixtures. Engineering Thermodynamics . Clausius inequality. of no. J. 3 Work and heat – definition and applications. • Engineering Thermodynamics -. & Mayhew Y.Y A Cengel & R H Turner.. Applications to simple systems 6 2nd Law – corollaries.Nag P. compressibility chart 5 The First Law of Thermodynamics.Moran M. hours 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 18. Carnot cycle. • Fundamentals of Thermodynamics -. Enthalpy. Vapor compression 4 refrigeration cycle. Page 3 15.Cengel and Boles Fundamentals of Thermal-Fluid Sciences-. Publisher. Approach -. entropy 7 7 Irreversibility and exergy analysis 3 8 Thermodynamic Relations 1 9 Vapor power cycles – Rankine cycle and its modifications. • Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics -. Lecture Outline(with topics and number of lectures) Module Topic No. The SSSF and USUF Processes.L. 6 Internal Energy. 4 10 Air standard cycles – Brayton/ Otto/ Dual cycles. J. • Engineering Thermodynamics -. First law for control mass/ volume. applications 3 to diverse engineering systems. equilibrium. Edition.C. & Shapiro H. Borgnakke C. & Van Wylen C. various forms of work 3 4 Thermodynamic properties of a pure substance – saturated and other 4 states.

• Thermodynamics : Fundamentals for Applications – J P O’connell & J M Jaile.B.6 Classroom infrastructure 19.4 Open-ended laboratory work 20.Spalding D. if possible) 20. and Cole E.3 Project-type activity 20.3 Teaching aides (videos.Howell J.) 19.7 Site visits 20. 19.4 Laboratory 19. Page 4 Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics -.1 Design-type problems 20.2 Open-ended problems 20. Design content of the course(Percent of student time with examples.2 Hardware 19.An Introductory Test -.1 Software 19.H.5 Others (please specify) Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department) . if any) 19. • Engineering Thermodynamics -.5 Equipment 19. etc.R. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements.

Buoyancy and stability./title) 8.3 Supercedes any existing course AML 160 9. Not allowed for (indicate program names) 10. Status vis-à-vis other courses (give course number/title) 8. Fluids in rigid-body motion. volume). and (b) teach and emphasize the role of fluid flows in real life engineering problems. Department/Centre Mechanical Engineering proposing the course 2. Course objective (about 50 words): The objectives of this course are to (a) introduce concepts of engineering through the fundamental laws of conservation and accounting. Course Title INTRODUCTION TO FLUID (< 45 characters) MECHANICS 3. Credits 4 5. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Introduction: scope. Will the course require any visiting no faculty? 13. project and problem based learning would be emphasized with a departure from conventional lecture and guided problem solving approach followed so far. AML 170. Faculty who will teach the course All faculty from Thermal group and any interested faculty from Applied Mechanics 12. Fluid Statics: Hydrostatic force on submerged surfaces. Additionally. CHL 231./Centre no 8. CHL 204 8. methods of analysis (system vs./Centre AML 150. Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11. Newton’s law of viscosity. Course number MEL 160 6. L-T-P structure 3-1-0 4. . Pre-requisites (course no. Eulerian/Lagrangian description. Page 1 COURSE TEMPLATE 1. Fluid as a continuum.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept. 14.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept. Status core (category for program) 7.

flow separation. Dimensional analysis and similitude: Dimensionless groups. stream function for 2D incompressible flow. scaling. Page 2 Flow kinematics: Flow lines. non- dimensionalization. linear and angular momentum for inertial and accelerating control volumes. head loss. conservation of momentum. Integral flow analysis: Reynolds transport theorem. Bernoulli’s equation. isentropic flows and converging-diverging nozzles. rotation and deformation. Differential analysis of fluid motion: Conservation of mass. the Mach cone. fluid translation. Compressible flow: speed of sound. streamlining and implications. conservation of mass. comparison of laminar and turbulent velocity profiles. Viscous flows: fully developed laminar and turbulent pipe flows. Navier-Stokes equations. vorticity and circulation. stagnation properties. . critical conditions. conservation of energy. boundary layer concept. incompressible inviscid flows. potential flow.

Dimensionless groups. Philosophy of Problem Solving. of no. hours 1 Introduction: Definition and Scope. Brief description of tutorial activities Tutorials will comprise of exercise and problem solving sessions based on lecture modules listed above. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures) Module Topic No. Simplification of Navier-Stokes through dimensional analysis. streaklines and their use in design 3 of nozzles and diffusers. Page 3 15. Absolute (laminar) vs Statistical (turbulent) Flows 9 Internal Flows: Concept of fully developed laminar flow in 2D 6 geometries. swirlers. Examples of Real Life Problems. 6 Development of Generalized Mathematical Framework: Integral vs. Mathematical Representation (Continuum. Vector (incompressible) vs 3 Vector & Scalar (compressible) dominated flow fields. Case Studies 12 Perspective and Closure 1 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 42 16. laminar vs turbulent flows. hours 1 NA 2 3 . Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. 2 Conservation and Accounting. area variation in isentropic flow. 10 Flow separation. Speed of sound. 5 Reducing the degrees of freedom of an engineering system using 2 dimensional analysis. 4 critical conditions. isentropic flow in converging-diverging nozzle. Mach cone. pathlines. Case Studies: Gates. Similarity solution. Examples. Friction and Form drag 11 Compressible Flows. advantages and applications (highlighted using case studies) 7 Potential Flow theory and its application to geometric design using 2 examples (such as airfoils) 8 Flow Classification: Internal vs External. Buoyancy 2 and stability. turbulent velocity profiles in fully developed pipe flow. Fluids in rigid-body motion. Containers/Reservoirs 4 Kinematics: Streamlines. Case studies: design of blender/mixer/chopper. in aerodynamics. of no. Eulerian/Lagrangian Description) 2 Fluid Properties: Case Studies to highlight their Role 1 3 Simple Statics:Hydrostatic force on submerged surfaces. Differential Analysis. stagnation properties. comparison of laminar and turbulent velocity profiles and design inferences. 17. importance of friction factor. vorticity and circulation. 6 Differential Analysis. case studies 10 External Flows: the boundary layer concept (for flat plate & cylinder).

Edition. Pritchard. Title.2 Open-ended problems 20. 19. 3) F. D.5 Equipment Collection of Real Life Fluid Devices 19.. Fundamentals of Aerodynamics. Fox.W.4 Open-ended laboratory work 20. 5th ed. Fluid Mechanics.6 Classroom infrastructure LCD & Black Board. 19. 1) P. if any) 19. 19.M. 7th ed. A.1 Software Freeware potential flow packages.3 Teaching aides (videos. John Wiley & Sons (2012).3 Project-type activity 20. if possible) 20. Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials. etc.2 Hardware NIL 19.7 Site visits 20. Introduction to Fluid Mechanics 7th ed. Tata McGraw Hill (2011).1 Design-type problems 20. etc. Tata McGraw Hill (2010).. 2) J.4 Laboratory 19. McDonald and R.J.5 Others (please specify) Simulation & Video based learing .. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements. Anderson.30% Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department) . Design content of the course (Percent of student time with examples.) Free Videos on fluid kinematics & Turbulence. Homsy videos.T. Page 4 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 0 18. Publisher. 19. Year. White.

Basics of thermodynamics: closed and open ./Centre Thermodynamics.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept. Course objective (about 50 words): To present the required fundamentals of thermal science with application examples to students of manufacturing. Faculty who will teach the course Prof S Kohli. Page 1 COURSE TEMPLATE 1. Department/Centre ME proposing the course 2. L-T-P structure 3-1-0 4. Status Core course for ME2 students (category for program) 7. Not allowed for ME1 (indicate program names) 10./Centre Transport Phenomena (ChE) (50%) 8. Prof S R Kale./title) 8. Prof S Jain. Course Title THERMAL SCIENCE FOR (< 45 characters) MANUFACTURING 3. Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11. Credits 4 5. Pre-requisites (course no.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept. Heat and Mass Transfer (50%) 8. 14. Status vis-à-vis other courses(give course number/title) 8. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Overview and the importance of the knoweldge of thermal science in manufacturing processes.3 Supercedes any existing course 9. Prof A Ray and other thermal engineering faculty 12. Course number 6. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13.

Irreversibilities and examples of irreversibilities in manufacturing. Page 2 systems. Surface radiation. Gray and diffuse surfaces. energy and mass. work and heat. thermal and concentration boundary layers.Case studies of manufacturing processes involving application of the above concepts.Concept of momentum. . Convective heat and mass transfer .diffusion and advective transport. Introduction to transport phenomena : various modes of transport of momentum. Second law of thermodynamics. relevant correlations. Blackbody radiation. First law of thermodynamics for control mass and control volume. Radiation heat transfer.

work. relevant non-dimensional numbers. Brief description of tutorial activities Numerical problem solving and some case studies of manufacturing processes. General equation for transport of these quantities (without detailed derivation) Diffusion: Newton's law of viscosity.diffusion and advective transport. energy and mass. (with suitable examples) 8 Case studies of manufacturing processes involving application of the 2 above concepts 9 10 11 12 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 42 16. concept of equation of state. hours 1 Introduction to relevance of thermal sciences to manufacturing 1 processes. system-surroundings. various aspects of thermal sciences . control volume. reversible and irreversible processes. . formulation of a 2- D steady state diffusion problem 5 1-D transient diffusion problems (involving semi-infinite media) in heat . Lecture Outline(with topics and number of lectures) Module Topic No.5 and mass transfer. Blackbody 7 radiation and surface properties. 5 definition of entropy. heat transfer.different statements of second law. Fourier's law. intensity. state. relevant non-dimensional numbers. Concept of radiation in an enclosure without participating medium. properties. lumped mass analysis in heat transfer. internal and external flows with examples for different configurations. Correlations for different types of flow : Laminar and turbulent flow regimes. 3 Second law of thermodynamics . Fick's law. Natural convection 7 Radiation Heat Transfer: Emissive power.thermodnamics as a study of 7 energy and its transformation. of no. Configuration factors. mathematical statement of second law for a closed system and a SSSF process. Control volume approach and statement of first law for a rate process and hence SSSF and USUF processes. Page 3 15. 17.thermodynamics and transport phenomena (fluid mechanics. Examples of 1-D steady state heat transfer and mass transfer problems in manufacturing involving only diffusion. examples of practical situations in manufacturing processes with irreversibilities 4 Introduction to transport phenomena : various modes of transport of 8 momentum. melting and solidification. examples from manufacturing processes to demonstrate application of first law of thermodynamics. mass transfer) 2 Basic concepts in thermodyamics . Relation for exchange of radiation between two gray and diffuse surfaces. thermal and 7 concentration boundary layers. of no. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. Gray and diffuse bodies.Concept of momentum. 6 Convective heat and mass transfer . heat and first law for closed and open systems. Various causes of irreversibilities.

Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials. Stewart and Lightfoot.4 Laboratory 19.3 Project-type activity 20. Page 4 hours 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 18. 1. Heat Transfer. Year. Publisher. Fundamentals of Thermodynamics. 2. Cengel.1 Software 19. 3. John Wiley.6 Classroom infrastructure 19.7 Site visits 20. Borgnakke. if possible) 20. John Wiley.5 Equipment 19. Van Wylen and Sonntag. Transport Phenomena. Design content of the course(Percent of student time with examples.4 Open-ended laboratory work 20.) 19. Title. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements. John Wiley. if any) 19.1 Design-type problems 20.2 Open-ended problems 20. Incropera and Dewitt. Bird. Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer.5 Others (please specify) Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department) . etc.2 Hardware 19.3 Teaching aides (videos. Edition. 4. 19. McGraw-Hill.

PMV Subbarao and other faculty of Thermal Engineering 12.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept. Page 1 COURSE TEMPLATE 1. Faculty who will teach the course Amit Gupta. Sanjeev Jain. Credits 4 5. and the remaining 7 weeks of tutorials. . M R Ravi. The course is envisaged to combine lectures on conventional energy conversion and utilization systems and on newer and emerging technologies with hardware exposure and term-paper assignments. Not allowed for None (indicate program names) 10. Department/Centre Mechanical Engineering proposing the course 2. Status Core for ME1 students (category for program) 7.5-1 format with 7 weeks of practicals for hardware exposure. Course objective (about 50 words): The objectives of the course are: .To expose them to the systems hardware and their working.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept. Storage and Environmental Impact . Status vis-à-vis other courses (give course number/title) 8.To train them to solve problems in the underlying concepts that govern the working of these systems . Course number MEL241 6./title) 8. Course Title ENERGY SYSTEMS AND (< 45 characters) TECHNOLOGIES 3. Utilization. Pre-requisites MEL140 or equivalent (course no. The course is expected to follow a 3-0./Centre No 8. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13.3 Supercedes any existing course MEL241 9.To expose students to Energy Systems and Technologies: Sources.5-1 4. Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11. Sangeeta Kohli./Centre ESL714 (>50%) 8. Conversion techniques. L-T-P structure 3-0.

Wind etc. Indirect solar . Ocean. Polygeneration.Biomass. Fuel Cells. Hydraulic turbines Chemical to Thermal: Combustion and stoichiometry Energy utilization : Refrigeration. Fuel upgradation: gasification of coal and biomass. Electromechanical conversion. Tidal. Nuclear fuels. Hydro. HVAC. Page 2 14. Desalination. Direct Solar. pumps and compressors Energy storage : Thermal/ Mechanical/ Electric/ Chemical Environmental Impact : Air/ water/ soil / nuclear waste . Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Energy sources : Fuels : Fossil fuels. Energy demand/ Growth/ economics . Thermoelectric Conversion Thermal to electric: IC Engines. biogas Energy conversion: Direct Conversion: Solar PV. Gas and Steam Turbines.

of no. Wind and 6 Hydraulic turbines 5 Direct Conversion to electricity : Solar PV. 2. nuclear reactors 3 Conversion of thermal to Mechanical Energy: IC Engines. Vapor 8 and combined power systems 4 Turbomachinery for power generation: Steam. 2 power. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures) Module Topic No. Refrigeration & HVAC systems 6 7 Energy Utilization/ efficiency: Polygeneration . steam generators. Title. Fuel upgradation: gasification of coal and biomass. Jochen Fricke and Walter Borst. Nuclear fuels. hydrogen.Desalination. Energy availability/ collection/ demand/ Growth/ economics. Year. & Mc Conkey A. Wind etc. Ocean. biogas 2 Combustion. hours 1 Energy sources : Fuels : Fossil fuels. Gas. Thermoelectric 4 Conversion 6 Recap of Psychrometry. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. thermochemical / Biochemical 6 conversion of biomass. Essentials of energy technology. Gas. Tidal. Hydro. 1. of no.D. 2013 .W.Biomass. 8 Turbomachinery for energy utilization: Compressors and pumps 2 9 Energy Storage and transport: Thermal/ Mechanical/ Electric/ 4 Chemical 10 Environmental Impact : Air/ water/ soil / nuclear waste 2 11 12 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 42 16. heat. Applied Thermodynamics -. Page 3 15. Fuel Cells. Principles of Energy Conversion -. Publisher. biogas. Edition. Brief description of tutorial activities 7 weeks of tutorial activity: problem solving on lecture material on energy systems and technologies 17. Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials. 2 Indirect solar .Eastop T. chemicals etc. coal gasification. 3. hours 1 Laboratory Exposure: Fuels and combustion 2 2 Laboratory exposure: IC engines 2 3 Laboratory exposure: Refrigeration and Airconditioning 2 4 Laboratory exposure: Turbomachinery 4 5 Visits to renewable energy systems 4 6 7 8 9 10 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 14 18. Direct Solar.Culp A. Wiley-VCH.

S.5 Equipment as above 19. and Van Wylen J.W.Nag P. Refrigeration and A/C. if possible) 20.) Working principles of systems 19. Gas Turbines and Power Plants: 9.C.E. 11. Gas Turbines -. 5. Turbomachinery.Stoecker W. Power Plant Engineering -.) 14 Fuel cell fundamentals.. Refrigeration and Air Conditioning -. Cha. O'Hayre.Rogers G. 4. Engineering Thermodynamics .K.D. Sonntag R. DG set. if any) 19.Colella. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements. Prinz 19.2 Hardware Systems of IC engines. AC plant.Arora C.Ganesan V. Design content of the course (Percent of student time with examples.Borgnakke C.P. Renewable Energy Systems 19. IC Engines: 8. Fundamentals of Thermodynamics -. 10.2 Open-ended problems If time permits 20.Sukhatme S. 13. Solar collectors and PV panels.3 Teaching aides (videos. 20. F. Renewable energy engg and technology .F.1 Design-type problems If time permits 20.4 Open-ended laboratory work If time permits 20. 7. etc.F.W. Internal Combustion Engines -. Solar Energy -.6 Classroom infrastructure with audiovisuals and projection 19.L.7 Site visits Choose from: Power Plant. etc.P. W.4 Laboratory as above 19.A Generalised Approach -. Page 4 Engineering Thermodynamics -. Refrigeration and Air Conditioning -.3 Project-type activity If time permits: term paper can be included 20. & Mayhew Y.Dhar P.El Wakil Renewable Energy 12.R. Solar Energy Centre. Refrigeration and Airconditioning: 6. Power Plant Engineering -.5 Others (please specify) NA Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department) . Gasification unit. & Jones J.Ganesan V.1 Software NA 19.VVN Kishore (ed.C.

Pre-requisites Thermodynamics. Page 1 COURSE TEMPLATE 1. Course objective (about 50 words): To introduce students to fundamentals of heat and mass transfer processes with adequate application examples. heat and mass transfer. Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11.3 Supercedes any existing course 9. 1-D steady state conduction in extended surfaces./Centre 8. L-T-P structure 3-1-0 4. Prof S Jain and other thermal engineering faculty 12. energy carriers and continuum approximation. heat diffusion equation. Mechanics of Fluids (course no.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept. Status Compulsory course for ME1 students (category for program) 7. Course Title HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER (< 45 characters) 3. Unified view of momentum. • Conduction: Fourier’s law. heat generation. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): • Modes of heat transfer. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13. lumped capacitance and 1D . Prof M R Ravi. Mechanisms of mass transfer./Centre CHL 251 8. Faculty who will teach the course Dr P Talukdar. Course number 6. Department/Centre Mechanical Engineering proposing the course 2. Credits 4 5. Status vis-à-vis other courses(give course number/title) 8. Dr B Premachandran. Not allowed for ME2 (indicate program names) 10.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept./title) 8. 14.

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transient models, semi-infinite wall. Diffusion mass transfer in 1D: steady state
and transient.
• Convection: Forced and free convection - mass, momentum and energy
conservation equations, scaling analysis and significance of non-dimensional
numbers, thermal boundary layers, heat transfer in external and internal
laminar and turbulent flows, and use of correlations. Convective mass
transfer. Boiling and condensation: physical phenomena and correlations.
• Heat exchanger types and analysis: LMTD and effectiveness-NTU
method.
• Radiation: properties, Laws, view factor, 3-surface network for diffuse-
gray surfaces. Gas radiation.

Page 3

15. Lecture Outline(with topics and number of lectures)
Module Topic No. of
no. hours
1 Modes of heat transfer, energy carriers and continuum approximation. 3
Mechanisms of mass transfer. Unified view of momentum, heat and
mass transfer.
2 Conduction: Fourier’s law, heat diffusion equation, 1-D steady state 3
conduction in different coordinate systems, effect of heat generation
3 Heat conduction in extended surfaces, fin characterization 2
4 Lumped capacitance and 1D transient models, semi-infinite wall. 4
Diffusion mass transfer in 1D: steady state and transient.
5 Convection: Forced and free convection - mass, momentum and 4
energy conservation equations, scaling analysis and significance of
non-dimensional numbers
6 Thermal boundary layers, heat transfer in external and internal laminar 8
and turbulent flows, Natural convection
7 Convective mass transfer 2
8 Boiling and condensation: physical phenomena and correlations. 4
9 Heat exchanger types and analysis: LMTD and effectiveness-NTU method. 4
10 Radiation: properties, Laws, view factor, 3-surface network for diffuse- 8
gray surfaces. Gas radiation
11
12
COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities
Primarily numerical problem solving on different topics covered in the lectures.

17. Brief description of laboratory activities
Module Experiment description No. of
no. hours
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’)

18. Suggested texts and reference materials
STYLE: Author name and initials, Title, Edition, Publisher, Year.
1. Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer, Incropera and Dewitt, Sixth Edition, John
Wiley.
2. Heat Transfer, Y Cengel, Mcgraw-Hill.

