www.cablinginstall.

com
Solutions for Premises and Campus Communication Systems Worldwide January 2009
Smart infrastructures
for video
Essentials of an
802.11y network
Power plus data in
one conduit
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How can Corning Cable Systems
simplify your local area network
(LAN) connectivity?
© 2008 Corning Cable Systems LLC
Connecting toys are classic: simple yet multifunctional. Each piece is
pre-engineered to integrate precisely with one another, making use
fast and easy.
Corning Cable Systems Plug & Play™ AnyLAN™ Systems deploy with that
same “connect the dots” ease. YOU control where network connectivity occurs, how
quickly it happens and how successfully it is deployed. Network access is built directly
into the cabling – simply pull the cable and connect with preterminated drop cable
assemblies that attach as easily as connecting a garden
hose. No midspan cable access, no splicing, no worries.
At Corning Cable Systems, innovation is timeless.
Please visit www.corning.com/zeux for more information
on LANscape
®
Solutions for your local area network and to
receive a free gift!
EASE OF
INSTALLATION.
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CPI Passive Cooling
®
Solutions are simply the most
efficient choice for today’s data centers. Fromsmall
applications with heat loads of 2 kWto large data
centers with high heat densities beyond 20+ kW. . .
CPI’s proven solutions can work for you.
Learn more about CPI Passive Cooling Solutions by
going to our Website:
www.chatsworth.com/passivecooling.
Simply
www.chatsworth.comor techsupport@chatsworth.com 800-834-4969
• Maximize cooling unit efficiency
• Reduce data center operating costs
• Minimize environmental impact
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Efficient
Organize.
Store.
Secure.
SM
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_________
departments
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www.cablinginstall.com Cabling Installation & Maintenance

January 2009

3
JANUARY 2009 VOL. 17, NO. 1
7
Using your infrastructure to
support video applications
Smart applications require smart infrastructure. Is yours up to the
task? VALERIE MAGUIRE
17
Increased efficiency with
unified communications
A Voice over Internet Protocol system anchors the unified-
communications project taking place at Cooper Industries. PATRICK
MCLAUGHLIN
23
Multimode fibers rise to the challenge
An update on the current state of optical fiber in standards, including
the definition of OM4. FIBER OPTICS LAN SECTION (FOLS)
27
Essentials of an 802.11y network
The recently approved standard will allow for high-powered Wi-Fi-
enabled communications at distances of 3 miles or more.
STEVE SMITH
31
INDUSTRY SPOTLIGHT
■ Barrier cable technology allows for power, low-voltage in
one conduit
■ Survey: wireless is hottest thing on campus
■ High-speed networking alliances plan to merge
ABOUT THE COVER
OM4 multimode fber,
with potential transmission
lengths to 250 meters, is
seen by many as a leading
solution for next-generation
Gigabit Ethernet speeds.
TO
LEARN MORE,
SEE PAGE 23.
4 Editorial
ONE DAY VERSUS EVERYDAY
35 New Products
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______________
PATRICK McLAUGHLIN
Chief Editor
patrick@pennwell.com
4

