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B.C.

Views
Secret negotiations
on HST? p6
Drama over missing shipping container. p12
Arts&life

THE NEWS
www.mapleridgenews.com Wednesday, September 8, 2010 · Serving Maple Ridge & Pitt Meadows · est. 1978 · 604-467-1122 · 50¢
Nia doesn’t
look like
exercise.
p24

Suspicious
death at
local motel
27-year-old woman
identified as Helen Clare
The homicide team is investigat-
ing the death of a woman who was
found dead in a Maple Ridge motel
early Sunday.
She has been identified as Helen
Clare, 27, of Maple Ridge. She was
known to live in a unit at the Cen-
tennial Motel and Trailer Court,
on Lougheed Highway near 216th
Street.
Ridge Meadows RCMP were
called there at 8 a.m. Sunday after
a woman’s body was discovered in
a room.
Cpl. Dale Carr, with the Integrat-
ed Homicide Investigation Team,
said the circumstances surround-
ing Clare’s death are suspicious.
See Homicide, p14

MR
Colleen Flanagan/THE NEWS NEWS Online
The RCMP homicide team was called in to investigate the death of a 27-year-old Maple Ridge woman found in a unit at the Centennial Motel and Trailer Court, on
For video, visit www.mapleridgenews.com
Lougheed Highway near 216 Street, Sunday afternoon.

North Lougheed Connector approved


“The south coast panel “This is the mechanism the commission is Dewdney Trunk Road, used by farm vehicles,
But adjacent properties have to [of the ALC] believed it wanting to use to reinforce that.” and for accommodating future growth in Ma-
remain farmland: commission was important to rein- Underhill said the condition was added be- ple Ridge.
force the agricultural cause the commission had heard of develop- A parallel road connecting to Lougheed
by Phi l M elnyc h u k designation on this land,” ment interest in the area and possible land- Highway, just west of Harris Road, would also
staff reporter Brian Underhill, execu- use changes. ease congestion at Harris and Lougheed. Cur-
tive-director of the com- “We are generally aware of that.” rently, there is no provincial money to build
mission, said Tuesday. But any change in land use would have to be the Harris Road overpass, MacLean said.
Pitt Meadows’s plan to punch a road It will be up to the City through a separate process, he added. Funding could come from TransLink, the
through farmland to join Lougheed High- of Pitt Meadows, which Pitt Meadows Mayor Don MacLean said city Ministry of Transportation and Infrastruc-
way and Golden Ears Way has the OK of the applied for the road, staff and council will review the decision and ture, Pitt Meadows and development charg-
Agricultural Land Commission – with a long to get those covenants Sather go from there. es.
string attached. when it negotiates with He agreed, the covenants would make it Smart!Centres mall development company
The July decision requires the city to get landowners for the right more difficult to develop. owns at least seven hectares along the north
covenants assigned to the land titles for each of way. “I guess so, but will our world end if it’s not side of Lougheed Highway, although it has
of the properties that will be adjacent to the The commission wanted to underline that built?” yet to apply to the city for any major develop-
new road. Those covenants would require the land intended for the road is within the Pitt Meadows wants the road because it says ment.
each property to remain farmland. farm reserve, Underhill said. it wants to remove traffic congestion from Old See Connector, p3

Index
Opinion 6
Tom Fletcher 6
Looking Back 16
Arts&life 24
Sports 27
Community Calendar 29
Classifieds 37
Grant to kickstart salmon stream New rail
cars for
Pacific Salmon Foundation
gives $310,000 for repairs to
pump station flood gates WCE, but
by Phi l M elnyc h u k
staff reporter not service
by Ph i l M e lnych uk
A key obstacle to fish spawning
staff reporter
in Spencer Creek is soon to be re-
moved, thanks to a $310,000 grant
from the Pacific Salmon Founda- Maple Ridge and Pitt Mead-
tion. ows commuters can relax a
The money will allow repairs to bit now because they won’t be
the flood gates at the pump sta- so tightly packed on the West
tion on Lougheed Highway and Coast Express.
Tamarack Lane, so that fish from Seven new rail cars, freshly
Kanaka Creek can pass through made out of Bombardier’s
the gate and get to Spencer Creek, plant in Thunder Bay, Ont.,
which runs through Albion flats. will be carrying commuters
“KEEPS [Kanaka Education and into Vancouver, starting this
Environmental Partnership So- month.
ciety] has been lobbying for that The cars, usually one for
improvement for a long time,” each train, will be added on to
spokesman Ross Davies said. the five trains that haul peo-
“It’s going to be a huge improve- ple into and out of Vancouver
ment. every weekday and will boost
capacity by another 2,000 peo-
Colleen Flanagan/THE NEWS
ple per day.
“It’s going to be a huge Ross Davies of KEEPS squats by a new flood gate that fish will be able to pass through to get to Spencer Creek. Don’t look for any increase
improvement.” not have flood gates that are fish and chum, while resident cut- habilitation that’s already been
in frequency hours or the
number of trips the Express
friendly and, therefore, fish access throat trout that already live in done upstream. Habitat restora- makes in a day, however.
Ross Davies, KEEPS was being blocked out for most of the stream also will benefit by tion has already taken place near A request earlier this year
the year, including the spawning more access. Being able to access the Albion fairgrounds. to TransLink by mayors of
periods,” he said via e-mail. Spencer Creek, the salmon can He also said that people in new cities along the West Coast
“I think we’ll start to see more “The addition of the new flood get to off-channel rearing habitat. homes upstream as far as 240th Express line to study expand-
and more of them up there.” gates at the pump station will al- Stott said the district will also Street eventually could hear the ing the commuter rail service
With fish allowed to get up- low for adult and juvenile salmon monitor the stream to see if other sounds of salmon spawning near- so far has been ignored by the
stream, the coho population in to pass through the pump station species benefit by the upgrading by. agency.
Spencer eventually should ap- from Kanaka Creek into Spen- of the gate. The district is about to start an Maple Ridge Mayor Ernie
proximate other tributaries of Ka- cer Creek throughout most of “Great news in terms of a signif- area plan to figure out what kind Daykin said he hasn’t had a
naka Creek, he added. the year, including the majority icant step forward on this signifi- of development should take place reply since forwarding the
Maple Ridge’s environmental of the salmon spawning season, cant urban stream getting a jump in Albion flats, most of which is in resolution in May.
planner, Rod Stott, said the proj- except during peak-flow or flood start on life again,” he added. the Agricultural Land Reserve. “I knew that finding the dol-
ect will be done by October. events.” Davies said previously that the The repair work is to be com- lars was going to be a huge
“The current pump station does The species affected are coho gate will capitalize on stream re- pleted by the end of the month. challenge.”
Daykin said while many
people say they’d support

Commission’s decision ‘sends a strong message’


increased train frequency,
either on weekends or mid
days, that’s all anecdotal and
a proper study with real data
is needed. He said he’d wait
Connector from front Underhill said the commission The ALC’s decision says lands • a need for more adequate evalu- until TransLink resumes its
It didn’t respond to an e-mail re- has required covenants on other south of the road and west of Mead- ation of the results of its decisions. budget discussions to push for
quest for an interview. applications to withdraw farmland ow Gardens Golf Course “would Another study earlier this year a feasibility study.
MacLean said he hasn’t heard from the reserve, but none involv- undoubtedly come under pressure said that government road projects Mission, Pitt Meadows, Port
from Smart!Centres. ing road projects. for non-farm use or exclusion from have paved over more farmland Coquitlam, Port Moody, Co-
“I can’t speak for them. They’re “I think the commission believes the ALR.” than private developers in the Sur- quitlam and Vancouver also
aware that the land is in the re- it’s effective.” According to a Tuesday news re- rey-Delta-Langley area over the signed on to the request, made
serve, they always have been.” While the decision approves the lease, a recent report by B.C. Au- past decade. in the after-glow of the 2010
The commission’s decision “sends right of way for a road, the land is ditor General John Doyle says the More than 70 per cent of the 264 Vancouver Winter Olympics.
a strong message that the ALC con- still within the Agricultural Land ALC has several problems: hectares of land removed from During the Games, West
siders the land farmland along the Reserve. The commission notes • a lack of knowledge regarding farm use over the past 10 years Coast Express ridership sky-
connector and anybody applying that on balance, the road would the boundaries of the ALR and the were for provincial government rocketed when extra trains
should take that into account,” said increase ability of farmers to make lands’ suitability for agricultural transportation projects, concluded were added.
NDP MLA Michael Sather. better use of their land. use; author Nathan Pachal, co-founder CP Rail however, which op-
“It’s pretty unique. Brian [Under- Building the road would occupy • inadequate compliance and en- of the transit advocacy group South erates the service for Trans-
hill] said he doesn’t know of these seven hectares of farmland and cut forcement; Fraser On Trax. Link, has said the Olympic
conditions being used before. in half six parcels, four of which are • the commission’s self-identi- The South Fraser Perimeter runs were a one-time excep-
“I’m hoping the commission re- currently farmed. fied limitations to meet its goals Road, which is eating up 90 hect- tion.
mains strong with that.” Another condition requires the through the application process; ares in Surrey and Delta, is the sin- Daykin was the only mayor
Sather has said previously the road to be built within three years. • the commission’s insufficient gle biggest reduction in farmland at the announcement of the
road is a “commercial project from That would help reduce specula- involvement in long-term land use in the South of Fraser area over the new trains in Vancouver last
start to finish.” tion on farmland in the area. planning with local governments; past 10 years. week.
No school at Greybrook this year
by R o b e r t M a n g e l s d o r f
staff reporter