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19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1 Software
19.2 Hardware
19.3 Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
19.4 Laboratory
19.5 Equipment
19.6 Classroom infrastructure
19.7 Site visits

20. Design content of the course(Percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1 Design-type problems 10%
20.2 Open-ended problems
20.3 Project-type activity
20.4 Open-ended laboratory work
20.5 Others (please specify)

Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department)

14./Centre NIL 8. Status vis-à-vis other courses (give course number/title) 8. Course Title MANUFCTURING PROCESSES I (< 45 characters) 3. WELDING: Shielded metal arc welding. Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11. Course number 6. Faculty who will teach the course D Ravi Kumar. S Ghosh 12. S Aravindan. Pouring and Fluidity. Resistance welding.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept. Gas welding and Gas cutting.3 Supercedes any existing course MEL232 9. Pre-requisites (course no. Not allowed for ME2 (indicate program names) 10. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): CASTING: Sand casting. Solidification of pure metals and alloys. Casting defects. Status CORE FOR ME1 (category for program) 7. Brazing. advantages and applications. ./title) 8. Page 1 COURSE TEMPLATE 1. Department/Centre ME proposing the course 2. Types of metal transfer in arc welding. L-T-P structure 3-0-0 4. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13. Inspection and testing. MIG and SAW processes. Riser design and its placement. other arc welding processes like TIG. Melting. Credits 3 5. Course objective (about 50 words): The objective of the course is to impart fundamental knowledge on primary manufacturing processes such as casting. joining. The course also covers analysis of the processes. Gating system and its design.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept./Centre With three core courses of ME2 (30% each) 8. Solid state welding processes. Other casting processes. forming and powder metallurgical processes and their applications.

Friction and lubrication in metal working. Page 2 Soldering and their applications. Powder Metallurgy: Powder production methods. Surfacing and its applications. Yield criteria. Applications of powder metallurgy. Hot working and Cold working. stress-strain relationships. . compaction and sintering. Analysis of bulk forming and sheet metal forming processes. Unconventional forming processes. FORMING: Plastic deformation of metals.

hours 1 Sand casting process. Solid state welding processes 3 8 Brazing. 6 GMAW and SAW processes. Principles of Metal Casting – RW Heine. 3 Casting defects. Patterns and pattern allowances. Applications of powder metallurgy. Soldering and their applications. other arc welding processes like GTAW. Brief description of tutorial activities NA 17.Groover 3. Moulding 3 sand properties and their testing methods. 12 Powder Metallurgy: Powder production methods. Surfacing and its 3 applications. Title. Edition. Inspection and testing. 4.Yield criteria 3 10 Hot working and Cold working. Year. Friction and lubrication in metal 4 working. Solidification of pure metals and alloys. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures) Module Topic No. 9 Plastic deformation of metals. Modern Manufacturing Processes . Pouring and Fluidity. COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 42 16. stress-strain relationships. hours 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 18. Manufacturing Engineering and Technology – Kalpakjian (Addison Wesley) 2. compaction and 2 sintering. Mould preparation. 3 3 Melting. 1. Core and Coremaking. Welding – AWS Handbooks . 4 Other casting processes. 11 Analysis of bulk forming and sheet metal forming processes. Page 3 15. CR Loper and PC Rosenthal (Tata-McGraw Hill). 7 Unconventional forming processes. 2 Gating system and its design. 4 5 Shielded metal arc welding. Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials. Publisher. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. of no. of no. Types of metal transfer in arc welding 6 Gas welding and Gas cutting 1 7 Resistance welding. Riser design and its placement.

4 Open-ended laboratory work 20.3 Teaching aides (videos. Page 4 5. Metal Forming: Processes and Analysis-B.1 Software 19. Rowe 8. if possible) 20. Mallik (East West Press).) Req 19.2 Hardware 19.1 Design-type problems 20. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements.5 Others (please specify) Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department) . 19.5 Equipment 19. Mechanical Metallurgy (Part IV) – G E Dieter (Tata-McGraw Hill).G.K.W.4 Laboratory 19. Manufacturing Science – A. Avitzur 7. Ghosh and A. 6.7 Site visits 20.6 Classroom infrastructure Req 19. Design content of the course (Percent of student time with examples.3 Project-type activity 20. if any) 19. Industrial Metal Working Processes. etc.2 Open-ended problems 20.

Methods of measurment of forces and temperature (experimentally and analytically). To Learn the basic mechanics of metal machining 2.3 Supercedes any existing course MEL233 9.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13. To Learn the basics of various Machine Tools 3./title) 8. Department/Centre ME proposing the course 2. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Introduction to Metal Machining and Machine Tools. Credits 3 5. Basic concepts of cost and economics of machining Various types of machine tools and their development with regard to productivity & accuracy requirements. Workholding and tool holding devices . Course objective (about 50 words): 1. Mechanics of Machining including force and temperature generation. Pre-requisites MANUFCTURING PROCESSES I (course no. Page 1 COURSE TEMPLATE 1. L-T-P structure 3-0-0 4. Status CORE (category for program) 7. Faculty who will teach the course Prof P V Rao. N Bhatnagar 12. Tool wear mechanisms and tool life criteria. Not allowed for ME2 (indicate program names) 10. To learn the various Non coneventional Machining Methods & Metrology and quality aspects during machining 14. Geometry of cutting tools. Course number 6. Ghosh. Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11./Centre 8./Centre 8. Course Title MANUFCTURING PROCESSES II (< 45 characters) 3. Dr S. Status vis-à-vis other courses (give course number/title) 8.

Surface quality inspection. Page 2 for machine tools Introduction to non conventional machining processes and understanding basic mechanisms of material removal in such processes Introduction to metrology. Design of Limit gauges. Inspection by measurment. Limit gauging. Dimensional Inspection. Feature inspection .

R. J..F. Publisher. 3rd Edition) 2. Page 3 15. C. London . & Shotbolt. Boothroyd.A. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures) Module Topic No. Title. 1. Measurement of Surface Roughness. C. Feature Inspection COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 42 16. Tool wear mechanisms and tool 4 life and control of tool wear 9 Basics of Grinding process and Economics of Machining 3 10 Introduction to Non Conventional machining processes and 5 mechanisms of material removal in these processes 11 Basics of Machine Tools 5 12 Introduction to Metrology. dimensional measurement. Ltd. Fundamentals of Metal Machining and Machine Tools – G. Advanced Methods of Machining – J.Various gauges and inspection techniques. fits and tolerances..Oblique and orthogonal machining 3 operations. Shaw (Oxford University Press) 3.McGeough (Springer International Edition) 4. Metal Cutting Principles – M. hours 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 18.Galyer. 7 limits. Edition. of no. Year. Cassell & Co. Standardization. of no. ( Taylor and Francis. hours 1 Introduction to Machining and Machine Tools 1 2 Basics of tool geometry including nomenclature of cutting tools 3 3 Mechanics of Machining . Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. chip formation processes during machining 4 Cutting forces in orthogonal machining using Merchant's Circle 3 Diagram 5 Fundamentals of heat transfer mechanisms during machining and 3 cutting temperature generation during machining 6 Various methods of determining cutting forces and temperature 3 7 Methods for controlling cutting temperature and improving surface 2 finish during machining 8 Various tool materials and their uses. Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials.W. “Metrology for Engineers”. Brief description of tutorial activities NA 17.

5 Equipment 19. if possible) 20.7 Site visits 20.5 Others (please specify) Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department) . if any) 19.2 Open-ended problems 10% 20. etc.3 Project-type activity 30% 20.) Req 19.4 Laboratory 19. Design content of the course (Percent of student time with examples.2 Hardware Req 19. Page 4 19.1 Design-type problems 10% 20. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements.1 Software 19.3 Teaching aides (videos.4 Open-ended laboratory work 20.6 Classroom infrastructure Req 19.

Tool wear mechanisms and tool life criteria. Bhatnagar 12. Faculty who will teach the course S. Various types of machine tools and their structures.temperature. Not allowed for ME1 (indicate program names) 10. To understand the basic machine tools and the kinematic structures 14. Status CORE (category for program) 7.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept. Ghosh. Nomenclature and geometry of cutting tools. Course objective (about 50 words): 1./Centre 8. N. L-T-P structure 3-0-0 4. Pre-requisites (course no. To learn various material removal processes and chip removal mechanisms 2. Mechanics of Conventional and Non Conventional Machining including force. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13. temperature and surface finish (experimentally and analytically). Course number 6.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept. Department/Centre ME proposing the course 2.3 Supercedes any existing course MEL234 9. Methods of measurment of forces./Centre 8. Basic concepts of cost and economics of machining. Status vis-à-vis other courses (give course number/title) 8. Workholding and tool . Credits 3 5. P V Rao. Page 1 COURSE TEMPLATE 1. Course Title MATERIALS REMOVAL PROCESSES (< 45 characters) 3. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Introduction to various material removal processes. To learn and analyse non traditional machining and ultra precision machining processes 3. surface integrity. Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11./title) 8.

Manufacturing of micro tools. Ultraprecision machining and grinding methods and the machine tools used for such processes. Nano-finishing of materials using advanced machining methods . Page 2 holding devices for machine tools.

LBM etc and modelling for material removal in those processes 11 Basics of Machine Tools and structures of general purpose machine 4 tools 12 Ultraprecision machining and grinding processes. . of no. hours 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 18. of no. Brief description of tutorial activities NA 17. hours 1 Introduction to Machining and Machine Tools 1 2 Geometry of cutting tools and various tool designation systems and 4 their interrelationship 3 Mechanisms of chip formation and Mechanics of Machining . Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials. Analysis of the 8 processes such as EDM. measurements of tool wear 9 Basics of abrasive machining processes 2 10 Introduction to Advanced machining processes. Tool wear mechanisms and 3 tool life. Year. Publisher. Safety considerations and impact on environment of the various machining processes COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 42 16. Page 3 15. Edition. Title. their applications 6 and requirements of machine tools for ultraprecision machining. 2 Orthogonal and Oblique machining operations 4 Analysis of Cutting forces during orthogonal machining using 3 Merchant's Circle Diagram 5 Fundamentals of heat transfer during machining and analysis of 3 cutting temperature generation during machining 6 Various methods of determining cutting forces and temperature 2 7 Methods for controlling cutting temperature and improving surface 4 integrity aspects during machining 8 Advanced tool materials and their uses. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures) Module Topic No. ECGM. Cost estimation for adopting such processes. ECM. Fabrication of micro tools and nano surface generation using the advanced machining processes. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No.

