You are on page 1of 16

                                                 Factors

A whole number that can be divided cleanly into another whole number is called a factor of that number.
Example: Factors of 10 10 can be evenly divided by 1, as 10 ÷ 1 = 10
10 can be evenly divided by 2, as 10 ÷ 2 = 5
10 cannot be evenly divided by 3: 10 ÷ 3 = 3.333
10 cannot be evenly divided by 4: 10 ÷ 4 = 2.5
10 can be evenly divided by 5: 10 ÷ 5 = 2
10 cannot be evenly divided by 6, 7, 8, or 9
10 can be evenly divided by 10: 10 ÷ 10 = 1
The factors of 10 are 1, 2, 5, and 10.
You can also look at this the other way around: if you can multiply two whole numbers to create a third number, those two 
numbers are factors of the third.
Example: Factors of 10 2 x 5 = 10, so 2 and 5 are factors of 10.
1 x 10 = 10, so 1 and 10 are also factors of 10.
You will notice that 1 and the number itself are always factors of a given number.

A Note About Negatives
Everything said above also applies to negative whole numbers.

The factors of 10 are actually –1, 1, –2, 2, –5, 5, –10, and 10. 
(–1 x –10 = 10, and –2 x –5 = 10.)

The factors of –10 are also –1, 1, –2, 2, –5, 5, –10, and 10. 
(2 x –5 = –10, –2 x 5 = –10, and so on.)

This can be written more easily by using a combined + and – sign (±) to indicate that both the positive and negative 
versions of a number are factors. Thus, the factors of 10 can be written as ±1, ±2, ±5, and ±10.

                                                                               

Prime Factors 

Some numbers can be evenly divided only by 1 and themselves. These are prime numbers. Factors that are prime numbers 
are called prime factors.
Every whole number greater than one is either a prime number, or can be described as a product of prime factors.
Examples: 10 is the product of the prime factors 2 x 5
11 is a prime number
12 is the product of the prime factors 2 x 2 x 3
324 is the product of the prime factors 2 x 2 x 3 x 3 x 3 x 3
700 is the product of the prime factors 2 x 2 x 5 x 5 x 7

701 is a prime number
2103 is the product of the prime factors 3 x 701

To find the prime factors of a given number, follow these steps:

1.

See if the number is a prime number. If it's below 1000, use the table of prime numbers. If it is prime, add it to the 
list of prime factors, and you're done. 

2.

If it's not prime, try dividing it by a prime number, starting with 2.

If it divides cleanly, with no remainder, then add that prime to the list of prime factors. Take the quotient as your 
new number to work with, and return to step 1. 

If it does not divide cleanly, return to step 2, but move on to the next prime on the list.

Example: Prime factors of 700

700 ÷ 2 = 350, with no remainder. Add 2 to the list of prime factors.
350 ÷ 2 = 175, with no remainder. Add 2 to the list of prime factors.
175 ÷ 2 = 87.5. It doesn't divide cleanly, so we go to the next prime number.
175 ÷ 3 = 58.33. It doesn't divide cleanly, so we go to the next prime number.
175 ÷ 5 = 35, with no remainder. Add 5 to the list of prime factors.
35 ÷ 5 = 7, with no remainder. Add 5 to the list of prime factors.
7 is a prime number. Add 7 to the list of prime factors, and we're done.
The prime factors of 700 are 2 x 2 x 5 x 5 x 7.

Be sure to check at each step to see if the number you have is a prime. The next example illustrates why:
Example: Prime factors of  2103 ÷ 2 is 1051.5. It doesn't divide cleanly, so we go to the next prime number.
2103
2103 ÷ 3 is 701, with no remainder. Add 3 to the list of prime factors.
The table of prime numbers will tell you that 701 is a prime. Add 701 to the list of prime factors, 
and we're done.
The prime factors of 2103 are 3 x 701.
If we didn't notice that 701 was a prime, we'd have gone on to check 5, 7, 11, 13, and so on, going through 120 more primes 
before getting done. So be sure to check the quotient every time before proceeding.
(As you might imagine, this method is designed for smaller numbers. It's too time­consuming for very large ones.)