Former Pitt Meadows


independent school
Greybrook Academy
did not open its doors
to new students this
week after failing to re-
ceive certification from
the provincial govern-
ment to operate.
The school has not
had a certificate to op-
erate since it shut its
doors last December,
following months of
financial uncertainty.
The move left parents
without a school to
send their children to,
THE NEWS/files
and staff jobless and
unpaid. Greybrook Academy closed at the end of November.
School founder Ni-
gel Turner applied in the school, including cial government. rimanded earlier this
April for provincial financial details and a The former school summer when the Min-
certification to re-open business plan, before site itself, which is istry of Education be-
the school. However, the certificate can be owned by Turner, is came aware of the fact
in light of the school’s granted. currently being rented the school was charg-
past instability, the Although an indepen- out to Stardom Child- ing prospective par-
provincial Office of dent school, Greybrook care, a locally-owned ents an application fee
the Inspector of Inde- received $300,000 annu- daycare which now oc- of $200 for the 2010/11
pendent Schools has ally in public money in cupies three rooms at school year, despite not
since requested addi- the form of operating Greybrook. having been accredited
tional requirements of grants from the provin- The school was rep- by the province.
Colleen Flanagan/THE NEWS

Sun-day
Koen Cooper, 5, examines the winning sunflower, submitted by Gerry Van Aert,
at 11 feet, nine inches, Sunday afternoon after judging for the tallest sunflower
at the Osprey Village Farmer’s Market. Koen won in the children’s category with a
nine-foot, 11-inch sunflower. The other two entries were by Hannah Ruzycki, 6, and
Lennon Tepper, 3, who both grew theirs from seed and tied with a height of 44.5
inches. Van Aert also won for the largest sunflower head, at 12 inches in diameter.
THE NEWS/opinion Published and printed by Black Press at 22328 – 119th Avenue, Maple Ridge, B.C., V2X 2Z3

News Views Ingrid Rice

Difficult to reverse
Fight HST collected some 700,000 signatures
on a petition calling for the death of the Har-
monized Sales Tax.
This was even before new revelations that
the B.C. Liberal government forged ahead with
the HST after high-level bureaucrats warned –
before the May 2009 election – about harmful
effects on the provincial economy for at least
five years.
There is growing doubt, however, that the
HST can be repealed even with all those sig-
natures, even if the anti-HST forces succeed in
recalling Liberal MLAs.
As detailed in a report by Black Press legisla-
tive correspondent Tom Fletcher, former B.C.
attorney-general Geoff Plant offered a legal
opinion about the petition’s HST extinguish-
ment component.
Despite of Vancouver Island North MP John
Duncan’s disingenuous comments about the
federal government’s lack of HST involvement,
the tax is a result of federal legislation.
A province, Plant noted, cannot extinguish
federal law.
If B.C. could repeal HST legislation before
the five-year contract expires, presumably
it would also have to return the portion of
the $1.6-billion bribe that Ottawa has already
shipped to Victoria.
The anti-HST petition also calls for Victoria
to reinstate the Provincial Sales Tax, although
it doesn’t estimate how much it would cost B.C.
taxpayers to rehire about 300 tax collectors
transferred to the Canada Revenue Agency.
There’s no way to halt the anti-HST move-
ment now without causing a backlash among
the 700,000 signatories, but it would make
more sense to save energy and conserve funds
Secret negotiations on HST?
VICTORIA – A few and to make some embarrassing admis- more than $4 billion. They do not show
as well as nurturing the sense of betrayal until hours after legisla- sions. negotiations with B.C. during the criti-
the next provincial and federal elections. tive press gallery Yes, Hansen would have got the cal time.
If you must, punish the provincial Liberals reporters unveiled 11-page briefing note on the Ontario This is important because it deter-
at the ballot box for the way they dropped the the documents HST deal from his ministry’s senior mines whether B.C. finance ministry
HST into our midst. And don’t forget about the obtained in a long- staff nearly two months before the elec- officials did their jobs in a professional
federal Conservative government’s heavy in- awaited freedom of tion. He doesn’t remember it. fashion.
volvement. information request He would have given it only a “cursory I’ll remind you that Delaney and
about B.C.’s prepara- look,” Hansen told me, because it was to Vander Zalm were quick to claim that
– Black Press tions for the harmo- prepare him for possible media ques- Elections B.C. officials were corrupt,
nized sales tax, the tions about Ontario’s decision to jump after they delayed the anti-HST petition
Tell us what you think @ www.mapleridgenews.com Bill Vander Zalm aboard the HST train. Since he and to see the results of a court challenge.
conspiracy clown B.C. Views Campbell have insisted for more than If that were true, it would have been the
car clattered by with Tom Fletcher a year that the HST was not on B.C.’s biggest political scandal in B.C. history,

THE NEWS
Serving Maple Ridge & Pitt Meadows since 1978
another urgent mes-
sage.
Zalm wheelman Chris Delaney leaped
to his computer to proclaim: “FOI
“radar” before the election, he didn’t
need to read it all.
NDP finance critic Bruce Ralston
grilled Hansen for hours during this
since that office presides over party reg-
istrations and campaign finance rules.

reveals B.C. government in negotiations spring’s legislative session on the HST


Jim Coulter, publisher
publisher@mapleridgenews.com
on HST months before 2009 election.” decision. At one point, Hansen denied “Judge our politicians as you
This would indeed be big news, if only that there was any discussion between
Michael Hall, editor
it were true. It would mean not only senior finance officials about the HST
will, but let’s not drag our whole
editor@mapleridgenews.com
Carly Ferguson, advertising, creative services manager that the B.C. Liberals deliberately lied before the May 2009 election. I now democratic system down with
admanager@mapleridgenews.com about their tax plans before the elec- hold the proof that there was, but it’s
Kathy Blore, circulation manager
tion, but that senior provincial officials, important to understand what kind of
false allegations.”
circulation@mapleridgenews.com
and at some level the Conservative communication.
22328 – 119th Avenue, government in Ottawa, were in on the A federal official sent out copies of the
Maple Ridge, B.C., deception. newly signed Ontario HST agreement to The Zalmoids dropped that one
V2X 2Z3
Office: 604-467-1122
I asked Delaney to show me where all provinces, including Alberta, which quickly, and now they’re on to the next
Fax: 604-463-4741 “negotiations” are “revealed.” Since has no provincial sales tax to merge baseless claim of Third World-style cor-
Delivery: 604-466-6397 he apparently hadn’t read the actual with. ruption.
Website: www.mapleridgenews.com documents, he replied with references B.C. officials watched developments Judge our politicians as you will, but
Email: newsroom@mapleridgenews.com
to various media accounts, including in Ontario and updated the minister’s let’s not drag our whole democratic
The News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self- speculation that the proof might be briefing papers, because that’s what system down with false allegations.
regulatory body governing the province's newspaper industry. The coun- hiding in pages blanked out by officials they do every day, on a wide variety of There is more news in these docu-
cil considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member
newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input to protect “advice” to Finance Minister issues. ments, such as the negative short-term
from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the Colin Hansen. Hansen either didn’t see these com- impact of the HST that the B.C. Liberals
editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or
story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written Despite the blanked-out pages, munications or didn’t remember them. ignored. More on that later.
concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Hansen was clearly worried about the NDP leader Carole James termed this
Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or
go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.
release of his ministry’s internal com- the “dog ate my homework” defence. Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter
munications in early 2009. He made a The documents confirm that Ontario and columnist for Black Press
CCAB audited circulation: (as of September 2009): special trip from Vancouver to sit for a was negotiating, and getting special and BCLocalnews.com
Wednesday - 30,221; Friday – 30,197.
series of interviews to respond to them, exemptions and a transition payment of (tfletcher@blackpress.ca).