Page 4 1. if possible) 20.4 Open-ended laboratory work 20. Non Traditional Machining Process . A. CRC Press 5. Design content of the course (Percent of student time with examples.5 Others (please specify) Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department) . if any) 19. Shaw (Oxford University Press) 3.1 Design-type problems 20% 20. Micromachining of Engineering Materials .4 Laboratory 19. McGeough.) Req 19. Marcel Dekker. Boothroyd. Mark J. 3rd Edition) 2.G F Bendict.1 Software 19.5 Equipment 19.2 Hardware Req 19. Metal Cutting Principles – M.Nano and micromachining.3 Teaching aides (videos. 19.A. Advanced Methods of Machining – J.3 Project-type activity 40% 20.6 Classroom infrastructure Req 19. Jackson.2 Open-ended problems 20% 20. John Wiley and Sons 6. Fundamentals of Metal Machining and Machine Tools – G.McGeough (Springer International Edition) 4. etc.J. C. Paulo Davim. J. ( Taylor and Francis. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements.7 Site visits 20.

Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Alternate year 11. Pre-requisites None (course no. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Introduction and fundamentals of Casting of complicated shapes: automotive components.5 Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s) None 9. Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title) 8.2 proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre None 8. magnesium and Titanium alloys Injection moulding: Thermoplastics. Department/Centre Mechanical Engineering proposing the course 2. Not allowed for ME 1 (indicate program names) 10. This also introduces the applications of such processes. 14. Course Title NEAR NET SHAPE MANUFACTURING (< 45 characters) 3./title) 8. Faculty who will teach the course ALL PRODUCTION FACULTY 12. thermoset plastics and composites – processing . Course objective (about 50 words): The objective of the course is to introduce the fundamental knowledge on the processes used for manufacturing near net shapes. Status Core ME2 (category for program) 7. Credits 3 5. Course number MEL 6.4 UG/PG course(s) from other Departments/Centers None 8.3 approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre None 8. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13. casting of light alloys – Aluminum. COURSE TEMPLATE 1.1 existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre 8. L-T-P structure 3-0-0 4.

. compacting. powder consolidation routes. Powder Metallurgy: fabrication routes. powder size determination – micro and nano level. Laser engineered net shaping. sintering.methodologies. sintering. Advances in near net shape manufacturing: Metal Injection moulding. field assisted sintering technologies. hot pressing. hot iso static pressing.

casting design: Metallurgical 5 consideration. economical consideration 5 Application of CAD\CAM in foundry. field assisted sintering technologies. compression. of eno. 8 Metal injection moulding and applications 2 9 Laser engineered net shaping and applications 4 10 11 12 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 42 16. risering system. stir casting. sintering. transfer . hot pressing. Casting of complicated shapes: 5 automotive components. 6 Injection moulding: Thermo and thermo set plastics and composites – 4 processing methodologies – extrusion. die design. injection moulding. hours 1 Cooling curves. investment casting 4 Gating system. sintering. solidification behaviour of metal and alloy. and defects of the components. hot iso static pressing. magnesium and Titanium alloys. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures) Modul Topic No. hours 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) . design consideration. dendritic. Brief description of tutorial activities Not Applicable 17. squeeze casting. compacting.15. 2 equi-axed and refined grain growth 2 Introduction and fundamentals of metal flow 5 3 Permanent mold. Brief description of laboratory activities Modul Experiment description No. casting of light alloys – Aluminum. powder metallurgy and applications. centrifugal 10 casting. pressure die casting. powder size determination – micro and nano 5 level. powder consolidation routes. continuous casting. rotational and blow moulding 7 Powder fabrication routes. of e no.

Ghosh and A.18.3 Teaching aides (videos. 7.2 Hardware 19. Principles of Metal Casting – RW Heine. Mallik (East West Press) 4. Manufacturing Science – A. Grover. Manufacturing Engineering and Technology – Kalpakjian (Addison Wesley) 2. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements. etc.3 Project-type activity 20. Materials and processes in manufacturing – E.Paul degarmo.6 Classroom infrastructure 19.2 Open-ended problems 20.5 Equipment 19.1 Design-type problems 20. Mikell P. Design content of the course (Percent of student time with examples. Processes & Systems by Mikell P.) 19.K.1 Software LCD PROJECTOR FACILITY 19.wiley 2002 6. ASM handbook on casting technology 5. CR Loper and PC Rosenthal (Tata-McGraw Hill) 3.4 Open-ended laboratory work 20. Groover –Prentice Hall USA.5 Others (please specify) Date : ( Signature of the Head of the Department) . 19. if any) 19.7 Site visits 20. Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing: Materials.4 Laboratory 19. Suggested texts and reference materials 1. if possible) 20.

Course number 6./title) Statistics" MAL140 8. Pre-requisites Programme Linked course "Probability and (course no. Manufacturing complexity. Status vis-à-vis other courses(give course number/title) 8. On completing the course. students should be able to understand the dynamics of manufacturing systems and use quantitative approaches to develop simple models for evaluating the performance of various elements of a manufacturing system. Kiran seth 12.3 Supercedes any existing course 9. Investment decisions using life cycle costing. Status Core Course (category for program) 7. Performance modeling of manufacturing systems. Production control mechanisms like Kanban. Course objective (about 50 words): The objective is to introduce students to the basics of manufacturing system modeling and design. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Manufacturing strategy. L-T-P structure 3-0-0 4. Bolia. Page 1 COURSE TEMPLATE 1. CONWIP and POL2 . Manufacturing flexibility. Department/Centre Department of Mechanical Engineering proposing the course 2. Course Title MANUFACTURING SYSTEM DESIGN (< 45 characters) 3. System reliability and maintenance models. Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11. 14. N.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept. Single and mixed model assembly line balancing. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13. Economic design of quality control plans.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept./Centre 8. Not allowed for (indicate program names) 10./Centre 8. Faculty who will teach the course M S Kulkarni. Credits 3 5. Lot sizing and inventory control models. Shop floor scheduling algorithms.

hours 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 18. D. Engineering Economics. L. of no.. McGraw Hill India. 2003. U. An Introduction to Reliability and Maintainability Engineering. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. Askin R. B. Miltenburg J. Taylor & Francis. Brief description of tutorial activities NA 17. Page 2 15. Edition. CONWIP and PLOCA 4 Futuristics approaches for manufacturing system control 2 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 16. Publisher. Design and Analysis of Lean Production Systems. of no.) .. John Wiley and Sons (Asia). Bedworth D. 2005. Goldberg J.. hours 1 Introduction to the course and overview of manufacturing systems 4 2 Manufacturing strategy 2 3 Manufacturing flexibility 1 4 Manufacturing complexity 1 5 6 Basic decision making models 2 Investment decisions under uncertainty using lifecycle costing models 2 7 System reliability and maintenance models 5 8 Economic design of quality control plans 3 9 Single and mixed model assembly lines 3 10 Shop floor scheduling algorithms 3 11 Economic lot sizing 2 Inventory control models 4 12 Performance modeling of production lines 4 Production control mechanisms like Kanban. Ebeling C.. Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials. E.. Year.G. 2000.. Randhawa S. 2004. Lecture Outline(with topics and number of lectures) Module Topic No. Tata Mcgraw Hill. Riggs J. Manufacturing Strategy: How to Formulate and Implement a Winning Plan / Edition 2. Title. Edition 4. James L.

3 Project-type activity 20.3 Teaching aides (videos.4 Laboratory 19.1 Design-type problems 80% 20.2 Hardware 19.) Yes 19. Page 3 19.2 Open-ended problems 20.1 Software 19.5 Others (please specify) Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department) .7 Site visits 20. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements.5 Equipment 19. etc.6 Classroom infrastructure LCD projector 19. if any) 19. if possible) 20.4 Open-ended laboratory work 20. Design content of the course(Percent of student time with examples.

/title) 8. A. Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11. .3 Supercedes any existing course MEL221 9. Course Title INTRODUCTION TO OPERATIONS (< 45 characters) RESEARCH 3. Department/Centre ME proposing the course 2. Software Tools and Case Studies. Integer Programming . Status Core (category for program) 7.Formulation. Page 1 COURSE TEMPLATE 1. Not allowed for (indicate program names) 10. The course will enable the students to appreciate how to model real life situations of various domains. Solution methods. L-T-P structure 3-0-0 4./Centre 8. Faculty who will teach the course Nomesh B. Linear Programming . Solution methods including Simplex.D. Bolia. Course number 6. and use mathematical tools to optimize decision making.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept. Will the course require any visiting Yes faculty? 13. Kiran Seth. Gupta 12./Centre 8. Status vis-à-vis other courses (give course number/title) 8. Credits 3 5. Course objective (about 50 words): To introduce students to basic modeling and tools of Operations Research. Introduction to Dynamic Programming. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Introduction to Modeling. Primal-Dual. 14. Pre-requisites None (course no.Formulation.

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Integer and Combinatorial Optimization. 7th Edition. Page 3 15. Pearson Education. available on IITD library website. 8th Edition. hours 1 Introduction and Motivation 2 2 Linear Programming: Formulation 3 3 Solution of Linear Programming Problems: Graphical Method 1 4 Simplex Method: Geometry. Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials. F. Tableau 4 5 6 Revised Simplex Method 3 7 Primal-Dual: Introduction. Operations Research: An Introduction.1 Software Excel with Solver Plugin . Basic Theory. of no. and Lieberman. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. Wolsey. 1999. L. S. Introduction to Operations Research.J. Publisher.A. subscribed by IIT Delhi. Formulations 2 8 Integer Programming: Formulation. Binary Formulations with 4 Examples 9 Solution of Integer Programming Programming: Branch and Bound 3 10 Dynamic Programming: basics. G. 19. and Nemhauser. H. John Wiley & Sons. if any) 19. Title. of no.A Journal of the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science (INFORMS). Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures) Module Topic No. G. McGraw-Hill. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements. Hillier. cplex) 2 12 Applications/Case Studies 12 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 42 16. L. 2001. formualtion. Edition. Interfaces . 2007. solution 6 11 Software tools (excel. Year. hours 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 18. Brief description of tutorial activities NA 17. Taha.