Common Factors
Factors that two numbers have in common are called the common factors of those numbers.
Example: 
What are the common factors of 20 and 25?
  The factors of 20 are 1, 2, 4, 5, and 20.
  The factors of 25 are 1, 5, and 25.
The common factors of 20 and 25 are 1 and 5.

Example: 
What are the common factors of 15 and 30?
  The factors of 15 are 1, 3, 5, and 15.
  The factors of 30 are 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 10, 15, and 30.
The common factors of 15 and 30 are 1, 3, 5, and 15.
Example: 
What are the common factors of 9 and 20?
  The factors of 9 are 1, 3, and 9.
  The factors of 20 are 1, 2, 4, 5, and 20.
The only common factor of 9 and 20 is 1.

Greatest Common Factors
The largest common factor of two numbers is called their greatest common factor or highest common factor.
Example: 
What is the greatest common factor of 20 and 25?
  The common factors of 20 and 25 are 1 and 5. (see above)
The greatest common factor is 5.
Example: 
What is the greatest common factor of 15 and 30?
  The common factors of 15 and 30 are 1, 3, 5, and 15.
The greatest common factor is 15.
Example: 
What is the greatest common factor of 9 and 20?
  The only common factor of 9 and 20 is 1.
The greatest common factor is 1.

Method #2: Prime Factors
Another method of finding the greatest common factor uses the prime factors of each number. Rather than looking at all the 
factors—prime or not—to find the single highest one they have in common, we multiply all the prime factors they have in 
common, to reach the same results.
Example: 
What is the greatest common factor of 20 and 25?
  The prime factors of 20 are 2 x 2 x 5.
  The prime factors of 25 are 5 x 5.
  The prime factor they have in common is 5.
The greatest common factor is 5.

Example: 
What is the greatest common factor of 15 and 30?
  The prime factors of 15 are 3 x 5.
  The prime factors of 30 are 2 x 3 x 5.
  The prime factors they have in common are 3 x 5.
  3 x 5 = 15.
The greatest common factor is 15.
When two numbers have no prime factors in common, their greatest common factor is 1.
Example: 
What is the greatest common factor of 9 and 20?
  The prime factors of 9 are 3 x 3.
  The prime factors of 20 are 2 x 2 x 5.
  9 and 20 have no prime factors in common.
The greatest common factor is 1.

Lowest Common Multiples
Common multiples are multiples that two numbers have in common. These can be useful when working with fractions and 
ratios.
 Example : 
What are some common multiples of 2 and 3?
  Multiples of 2: 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24...
  Multiples of 3: 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27...
Common multiples of 2 and 3 include 6, 12, 18, and 24.
 Example : 
What are some common multiples of 25 and 30?
  Multiples of 25: 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150, 175, 200, 225, 250, 275, 300, 325...
  Multiples of 30: 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 210, 240, 270, 300, 330...
Common multiples of 25 and 30 include 150 and 300.
The lowest common multiple or least common multiple is the lowest multiple two numbers have in common.
There are two ways of finding the lowest common multiple of two numbers.

Method 1: Listing Multiples

The first way to find the lowest common multiple is to do what we did above: write out a list of the lowest multiples of each 
number, and look for the lowest multiple both numbers have in common.
 Example : 
What is the lowest common multiple of 2 and 3?
  Multiples of 2: 2, 4, 6, 8...
  Multiples of 3: 3, 6, 9...
The lowest common multiple of 2 and 3 is 6.
 Example : 
What is the lowest common multiple of 25 and 30?
  Multiples of 25: 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150, 175...
  Multiples of 30: 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180...
The lowest common multiple of 25 and 30 is 150.