This week’s question: Is Pitt Meadows a good location for a casino and convention centre?
@ Online poll: cast your vote at www.mapleridgenews.com, or e-mail your vote and comments to editor@mapleridgenews.com
THE NEWS/opinion Published and printed by Black Press at 22328 – 119th Avenue, Maple Ridge, B.C., V2X 2Z3

News Views Ingrid Rice


Sockeye return even
more reason for inquiry
To make the tough job of managing and pro-
tecting our salmon resource even more confus-
ing, sockeye salmon seem to be making a come-
back in the very summer when the federally
appointed Cohen Commission is studying their
disappearance.
So we ask the question, is the commission still
worthwhile if this year turns out to be a strong
sockeye year, showing that their demise has
been greatly exaggerated?
The answer is – the inquiry should proceed ag-
gressively and thoroughly to determine the rea-
sons for the three previous disastrous seasons.
Then, thanks to the honest testimony from all
involved, combined with rigorous research, per-
haps some answers can be found to explain why
sockeye vanished one year – then returned the
next.
It’s never easy to be conclusive about natural
cycles.
But it is easy to draw conclusions after the fact,
such as the over-fishing that destroyed the At-
lantic cod.
We cannot make the same mistake with B.C.’s
iconic fish, the sockeye salmon.
The species means too much to all British
Columbians – from the First Nations who first
harvested them, to the resort and sports fish-
ing industry that shares them with visitors from
around the world, to the severely diminished

Secret negotiations on HST?


commercial fishery – all groups agree on pro-
tecting the resource.
There may be differences in how that’s
achieved, but one message from all groups is
clear: Do what’s necessary to save the sockeye.
VICTORIA – A few and to make some embarrassing admis- more than $4 billion. They do not show
– Black Press
hours after legisla- sions. negotiations with B.C. during the criti-
tive press gallery Yes, Hansen would have got the cal time.
Tell us what you think @ www.mapleridgenews.com
reporters unveiled 11-page briefing note on the Ontario This is important because it deter-
the documents HST deal from his ministry’s senior mines whether B.C. finance ministry
obtained in a long- staff nearly two months before the elec- officials did their jobs in a professional

THE NEWSServing Maple Ridge & Pitt Meadows since 1978


awaited freedom of
information request
about B.C.’s prepara-
tion. He doesn’t remember it.
He would have given it only a “cursory
look,” Hansen told me, because it was to
fashion.
I’ll remind you that Delaney and
Vander Zalm were quick to claim that
tions for the harmo- prepare him for possible media ques- Elections B.C. officials were corrupt,
Jim Coulter, publisher
nized sales tax, the tions about Ontario’s decision to jump after they delayed the anti-HST petition
publisher@mapleridgenews.com Bill Vander Zalm aboard the HST train. Since he and to see the results of a court challenge.
Michael Hall, editor conspiracy clown B.C. Views Campbell have insisted for more than If that were true, it would have been the
editor@mapleridgenews.com car clattered by with Tom Fletcher a year that the HST was not on B.C.’s biggest political scandal in B.C. history,
Carly Ferguson, advertising, creative services manager
admanager@mapleridgenews.com another urgent mes- “radar” before the election, he didn’t since that office presides over party reg-
Kathy Blore, circulation manager sage. need to read it all. istrations and campaign finance rules.
circulation@mapleridgenews.com Zalm wheelman Chris Delaney leaped NDP finance critic Bruce Ralston
to his computer to proclaim: “FOI grilled Hansen for hours during this
Editorial
Reporters: Phil Melnychuk, Monisha Martins,
reveals B.C. government in negotiations spring’s legislative session on the HST
Robert Mangelsdorf on HST months before 2009 election.” decision. At one point, Hansen denied “Judge our politicians as you
Photographer: Colleen Flanagan This would indeed be big news, if only that there was any discussion between
it were true. It would mean not only senior finance officials about the HST
will, but let’s not drag our whole
Advertising
Sales representatives: Karen Derosia, Glenda Dressler, Rina Varley,
that the B.C. Liberals deliberately lied before the May 2009 election. I now democratic system down with
about their tax plans before the elec- hold the proof that there was, but it’s
Michelle Baniulis
Ad control: Mel Onodi tion, but that senior provincial officials, important to understand what kind of
false allegations.”
Creative services: Kristine Pierlot, Cary Blackburn and at some level the Conservative communication.
Annette WaterBeek, Chris Hussey
Classified: Vicki Milne
government in Ottawa, were in on the A federal official sent out copies of the
deception. newly signed Ontario HST agreement to The Zalmoids dropped that one
22328 – 119th Avenue, I asked Delaney to show me where all provinces, including Alberta, which quickly, and now they’re on to the next
Maple Ridge, B.C., “negotiations” are “revealed.” Since has no provincial sales tax to merge baseless claim of Third World-style cor-
V2X 2Z3
Office: 604-467-1122
he apparently hadn’t read the actual with. ruption.
Fax: 604-463-4741 documents, he replied with references B.C. officials watched developments Judge our politicians as you will, but
Delivery: 604-466-6397 to various media accounts, including in Ontario and updated the minister’s let’s not drag our whole democratic
Website: www.mapleridgenews.com speculation that the proof might be briefing papers, because that’s what system down with false allegations.
Email: newsroom@mapleridgenews.com
hiding in pages blanked out by officials they do every day, on a wide variety of There is more news in these docu-
The News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self- to protect “advice” to Finance Minister issues. ments, such as the negative short-term
regulatory body governing the province's newspaper industry. The coun- Colin Hansen. Hansen either didn’t see these com- impact of the HST that the B.C. Liberals
cil considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member
newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input Despite the blanked-out pages, munications or didn’t remember them. ignored. More on that later.
from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the Hansen was clearly worried about the NDP leader Carole James termed this
editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or
story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written release of his ministry’s internal com- the “dog ate my homework” defence. Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter
concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 munications in early 2009. He made a The documents confirm that Ontario and columnist for Black Press
Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or
go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.
special trip from Vancouver to sit for a was negotiating, and getting special and BCLocalnews.com
series of interviews to respond to them, exemptions and a transition payment of (tfletcher@blackpress.ca).
CCAB audited circulation: (as of September 2009):
Wednesday - 30,221; Friday – 30,197.

This week’s question: Is Pitt Meadows a good location for a casino and convention centre?
@ Online poll: cast your vote at www.mapleridgenews.com, or e-mail your vote and comments to editor@mapleridgenews.com
THE NEWS/letters
Pesticide bans Nature’s tasty bounty returned
do nothing to T
his year’s
monumen-
tal return
out of those narrow plastic bags they
used when selling fish to the public and
just dumped them into black garbage
salmon in my hand.)
To borrow some personification from
Jack Emberly’s recent column about the

protect public
of 30-million plus bags. inquiry into the sockeye, it is the salmon,
sockeye salmon Old boats that had been hidden away particularly the sockeye, who teach us
has restored hope, appeared out of nowhere. A packing lessons year after year.
given us all just the boat sat in mid-river, completing the By their presence or absence, they
EDITOR, THE NEWS : slightest reason for scene while grumpy old fishermen ran bring us together for a few weeks, native
Re: Different approaches to pesticide ban (The optimism. the boats and people milled about and and non-native, commercial fisherman,
News, Sept. 1). Perhaps we haven’t chatted on the dock and thousands of sports angler, conservationists and con-
While a recent article in the The News advo- screwed things up sockeye stored in ice water awaited a sumers, politicians and bureaucrats.
cates for a federal ban on the use of pesticides completely, yet. hungry public. This year’s River Manners Tour, in
in urban settings, I’d like to take this opportu- The sockeye run of Commentary I made sure I got my share. The which natives and non-natives toured
nity to point out the benefits – and safety – of the 2010 is surely one for Phil Melnychuk salmon glut turned me into even more the river to foster communication be-
products in question. the books. Maybe it’s of a glutton. I bought, cleaned, chopped, tween two groups, is a great example.
Pesticides play an important role in helping the run of the cen- froze, barbecued and gobbled as much Concern and complaints and debates
maintain public and private spaces, protecting tury, which makes me think about how it as possible. I think I’ve got six in the about the salmon runs are a ritual on the
these valuable properties from potentially dam- will be viewed in the distant future. freezer for the year. modern West Coast. Despite our iPhones
aging insects, weeds or diseases. Will the kids of today remember the I’ve learned the way to cook a salmon and tofu, probiotic yogurt and Wonder-
These products are thoroughly reviewed by run of 2010 half a century from now, or steak is – not too much. Put it on a bread, the lure of real food is hard to
Health Canada, one of the most respected regu- will the Fraser River sockeye be just a medium-high grill after marinating in resist.
latory agencies in the world, to ensure they are memory? soy sauce, olive oil and garlic. Cook it Suburbanites who normally wouldn’t
safe for use. Was this phenomenal run the last gasp quickly to get those grill marks, about know the first thing about ocean
Health Canada undertakes a comprehensive of a resource endangered by climate three to four minutes each side. Some temperatures or stream water qual-
review of all available credible scientific studies change, warming oceans, fish farms and white B.C. wine and for dessert, blueber- ity, pay attention to the natural world.
to ensure that a pesticide will not cause harm to roads and driveways? What happened ries or blackberries, complete the meal. Salmon really are the heart and soul
people, animals or the environment when used in the wide Pacific that allowed so many Whatever you do, don’t overcook of this province. They should re-name
according to the directions. sockeye to get back this year? Whatever salmon. It’s not a prime rib steak. the Vancouver Canucks, the Vancouver
Arbitrary pesticide bans do nothing to protect it is, Fisheries and Oceans Canada better Any left over steaks? Fry them in but- Salmonbellies.
citizens; they merely create a situation where find out quickly. ter for breakfast. So what will the salmon run be like
homeowners and municipalities are unable to That’s why this was a year to re- This year’s historic run was a cause for next year? Will the sockeye come back?
use Health Canada-approved products to prop- member, so I stopped as frequently as celebration for everyone on the water. Are they gone for good?
erly protect their investments in urban land- possible at the Kanaka wharf at the foot I kept checking with my brother, a Will it resemble anything like this run
scaping. of MacKay Avenue in Albion Industrial sports fisherman who hadn’t been able of the century?
Canada’s plant science industry welcomes Park. That was like stepping back into to fish for sockeye for three years. He Unlikely.
questions about our products and looks forward time. fishes from a sandbar farther up river, But next year, and the year after that,
to future opportunities to set the record straight While a shake mill nearby trimmed but was shut out of the biggest run of and after that, whatever the run, we’ll
about the safety of our products and our indus- cedar logs, boats full of salmon, running the century, although I heard this from start talking and complaining and caring
try’s commitment to people, public health and low in the water, would regular unload others as well. I told him not to worry, a bit about the real world – exactly the
the environment. their shiny cargo. I wouldn’t say too much. (He’s always way sockeye intended it.
LORNE HEPWORTH, PRESIDENT As the forecast for the sockeye run tried to get me interested in fishing, but I
CROPLIFE CANADA kept getting revised upwards, the activ- find the best way is to hold out $15, after Phil Melnychuk is a reporter with the
OTTAWA ity grew frenetic. On the dock, they ran which someone grabs it and puts a shiny Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows News.
Colleen Flanagan/THE NEWS

