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IV.

THE UTOPIA
1.HOW DOES THE DEVELOPMENT OF UTOPIA’S URBAN AREAS DIFFER
FROM THE WAY CITIES DEVELOP IN THE REAL WORLD? WHAT IMPLIED
CRITICISM IS MORE MAKING IF TOWN LIFE AND GROWTH IN HIS DAY?
Thomas More creates a society in which women are given more rights and power than any in
existence, and yet even he cannot completely escape the European conviction that women were
inferior. Cities are distinguishable from each other only by those differences imposed by
geographical location and topography. Hythloday describes them all by describing one, choosing
the capital city, Amaurot, as his subject. Amaurot is spread along a tidal river that is bridged only
at its farthest point from the sea, so that ships can access all of the city quays. A second fresh
water stream runs through the city. The source of this stream is enclosed within the city walls, so
that the city will never be without a source of drinking water.

The city is surrounded by a thick wall. Its streets are rationally planned to allow for easy
movement of traffic. Buildings are well maintained. Every house has a front door that opens on a
street and a back door that opens onto a garden. No doors can be locked; there is no private space.
Houses are all well built and three stories high, with brick or flint facades.

2.HOW DOES THE SOCIETY RAPHAEL DESCRIBES AMOUNT TO SOMENTHING


LIKE’’COMMUNISM’’.

The different religions meet in the same churches run by the same priests, and services emphasize the similarities
between the religions. If some religion demands a rite or prayer that might be offensive to another, then that rite must
be performed in a home in private, not in the church. Utopian priests are men of the highest moral and religious
caliber, and, accordingly, there are very few of them.In the imaginary country Utopia (the name means “noplace”),
there is no money or private property. Everyone has a job, working for the commonwealth, and productivity is such
that all needs are met (food, clothing, shelter, etc.) while also leaving ample leisure time. Needless to say, everyone
is happy, there’s no cause for dissatisfaction, hence practically no cheating or crime or grasping for power.
“Communist” or not, this might seem attractive (albeit kind of boring). But of course it’s a vain dream, because
actual human beings resist such regimentation, and mainly because there’s a powerful drive for status (biologically
installed by evolution since higher status means more mating opportunities)