Method 2: Factors
The other way to find the lowest common multiple is to list the prime factors for each number. Remove the prime factors both 
numbers have in common. Multiply one of the numbers by the remaining prime factors of the other number. The result will be 
the lowest common multiple.
 Example : 
What is the lowest common multiple of 25 and 30?
  The prime factors of 25 are 5 x 5.
  The prime factors of 30 are 2 x 3 x 5.
  Remove the 5 that 25 and 30 have in common as a prime factor.
  Multiply 25 by the remaining prime factors of 30.
  25 x 2 x 3 = 150.
The lowest common multiple of 25 and 30 is 150.
You'll get the same results no matter which number you work with:
 Example : 
What is the lowest common multiple of 25 and 30?
  The prime factors of 25 are 5 x 5.
  The prime factors of 30 are 2 x 3 x 5.
  Remove the 5 that 25 and 30 have in common as a prime factor.
  Multiply 30 by the remaining prime factors of 25.
  30 x 5 = 150.
The lowest common multiple of 25 and 30 is 150.

Another Example

 Example : 
What is the lowest common multiple of 42 and 48?
  The prime factors of 42 are 2 x 3 x 7.
  The prime factors of 48 are 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 3.
  Remove the 2 x 3 that 42 and 48 have in common as prime factors.
  Multiply 48 by the remaining prime factors of 42.
  48 x 7 = 336.
The lowest common multiple of 42 and 48 is 336.

What if they have no prime factors in common?
 Example : 
What is the lowest common multiple of 44 and 45?
  The prime factors of 44 are 2 x 2 x 11.
  The prime factors of 45 are 3 x 3 x 5.
  44 and 45 have no prime factors in common.
Either:
  Multiply 44 by the remaining prime factors of 45.
  44 x 3 x 3 x 5 = 1980.
Or:
  Multiply 45 by the remaining prime factors of 44.
  45 x 2 x 2 x 11 = 1980.
Or:
  44 x 45 = 1980.
The lowest common multiple of 44 and 45 is 1980.
As that last example illustrates, if two numbers have no prime factors in common, the lowest common multiple will be equal 
to the product of the two numbers.

Treat primes as prime factors
If one number is prime, you can treat it as its own prime factor.
 Example : 
What is the lowest common multiple of 7 and 30?
  7 is a prime number.
  The prime factors of 30 are 2 x 3 x 5.
  7 and 30 have no prime factors in common.
  7 x 30 = 210.
The lowest common multiple of 7 and 30 is 210.

 Example : 
What is the lowest common multiple of 2 and 3?
  2 is a prime number.
  3 is a prime number.
  2 and 3 have no prime factors in common.
  2 x 3 = 6.
The lowest common multiple of 2 and 3 is 6.
 Example : 
What is the lowest common multiple of 3 and 30?
  3 is a prime number.
  The prime factors of 30 are 2 x 3 x 5.
  Remove the 3 that 3 and 30 have in common as a prime factor.
Either:
  Multiply 3 by the remaining prime factors of 30.
  3 x 2 x 5 = 30
Or:
  You would normally multiply 30 by the remaining prime factors of 3, but there are no remaining prime factors.
The lowest common multiple is 30.

Prime results
As you can see from the above, there are two scenarios if at least one number is prime:

If one number is prime, and the other number's prime factors include that prime number, the lowest common 
multiple will be equal to the non­prime number. 

If one number is prime, and the other number's prime factors do not include that prime number, the lowest common 
multiple will be equal to the product of the two numbers.

(The second scenario also includes cases where both numbers are prime.)

Mixed Numbers and Improper Fractions
A mixed number is a combination of a whole number and a fraction. For example, if you have two whole apples and one 
half apple, you could describe this as 2 +  /2 apples, or 2 /2 apples.
1

1

Writing Mixed Numbers as Fractions
This mixed number can also be expressed as a fraction. Each whole apple contains two half apples. Your two whole apples 
are also four half apples. Four half apples plus one half apple is five half apples. So you have  /2 apples.
5

To put this another way: to turn a mixed number into a fraction, multiply the whole number by the denominator (the 
bottom part), and add the result to the numerator (the top part).