The Pet Goat


Paige Sallstrom, 22 months old, reaches out to pet a goat at the Meadows Maze petting zoo last week.
Look out for those bruins
People should also realize that
Keep garbage securely stores, during the salmon spawning sea-
locked up or in garage son, bears will be looking for their
meals at creeks and may not hear
Maple Ridge district is remind- people as they approach.
ing people to keep an eye out for If you see a bear in a munici-
bears, especially if they’re around pal park, please report it to the
food, such as fish in streams, or District’s Parks Department at
near their cubs. 604-467-7346.
A news release Thursday asks Staff will post a sign at the park
Maple Ridge residents to ensure notifying visitors to exercise cau-
that garbage is securely stored – tion.
locked up or in garage or shed –
and not to put out trash until col-
lection day. Aggressive bears
The unsightly premises bylaw re- To report an aggressive bear (bluff charging,
quires all containers to be sealed
and secured against animals.
damaging property, etc.), call the Ministry
To reduce the chance of meeting of Environment Conservation Officer at
a bear while hiking, cycling, moun- 1-877-952-7277.
tain biking, horse-back riding or For more information on how to “Get Bear
any other outdoor activity, people Aware”, visit the province’s Ministry of Envi-
should travel in groups, make noise ronment’s website at www.env.gov.bc.ca/cos/
or carry something that makes info/bearaware/index.html.
noise, such as a bell.
Mariah van Herwaarden
(front), a recent Maple
Ridge Christian gradu-
ate, along with her
sister Cheyanne, and
Graeme Miller, both in
Grade 9, sit by theatre
backgrounds that were
supposed to be housed
in a container that was
paid for by the school,
but not delivered.
Mariah was part of the
fundraising program
for the container. For
now, the backdrops and
props have to be stored
on the school’s stage.
Colleen Flanagan/THE NEWS

Drama over missing shipping container


by R o b e r t M a n g e l s d o r f ers and Logistics up
staff reporter front for the container
on the promise it would
be delivered in about a
A local teacher is feel- week.
ing burned after his That was close to a
students raised close to month ago, and the
$1,600 to buy a shipping company still has not
container to store the dropped off the con-
program’s props and tainer at the school, or
sets, and the container returned Park’s phone
never showed up. calls.
Reg Parks, a drama “I feel a little sick
teacher at Maple Ridge in the stomach at the
Christian School, says guy responsible,” said
he paid Langley-based Parks.
company RSI Contain- See Container, p13
‘Do homework before doing business’
Container from p12 week. Containers are currently have it Monday,” says
“It’s pretty heart- The container never facing two separate law- the email.
breaking.” showed, and Appleyard suits in provincial small However, the refund
Parks’ drama class stopped returning Parks’ claims court. In both had not arrived by Tues-
raised the money by phone calls and emails. cases, the plaintiffs paid day afternoon, and Parks
charging admission and “The kids worked so thousands of dollars up has not heard back from
taking donations during hard for this money,” front for shipping con- Appleyard.
the school’s performance said Parks. “How dare tainers that never ar- Mark Fernandes,
of Fiddler on the Roof he treat these kids so rived, and never heard spokesperson for the
last school year. poorly.” from Appleyard again. Mainland B.C. Better
Parks said he found out However, the condi- Neither claim has been Business Bureau, says it’s
about RSI Containers tions of sale listed on proven in a court of law. not a common practice to
and Logistics through a RSI Containers and Lo- Parks says he also for a company to ask for
simple Internet search, gistics’ website state the plans to file a claim with payment up front.
and spoke with Richard company can back out of provincial small claims “That’s a big red flag,”
Appleyard, listed as the any verbal deal. court in an attempt to he said. “Especially if
company’s president on “No oral agreement, get his money back from someone is requesting
its website. guaranty, promise, con- Appleyard. cheques made out in
“I phoned and ex- dition, representation, “Right now, we have their name.”
plained the situation and or warranty made to the to find a way to come Fernandes recom-
he said he’d supply [the Purchaser by the Seller, up with around $2,500 to mends doing your home-
container] at cost.” its employees and or buy another container,” work before doing busi-
Parks says he hand- agents with respect to he said. ness with companies
delivered the cheque to the Container(s) shall be Neither Appleyard nor over the Internet.
Appleyard, which he re- binding upon the Seller,” RSI Containers and Lo- “You can’t trust things
quested be made out in the website states. gistics returned repeated like slick looking web-
his name, at Appleyard’s Without the container, phone calls and emails sites,” said Fernandes.
home in Langley, which the class has been forced from The News. “Ask for referrals, check
is also the listed address to cram the props and However, Appleyard the Better Business Bu-
for the company. Parks sets into their class- sent Parks an email, reau, and try to get an
says Appleyard told him room, making for some apologizing for the delay idea of the history of the
the container would be cramped quarters with and lack of communica- company.”
dropped off at the school school starting this tion, and promised him a Most credit card com-
in about a week. The week. full refund by Monday. panies will allow you to
cheque was promptly “We’re not a rich “Refunds are generally reverse charges for pur-
cashed, but after the school, we’re a pretty given within 30 business chases if the goods have
week had passed, there small school, actually,” days however because not been delivered within
was no container. Parks said Parks. “We’ve been of the circumstances I a reasonable amount of
says he called Appleyard, growing this program af- have asked our accoun- time. It’s also a good idea
who said the container ter the past 10 years, and tant Tom to expedite it to get everything in writ-
was delayed and would this is a real blow to that for you, in addition no ing so if you go to court
be there on Monday or momentum.” cancelation fees will be you have documentation,
Tuesday the following Appleyard and RSI deducted. You should Fernandes notes.
Autopsy was to be conducted Tuesday
Homicide from front
Investigators attended and were
to speak with neighbours to see if
they could offer any information
regarding the death.
“At this point, it is not known if
there are links to gangs, drugs or
organized crime,” Carr said Sun-
day.
An autopsy was conducted
Tuesday. But until toxicology re-
sults are received, investigators
are still unable to declare the
death a homicide or otherwise,
Carr said Tuesday.
“We are not in a position to clas-
sify it yet.”
• Anyone with information
is asked to call IHIT tip Line at
1-877-551-IHIT. If you wish to
remain anonymous please call Colleen Flanagan/THE NEWS
CrimeStoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS. IHIT officers conduct investigation at the crime scene.