January 2009

Cabling Installation & Maintenance www.cablinginstall.com
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One day versus everyday
O
ne summer, I worked as an
attendant at a convenience-
store/gas-station chain. My
duties were pumping gas and ensur-
ing some parts of the convenience
store remained stocked. As a low-lev-
el employee, I had a seemingly endless
list of superiors. I
had a supervi-
sor who was the
head gas-pump-
er/shelf-stocker.
He answered to
the store manager.
The store man-
ager answered to
a regional manager who answered
to a district manager. Or maybe the
district manager answered to the
regional manager. I can’t remember.
Anyway, one day the regional
manager (or maybe it was the dis-
trict manager) was supposed to pay
a visit to the store. You should have
seen how the place operated that day;
we went through more Windex and
Spic’n’Span in one shif than we did
the rest of the summer. Everything
had to be in the best possible shape
because apparently the store was go-
ing to receive a grade from the region-
al/district manager.
Unfortunately, I can’t tell you the
rest of the story because I wasn’t
there when the person handing out
the grades showed up. All I can say is
that the store’s staf remained intact
throughout the summer, so we must
have done OK.
What became evident even to a
naïve kid like me was the grade we
got that day did not represent every-
day reality. It represented our abso-
lute best efort for a very short period
of time. Unfortunately, that’s exactly
the phenomenon some of you might
be experiencing as users of structured
cabling systems.
A recent report from the Commu-
nications Cable and Connectivity
Association said that cables purchased
of distributor shelves failed to meet
the electrical- and fame-resistance
performance they claimed on their
outer jackets. Te CCCA has been
quick to point out the brands are not
prominent in North America, and
each of the cables was made by an
ofshore manufacturer.
But the deeper question is: Did
these cables ever really pass CMP/
CMR and electrical-performance
tests, and receive third-party lab rec-
ognition of that performance? If so,
then on the day these manufacturers
produced the cable to be tested, they
acted as if the district manager was
paying a visit. Everything from ma-
terials to processes was buttoned up
tightly for one day. Ten they went
back to their normal routine of far-
less-strict practices. On the other
hand, if they never went through
such testing, then these manufactur-
ers are fraudulently portraying that
they did.
We’re tracking this story now and
will have more details next month, as
well as on www.cablinginstall.com.
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CONNECTING THE WORLD TO A HIGHER STANDARD
W W W . S I E M O N . C O M
Z-MAX is not merely a collection of components, but an optimized end-to-end category
6A UTP and Shielded system developed from the ground up shattering the limitations
of the RJ45 as we know it today.
Siemon Labs has again proven its technology leadership with breakthrough Z-MAX
innovations including zero-cross termination and PCB-based patchcords (patent pending)
that enable best-in-class performance across every critical category 6A
parameter.
But Z-MAX performance did not come at the expense of simplicity and usability.
In fact, the groundbreaking Z-MAX termination process is by far the fastest category
6A termination in the world - 60 seconds for both UTP and Shielded.
And this is only the first rumblings of the storm. To learn about other Z-MAX innovations,
such as the system’s high-density 48 port, 1U patch panels and flexible flat/angled hybrid
modules, or to see video of the Z-Tool termination process, visit www.siemon.com
Z-MAX

Introducing Z-MAX, The Siemon Structured Cabling Revolution
The Storm has Arrived!
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_____________________
YOU’RE SO PREDICTABLE
Why…Thank you!
The conditions in which premises optical fiber
cables are installed can’t always be predicted.
That’s why it’s important to install an optical
fiber cable from the company that’s always,
well, predictable.
Superior Essex manufactures quality, high performance
premises optical fiber cables for every installation, for every
run - every time. And, we’ve established a long-standing
reputation with leading corporations and institutions for
providing on-time delivery and expert technical support.
So when you say Superior Essex is predictable,
we consider it a compliment.
View our broad portfolio of premises
fiber cables and installations at:
www.spsx.com/comm/predictable.aspx
Y OUR C OMMUNI C AT I ONS E X P E R T S
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______________
Camera
Balun
Telecommunications
outlet
Interconnect panel
(optional)
Televison
Televison
DVR
Video distribution hub (balun)
Power cord
Patch cord
Horizontal
cable
Fixed or PTZ camera
Interconnect panel
(optional)
Horizontal
cable
PVD video
integrator
Class II
power
supply
(24 VAC)
PVD video transceiver
Power
Source: Siemon
Twisted-pair
cabling
PVD video receiver
PVD Camera (No PTZ)
Data
DVR
Wiring Closet Control Room
Camera
Typical analog CCTV surveillance topologies
www.cablinginstall.com design
www.cablinginstall.com Cabling Installation & Maintenance