1 Design-type problems 20. Page 4 19.3 Teaching aides (videos.2 Hardware Laptop 19.4 Open-ended laboratory work 20.4 Laboratory 19. 2014 (Signature of the Head of the Department) .7 Site visits 20.2 Open-ended problems 20.5 Others (please specify) Date: Jan 2. etc.3 Project-type activity 20. Design content of the course (Percent of student time with examples.) 19. if possible) 20.6 Classroom infrastructure LCD 19.5 Equipment 19.

and find analytical or simulation based solutions. Introduction to Continuous Time Markov Chains (CTMC)./title) 8.Introduction. Status vis-à-vis other courses (give course number/title) 8./Centre 8. The course will enable the students to appreciate how to model uncertainty in systems. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Overview of Probability Basics. Introduction to Discrete Time Markov Chains (DTMC). 14. Course objective (about 50 words): To introduce students to stochastic modeling and simulation. Faculty who will teach the course Nomesh B. . Will the course require any visiting Yes faculty? 13. Department/Centre ME proposing the course 2. Kiran Seth 12. Course Title STOCHASTIC MODELING AND (< 45 characters) SIMULATION 3. Credits 3 5./Centre 8.3 Supercedes any existing course MEL770. Page 1 COURSE TEMPLATE 1. Course number MEL324 6. Status Core (category for program) 7.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept. Discrete Event Simulation . Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11. MEL250 9.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept. Simulation modeling thorugh case studies. Not allowed for (indicate program names) 10. Generation of Random Variables. L-T-P structure 3-0-0 4. Applications. Pre-requisites MAL140 or equivalent (course no. Bolia. Transient and Limiting analysis of DTMC. Transient and Limiting analysis of DTMC.

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Springer- Verlag New York. Introduction to Probability Models.) . Interfaces . Modeling Analysis. 10th Edition. 1999. available on IITD library website. Page 3 15. software tools 14 11 12 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 42 16. Kulkarni. Design and Control of Stochastic Systems. Ross. of no. if any) 19. V. 19. 2010.2 Hardware Laptop 19. Inc. Title.A Journal of the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science (INFORMS).with examples. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements. Brief description of tutorial activities NA 17. Sheldon. subscribed by IIT Delhi. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No.1 Software Anylogic Simulation Software 19. Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials.3 Teaching aides (videos. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures) Module Topic No. Year. hours 1 Introduction and Motivation 2 2 Basics of Probability and Random Variables 2 3 DTMC: Introduction and Transient Analysis 5 4 DTMC: Limiting Behavior 4 5 6 CTMC: Introduction and Evolution 2 7 CTMC: Transient and Limiting Analysis 6 8 Applications 4 9 Simulation: Introduction and Generations of Random Variables 3 10 Simulation Modeling . etc. Publisher. Edition. hours 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 18. Elsevier. G. of no.

2014 (Signature of the Head of the Department) .6 Classroom infrastructure LCD 19.5 Equipment 19.1 Design-type problems 20.5 Others (please specify) Date: Jan 2. Page 4 19. Design content of the course (Percent of student time with examples. if possible) 20.2 Open-ended problems 20.7 Site visits 20.4 Laboratory 19.4 Open-ended laboratory work 20.3 Project-type activity 20.

2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept. Analysis of forming processes like forging.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept. The course also covers the equipment and tools used in metal forming and recent developments including unconventional forming processes. Status vis-à-vis other courses (give course number/title) 8. Course Title METAL FORMING AND PRESS TOOLS (< 45 characters) 3./Centre 30% WITH MFG-1 FOR ME1 8. RAVI KUMAR AND OTHER INTERESTED FACULTY OF ME DEPT. Fundamentals of plasticity. Stress-strain relationships. wire . extrusion. Yield criteria. Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11. Credits 3 5. Strain rate and temperature in metal working. Course objective (about 50 words): The objective of the course is to impart knowledge on fundamentals of important metal forming processes and to make the students understand the mechanics of the processes by mathematical analysis and their application in real situations by solving numericals. Status CORE FOR ME2 (category for program) 7.3 Supercedes any existing course MEL 234 9. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Mechanical behaviour of metals and alloys in plastic deformation. rolling. 14. L-T-P structure 3-0-0 4. Will the course require any visiting NO faculty? 13. Hot working./Centre NIL 8. Tensile properties. Flow stress and flow curves. Not allowed for ME1 (indicate program names) 10. Page 1 COURSE TEMPLATE 1. Faculty who will teach the course D. Cold working and annealing. Course number 6. Department/Centre ME proposing the course 2. 12. Pre-requisites (course no./title) 8. Fundamentals of metal forming processes.

Equipment and tools used in metal forming operations. different types of dies and their design aspects. Unconventional forming processes. Types of presses. . Page 2 drawing and sheet metal forming by slab method.

Schmid 2. 2 Stress-strain relationships 2 Tensile properties. of no. Page 3 15.1 Software 19. Metal Forming: Processes and Analysis-B.G.S. Publisher. hours 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 18. etc. Mechanical Metallurgy – G.) . hours 1 Elastic and plastic deformation of metals and alloys. Edition. Flow stress and constitutive equations 3 3 Fundamentals of plasticity. Kalpakjian and S. if any) 19. 1. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements. Avitzur 3. Brief description of tutorial activities NA 17. Title. Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials. Manufacturing Processes for Engineering Materials. Year. Yield criteria 4 4 Fundamentals of metal working. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures) Module Topic No.W.3 Teaching aides (videos. Rowe 4. Classification 2 5 Temperature and strain rate in metal forming.2 Hardware 19.E. different types of dies 3 11 Unconventinal forming processes 2 12 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 42 16. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. Dieter 19. of no. Hot deformation 2 6 Cold working and annealing 2 7 Theory and analysis of buk forming processes 12 8 Theory and analysis of sheet metal forming processes 8 9 Metal forming equipment 2 10 Metal forming tools. Industrial Metal working Processes.

7 Site visits 20.6 Classroom infrastructure 19.4 Open-ended laboratory work 20.5 Equipment 19. Design content of the course (Percent of student time with examples. Page 4 19.4 Laboratory 19. if possible) 20.2 Open-ended problems 20.1 Design-type problems 20.3 Project-type activity 20.5 Others (please specify) Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department) .

Course objective (about 50 words): The objective of this course is to introduce the fundamental concepts of various welding and allied processes. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13. Gas welding and Gas cutting. L-T-P structure 3-0-0 4. manual metal arc welding. Electrogas and electro slag welding.3 approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre None 8./title) 8.2 proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre None 8.4 UG/PG course(s) from other Departments/Centers None 8. COURSE TEMPLATE 1. Metal transfer mechanisms in arc welding. basic physics of arc and flame.1 existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre 30% OVERLAP 8. Course Title WELDING AND ALLIED PROCESSES (< 45 characters) 3. 14. Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title) 8. GMAW. Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Alternate year 11. Faculty who will teach the course : Sunil Pandey. Course number 6. Weld bead characterization. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Principles of arc welding. Not allowed for ME 1 (indicate program names) 10. S Aravindan 12. GTAW. Resistance .5 Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s) None 9. Status ME2 (category for program) 7. Department/Centre Mechanical Engineering proposing the course 2. Credits 3 5. The students will understand the science behind the joining processes and associated applications. Pre-requisites None (course no.

causes and remedies. Solid state welding processes.welding. residual stress and distortion. surfacing and plasma spray forming. Joint design. welding symbols and Joint evaluation through destructive and non destructive testing methods. welding defects. surfacing applications. Radiant energy welding processes. Soldering and their applications. Heat flow characteristics and metallurgical changes in fusion welding. Plasma cutting. Advances in welding. Brazing. .

Brief description of tutorial activities Not Applicable 17. projection. Plasma. basic physics of arc and flame. power source characteristic curves. welding symbols and Joint evaluation through destructive 4 and non destructive testing methods. GMAW and SAW processes and their recent variants. 4 Heat flow characteristics and metallurgical changes in fusion welding. causes and remedies 2 10 Hybrid welding processes and applications 2 11 12 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 42 16.transferred arc welding and their applications. hours 1 Principles of arc welding. heat balance.ceramic- metal joints 6 Radiant energy welding processes . 9 welding defects. hours 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 . Brief description of laboratory activities Modul Experiment description No. manual metal arc welding. surfacing and plasma spray forming. Gas welding 8 and Gas cutting.15.laser beam welding (LBW) . Electrogas and electro slag welding. 7 Brazing. flux covering. 3 Weld bead characterization. 2 5 Solid state welding processes-Cold welding. different types of electrodes and their applications. plasma cutting. RSW applications. explosive and diffusion bonding. 2 GTAW. Arc welding power sources. percussion. 8 arc welding process: transferred and non. flash butt welding. of e no. electrode life.equipment -electron beam welding 3 (EBW) . Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures) Modul Topic No.applications of EBW and LBW. seam. 6 Resistance welding: spot. ultrasonic welding. Soldering and their applications 2 8 Joint design. 5 friction and friction stir. of eno.

brazing and soldering. Design content of the course (Percent of student time with examples. COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 18. 6th Ed. 2004 19. etc.2 Open-ended problems 20. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements.) 19. Modern welding technology. if possible) 20.5 Others (please specify) Date : ( Signature of the Head of the Department) ..1 Design-type problems 20. Howard B Cary.3 Project-type activity 20.4 Open-ended laboratory work 20.5 Equipment 19. vol 6. if any) 19.6 Classroom infrastructure 19.3 Teaching aides (videos. AWS Handbook (Vol 1-5). Prentice Hall USA. ASM Handbook – welding.4 Laboratory 19.2 Hardware 19.7 Site visits 20. Suggested texts and reference materials 1. USA. 3. American welding society. 2. Miami.1 Software LCD Projector 19.

pneumatics and PLCs with mechanical systems. Credits 3 5. Page 1 COURSE TEMPLATE 1. Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11. P M Pandey./Centre 8. Status Core (category for program) 7./Centre 8. Course number 6. Course Title CAM&AUTOMATION (< 45 characters) 3. Course objective (about 50 words): Industrial automation is at the heart of modern industries. Status vis-à-vis other courses(give course number/title) 8. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13. Faculty who will teach the course Sunil Jha.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept. Use of group technology.3 Supercedes any existing course 9. The automation in modern manufacturing industries is achieved by introduction of automation implementation technologies using like hydraulics. L-T-P structure 2-0-2 4. P V M Rao 12.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept. Computer numerical control is used to manufacture mathematically defined geometries./title) processes(ME2) 8. Not allowed for (indicate program names) 10. Pre-requisites MFG-I & MFG-II for ME1. Material Removal (course no. The syllabus of the course has been designed to develop basic understanding about automation implementation technologies and computer aided manufacturing practiced in modern manufacturing industries. Department/Centre ME proposing the course 2. process planning and automated material handling technologies adds to achieve automation. .

virtual manufacturing. FMS. . CIM. NC and CNC hardware and programming. DNC system. Numerical control. economics of automation. Inspection automation and reverse engineering. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Automation need and types of automation. Circuit design and applications of hydraulic. Automated material handling technologies. Group technology. electro-hydraulic and programmable logic control (PLC) systems. Page 2 14. Basics of electro-mechanical automation technologies. Computer aided process planning. pneumatic. Machine controls. Rapid prototyping and tooling concepts and applications. HMI design and implementation. Control engineering in production systems: open loop and closed loop control systems. electro-pneumatic.