Man, 68, arrested for assaulting officer


A 68-year-old Maple Ridge and when he was arrested, he merous pieces of mail that
man was arrested Saturday for pushed a female officer in an ef- didn’t belong to her.
assaulting a Peace Officer. fort to get away.” Police stopped the car she
Police are recommending He was taken into custody, was driving on 232 Street near
charges against him. and later released by a justice 116 Avenue.
Police were called to a dis- for a court appearance at a later The woman was well known
turbance in the 21000-block of date. to police and had an outstand-
Lougheed Highway in Maple ing warrant against her from
Ridge at around 5:45 p.m. Langley RCMP and she was
“During the investigation, Woman arrested with prohibited her from driving.
which involved a man with a The woman was also in con-
baseball bat uttering threats
others’ mail travention of other court-or-
of violence, the suspect was A 23-year-old Maple Ridge dered conditions, so she was
spoken to,” police said. “The woman was arrested Friday in remanded by a justice to spend
suspect attempted to obstruct Maple Ridge for driving while the weekend in custody, and to
the police by walking away, prohibited and for having nu- appear in court on Tuesday.
Autopsy was to be conducted Tuesday
Homicide from front
“At this point, it is not known
if there are links to gangs,
drugs or organized crime.”
He added that the woman was
known to live in the unit at the
motel.
Investigators are unable to
make a conclusive link to mur-
der until an autopsy is done
and toxicology results are re-
ceived.
An autopsy was to occur
Tuesday, when a forensic pa-
thologist could assist with a
determination.
• Anyone with informa-
tion is asked to call IHIT tip
Line at 1-877-551-IHIT. If you
wish to remain anonymous
please call CrimeStoppers at Colleen Flanagan/THE NEWS
1-800-222-TIPS. IHIT officers conduct investigation at the crime scene.

Man, 68, arrested for assaulting officer


A 68-year-old Maple Ridge and when he was arrested, he merous pieces of mail that
man was arrested Saturday for pushed a female officer in an ef- didn’t belong to her.
assaulting a Peace Officer. fort to get away.” Police stopped the car she
Police are recommending He was taken into custody, was driving on 232 Street near
charges against him. and later released by a justice 116 Avenue.
Police were called to a dis- for a court appearance at a later The woman was well known
turbance in the 21000-block of date. to police and had an outstand-
Lougheed Highway in Maple ing warrant against her from
Ridge at around 5:45 p.m. Langley RCMP and she was
“During the investigation, Woman arrested with prohibited her from driving.
which involved a man with a The woman was also in con-
baseball bat uttering threats
others’ mail travention of other court-or-
of violence, the suspect was A 23-year-old Maple Ridge dered conditions, so she was
spoken to,” police said. “The woman was arrested Friday in remanded by a justice to spend
suspect attempted to obstruct Maple Ridge for driving while the weekend in custody, and to
the police by walking away, prohibited and for having nu- appear in court on Tuesday.
CP museum caboose vandalized
Ridge Meadows
RCMP are investigat-
ing graffiti that was
sprayed on the CP Rail
caboose at the Maple
Ridge Museum.
Sometime during the
weekend of Aug. 27-29,
the message “gig
creep noir” was paint-
ed on the ceremonial
caboose, located in the
22500-block of 116 Av-
enue in Maple Ridge.
Police have few leads
and are hoping for help
from the public.

Boats stolen
Three aluminum
boats were stolen
in Maple Ridge last
week.
A 12-foot aluminum
RCMP photo
boat, painted white,
was stolen in the early Graffiti was sprayed on the caboose at the museum.
hours of Tuesday from
a residential yard on in Maple Ridge. It was • Anyone with any in- 1-800-222-8477 or leave
Purdey Avenue in Ma- stolen while the owner formation in regards to a TIP online at www.
ple Ridge. It had a 9.9 was away from lunch, any of these, or other bccrimestoppers.com.
horsepower motor at- between 1 p.m. and 2: crimes is asked to con- Crime Stoppers will
tached to it. 30 p.m. The “Carson” tact Ridge Meadows pay a reward of up to
dump trailer had Brit- RCMP at 604-463-6251. $2,000 if your informa-
ish Columbia licence To remain anonymous, tion leads to an arrest
Teen arrested plate No. UNT43N. call Crime Stoppers at and conviction.
Police arrested an in-
toxicated 17-year-old
boy Saturday after a
report of an unknown
person in neighbour’s
house around 2:30 a.m.
in the 21400 block of
River Road in Maple
Ridge.
“He was arrested,
and slept off his intoxi-
cation in jail,” police
said.

Missed curfew
Police arrested an in-
toxicated 23-year-old
man on Saturday for
disobeying a court-
ordered curfew.
The man and an in-
toxicated 20-year-old
friend were noticed
by police on Dewdney
Trunk Road by 222
Street. The older man
was not supposed to be
outside his residence
past 11 p.m. He was
arrested and remand-
ing in custody until a
court appearance on
Tuesday.
His friend was also
arrested, but released
the next morning.

Pickup stolen
Police are looking a
for pickup truck stolen
on Saturday in Maple
Ridge.
The grey 1994 Nis-
san was stolen from
the 22800-block of
125A Avenue in Maple
Ridge, between 12:30
a.m. and 7 a.m. The
truck had British Co-
lumbia licence plate
No. CB2685.

Trailer stolen
A green dump trailer
was stolen Saturday
from McKay Avenue
Tim Woodland’s forestry collection
T
im Many of these
Wood- companies
land and business-
began his es no longer
avocation as a exist, but their
collector at an letterhead
early age, when and stock
he took an in- certificates
terest in stamp are a nostal-
collecting. gic reminder
The old- of an earlier
est child of time.
Pat and Alan Looking Back One ex-
Woodland, he Sheila Nickols ample from
was probably Woodland’s Maple Ridge Museum
influenced by collection is a Allco Post Office and logging workers for the
his father’s career as a fancy stock certificate A & L Logging Company, in 1925.
reference librarian. for the E.A. Heaps Co.
Today, Tim Woodland Ltd. for 100 shares in River, at the end on involved in logging,
specializes in collect- the company, made out 248th Street. sawmilling and pulp
ing letters, photos and to Englishman the Rev. During the 1920s, a and paper manufacture.
memorabilia connected Arthur Reginald Wells. wooden trestle bridge As well as showing
with the forest indus- Another item is an brought huge flatcar images of early logging,
try in coastal British envelope with the let- loads of logs from what he will play a recording
Columbia. He will be terhead of the Abern- is now Golden Ears of logging poetry put to
presenting a program ethy Lougheed Logging park to the log dump at music.
for the Maple Ridge Co. Ltd. at Box 15, Port the mouth of Kanaka The Maple Ridge
Historical Society on Haney. The letter was Creek. If you walk along Museum is grateful
Sept. 23 at 7:30 p.m. in addresses to the Secre- the Fraser River in to Woodland for his
St. Andrew’s Heritage tary of the Burquitlam Kanaka Creek Park, you contributions to their
Hall. Conservative Party in can still see the remains archives. Whenever
From 1979 to 1996, New Westminster. of the pilings where the he sees a photo or post
Tim Woodland worked Woodland’s presen- logging trains dumped card on e-Bay relating
in the forest industry tation will include their loads. to our community, he
in northern Vancouver pictures of early post Woodlands plans to tries to buy it to add
Island, in a camp up offices, such as the one present stories and to our collection and
Jervis Inlet, in North in today’s photo at Allco history of the B.C. forest increase our knowledge.
Vancouver and finally Camp, headquarters industry, with an em- To enhance the pro-
in Squamish. He soon of the Abernethy- phasis on Maple Ridge. gram, Woodland will be
began to collect photos Lougheed Logging Com- He will explore some of displaying some of his
and memorabilia from pany. This site is now the family and corpo- collection in a “show
lumber companies that shady Allco Park on the rate linkages between and tell” area.
existed in coastal B.C. banks of the Alouette companies and places See Look, p17
ICBC trimming basic auto rates
we’ve been able to re- aside similar dividends year and dropped them
2.4 per cent cut duce basic rates in more for Victoria in future 17 per cent over the past
first in a decade than a decade.” years. five years.
Less frequent claims Canadian Taxpayers Some industry observ-
by J eff Nage l and better driving Federation spokesper- ers have also questioned
Black Press weather are the main son Maureen Bader said the need for ICBC’s
reasons for the reduced rates should be cut even large $3.1-billion reserve
expenses, even though further so there’s less account.
Motorists will get a average claim costs con- surplus money left for
modest break on basic tinue to climb, especially the province to raid.
auto insurance premi- for injury crashes. “There’s no way the av-
ums after years of fat “It’s our customers’ erage driver should have “It’s the first time
profits for the Insurance smart driving that re- to be subsidizing the we’ve been able to
Corporation of B.C. ally allows us to do this,” government’s pet proj-
The public auto in- Schubert said. ects like the B.C. Place reduce basic rates
surer has been ordered ICBC will have to cut roof and green energy in more than a
to reduce basic rates 2.4 much further, however, subsidies,” she said.
per cent effective Nov. 1. to get basic rates back But Schubert said pay- decade.”
It’s a deeper cut than down to 2005 levels – in- ments to the province
the 1.9 per cent ICBC creases in 2006 and 2007 are unrelated to basic Jon Schubert, ICBC president
had proposed because raised basic premiums rates, because they are
regulators at the B.C. nearly 10 per cent. paid out of profits made
Utilities Commission ICBC recorded another on the optional side of
(BCUC) decided ex- $232 million in net earn- ICBC’s business. Schubert said it’s ap-
penses were lower than ings for the first half of Basic rates are regulat- propriate and noted
expected, leaving room this year, the latest in a ed by the BCUC because ICBC’s reserve ratio is
to lop off another half long string of hefty prof- they are compulsory for less than the industry
point. its. all motorists and no pri- average.
“They crunched the And the provincial vate insurers compete “All insurance com-
numbers and came up government this year with ICBC to provide the panies carry a certain
with a slightly differ- moved to tap some of the service. amount of capital to
ent calculation,” ICBC cash ICBC generates to Optional rates, where make sure we’re able
president and CEO Jon pay down B.C.’s deficit. there is competition, is to meet our obligations
Schubert said in an in- It ordered ICBC to unregulated. and protect our custom-
terview. hand over $487 million ICBC cut optional ers from rate shock,” he
“It’s the first time from its reserves and set rates 3.3 per cent last said.