January 2009

7
Today’s surveillance and broad-
band video applications are down-
right smart. Consider the following:
• Surveillance equipment boasting Internet
Protocol (IP)-addressable interfaces and
remote-control features ofer signifcant-
ly more security and fexibility than fxed
analog devices;
• IP-based systems record images in digital
format onto servers or hard drives, render-
ing the use of cumbersome tapes and cas-
settes for video storage obsolete;
• Community antenna television (CATV)
will migrate to virtually interference-free,
100% digital broadcasting in February;
• Emerging Internet Protocol Television (IP-
TV) technology promises on-demand, inter-
active, high-defnition viewing experience.
Tese applications are no longer suitably
supported by generic coaxial cabling; they
require smart cabling, too.
Growing smarter
Te number of design professionals and
building owners choosing to support sur-
veillance, broadcast, and other video ap-
plications with their telecommunications
cabling infrastructure is climbing rapid-
ly. For example, according to a report from
Multimedia Intelligence (www.multimedi-
aintelligence.com) entitled “Internet Proto-
col/Networked Video Surveillance Market:
Equipment, Technology, and Semiconductors,” the mar-
ket for IP/networked video surveillance cameras grew
nearly 50% in 2007 to approach $500 million worldwide.
Te market segment is growing at more than four times
the rate of the overall surveillance market.
In addition to replacing coaxial cables with slimmer
and more-fexible balanced twisted-pair cables, the ben-
efts provided by using a structured telecommunica-
tions cabling network to support video applications are
numerous, including:
• Digital image quality;
In a typical analog CCTV surveillance-system topology, the video-distribution
hub or PVD integrator is located in the TR, and the system has a coaxial back-
bone. The interconnect patch panel is recommended for system flexibility.

Using your infrastructure to
support video applications
Smart applications require smart
infrastructure. Is yours up to the task?
VALERIE MAGUIRE is global sales engineer with Siemon (www.siemon.
com).
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__
____________
____________
Telecommunications outlet
Wireless access
point coverage area
Source: Siemon
Wall
Ceiling coverage areas
TO
TO
TO
TO
TO
TO
TO
TO
TO
TO
TO
TO
TO
rs
12m
8

January 2009

Cabling Installation & Maintenance www.cablinginstall.com
• Ability to support high-defnition (480i/p SDTV and 720p
and 1080 i/p HDTV) applications;
• Active surveillance area motion, audio, and
tamper detection with advanced security alerts;
• Pan/tilt/zoom and remote-powered devices, eliminating the
need for separate power and control cables;
• End-user ability to communicate and interact with “smart”
video devices;
• Compact and highly efficient storage and retrieval
capabilities;
• Convergence of voice, data, and video applications over a
single common infrastructure;
• Full support of standards-based cabling distances and
topologies;
• More-efective infrastructure management, service, and
scalability;
• Simplifed troubleshooting;
• Improved asset management via IP-addressability;
• Neater pathways and improved pathway fll-ratios;
• Ability to upgrade to future applications;
• Lower total cost of ownership for many IP-based versus
analog-camera implementations.
Planning for video
If you are not sure you need to support video now, the rec-
ommendation is to include in your cabling plans additional
twisted-pair channels specifcally targeted for video applica-
tions to accommodate future system needs. While you may
not currently anticipate the need to support surveillance
applications with your infrastructure, you cannot ignore that,
with increasing safety and security requirements worldwide,
the surveillance industry is growing rapidly. According to the
RNCOS Industry Research Solutions study, “Global CCTV
Market Analysis” (www.rncos.com), the global CCTV mar-
ket—including analog and IP-based CCTV—grew at a com-
pound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 24.28% in 2007 over
2006. Te same study forecasts the market to grow at a CAGR
of approximately 23% between 2008 and 2012.
Planning now for video-applications support makes good
business sense as well. According to a total cost of ownership
analysis recently published by Axis Communications (www.
axis.com), IP-based video systems always have lower imple-
mentation costs than analog-based systems if the cabling
infrastructure is already present.
All surveillance and broadband video applications,
I
dentifying the exact location of surveillance cameras at any
time during the cabling design phase, as well as develop-
ing a flexible surveillance infrastructure that can accommo-
date device moves and upgrades, can be challenging. One
way to overcome this challenge is to piggyback surveillance
equipment access points with wireless access points.
This approach supports all surveillance topologies and
may be especially convenient for the management of
installations in which cable sharing is used to support up
to four 1-pair video signals over one Category 7/7A fully-
shielded channel.
TIA TSB-162 Telecommunications Cabling Guidelines
for Wireless Access Points and ISO/IEC 24704 Information
Technology—Premises Cabling for Wireless Access Points,
offers guidance on locating wireless access points in ceiling
spaces that can be applied to video-equipment access
points. A pattern of circles or grids with coverage areas is
defined, with the intention that work area outlets be cen-
trally located in their coverage area and MUTOAs centrally
located in their associated coverage area grid.
Although coverage areas may range in size from 3 to 30
meters, 12 meters is generally recommended as an opti-
mum size to accommodate most wireless and surveillance
applications.—VM
Juxtaposing surveillance equipment and wireless access-point coverage
This example of ceiling coverage areas for video equipment and/or
wireless access points is based on the TIA’s TSB-162 and the ISO/IEC
24704 specifications.