2 /2 = ?
1

  Multiply the whole number by the denominator.
    The whole number is 2.
    The denominator is 2.
    2 x 2 = 4.
  Add the result to the numerator:
    The numerator is 1.
    4 + 1 = 5
  The numerator is 5. The denominator remains 2.
2 /2 =  /2
1

5

Another Example
Let's try another example:
5 /3 = ?
2

  Multiply the whole number by the denominator.
    The whole number is 5.
    The denominator is 3.
    5 x 3 = 15.
  Add the result to the numerator:
    The numerator is 2.
    15 + 2 = 17
  The numerator is 17. The denominator remains 3.
5 /3 =  /3
2

17

Proper and Improper Fractions
A fraction in which the numerator is smaller than the denominator, like  /3 or  /5 is called a proper fraction. A fraction in 
1

2

which the numerator is larger than or equal to the denominator, like  /2,  /3, or  /6 is called an improper fraction. (To put it 
5

17

6

another way, a fraction with a value less than 1 is a proper fraction. A fraction with a value greater than or equal to 1 is an 
improper fraction.)
As we have shown above, mixed numbers can be written as improper fractions. Similarly, improper fractions can be written 
as mixed numbers.

Writing Improper Fractions as Mixed Numbers
To write an improper fraction as a mixed number, divide the numerator (top part) by the denominator (bottom part). 
The quotient is the whole number, and the remainder is the numerator.
How would you express  /4 as a mixed number?
17

  Divide the numerator by the denominator:

  17 ÷ 4 = 4, with a remainder of 1
  The quotient, 4, is the whole number. The remainder, 1, is the numerator. The denominator remains 4.
/4 = 4 /4

17

1

Two More Examples
Let's try another couple of examples:
/9 = ?

14

  Divide the numerator by the denominator:
  14 ÷ 9 = 1, with a remainder of 5
  The quotient, 1, is the whole number. The remainder, 5, is the numerator. The denominator remains 9.
/9 = 1 /9

14

5

If there is no remainder, just take the quotient as the whole number:
20

/5 = ?

  Divide the numerator by the denominator:
  20 ÷ 5 = 4
  The quotient, 4, is the whole number. There is no remainder.
20

/5 = 4

For more fun and practice with mixed numbers and improper fractions, see the Fraction Cafe!

Multiplying Fractions and Mixed Numbers
Multiplying Fractions
If your friend has one­quarter of a pie, and she gives you half, how much of the pie do you have? Or, to put it another way, 
what's half of one­quarter? Or, to put it into mathematical notation:
1

/2 x  /4 = ?
1

To get the answer, multiply the numerators (the top parts) and denominators (the bottom parts) separately.
In this case, first we multiply the numerators:

1 x 1 = 1
Next we multiply the denominators:
2 x 4 = 8
The answer has a numerator of 1 and a denominator of 8. In other words:
1

/2 x  /4 = 
1

/2 x 4 =  /8

1 x 1

1

You have one­eighth of the pie.

Another Example
Let's try another.
2

/9 x  /4 = ?
3

First we multiply the numerators:
2 x 3 = 6
Next we multiply the denominators:
9 x 4 = 36
The answer has a numerator of 6 and a denominator of 36. In other words:
2

/9 x  /4 = 
3

/9 x 4 =  /36

2 x 3

6

This can be further reduced:
6 ÷ 6

/36 ÷ 6 =  /6
1

(See Reducing Fractions.)

Multiplying Mixed Numbers
To multiply two mixed numbers, or a mixed number and a fraction, first convert each mixed number to a fraction. Then 
multiply the fractions.
What is 2 /3 x  /4 = ?
1

1

First we write 2 /3 as a fraction:
1

2 /3 =  /3
1

7

Then we multiply the fractions.
7

/3 x  /4 = ?
1

First we multiply the numerators:
7 x 1 = 7
Next we multiply the denominators:
3 x 4 = 12
The answer has a numerator of 7 and a denominator of 12. In other words:
2 /3 x  /4 = 
1

1

7 x 1

/3 x 4 =  /12
7

Reciprocal Fractions
To find the reciprocal of a fraction, flip it over, so that the numerator becomes the denominator and the denominator 
becomes the numerator. That is:
The reciprocal of  /5 is  /4
4

5

Note that the product of a fraction and its reciprocal is always 1.
4

/5 x  /4 =  /20 = 1
5

20

In the case of a whole number, think of it as having a denominator of 1:
The reciprocal of 5 is  /5.
1

5

/1 x  /5 =  /5 = 1
1

5

Every number has a reciprocal except for 0. There is nothing you can multiply by 0 to create a product of 1, so it has no 
reciprocal.
Reciprocals are used when dividing fractions.