Circuit design 4 and applications of hydraulic and pneumatic controls 3 Electro-hydraulic and Electro-pneumatic System design 4 4 Programmable Logic Control (PLC) hardware and programming. Prentice Hall India. Programmable Logic Controllers - Programming Methods and Applications. Publisher. Grover. Lecture Outline(with topics and number of lectures) Module Topic No. and Computer Integrated Manufacturing. 2008 3. 6th edition. 1 9 Rapid prototyping and tooling concepts and applications. hours 1 Basic Pneumatics Experiments 6 2 Electro-Pneumatics Experiments 4 3 Electro-Hydraulic Experiements 4 4 Programmable Logic Controller Experiments 6 5 Machine interface Programming and HMI Design 4 6 Motion Control Experiments 4 7 8 9 10 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 28 18. Hackworth. Computer aided process planning 2 8 Inspection automation and reverse engineering. 2011 4. 2009 2. Pearson Prentice Hall. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. Page 3 15. Year. Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials.Principles and Applications. 7th impression. John R. Webb. Edition. of no. 2 Basics of automation implementation methodologies. 1. Machine interface programming. 3rd Edition. 2 Computer Integrated Mfg. Fluid Power with Applications. economics of automation. John W. Production Systems. Anthony Esposito. Mikell P. hours 1 Automation need and types of automation. Programmable Logic Controllers . 5 5 NC and CNC hardware. Ronald A Reis. 5th Edition. Pearson Education. Pearson Education. 10 11 12 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 28 16. Frederick D. Hackworth Jr. HMI Design 5 6 Automated material handling technologies 3 7 Group technology. Automation. 2008 . of no. Brief description of tutorial activities NA 17. virtual 2 manufacturing. Title.

Hydraulic and Pneumatic Simulation. Electrohydraulic Trainers.2 Hardware Pneumatic Trainers. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements. Electropneumatic Trainers. Page 4 19.1 Design-type problems 40% 20.1 Software Automation Studio.4 Laboratory Automation Laboratory 19. Motion control softwares 19. HMI.5 Equipment Trainers and CNC Machines 19.2 Open-ended problems 20% 20.6 Classroom infrastructure 19.7 Site visits 20. if possible) 20.3 Project-type activity 30% 20.4 Open-ended laboratory work 10% 20. PLC Trainers.) 19. Design content of the course(Percent of student time with examples. Electropneumatic Simulation.5 Others (please specify) Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department) . if any) 19. Motion Controllers. PLC Programming. CNC Machines 19. etc. Hydraulic Trainers.3 Teaching aides (videos.

Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13./Centre NONE 8. Laser.Electron and Ion beam micromachining methods.NEMS and nanotechnology have already found many applications in Mechanical Engineering and are projected to be of greater relevance to mechanical systems in future . Status ME2 (category for program) 7. Faculty who will teach the course P V Madhusudhan Rao. L-T-P structure 3-0-0 4. Course objective (about 50 words): MEMS. Department/Centre Mechanical Engineering proposing the course 2. Course Title MICRO. Status vis-à-vis other courses(give course number/title) 8. Nanomanufacturing methods. 14. nanomaterials and nano metrology. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): An overview of micro and nano mechanical systems and their applications in Mechanical Engineering.Aravindan 12.3 Supercedes any existing course NONE 9. Not allowed for (indicate program names) 10. Objective of the course is to expose students with emerging manufacturing techniques for producing micro and nano level products..S.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept. Mechanical Micromachining techniques. Course number 6. Material Removal (course no. MEMS Microfabrication methods.AND NANO- (< 45 characters) MANUFACTURING 3. Silicon Micromachining methods. Pre-requisites MFG-I & MFG-II for ME1. Page 1 COURSE TEMPLATE 1./title) processes for ME 2 8./Centre NONE 8. Credits 3 5. .

. application 6 potential of micro and nano structured surfaces 9 Recent advances in micro & nanofabrication 2 10 11 12 COURSE TOTAL(14 TIMES ' L' 42 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 16. ion implantation. of no.abrasive microgrinding. Year. nano grinding. Publisher. hours 1 An overview of micro and nano mechanical systems and their 5 applications in Mechanical Engineering . thermal 7 oxidation. Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials. hours 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 14 18. 8 micro electro discharge machining. 3 Silicon Micromachining . . Title. micro electro chemical machining. micro milling. Edition. Nano-fluidics.anisotropic wet chemical etching.manufacture of substrates. surface micromachining. of no. wafer 5 bonding. non-optical photolithography. photoresists. focused ion beam and electron beam machining 7 Fabriaction of nano materials and nano crystalline materials 7 Characterization techniques such as SEM. and etching processes. Nano- mechanics. Nano-metrology. dry plasma etching.Nano-machines. epitaxial growth processes. 4 Laser Micromachining methods 2 5 6 Mechanical Micromachining . Brief description of tutorial activities NA 17.nano patterned surfaces for functional devices. Page 2 15. diffusion. vacuum processes and plasmas.AFM. Nano- manufacturing 2 MEMS Microfabrication . 8 Micro.TEM. optical lithography. rapid thermal processing. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. Nano-tribology. chemical vapor deposition. SPM. thin film manufacturing using physical vapor deposition. Lecture Outline(with topics and number of lectures) Module Topic No.

1 Design-type problems 20.2 Open-ended problems 20.7 Site visits 20.1 Software 19. Introduction to micromachining. 4. Handbook of Microlithography. K Eric Drexler. J A McGeough and Joseph McGeough. Manufacturing and Computation. etc. 5. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements. Page 3 1. SPIE Press 3.6 Classroom infrastructure 19. Narosa Publications 2011.4 Laboratory 19. 19. 2.2 Hardware 19. Micromachining and Microfabrication. Micromachining of Engineering Materials.Stefano Cabrini and Satoshi Hawata. P Rai-Choudhuri.3 Project-type activity 20. John Wiley.) 19. if any) 19. Nano fabrication hand book – CRC press 2012.5 Equipment 19. Design content of the course(Percent of student time with examples. Nanosystem: Molecular Machinery.3 Teaching aides (videos. Marcel Dekkar.4 Open-ended laboratory work 20. if possible) 20.5 Others (please specify) Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department) . V K Jain.

Calibration of sensors and analysis leading to the defined objectives. Pre-requisites Fluid Mech. Kinematics and dynamics and Energy Systems . Faculty who will teach the course 12. Department/Centre Mechanical Engineering proposing the course 2./Centre 8. Course number 6. Solid Mech./Centre 8. Credits 1. Page 1 COURSE TEMPLATE 1. Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11. Not allowed for (indicate program names) 10. Status DC for ME1 (category for program) 7. Status vis-à-vis other courses (give course number/title) 8. Kinematics./title) Energy Systems 8. conceptualizing a rig. carrying out the measurements. L-T-P structure 0-0-3 4. The students will also be introduced to uncertainty analysis of the results. (course no. Solid Mech.3 Supercedes any existing course 9.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept. Thermodynamics. putting it together in a flexible laboratory environment. Thermo. Will the course require any visiting faculty? 13.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept.5 5. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Experiments pertaining to applications of the concepts learnt in the theory courses of Fluid Mech. Course Title MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (< 45 characters) LABORATORY I 3. Course objective (about 50 words): To introduce to the students the methodology of experimentation through the process of defining a set of objectives. 14.

Page 2 .

5 First and second law analysis of variety of systems 9 6 Dynamics of rotaing systems 3 7 8 9 10 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 42 18. Title. J. 3 Evaluation of stresses due to drag forces on an object. . 2.O. Dally. 2007.C. of no. McGraw Hill. 3. Doeblin. Brief description of tutorial activities NA 17. McGraw-Hill. Page 3 15. Tata McGraw Hill. W. hours 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 16. vis-à-vis 6 the shape and surface characteristics of the balls. study of relevant mechanisms like CAM. Year. .G. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures) Module Topic No. Measurement Systems – Application and Design. Instrumentation. Experimental Methods for Engineers .J P Holman. E. Publisher. slider crank etc. Nakra and K. Edition. 4. hardness. 1.K. Also measurment of different properties of various materials.F. Riley and K. Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials. John Wiley & Sons. Chaudhry. of no. wear resistance etc. Also thermal analysis of the heat treatment process.W. B. McConnell. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. Measurement and Analysis. hours 1 Examples: Study of trajectories of cricket ball/golf ball etc. Instrumentation for Engineering Measurements. 6 4 Measurment of pressure and temperatures in an IC 9 engine/compressor with measurement of the cylinder dimensions and estiimating mass flow rate. 2 Heat treatment of steel bars and measurement of properties like 9 strength.

4 Open-ended laboratory work 20.2 Hardware 19.2 Open-ended problems 20.3 Project-type activity 20.6 Classroom infrastructure 19.4 Laboratory 19. Page 4 19.1 Software 19. etc. if any) 19.5 Equipment 19. if possible) 20.) 19. Design content of the course (Percent of student time with examples.7 Site visits 20.3 Teaching aides (videos.1 Design-type problems 20.5 Others (please specify) Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department) . Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements.