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____
______
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__________________________
Bring a little green to the jobsite.
Leviton’s new GreenPack

is loaded with 24 RoHS-compliant connectors. And it’s recyclable.
That means less pollution, fewer heavy metals in landfills, and a safer environment for everyone.
Clear, easy-open pockets allow you to pop out just one connector at a time, and instantly see how
many you have left. In fact, GreenPacks are so quick and easy to use, you’ll have time to hug a tree.
Now GreenPacks are available at Leviton distributors, so visit your local branch today.
Or call 800-922-6229 for more information. Available in five colors in GigaMax
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Bring
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LEVITON.COM | P 800.922.6229 | F 425.483.5270
ISO 9001:2000 registered quality manufacturer | © 2008 Leviton Manufacturing Co., Inc
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________
The Applications AssuranceTester
Validator-NT documents floor plans, certifies
Ethernet speeds with BER testing, ensures
IP configuration and connectivity, and verifies
cable continuity—exactly what you need to get
the job done at a price less than you expect.
Look for Validator-NT and the entire line of
network and enterprise test tools through our
worldwide distributor network.
Visit www.jdsu.com/know to locate a distributor
near you. You’ll find JDSU quality, network testing
experience, and value built into every tool.
Knowthe Network
Validator-NT™Ethernet Speed Certifier NT955
www.cablinginstall.com Cabling Installation & Maintenance

January 2009

11
when appropriate amplifcation is used
to boost CATV signal levels at higher-
frequency channels, are capable of oper-
ating over lengths of twisted-pair cabling
greater than 100 meters. But maintaining
the TIA/EIA- and ISO/IEC-specifed ge-
neric maximum 100-meter, 4-connector
horizontal channel topology has numer-
ous benefts and is strongly recommended
for video-applications support. In par-
ticular, adhering to the generic topology
ensures that upgrades to future video ap-
plications will occur seamlessly, while
also providing the fexibility that chan-
nels originally designed for high-speed
data support can be used for video if nec-
essary, and vice versa.
Pretty simple, actually
Video-deployment planning is sim-
ple: bring video-ready twisted-pair ca-
bling, in addition to data cabling, to each
work area or multi-user telecom-
munications outlet assembly
(MUTOA). For support of sur-
veillance applications in areas
where wireless coverage is pro-
vided, it may be convenient to
juxtapose video access points
with wireless access points in
the coverage area. (See sidebar,
“Juxtaposing surveillance-equip-
ment and wireless access-point
coverage.”) Te advantage to this
approach is that the telecommu-
nications outlet is conveniently located
in the ceiling space where cameras re-
side, and video-equipment positioning
is more fexible.
IP-enabled video devices are precon-
fgured to accept the 8-position modular
plug interface and ofer plug-and-play
capability with structured telecommuni-
cations cabling. Generic analog devices,
such as CCTV cameras, monitors, and
television sets, are typically confgured
with coaxial BNC or Type F connectors
and require the use of video baluns to
enable transmission over twisted-pair
cabling.
Video baluns are used in pairs to con-
vert a 75-Ω unbalanced (i.e., coaxial) sig-
nal at the video-equipment interface to
a 100-Ω balanced (i.e., twisted-pair) sig-
nal and then back to a 75-Ω unbalanced
signal at the telecommunications room
(TR) or foor distributor (FD). Video bal-
uns are application-specifc, such as for
CATV or CCTV, and may be confgured
as single-port converters for use at the de-
vice interface, as single-port converters
located in breakout boxes for use at the
work area, or in 8- and 16-port video-dis-
tribution hubs for use in the TR. Video
baluns may also be integrated into high-
performance Category 7/7A patch cords.
CCTV surveillance applications
Video security can be an efective de-
fense in detecting threats as well as a
deterrent against future threats. CCTV
solutions are simple to deploy; consist-
ing of fxed or remote-controlled cam-
eras, cabling, a recoding device, and a
monitoring device. While mandatory for
highly secure environments, such as gov-
ernment buildings, prisons, and casinos,
surveillance systems are now also com-
monplace in education, healthcare, indus-
trial, and fnancial facilities.
This one-pair Category 7/7A TERA-to-Type F cord inte-
grates a balun.
The BNC (l) and Type F are common analog-
video connector interfaces.
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________________
Stewart Connector
PLUGS-CAT 3 to 7a
www.stewartconnector.com • 717/235-7512
Premise Wiring
CAT 6 • CAT 6a • CAT 7a
Modular Plugs & Jacks
• For Solid & Stranded Cable
• Shielded and Unshielded
• Polished Contacts for High
• Multiple Keying and Wire
Insertion Life
Management Options
JACKS-CAT 3 to 7a
• Horizontal, Vertical, and Angled
• Shielded and Unshielded
• Single and Multi-Port Designs
• PCB and Cable Mounted Designs
Mounting Options
Stewart Connector understands that specifying and sourcing quality
modular connectors for premise and campuswide communications
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12