Dividing Fractions
If your friend has half a pie, how many quarter­pies are in that half? Or, to put this into mathematical notation:
1

/2 ÷  /4 = ?
1

To get the answer, flip the divisor (the second fraction) over, and then multiply the fractions. (Or, to put it another way, 
multiply the dividend [the first fraction] by the reciprocal of the divisor [the second fraction].)
In this case, that makes the problem:
1

/2 x  /1 = ?
4

We begin by multiplying the numerators:
1 x 4 = 4

And then we multiply the denominators:
2 x 1 = 2
The answer has a numerator of 4 and a denominator of 2. In other words:
/2 x 1 = /2

1 x 4

4

This fraction can be reduced to lowest terms:
4 ÷ 2

/2 ÷ 2 = /1 = 2
2

There are 2 quarter­pies in a half­pie.

Another Example
Let's try another:
4

/5 ÷  /7 = ?
6

We flip the divisor over, and change the division sign to a multiplication sign:
4

/5 x  /6 = ?
7

We multiply the numerators:
4 x 7 = 28
And we multiply the denominators:
5 x 6 = 30
The answer has a numerator of 28 and a denominator of 30. In other words:
/5 x 6 = /30

4 x 7

28

We can reduce this fraction by dividing the numerator and denominator by 2:
28 ÷ 2

/30 ÷ 2 =  /15
14

Mixed Numbers
Let's try one more, this time with a mixed number:
2 /4 ÷  /3 = ?
1

2

First we change the mixed number to an improper fraction:
9

/4 ÷  /3 = ?
2

Next we flip the divisor over and change the division sign to a multiplication sign:
9

/4 x  /2 = ?
3

We multiply the numerators:
9 x 3 = 27
And we multiply the denominators:
4 x 2 = 8
The answer has a numerator of 27 and a denominator of 8. In other words:

/4 x 2 = /8

9 x 3

27

Finally, we turn the result—an improper fraction—into a mixed number.
/8 = 3 /8 =

27

3

Reducing Fractions to Lowest Terms
Consider the following two fractions:
1

/2 and  /4
2

These fractions are equivalent fractions. They both represent the same amount. One half of an orange is equal to two 
quarters of an orange. However, only one of these fractions is written in lowest terms.
A fraction is in lowest terms when the numerator and denominator have no common factor other than 1.
The factors of 2 are 1 and 2.
The factors of 4 are 1, 2, and 4.
2 and 4 share a common factor: 2.
We can reduce this fraction by dividing both the numerator and denominator by their common factor, 2.
2 ÷ 2

/4 ÷ 2 =  /2
1

1 and 2 have no common factor other than 1, so the fraction is in lowest terms.

Method #1: Common Factors
(a slow and steady method)
Let's try another example:
30

/36

Do 30 and 36 share any factors other than 1?
The factors of 30 are 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 10, 15, 30.
The factors of 36 are 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 12, 18, 36.
30 and 36 have three common factors: 2, 3, and 6.
Let's see what happens if we divide the numerator and denominator by their lowest common factor, 2. (In fact, we'd know 
that they have 2 as a common factor without having to work out all their factors, because both 30 and 36 are even numbers.)
30 ÷ 2

/36 ÷ 2 =  /18
15

Are we done? Do 15 and 18 share any factors other than 1?
The factors of 15 are 1, 3, 5, 15.
The factors of 18 are 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 18.
15 and 18 have one common factor: 3.
Once again, we divide the numerator and denominator by their common factor, 3.
15 ÷ 3

/18 ÷ 3 =  /6
5

Are we done? Do 5 and 6 share any factors other than 1?
The factors of 5 are 1 and 5.
The factors of 6 are 1, 2, 3, and 6.
5 and 6 have no common factors other than 1.
This method will reduce a fraction to its lowest terms, but it can take several steps until you reach that point. What would 
have happened if, instead of dividing the numerator and denominator by their lowest common factor, we had started with 
their greatest common factor?