Course objective (about 50 words): Experiments with Practical systems involving Engineering Concepts 14. HMT.0 5. Course Title MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (< 45 characters) LABORATORY II 3.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept. Not allowed for (indicate program names) 10. Pre-requisites Mech Eng Lab I. Faculty who will teach the course Sangeeta Kohli. The knowledge gained in control engineering course would also be used for setting up computerised measurements using Data acquisition cards . Status DC for ME1 (category for program) 7. Page 1 COURSE TEMPLATE 1. Credits 2. A K Darpe. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): The expeiments would involve full or partial fabrication of setups and then taking readings and analysis of its behavior. Control Theory.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept./Centre 8. S Mukherjee./title) Machines 8. Course number 6. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13. L-T-P structure 0-0-4 4. instead of using ready made setups.3 Supercedes any existing course 9. A Gupta and other faculty of Mechanical Engg Department 12./Centre 8. Design of (course no. Status vis-à-vis other courses (give course number/title) 8. Department/Centre Mechanical Engineering proposing the course 2. Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11.

of no. Dally.J P Holman. 2. Riley and K. thermal analysis of motor and importance of fins 3 Experiments with a refrigeration system in heating and cooling mode 8 to find COP. Doeblin. McGraw Hill. of no. Title. Experimental Methods for Engineers . Nakra and K. Measurement Systems – Application and Design. Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials. Brief description of tutorial activities NA 17. Publisher.K.C. 4 Experiments using power window mechanism of a car 8 5 Automotive Transmissions : Analysis and conceptualising new design 12 6 Presentations and experience sharing 8 7 8 9 10 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 56 18. Instrumentation. temperature rise in the slurry.W. hours 1 Examples: Setting up an on-off controller for a thermal system and 8 related measurements. 4. 2 Experiments with a domestic mixer including measurement of 12 pressure variations.F. 2007. McGraw-Hill. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures) Module Topic No. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. Chaudhry. Year.O. Measurement and Analysis. Instrumentation for Engineering Measurements. . 3. E. B. Tata McGraw Hill. J. Page 2 15. McConnell. Edition. study of mountings. John Wiley & Sons. measurement of system noise levels.G. hours 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 16. 1. W.

Design content of the course (Percent of student time with examples.3 Teaching aides (videos. if any) 19.7 Site visits 20. Page 3 19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements. Matlab 19.1 Design-type problems 30% 20.) 19.5 Others (please specify) Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department) .4 Open-ended laboratory work 30% 20. etc.2 Hardware 19.1 Software Solid Modelling Software.5 Equipment 19.4 Laboratory Flexible Laboratory facilities 19.6 Classroom infrastructure 19.3 Project-type activity 20.2 Open-ended problems 20. if possible) 20.

Credits 1 5./Centre NIL 8./title) 8. Faculty who will teach the course D. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13. L-T-P structure 0-0-2 4. S. Page 1 COURSE TEMPLATE 1. forming.Aravindan. Status vis-à-vis other courses(give course number/title) 8. . Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Experiemnts on casting. injection molding and powder metallurgical processes.Bhatnagar. joining.Ravikumar. joining. N. 14. Not allowed for ME2 (indicate program names) 10./Centre Production Engg. Department/Centre ME proposing the course 2.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept.Ghosh 12. S. Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11. lab I course of ME2 (60%) 8.3 Supercedes any existing course Prac part of MEL 232 9. Pre-requisites (course no. forming and powder metallurgical processes and their applications. Course Title MANUFACTURING LAB I (< 45 characters) 3. Course objective (about 50 words): The objective of the course is to give hands on exposure on primary manufacturing processes such as casting.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept. Course number MEP 6. Status CORE FOR ME1 (category for program) 7.

Modern Manufacturing Processes . Lecture Outline(with topics and number of lectures) Module Topic No. hours 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 16. Publisher. 2 9 Determination of springback in bending of different materials. Page 2 15. Brief description of tutorial activities NA 17. of no.Groover .Process parameter control in Injection molding process 2 7 Drop forging of a spanner and study of power hammer 2 8 Determination of formability in deep drawing and stretch forming. Title.Processing of polymers into product by Injection molding b. Manufacturing Engineering and Technology – Kalpakjian (Addison Wesley) 2. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No.Edge preparation and GTAW process with and without filler metal 2 6 2 a. Year. Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials. current and weld speed Weld bead analysis and microstructure analysis in GMAW process 2 . hours 1 Introduction to lab and safety 2 2 Sieve analysis and testing of moulding sand 2 3 Determination of fluidity of molten metal by spiral test 2 4 Study of die casting and centrifugal casting 2 5 Analysis of weld bead profiles in shielded metal arc welding : varying 2 polarity. 1. Edition. 2 10 Compaction and sintering of powder metallurgical samples and 2 evaluation 2 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 28 18. of no.

3 Project-type activity 20. Ghosh and A.5 Others (please specify) Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department) . CR Loper and PC Rosenthal (Tata-McGraw Hill).5 Equipment Yes 19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements. 6. Manufacturing Science – A. Rowe 8.7 Site visits 20. Design content of the course(Percent of student time with examples. Mechanical Metallurgy (Part IV) – G E Dieter (Tata-McGraw Hill). Principles of Metal Casting – RW Heine.6 Classroom infrastructure 19.4 Open-ended laboratory work 20. Industrial Metal Working Processes.) 19.K. 4.W. Metal Forming: Processes and Analysis-B.1 Software 19.4 Laboratory Yes 19. if possible) 20. Mallik (East West Press). if any) 19. etc.1 Design-type problems 20.2 Hardware Yes 19.3 Teaching aides (videos. Avitzur 7.G. Page 3 3. 19. Welding – AWS Handbooks 5.2 Open-ended problems 20.

Page 1

COURSE TEMPLATE

1. Department/Centre ME
proposing the course
2. Course Title MANUFCTURING LAB II
(< 45 characters)

3. L-T-P structure 0-0-2
4. Credits 1
5. Course number
6. Status CORE
(category for program)

7. Pre-requisites MANUFACTURING LAB I
(course no./title)

8. Status vis-à-vis other courses(give course number/title)
8.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept./Centre
8.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept./Centre
8.3 Supercedes any existing course

9. Not allowed for ME2
(indicate program names)

10. Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem
11. Faculty who will teach the course
Prof P V Rao, Dr S. Ghosh, N Bhatnagar
12. Will the course require any visiting No
faculty?
13. Course objective (about 50 words):
The objective of the course is to give hands on exposure of machining and
measurement/Metrology and their applications.
14. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities):
Experiments on machining and metrology.

Page 2

15. Lecture Outline(with topics and number of lectures)
Module Topic No. of
no. hours
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’)

16. Brief description of tutorial activities
NA

17. Brief description of laboratory activities
Module Experiment description No. of
no. hours
1 INTRODUCTION TO THE LAB AND SAFETY RELATED ISSUES 2
2 STUDY OF CHIP FORMS DURING TURNING UNDER VARIOUS 2
PROCESS PARAMETRIC CONDITIONS
3 ROLE OF MACHINING PROCESS PARAMETERS ON SURFACE 2
FINISH
4 TEMPERATURE MEASURMENT DURING TURNING PROCESS 2
5 EFFECT OF DRESSING PARAMETERS ON SURFACE FINISH 2
DURING GRINDING
6 TOOL WEAR MESURMENT DURING MACHINING 2
7 MACHINING OF HARDENED STEELS BY VARYING PROCESS 2
PARAMETERS IN EDM
8 DEMONSTRATION OF A SPINDLE GEAR BOX OF A CENTRE 2
LATHE AND CONSTRUCTING THE RAY DIAGRAM FOR THE
SAME
9 ALIGNMENT STUDY OF A CENTRE LATHE, STUDY OF 4
MECHANISMS OF A CAPSTAN LATHE
10 Comprehensive Measurement, Dimensional and feature inspection by 6
CMM, Inspection of threads using floating carriage micrometer
Evaluation 2
COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 28

18. Suggested texts and reference materials
STYLE: Author name and initials, Title, Edition, Publisher, Year.

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)

Page 3

19.1 Software
19.2 Hardware
19.3 Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
19.4 Laboratory
19.5 Equipment
19.6 Classroom infrastructure
19.7 Site visits

20. Design content of the course(Percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1 Design-type problems
20.2 Open-ended problems
20.3 Project-type activity
20.4 Open-ended laboratory work
20.5 Others (please specify)

Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department)

Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11. D. Page 1 COURSE TEMPLATE 1. Course objective (about 50 words): The objective of the course is to give hands on exposure on primary manufacturing processes such as casting.Ghosh. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Experiemnts on casting. Pre-requisites (course no.Ravikumar.Bhatnagar and S. Faculty who will teach the course S. Department/Centre ME proposing the course 2. forming and powder metallurgical processes and their applications. Not allowed for ME1 (indicate program names) 10. . Status CORE FOR ME2 (category for program) 7. Course Title PRODUCTION ENGINEERING LAB I (< 45 characters) 3. Course number MEP 6. Status vis-à-vis other courses(give course number/title) 8. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13. Credits 1 5./Centre With Manufacturing lab I of ME1 (60%) 8.Aravindan 12.3 Supercedes any existing course Prac part of MEL 234 9. injection molding and powder metallurgical processes. 14./Centre NIL 8. forming.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept./title) 8. N. L-T-P structure 0-0-2 4.

Publisher. Year. Manufacturing Science – A. Manufacturing Engineering and Technology – Kalpakjian (Addison Wesley) 2. Rowe 7. Lecture Outline(with topics and number of lectures) Module Topic No. Edition. Ghosh and A.G. Title. Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials. Industrial Metal Working Processes.Processing of polymers into product by Injection molding b. Modern Manufacturing Processes . Brief description of tutorial activities NA 17.W. . of no. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. Mechanical Metallurgy (Part IV) – G E Dieter (Tata-McGraw Hill).Process parameter control in Injection molding process 5 Thermoforming of polymer 2 6 Effect of cold rolling on hardness of Al alloy sheets 2 7 Drop forging of a spanner and study of power hammer 2 8 Determination of formability in deep drawing and stretch forming.K. 2 10 Compaction. 4. 1. sintering and hot isostatic pressing of powder 4 metallurgical samples COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 28 18. hours 1 3 2 3 3 3 4 4 5 6 6 1 7 3 8 3 9 3 10 4 11 7 12 2 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 42 16. of no.size and morphology analysis: property testing 2 3 Study of investment casting process for precision castings 2 Fluidity Estimation of cast iron at different pouring temperatures 2 Study on die casting and centrifugal casting 2 4 4 a. Principles of Metal Casting – RW Heine. 2 9 Determination of springback in bending of different materials.Groover 3. Page 2 15. Avitzur 6. Mallik (East West Press). CR Loper and PC Rosenthal (Tata-McGraw Hill). Metal Forming: Processes and Analysis-B. 5. hours 1 Introduction to lab and safety 2 2 Moulding sand .

2 Hardware Yes 19. Design content of the course(Percent of student time with examples.6 Classroom infrastructure 19. if any) 19.5 Others (please specify) Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department) .) 19. if possible) 20.5 Equipment Yes 19.2 Open-ended problems 20.3 Project-type activity 20. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements.4 Laboratory Yes 19.4 Open-ended laboratory work 20.7 Site visits 20. etc.1 Design-type problems 20.1 Software 19.3 Teaching aides (videos. Page 3 19.