January 2009

Cabling Installation & Maintenance www.cablinginstall.com
Historically, CCTV systems were stat-
ic and deployed as analog systems sup-
ported by coaxial cabling. Enhancements,
such as the availability of cost-efective
baluns and IP-addressable devices, now
make surveillance solutions the perfect ap-
plication for operation over twisted-pair
cabling. IP-based surveillance systems have
the added advantage that they are signif-
cantly more fexible and “intelligent” than
traditional analog CCTV systems. A wide
range of structured cabling solutions sup-
ports video surveillance applications.
Te simplest analog video CCTV con-
fguration is a static system consisting of a
fxed camera, twisted-pair cable, a pair of
video baluns, and a recording device such
as a digital video recorder (DVR). Te
video baluns are BNC/RJ-45 connectorized
devices that transmit black-and-white or
color images over one pair (the pair ter-
minated on pins 7-8) of the twisted-pair
cable. Optional PTZ capability supports
the remote-controlled operation of the
camera and ofers more fexibility than
fxed camera systems.
PTZ in focus
Adjusting the focus, angle, and feld of view
without being present at the camera site
are all benefts of a PTZ-enabled system.
Structured cabling that includes PTZ-en-
abled baluns, which use only the 7-8 pair to
transmit video and PTZ commands, easily
supports this functionality. Because these
solutions operate over only one pair of a
4-pair cable, they represent an excellent
opportunity to take advantage of the
cable sharing capability of Category
7/7A fully-shielded solutions. (For
more information on cable sharing, see
Adjusting the focus, angle,
and fi eld of view without
being present at the
camera site are all benefi ts
of a PTZ-enabled system.
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OneTool for IPDevice Installation
LanScaperPRO tests cables, verifies port
configuration, measures PoE power, and ensures
IP configuration and connectivity—exactly
what you need to get the job done at a price less
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Video server
PoE switch
Interconnect panel
(Optional)
Patch panel
Camera recording,
playback and optional
controller software
Telecommunications
outlet or MuTOA
Horizontal cable
Camera
Typical IP-addressable CCTV surveillance topology
www.cablinginstall.com Cabling Installation & Maintenance