Method #2: Greatest Common Factor
(a more efficient method)
Let's try it again:
30

/36

Do 30 and 36 share any factors other than 1?
The factors of 30 are 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 10, 15.
The factors of 36 are 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 12, 18.
30 and 36 have three common factors: 2, 3, and 6.
The greatest common factor is 6.
Divide the numerator and denominator by the greatest common factor:
30 ÷ 6

/36 ÷ 6 =  /6
5

This time, it takes only one step to get to the same result. To reduce a fraction to its lowest terms, divide the numerator 
and denominator by the greatest common factor.

Method #3: Prime Factors
(an even more efficient method)
Another way to reduce fractions is to break the numerator and denominator down to their prime factors, and remove every 
prime factor the two have in common. Let's do that example one more time, using this method.
30

/36

The prime factors of 30 are 2 x 3 x 5.
The prime factors of 36 are 2 x 2 x 3 x 3.
/2 x 2 x 3 x 3

2 x 3 x 5

We remove the 2 x 3 the numerator and denominator have in common:
5

/2 x 3 =  /6
5

(If you think about it, this works the same way as the last method. The greatest common factor of two numbers is the same 
as the product of the prime factors they have in common.)
For more fun and practice with fractions, see the Fraction Cafe!

                                            Roman Numerals
Try the Roman 
 
 Numeral
 
  Challenge
 
 .
Roman numerals are expressed by letters of the alphabet: 
I=1
V=5 
X=10 
L=50 
C=100 
D=500
M=1000
There are four basic principles for reading and writing Roman numerals:

1. A letter repeats its value that many times (XXX = 30, CC = 200, etc.). A letter can only be repeated three times. 

2. If one or more letters are placed after another letter of greater value, add that amount. 
VI = 6 (5 + 1 = 6)
LXX = 70 (50 + 10 + 10 = 70)
MCC = 1200 (1000 + 100 + 100 = 1200)
3. If a letter is placed before another letter of greater value, subtract that amount. 

IV = 4 (5 – 1 = 4)
XC = 90 (100 – 10 = 90)
CM = 900 (1000 – 100 = 900)

Several rules apply for subtracting amounts from Roman numerals: 

a. Only subtract powers of ten (I, X, or C, but not V or L) 
For 95, do NOT write VC (100 – 5). 
DO write XCV (XC + V or 90 + 5)

b. Only subtract one number from another. 
For 13, do NOT write IIXV (15 – 1 ­ 1). 
DO write XIII (X + I + I + I or 10 + 3)

c. Do not subtract a number from one that is more than 10 times greater (that is, you can subtract 1 from 
10 [IX] but not 1 from 20—there is no such number as IXX.) 
For 99, do NOT write IC (C – I or 100 ­ 1). 
DO write XCIX (XC + IX or 90 + 9)

4. A bar placed on top of a letter or string of letters increases the numeral's value by 1,000 times. 
XV = 15, 

= 15,000
One 

Eleven 

XI 

Thirty 

XXX

Two 

II 

Twelve 

XII 

Forty 

XL

Thirteen 

XIII 

Fifty 

L

Three  III 
Four 

IV  Fourteen 

XIV  Sixty 

LX

Five 

XV 

LXX

Six 

VI  Sixteen 

Fifteen 

Seventy 

XVI  Eighty 

Seven  VII  Seventeen  XVII  Ninety 

LXXX
XC

Eight  VIII  Eighteen 

XVIII  One hundred  C

Nine 

IX  Nineteen 

XIX  Five hundred  D

Ten 

XX 

Twenty 

One thousand  M