Call museum
for more info.
Look from p16
For any further
information about the
Sept. 23 presentation
or the activities of the
Maple Ridge Historical
Society, please call the
Maple Ridge Museum at
604-463-5311.

Sheila Nickols is a
board member of the
Maple Ridge Historical
Society.
B.C. loathes HST, poll finds
ity in B.C., where they
found 75 per cent feel
the government did a
very bad job of han-
by J eff Nagel verely or moderately July 1. dling the HST.
Black Press harmed their house- Angus Reid officials “The public is almost
hold finances, citing say the negative view universal in panning
higher costs of dining, of the HST appears the way the tax was
Seventy-one per cent groceries, cellphone to run deeper in B.C. implemented and ex-
of B.C. residents sur- bills and clothing. than Ontario, despite plained by the provin-
veyed in a new Angus Only one in 20 people the fact Ontarians are cial administration.”
Reid poll say they’re polled believe govern- harder hit because The Aug. 16-17 online
buying less as a result ment projections of their government survey included 803
of the Harmonized lower prices over time didn’t exempt gasoline B.C. residents and a
Sales Tax. as a result of the 12 and electricity bills similar number in On-
More than two-thirds per cent HST, which from the HST. tario. The margin of er-
of B.C. respondents replaced the GST and The pollsters’ cite ror is estimated at plus
said the HST has se- provincial sales tax on the “palpable” animos- or minus 3.5 per cent.
Big catch
Commercial fisherman Dave McDonald of Maple Ridge takes a break to
smoke a cigarette while his sockeye catch is unloaded and weighed at
the McKay Avenue wharf last week. This year’s sockeye run of 34
million was the largest since 1913. Colleen Flanagan/THE NEWS
New Pattullo Bridge could
come as soon as 2015
by J eff Nagel equipment now work- from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Black Press ing on the new Port TransLink previously
Mann Bridge to shift rejected the possibil-
over to the Pattullo once ity of a combined road
A new six-lane Pattul- the Highway 1 project and railway bridge that
lo Bridge could open as is finished in 2013. would also replace the
early as 2015, according Open houses are slat- existing New Westmin-
to TransLink. ed for later this month ster rail bridge, poten-
Officials there say in Surrey and New tially also combined
they will work to fast- Westminster on the with the creation of a
track the new span design of the bridge ap- new artificial island at
over the Fraser River. proaches. Sapperton Bar.
Spokesperson Ken The biggest change is TransLink’s current
Hardie said there’s on the New West side, financial plan, which
potential – depending where TransLink’s includes an extra $130
on the outcome of the preferred option is to million a year in taxes
bidding process – for switch access from and fares approved
contractors, crews and Royal Avenue to Front last year, assumes the
Street. bridge will be tolled
“Front Street is al- and does not earmark
ready a major truck any dollars towards
route,” Hardie said. “It the estimated $800-mil-
makes sense to us that lion to $1-billion capital
Front Street becomes a cost.
major point of access The provincial gov-
for the Pattullo, both on ernment has pledged to
and off.” look for ways to finance
There would also be the bridge without tolls
access via East Colum- and avoid the spectre
bia and McBride Boule- of tolling every river
vard. crossing into Surrey.
On the Surrey side, Hardie said Trans-
Hardie said it’s antici- Link is willing to look
pated the new Pattullo, at any such ideas.
which would be built “In the absence of any
just upstream of the ex- other way to pay for it,
isting one, will connect it has to be tolled,” Har-
with a full interchange die said. “There’s no
to the South Fraser Pe- question there has to
rimeter Road. be a new bridge.”
There would also The 73-year-old
be connections to 128 bridge is 12 metres
Street and Scott Road. wide, far tighter than
More details are ex- the 19-metre width for
pected at the two open a four-lane bridge built
houses – the first on to modern standards
Tuesday Sept. 14 at today.
Chuck Baillie Commu- TransLink since 2005
nity Centre in Surrey has closed the centre
near Gateway Station lanes at night to pre-
and the second on vent head-on crashes,
Tuesday, Sept. 21 at the greatly reducing the
Justice Institute in New frequency of fatalities
Westminster. Both run up until then.
Section coordinator:

THE NEWS/arts&life
Monisha Martins
604-467-1122 ext. 217
newsroom@mapleridgenews.com

It doesn’t look like exercise


Short for Neuromuscular
Integrative Action, Nia is a
“movement with consciousness”
by M o n i s h a M a r t i n s
staff reporter

S
harolyn Wandzura lifts her arms in one
graceful swoop.
“Reach up,” she instructs.
Barefoot and warmed up, her class stretch-
es its arms to the painted blue sky and fluffy
clouds on the ceiling at the Kali Yoga Centre
in Pitt Meadows.
Short for Neuromuscular Integrative Action
(as well as non-impact aerobics), Nia doesn’t
look like a workout.
“It’s movement with a consciousness,” she
says.
Founded by Debbie Rosas Stewart and Car-
los Aya Rosas, Nia began in 1983 and now
boats approximately 2,200 trainers in 43 coun-
tries.
It draws from disciplines of the martial arts
(tae kwon do, Tai Chi and aikido), dance (jazz,
modern and Duncan dance) and healing arts
(Feldenkrais, the Alexander technique and
yoga).
Every class offers a unique combination of
52 moves that correspond with the main areas
of the body: the base, the core and the upper
extremities.
Each has their own quirky names: Butterfly,
Colleen Flanagan/THE NEWS
Passion, Infinity, Omega, Sanjana and Sexi.
It’s a free-spirited experience, something Sharolyn Wandzura teaches a Nia class at Kali Yoga in Osprey Village.w
you’d perhaps see around a campfire at Wood-
stock, but everyone leaves their inhibitions at
the door and gets their groove on.
Wandzura says Nia does require unlearn-
Health living
ing. • Check out Nia at the Diversity Health Fair 2010 on
“It’s a struggle for some students, but once Sept. 11 at at the Ridge Meadows Seniors Centre,
you start, you get back into your body.” 12150 224 Street in Maple Ridge from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Nia believes every person can discover, ex- This interactive health fair – the first of its kind to be
plore, unleash and enhance their individual offered in Maple Ridge and Pitt Meadows – targets the
potential to live a fulfilling and meaningful African, Latin, South Asian, Chinese, and Vietnamese
life – by engaging their senses and listening populations and will involve over 25 health and well-
to their bodies.
The experience requires concentration as
ness exhibitors.
students repeat a series of movements while • Learn about health programs and services.
staying focused. • Join in fitness and cooking demonstrations.
“It works because you are 100 per cent pres- • Sample ethnic foods and gather recipes.
ent,” says Wandzura. • Attend information packed presentations.
“Movement is one way of releasing all the • Test personal health & wellness with onsite health
things we have stored in our bodies. It’s just screenings.
rebalancing everything, starting from the bot- • Enjoy ethnic music, dancers, and cultural displays.
tom of our feet.”