January 2009

13
www.cablinginstall.com: “In commer-
cial buildings, cable sharing makes
cents,” June 2006; that article is based
on the white paper, “Cable Sharing in
Commercial Building Environments:
Reducing Cost, Simplifying Cable Man-
agement and Converging Applications
Onto Twisted-pair Media.”)
Note that power must be provided
locally to each camera in both tradi-
tional coaxial and balun-based twist-
ed-pair CCTV camera deployments.
Depending upon the camera location,
providing separate power can range
from inconvenient to practically impos-
sible, and this need cannot be avoided in
coaxial implementations. Emerging PVD
(power-video-data) technology uses a
pair of powered video transceivers to ful-
ly support CCTV applications and elimi-
nate the need for external power cords by
transmitting video (one pair), power (two
pairs), and data (one pair) over one 4-pair
telecommunications cable.
PVD devices are not IP-enabled and
data is still collected on a traditional
external recording device, such as a DVR.
At this time, PVD transceiver solutions
easily accommodate the operation of
fxed position cameras, which typically
consume less than 300 mA of power,
over 100-meter structured cabling
topologies. Be advised that the maxi-
mum distance supported by PTZ cam-
eras, which typically consume at least
600mA of power, is manufacturer-
dependent and may be less than 100
meters, causing these implementa-
tions to fall outside the scope of struc-
tured cabling. Te good news is that
power delivery technology “borrowed”
from the emerging related IEEE 802.3at
PoE (Power over Ethernet) Plus ap-
plication Standard may result in an
improvement in the operating dis-
tances associated with PVD support of
PTZ cameras in the future.
In typical structured cabling imple-
mentation topologies for analog bal-
un-based and PVD video transceiver
CCTV surveillance systems, the video
distribution hub or PVD video integra-
tor is located in the TR and a coaxial
cabling backbone is provided. For max-
imum infrastructure fexibility and to
facilitate adds, moves, and changes, it
is recommended to use an interconnect
patch panel in the TR.
CCTV over structured cabling of-
fers a distinct advantage over tradi-
tional coaxial cabling implementations
in that scalability and fexibility are
In a cabling infrastructure supporting IP-based video surveillance, it is best to install a full cross-
connect in the TR for flexibility with moves, adds, and changes.
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________________
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Cabling Installation & Maintenance www.cablinginstall.com
Comparison of common video compression schemes
Pros Cons
MJPEG 1. Each frame is a complete JPEG image
2. Very high picture quality
1. Bandwidth and disk space required for storage are high
2. Maximum image capture rate: 30 frames per second
MPEG-4 1. Bandwidth and disk space required for
storage are low
1. Only a fraction of video frames are sent as complete images; when possible,
only information differences between frames is transmitted
2. Lower picture quality than MJPEG and H.264
H.264 1. Also known as MPEG-4 Part 10
2. Uses MPEG technology with more sophisticated
between frame difference detection
3. Likely to be the next widely adopted standard for
video compression
4. Big Internet players (e.g., Google/YouTube,
Adobe, Apple iTunes) are backing the format
1. Lower picture quality than MJPEG
introduced into the surveillance infrastructure. With struc-
tured solutions, cameras can easily be added or moved as
the system grows and needs change; however, this tech-
nology is not intelligent, meaning that while substantial
data is recorded, it is unlikely that the video is being actively
monitored. Events can be missed
and suspicious behavior can go
unnoticed when monitoring per-
sonnel are distracted or otherwise
occupied.
It is also important to remem-
ber that images collected over an-
alog surveillance camera systems
are recorded on bulky cassettes or tapes that must be period-
ically changed and will wear out over time. Image quality can
also be impacted by the limitations of the recording device. IP-
addressable surveillance solutions overcome these hurdles.
IP-based surveillance systems
IP-cameras and IP-based systems represent the fu-
ture of video surveillance. These solutions deliver
superior image quality, intelligent monitoring capabil-
ity, remote accessibility, and infrastructure scalability. Today’s
fxed IP-cameras are all re-motely powered, and the use of an
IEEE 802.3af-enabled PoE switch is required. IP-cameras may
be fxed or PTZ-enabled. Further enhancements, such as more
powerful PTZ capability, will become possible when the IEEE
802.3at standard is ratifed.
Te advantage of an IP-based surveillance system is that
the camera acts like any other device on the IT LAN. Im-
ages are transmitted via Ethernet or wireless networks and
can even be accessed through the Internet. Tis means that
video feeds from multiple areas at multiple locations can be
monitored from one supervisory site. Furthermore, because
transmission is digital, the picture quality of an IP-camera
is superior to that of an analog camera. Audio transmis-
sion is also supported. Tese capabilities result in IP-based
surveillance solutions being increasingly integrated into the
structured cabling network by companies with geographi-
cally dispersed locations, building access control systems,
and point-of-sale applications.
Network intelligence can also be built into the IP-based sur-
veillance system. Events can be monitored and alerts can be
delivered to report suspicious behavior that would otherwise
go unnoticed. For example, the activation of a motion detec-
tor, audio sensor, or anti-tampering mechanism could auto-
matically result in a short message service (SMS) text or e-mail
being sent to the security operator.
Instead of relying on external recording devices, IP-cam-
era images are recorded in digital format directly onto serv-
ers or hard drives. Video data can be stored indefnitely locally
or transported to a remote location via the LAN or the Inter-
net. Real-time video transmission is highly compressed and
several compression options are available to maximize the trade-
of involving image quality, bandwidth, and storage capacity.
Commonly used compression techniques include MJPEG,
MPEG-4, and the emerging H.264 format.
Interoperability efforts
In what will be another advance for the IP-based surveil-
lance market, three leading manufacturers of IP devices
(Axis Communications, Bosch Security Systems, and Sony)
have created the framework for a forum whose purpose will
be to develop a standard that will specify interoperability
requirements for video devices. Once the framework was
established in late 2008, the manufacturers opened the
The advantage of an IP-based surveillance system is that
the camera acts like any other device on the IT LAN.
Images are transmitted via Ethernet or wireless networks
and can even be accessed through the Internet.
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January 2009