/title) 8. L-T-P structure 0-0-2 4. S. Course number MEP 6. Jha. Credits 1 5./Centre 8. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept. Status CORE (category for program) 7.3 Supercedes any existing course 9. Course Title PRODUCTION ENGGLAB II (< 45 characters) 3./Centre 8. Not allowed for ME1 (indicate program names) 10. Page 1 COURSE TEMPLATE 1.S.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept. S Aravindan 12. Course objective (about 50 words): The objective of the course is to give hands on exposure on machining and welding processes 14. Faculty who will teach the course Prof P V Rao. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Experiments on machining and welding processes . Department/Centre ME proposing the course 2. Status vis-à-vis other courses(give course number/title) 8. Pre-requisites PRODUCTION ENGG LAB I (course no. Ghosh. Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11.

7 Demonstration of a spindle gear box of a centre lathe and constructing 2 the Ray diagram for the same. 4 Machining of hardened steel by varying process parameters in EDM. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. if any) 19. 19. Year. 2 5 Improving machining of difficult to machine materials 2 6 Machining of brittle materials using USM. Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials. hours 1 Introduction to Lab and safety related issues 2 2 Study of chip forms during turning under various process parametric 4 conditions. Page 2 15.1 Software . of no. 8 Bead on plate studies in SMAW process: mild steel on mild steel plate. Edition. Brief description of tutorial activities NA 17. Title. 2 stainless steel on mild steel plate 9 Weld Bead analysis in GTAW process with and without filler 2 10 Effect of process parameters in GMAW process through 2 microstructural analysis of weld bead Evaluation 2 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 28 18. Lecture Outline(with topics and number of lectures) Module Topic No. hours 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 16. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements. of no. Role of machining process parameters on surface finish 3 Temperature Measurement during turning process 4 Tool wear measurement during machining 4 Effect of dressing parameters on surface finish during grinding. Publisher.

7 Site visits 20.3 Project-type activity 20. if possible) 20.5 Others (please specify) Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department) . Page 3 19.2 Hardware 19.2 Open-ended problems 20.3 Teaching aides (videos.5 Equipment 19.6 Classroom infrastructure 19.) 19. Design content of the course(Percent of student time with examples.1 Design-type problems 20.4 Laboratory 19. etc.4 Open-ended laboratory work 20.

sensitivity analysis. Conceptualization/Visualization of problem situation.The theory would be covered earlier. solution using CPLEX. Faculty who will teach the course N. B.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept. Bolia. Page 1 COURSE TEMPLATE 1. Stochastic Modeling and (course no. The exposure would include both deterministic optimization problem as well as stochastic modeling and simulation oriented problems. L-T-P structure 0-0-2 4.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept. Credits 1 5./Centre 8. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Deterministic optimization problem formulation. Course Title IE LAB 1 (< 45 characters) 3. Status Core (category for program) 7. Kulkarni./Centre 8. M. S. Status vis-à-vis other courses (give course number/title) 8. Pre-requisites Operations Research. Not allowed for (indicate program names) 10.3 Supercedes any existing course 9. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13. simulation runs and output analysis. Course objective (about 50 words): The objective of the course is to expose students to a large problem starting from formulation to solution. Department/Centre ME proposing the course 2. Kiran Seth 12. formulation of simulation model. 14. and this course would serve the requirements of hands on sessions to use the theory studied and real life problems. . Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11./title) Simulation 8. Course number 6.

Discrete Event Simulation: Modeling. New York. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures) Module Topic No. 2012. Springer- Verlag Inc.2 Hardware Computers depending on class size 19. of no. Fishman. hours 1 Introduction to the course (1 practical session) 2 2 Simple examples on CPLEX (1 practical sessions) 2 3 Problem Formulation (1 practical session) 2 4 Solution Using CPLEX (2 practical sessions) 4 5 Sensitivity Analysis (2 practical sessions) 4 6 Conceptualization/Visualization of problem (2 practical sessions) 4 7 Creation of Simulation Model using Anylogic/Arena (2 sessions) 4 8 Output Analysis (2 practical sessions) 4 9 Evaluation and Conclusion (1 session) 2 10 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 28 18. 2001. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements. etc. 19. of no. AnyLogic 6 in Three Days: A Quick Course in Simulation Modeling. Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials. CPLEX 19. if any) 19.3 Teaching aides (videos. Year. Edition. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. Grigoryev. Title. AnyLogic Company. Page 2 15. Ilya. Publisher. hours 1 NA 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 16. S. Programming and Analysis. G.) .1 Software AnyLogic. Brief description of tutorial activities NA 17.

6 Classroom infrastructure 19.1 Design-type problems 20.4 Open-ended laboratory work 20.5 Equipment 19.4 Laboratory 19. Design content of the course (Percent of student time with examples. if possible) 20.7 Site visits 20. Page 3 19.2 Open-ended problems 20.3 Project-type activity 20.5 Others (please specify) Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department) .

The lab course will in two parts. Simulation of machine failures and Simulation of job shops and production lines with various production control mechanisms. Course Title IE LAB 2 (< 45 characters) 3. 14. N. S. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): Design of optimal acceptance sampling plans. The experiments will be based on the topics covered in the Metrology and QA course as well as the Manufacturing System Design course. L-T-P structure 0-0-2 4. Design of optimal control charts Simulation of process failures.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept. Page 1 COURSE TEMPLATE 1./Centre 8./title) System Design 8. Status Core (category for program) 7. Pre-requisites OR. Not allowed for (indicate program names) 10./Centre 8. Department/Centre ME proposing the course 2. .2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept. Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11. Bolia 12. The first part will cover SPC and the second part will cover discrete event simulation of manufacturing systems. Stochastic Modeling and Simulation. Course number 6. Course objective (about 50 words): The objective of the course is to expose students to the methodology of optimal design of Statistical Process Control (SPC) procedures as well as modeling and simulation of manufacturing systems.3 Supercedes any existing course 9. Kulkarni. Mfg (course no. Faculty who will teach the course M. Credits 1 5. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13. Status vis-à-vis other courses (give course number/title) 8.

Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements.2 Hardware Computers depending on class size 19. Quest (Delmia V6) manuals 2013 19.6 Classroom infrastructure 19. hours 1 Economic design of acceptance sampling plans 4 2 Economi design of control charts 4 3 Learning Delmia shopfloor simulation software 8 4 Simulation of production lines with Kanban. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures) Module Topic No. of no. Publisher.4 Laboratory 19.5 Equipment 19. of no. hours 1 NA 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 16. Year. Brief description of tutorial activities NA 17. Page 2 15. Title.7 Site visits .) 19. Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials.1 Software Quest (Delmia V6) 19. Edition. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. 4 5 Simulation of production lines with CONWP 4 6 Evaluation 4 7 8 9 10 COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 28 18. etc. if any) 19.3 Teaching aides (videos.

if possible) 20.4 Open-ended laboratory work 20.2 Open-ended problems 20.5 Others (please specify) Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department) .1 Design-type problems 20.3 Project-type activity 20. Design content of the course (Percent of student time with examples. Page 3 20.

/Centre No 8. this course be considered equivalent to the old MEL737 course. COURSE TEMPLATE 1.3 Supercedes any existing course* - For 2011 and earlier entry students. Department/Centre Mechanical Engg proposing the course 2. L-T-P structure 0-0-6 4. survey and self learning of the existing relevant literature. Course objective (about 50 words): The objective of the project is to impart an experience of working in a team on an engineering problem related to mechanical engineering that may include: formulation and definition of the problem. Pre-requisites EC 120 (course no. All applied mechanics faculty 12. analysis and presentation of the results and documentation.2 Overlap with any UG/PG course of other Dept. Frequency of offering Every sem 1st sem 2nd sem Either sem 11. Status Core for ALL UG Students (category for program) 7. Credits 3 5. Faculty who will teach the course All Mechanical faculty./Centre No 8. Status vis-à-vis other courses (give course number/title) 8. Will the course require any visiting No faculty? 13.1 Overlap with any UG/PG course of the Dept./title) 8. Course contents (about 100 words) (Include laboratory/design activities): A broad outline of the contents is as follows and a project may include some or all of these activities: . 14. Course number - 6. planning a methodology. Course Title MAJOR PROJECT BTP-I (< 45 characters) 3. Not allowed for - (indicate program names) 10.  9. execution of the necessary analysis/design/manufacturing activities to achieve the objectives. It is desirable that the project is Industry oriented/a real life problem.

Materials and standard components are procured and manufacturing is carried out. 15. Professional quality documentation of all designs. selection of design for development. sub-assemblies and components culminating in engineering drawings and material specifications. Detailed mechanical. formulating project management procedures. They should maintain a separate log-book in which they must regularly enter . overall assessment. Assembly procedure is finalized and the machine is assembled. Team formation for designing. of no. and testing procedure. machine tools and other fabrication facilities. The students are expected to interact with the supervisor/s periodically and work on the project to achieve the set objectives as per the time schedule of the activities that are planned at the beginning of the project. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)   Module Topic No. data. assemblies. etc. and results. Using engineering drawings. thermal and manufacturing-related design of systems. is mandatory. drawings. change history. Acceptance tests are carried out vis-à-vis specifications. along with a final presentation. the process sheets are developed based on available materials. defining design and performance specifications. of no. an industrial problem or a product development. The project is executed under faculty supervision. parts are accepted. preparing bill of materials and identification of standard components and bought-out parts. Brief description of tutorial activities NA 17. Need identification. assessment of alternative designs. manufacturing and operating a selected product. Brief description of laboratory activities Module Experiment description No. After inspection. No Lectures COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘L’) 16. hours The project is allotted to a group of students (preferably in a team of four or more) who work on a topic that could be in the form of a research project. hours NA.

Publisher. Year.) 19. etc. 19. Design content of the course (Percent of student time with examples. 20. if possible) 20.3 Project-type activity -- 20.1 Design-type problems Design content depends on the individual projects.4 Open-ended laboratory work -- 20.5 Equipment ---- 19. Edition.7 depends on the individual projects. the project activities as and when performed with dates.6 Classroom infrastructure ---- 19. if any) 19.1 Software Need of Items 19.3 Teaching aides (videos.7 Site visits ---- 20. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements. COURSE TOTAL (14 times ‘P’) 18.1 to 19.  NA 19.5 Others (please specify) -- Date: (Signature of the Head of the Department)     . Suggested texts and reference materials STYLE: Author name and initials. Title.2 Open-ended problems -- 20.4 Laboratory 19.2 Hardware 19.