Maple Ridge singer comes full circle


“My inner spark is back,” says Ron into the biz has propelled him back “Ron is simply one of the best sing-
Kalmakoff, smiling, with a twinkle in into the limelight. ers around,” Creber says. “In the stu-
his green eyes. Kalmakoff lived in Maple Ridge dio, he’s a producer’s dream in that all
Looking youthful and energetic af- for more than 12 years and has his vocal work is virtually flawless on
ter spending hours inside the record- owned Little Cricket Gift Gallery on every take he performs. In addition,
ing studio, the Saskatchewan-born Lougheed Highway and Glover Road he has a depth of musical knowledge
singer best known for his silvery in Fort Langley for close to 10 years. that enables him to collaborate bril-
tenor voice is elated to be working on There is a new sound that you’ll liantly in the recording studio. He is
his newest album, Turn Around. hear in Turn Around. a total joy to work with, and I’m re-
More than a decade ago, Kalmakoff The album features a dozen bal- ally proud of this record.”
was drawing applause for his sixth lads, including six originals written • Ron Kalmakoff perform two con-
album, Journey of the Heart, when by Kalmakoff. certs in Vancouver at The Cultch,
life took a harsh turn with a series of So far, there has been a steady flow 1895 Venables Street on Sept. 11 at 8
family-related events. of praise from his fellow musicians p.m. and Sept. 12 at 2 p.m. He will be
“Life changes, revolves and moves and industry leaders. backed by a four piece band. The con-
in many different directions,” he Grammy-nominee and Juno Award- cert will feature a guest appearance
muses. winning composer and musician by Shari Ulrich. Tickets are available
He admits that, lately, the push by Michael Creber co-produced Turn by calling (604) 251-1363 or online at Contributed
his fans and supporters to get back Around. tickets.thecultch.com. Ron Kalmakoff returns to the studio after a 10-year hiatus
Section coordinator:

THE NEWS/arts&life
Monisha Martins
604-467-1122 ext. 217
newsroom@mapleridgenews.com

Nia doesn’t look like exercise


Short for Neuromuscular
Integrative Action, Nia is a
“movement with consciousness”
by M o n i s h a M a r t i n s
staff reporter

S
harolyn Wandzura lifts her arms in one
graceful swoop.
“Reach up,” she instructs.
Barefoot and warmed up, her class stretch-
es its arms to the painted blue sky and fluffy
clouds on the ceiling at the Kali Yoga Centre
in Pitt Meadows.
Short for Neuromuscular Integrative Action
(as well as non-impact aerobics), Nia doesn’t
look like a workout.
“It’s movement with a consciousness,” she
says.
Founded by Debbie Rosas Stewart and Car-
los Aya Rosas, Nia began in 1983 and now
boats approximately 2,200 trainers in 43 coun-
tries.
It draws from disciplines of the martial arts
(tae kwon do, Tai Chi and aikido), dance (jazz,
modern and Duncan dance) and healing arts
(Feldenkrais, the Alexander technique and
yoga).
Every class offers a unique combination of
52 moves that correspond with the main areas
of the body: the base, the core and the upper
extremities.
Each has their own quirky names: Butterfly,
Colleen Flanagan/THE NEWS
Passion, Infinity, Omega, Sanjana and Sexi.
It’s a free-spirited experience, something Sharolyn Wandzura teaches a Nia class at Kali Yoga in Osprey Village.
you’d perhaps see around a campfire at Wood-
stock, but everyone leaves their inhibitions at
the door and gets their groove on.
Wandzura says Nia does require unlearn-
Healthy living
ing. • Check out Nia at the Diversity Health Fair 2010 on
“It’s a struggle for some students, but once Sept. 11 at at the Ridge Meadows Seniors Centre,
you start, you get back into your body.” 12150 224 Street in Maple Ridge from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Nia believes every person can discover, ex- This interactive health fair – the first of its kind to be
plore, unleash and enhance their individual offered in Maple Ridge and Pitt Meadows – targets the
potential to live a fulfilling and meaningful African, Latin, South Asian, Chinese, and Vietnamese
life – by engaging their senses and listening populations and will involve over 25 health and well-
to their bodies.
The experience requires concentration as
ness exhibitors.
students repeat a series of movements while • Learn about health programs and services.
staying focused. • Join in fitness and cooking demonstrations.
“It works because you are 100 per cent pres- • Sample ethnic foods and gather recipes.
ent,” says Wandzura. • Attend information packed presentations.
“Movement is one way of releasing all the • Test personal health & wellness with onsite health
things we have stored in our bodies. It’s just screenings.
rebalancing everything, starting from the bot- • Enjoy ethnic music, dancers, and cultural displays.
tom of our feet.”

Maple Ridge singer comes full circle


“My inner spark is back,” says Ron into the biz has propelled him back “Ron is simply one of the best sing-
Kalmakoff, smiling, with a twinkle in into the limelight. ers around,” Creber says. “In the stu-
his green eyes. Kalmakoff lived in Maple Ridge dio, he’s a producer’s dream in that all
Looking youthful and energetic af- for more than 12 years and has his vocal work is virtually flawless on
ter spending hours inside the record- owned Little Cricket Gift Gallery on every take he performs. In addition,
ing studio, the Saskatchewan-born Lougheed Highway and Glover Road he has a depth of musical knowledge
singer best known for his silvery in Fort Langley for close to 10 years. that enables him to collaborate bril-
tenor voice is elated to be working on There is a new sound that you’ll liantly in the recording studio. He is
his newest album, Turn Around. hear in Turn Around. a total joy to work with, and I’m re-
More than a decade ago, Kalmakoff The album features a dozen bal- ally proud of this record.”
was drawing applause for his sixth lads, including six originals written • Ron Kalmakoff perform two con-
album, Journey of the Heart, when by Kalmakoff. certs in Vancouver at The Cultch,
life took a harsh turn with a series of So far, there has been a steady flow 1895 Venables Street on Sept. 11 at 8
family-related events. of praise from his fellow musicians p.m. and Sept. 12 at 2 p.m. He will be
“Life changes, revolves and moves and industry leaders. backed by a four piece band. The con-
in many different directions,” he Grammy-nominee and Juno Award- cert will feature a guest appearance
muses. winning composer and musician by Shari Ulrich. Tickets are available
He admits that, lately, the push by Michael Creber co-produced Turn by calling (604) 251-1363 or online at Contributed
his fans and supporters to get back Around. tickets.thecultch.com. Ron Kalmakoff returns to the studio after a 10-year hiatus
Arts&Life

Locals win photo contest


Two local photographers took first Audition for Gallery 7 Theatre & Per-
and second place in the first annual forming Arts November production
Greener Steps Photo Contest held of J.M. Barrie’s classic tale Peter Pan,
throughout British Columbia this sum- adapted by Canadian playwright, Jeff
mer. Pitcher.
This year’s theme was the ‘Best Green Gallery 7 Theatre’s production will
Photo of Summer 2010’ and the first feature 10 male and female perform-
prize was claimed by Kyle W. Falconer ers playing a combined total of up to
of Pitt Meadows, 18 characters.
Falconer won for submitting a beau- British accents will be used and cre-
tiful photograph of Alouette River at ativity and the ability to “play” will be
dusk. a requirement of all performers.
Mia Paisley of Maple Ridge captured Dance and movement experience,
second place with her photo of a drag- along with singing ability, are assets
onfly resting on a blackberry bush. but not a necessity.
The Greener Steps Photo Contest is Directing Peter Pan will be Eldon
the idea of Greener Steps founder Alex Letkeman, who was at the helm of last
Contributed
Sangha. The contest aims to generate season’s hit Around the World in 80
Kyle Falconer won for greater public interest about the envi- Days.
his photograph of the ronment, sustainability and greener Peter Pan will take stage in Novem-
Alouette River at dusk living, through a series of thematic ber.
(above), while Mia Pais- photo contests. • Performers ages 16 and up are in-
ley came second for her The contest generated a lot of public vited to be a part of the adventure by
photo of a dragonfly interest and drew in over 43 quality auditioning for a role tomorrow, Sept.
resting on a blackberry photo entries from locations as far as 9 at 6:30 p.m. Those interested in work-
bush. Harrison Hot Springs, Duncan, Nano- ing behind the scenes in such areas as
ose Bay, Buntzen Lake, and throughout assistant stage management, sound
the Lower Mainland. operation, running crew and others
are also invited to attend the audition.
All interested individuals are asked
Auditions for Peter Pan to sign up ahead of time by calling
Want to play a fairy or a boy that 604-504-5940 or emailing info@gallery-
never grows up? 7theatre.com.
Section coordinator:

THE NEWS/sports
Robert Mangelsdorf
604-467-1122 ext. 216
newsroom@mapleridgenews.com

that will serve them well while in

Mason,
Bruins England.
“They are going to be good ambas-
sadors for the club,” said McIntosh.
“Canadians have a reputation for
being hard-hitting, aggressive play-
ers with a good work ethic.” Lee both
head
The pair have already been set up
with factory jobs while in Hove that
will give them flexibility to play and
practice with the club.
“I may not be as skilled as some of
take 2nd
the players over there, but I want to
show them how hard I can work,”
Strong finishes for

to UK said Ladd, the younger brother of


NHLer Andrew Ladd.
He flew out on Saturday after
fulfilling the last of his school com-
mitments, and will join Hughes in
Hove. Hughes arrived in England
local golfers at MJT
event in Langley
Maple Ridge News
staff reporter
Pair of local rugby players for preseason training with the
team at the beginning of August.
to play for Hove RFC “Rugby is a real culture over Maple Ridge golfers
there,” said Ladd. “It’s pretty excit- Keanna Mason and Tae-
ing to be surrounded by it all the In Lee both finished sec-
by R o b e r t M a n g e l s d o r f time.” ond in their respective
staff reporter The Ridge Meadows Bruins Rugby divisions at the Maple
Club has steadily grown in the past Leaf Junior Tour event
fews years after a time in the late at Belmont Golf Course
The Ridge Meadows Bruins Rug- 1990s when it looked like the club in Langley last week-
by Club may not have a first divi- might fold. Today, the Bruins oper- end.
sion team for its elite players, but ate competitive men’s and women’s Mason overcame a
that isn’t stopping the club from teams, as well as U-12, U-14, U-16, four-stroke deficit in the
continuing to develop its top tier and U-19 teams. The club has also second and final round
talent. started up a mini-rugby program to tie Valentina Trillo on
Local rugby players Josh Ladd for young children that McIntosh the 18th hole in the girls’
and Rob Hughes hopes will develop into the next division. Mason bogied
are headed to crop of elite local players. the hole to finish the day
England for Many of the club’s Division 3 play- with a 73 and second-
an extend- ers are holdovers from the Samuel place honours.
ed stay Robertson Technical Secondary Tae-In Lee of Maple
with Hove School team that dominated high Ridge also finished
Rugby school rugby in the Fraser Valley second at the event, in
Fo o t b a l l for much of the past five years. the boys’ U-20 division.
Club near “I’m pretty passionate about Lee posted consecutive
Brighton, a building our club up,” said Ladd. rounds of 74 but was
trip club Robert Mangelsdorf/THE NEWS
“Every time we get better players, unable to catch winner
president Cal Josh Ladd (pictured) and Rob Hughes of the Ridge Meadows Bruins Rugby Club will they leave [for other rugby clubs].” Mike Belle of Vancou-
MacIntosh hopes will allow them to be playing for Hove Rugby Football Club in England this season. Ladd says he hopes to return to ver, who will be playing
take their game to the next level. the club after his time in England to NCAA golf for Simon
“They are huge assets to our they want to develop talent locally, to help grow the club. both play and coach. Fraser University next
team, and we’ll miss them,” said he says. “If we want a first division team, “We are starting to get that club season. Lee finished
McIntosh. “But we don’t want to McIntosh hopes the trip to Eng- we’re going to need more coaches, culture with the younger guys,” he just one shot better than
hold our guys back.” land, the birthplace of rugby, will that’s the first thing,” said McIn- said. “We’re definitely growing.” three players who tied
As a rugby club without a first expose the players to a higher cali- tosh. • For more information about the for third: William Deck
division team, the Ridge Meadows bre of play so that upon their re- McIntosh said both Ladd and Ridge Meadows Bruins Rugby club, of Kelowna (78-71), Jesse
Bruins are faced with a dilemma if turn, they can use their experience Hughes have a strong work ethics visit bruinsrugby.com. Reichelt of Langley (75-
74), and Matthew Dorion
of Surrey (72-77).
Flames to broadcast Ryan Briggs will be re- Maple Ridge’s Seung
turning behind the micro- Game time Thursday, Dec. 30 vs. Port Moody Black Panthers, 7:30 p.m. Jun Woo won the long
games on web phone for the a second Friday, Jan. 7 vs. North Delta Devils, 7:30 p.m. drive competition in the
season along with colour Saturday, Sept. 25 @ North Delta Devils, 6:45 p.m. Friday, Jan. 14 vs. Mission Icebreakers, 7:30 p.m. boys’ U-20 division.
The Ridge Meadows
analyst Brad Reminek. The Saturday, Oct. 2 vs. Abbotsford Pilots, 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 21 vs. Aldergrove Kodiaks, 7:30 p.m. Mason finishes the
Flames junior B hockey
club will be broadcasting 15 pair will be joined by an Friday, Oct. 29 vs. Aldergrove Kodiaks, 7:30 p.m. Friday, Jan.28 vs. Delta Ice Hawks, 7:30 p.m. summer off with a pair
regular season games, plus occasional analyst Adam Saturday, Nov. 20 vs. Abbotsford Pilots, 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 4 vs. Abbotsford Pilots, 7:30 p.m. of runner-ups, after
play-offs in live streaming Dunfee, of Hockey Now Friday, Nov. 26 vs. Aldergrove Kodiaks, 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 11 vs. Mission Icebreakers, 7:30 p.m. taking second place at
video this season. magazine. Friday, Dec. 10 vs. Richmond Sockeyes, 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 18 vs. Port Moody Black Panthers, 7:30 p.m. the Maple Leaf Junior
The games will be broad- “It’s really exciting to be Friday, Dec. 17 vs. Squamish Wolf Pack, 7:30 p.m. Tour event at Highland
sports@mapleridgenews.com
cast using new technol- taking the broadcasts to the Pacific Golf in Victoria
ogy developed by Play Full next level by incorporating Aug. 30 and 31, where
Screen that allows for live video this season,” said very happy to have such a resenting our club on air.” All broadcasts begin 15 she bounced back from
streaming to television, Flames President and Own- professional broadcaster Games can be viewed at minutes before puck drop a first round 78 with a
computer or smart phone. er Andrew Ilaender. “I’m like Ryan and his team rep- www.playfullscreen.com. with the pre-game show. second round 74.
Sports

Colleen Flanagan/THE NEWS

Gold striker
Tre Spedding (right) of the Golden Ears United Strikers fights off a member of the Coquitlam Metro Ford Gunners
during a U-12 select A game during the Pitt Meadows Soccer Club’s Labour Day Tournament at the Pitt Meadows
Athletic Fields Sunday afternoon.
Community Calendar

C
ommunity Calendar lists experiences in nature KEEPS 4 p.m., and Sundays from noon haneyfarmersmarket.org). Scottish pipers. There will also be
events in Maple Ridge and members have had over the to 4 p.m. Closed Mondays. www. a live band, BBQ, agility display,
Pitt Meadows. Notices are summer. For more information, newcreationsgallery.ca Sunday, Sept.12 community area and much more,
free to local non-profit groups call 604-462-8643. • Scotiabank and the B.C. all in support of our favourite
courtesy of The News. Drop off Saturday, Sept. 11 SPCA present Paws for a Cause furry friends. Registration starts
details to 22328 119 Ave., fax to Thursday, Sept. 9 • Join the Family Educa- at the Albion Fairgrounds. Bring at 10 a.m., with the events
604-463-4741 or e-mail events@ • The Alouette Field tion and Support Centre and along your pooch and enjoy beginning at 11 a.m. Visit spca.
mapleridgenews.com at least a Naturalists hold their monthly the Affiliation of Multicultural a 2.5-kilometre walk led by bc.ca/walk to register.
week before the event. Include a meeting at 7:30 p.m. at the Societies and Service Agencies
contact name and number. (No Ridge Meadows Seniors’ Centre, at the Diversity Health Fair at
submissions by phone.) Listings 12150 224th Street. All welcome. the Ridge Meadows Seniors’
appear as space permits. For guar- Call Duanne at 604-463 -8743 for Centre, 12150 224th Street from
anteed publication, ask our classi- more information. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Visitors can
fied department at 604-467-1122 learn about healthy cooking
about non-profit rates. Friday, Sept. 10 and lifestyles, take part in
• Opening Reception for a fitness classes, tap their foot
Wednesday, Sept. 8 new exhibit featuring the paint- to ethnic music, watch cultural
• The Maple Ridge Parkin- ings of mother and daughter Lea dancers, speak with health care
son’s Support Group meets Sevcov and Dorothy Sevcov, and professionals, or sample ethnic
from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Ridge the carvings of Lynn McIntosh foods. To learn more, call Angie at
Meadows Seniors’ Centre. This takes place at the New Creations 604-476-2447 or email angie@
meeting is open to all persons Art Gallery and Studios from hipstrategic.com.
with Parkinson’s, their caregivers, 5 to 8 p.m. at 22409 McIntosh • Haney Farmers’ Market
families, and friends. For more in- Avenue, Maple Ridge. Lea and celebrates tomatoes with a cook-
formation please contact Megan Dorothy are both accomplished ing demonstration presented
Benoit at 604-465-6374, or via painters who work in a variety of by Chef Nathan Hyam at 10:30
email at megan2008@shaw.ca media and whose works run the a.m. Take the taste test and
• The next general meeting gamut from realistic landscapes taste what vine-ripened means.
of the Kanaka Education and En- to abstracts. The show is The Market is overflowing with
vironmental Partnership Society supplemented by Lynn’s unique freshly picked fruit and produce
takes place at 7 p.m. in the Fraser and original carvings. The from our own Fraser Valley
Room of Maple Ridge Library. show will run for the month of and the Okanagan. Memorial
Everyone is welcome. There will September. The gallery is open Peace Park in downtown Maple
be a slide presentation about Tuesday to Saturday 11 a.m. to Ridge on 224th Street ( www.

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