15
process to all interested parties. Tis step
will go far in removing barriers, such as
the perceived custom nature of IP-based
surveillance and concern regarding spe-
cialized knowledge required to install
these systems that have been a hindrance
to the adoption of the technology.
In most cases, an IP-based surveillance
system is more cost-efective than an
analog system. Furthermore, IP-enabled
equipment is expected to decrease in
price faster than analog equipment. Te
previously referenced total cost of own-
ership analysis prepared by Axis Com-
munications concludes that IP-based
solutions of 40 cameras or more have a
lower cost to acquire, install, and oper-
ate than same-size analog-based solu-
tions. In fact, while 32-camera systems
are the break-even cost point between
the two systems, the analysis fnds that
even 16- to 32-camera analog solutions
are only “slightly lower” in cost than
IP based systems.
Te typical structured cabling im-
plementation topology for an IP-
based surveillance system is shown
on page 13. For maximum infrastruc-
ture fexibility and to facilitate adds,
moves, and changes, it is recommend-
ed that a full crossconnect be pro-
vided in the TR. A side beneft of IP-based
surveillance technology operating over
structured cabling is that cameras can
receive centralized backup power from
the server room, so they will continue to
operate in the event of a power failure.
IP in focus
Advanced video systems now deliv-
er the highest-levels of system perfor-
mance, image quality, fexibility, and
intelligence; capabilities that can only be
realized with the implementation of IP-
based technology and a structured ca-
bling infrastructure.
Next month, I will have a companion
article discussing the use of structured
twisted-pair cabling infrastructure
to support broadband video and IPTV
applications.
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________________
B E C A U S E Y O U R B U S I N E S S R U N S T H R O U G H U S
No terminating. No testing. No trouble .
Berk-Tek has you covered with our factory-direct pre-terminated cable assemblies. We start
with superior fiber optic cable and top-of-the-line connectors, construct and test each assembly
to exact specifications to ensure extraordinary performance and reliability, and ship them direct
to your job site so they are ready for quick and immediate installation the moment they
arrive. It really is that easy.
Visit us online at www.berktek.com/teklab to configure your assembly,
generate a part number or schematic, and request a quotation.
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www.cablinginstall.com
www.cablinginstall.com Cabling Installation & Maintenance

January 2009

17
installation
The name Cooper Indus-
tries (www.cooperindustries.
com) may look familiar to
many professionals in the
structured cabling industry.
Te company, which derives
most of its revenue from elec-
trical products, also ofers the Cooper B-Line brand of
products including cable tray and frestopping prod-
ucts. Additionally, Cooper B-Line acquired GS Metals,
also a provider of cable tray, a little more than a year
ago. Cooper Industries’ footprint on the structured
cabling industry is not an insignifcant one.
As a manufacturing business, Cooper Industries has
communications-infrastructure needs of its own and,
like its clientele, it seeks quality and value when making
purchasing decisions. Currently, Cooper is in the midst
of a communications-system upgrade that is marked by
the company’s geographical diversity, and geography has
played a part in several of the company’s decisions.
A global solution
Te previous telephone system was a traditional dial
plan with handsets and standard voice messaging. Te
central network interfaced among the companies divi-
sions in Wisconsin, Illinois, Missouri, Texas,
Georgia, North Carolina, South Caroli-
na, New York, and the United Kingdom.
Inter-of ce calling required the dialing of the entire
long-distance number, so a critical need for the new
phone system was the ability for 8-digit dialing among
all its of ces.
“Cooper wanted a phone system that would also enable
continued global business growth,” says Jef Taf, strate-
gic partnership manager with CXtec (www.cxtec.com), a
provider of new and certifed pre-owned networking and
technology equipment. Taf adds, Cooper Industries has
been a CXtec customer for approximately six years, dur-
ing which time CXtec has provided pre-owned “equal-
2new” equipment as well as its own OEM products, in
addition to support services. In this situation, “Cooper
needed to leverage its global network and embrace the
age of the new telecommunications in-
frastructure,” he says.
CXtec recommended fat-
tening, consolidating,
and simplifying Coo-
per’s phone system
so that core, neces-
sary services could
be available at all
of the company’s
locations. CXtec ad-
vised Cooper on a
single, Internet Pro-
tocol (IP)-based unifed
global communications system that comprises best-of-
breed technology with centralized management.
“When ofering a solution to any customer, it ulti-
mately boils down to the solid relationships we have with
our partners and their strong product oferings,” Taf
continues. “Our goal is to ofer our customers the best
solution for their individual needs without being com-
mitted to only one or two vendor oferings.”
Ultimately, Cooper adopted a system that in-
Cooper Industries achieved efficient communication across its
global sites thanks to the implementation of a unified communi-
cations system.

Increasing efficiency with
unified communications
A Voice over Internet Protocol system
anchors the unified-communications
project taking place at Cooper Industries.
PATRICK MCLAUGHLIN is chief editor of Cabling Installation &
Maintenance.
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___
18

January 2009

Cabling Installation & Maintenance www.cablinginstall.com
cludes expertise and equipment from two vendors: Cisco Sys-
tems (www.cisco.com) and Netelligent (www.netelligent.com).
Specifcally, the suite of products includes Cisco’s CallManager
5.1 sofware clustered system with Cisco IPCC and cold-spare
capability, and Netelligent Aware call recording.
The unified big picture
Unifed communications as a technology is large and grow-
ing. In December, research frm Dell’Oro Group (www.delloro.
com) published a report stating the unifed communications
market surpassed $3 billion during the third quarter of 2008.
According to Dell’Oro, the $3 billion fgure was driven in large
part by the market’s top two vendors, Cisco and Avaya (www.
avaya.com).
Te report indicates that unifed communications is driv-
ing the enterprise-voice market from its hardware base, such
as private branch exchanges (PBXs), to sofware.
“Functionality that has historically been confned to the core
PBX hardware is moving into sofware applications that run on
data servers and phones,” commented Alan Weckel, a direc-
tor at Dell’Oro Group. “Previously unavailable features, such
as graphical corporate directories and Web browsing, are be-
coming telephony features. At the same time, functionality
The centerpiece of Cooper Industries’ unified communications system is
the Voice over Internet Protocol phone.
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___
____
_______
___________________
More dependability. More efficiency in your infrastructure.
Eaton makes selecting Enclosure
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Making the right decisions from the start can make a difference
in the dependability and efficiency of your infrastructure.
Use our new product configuration wizard to search over
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include a wide range of voltages using various combinations
of NEMA and IEC outlets and plugs.
Visit the product wizard to meet your power distribution
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Eaton and ePDU are trademarks of Eaton Corporation. ©2008 Eaton Corporation. All rights reserved.
www.cablinginstall.com
that used to be tied to the phone at a person’s desk, such as
caller ID logs or voicemail indication, is becoming available in
cell phones and sof phones. More than ever before, the overall
enterprise telephony market, from the PBX switch to the desk-
top phone, is shifing its emphasis toward sofware.”
Another research and analyst frm, Gartner (www.gartner.
com), identifed unifed communications as one of the top 10
strategic technologies for 2009. (See sidebar, page 20.)
While the implementation of this unifed-communications
system is still rolling out across Coo-
per’s multiple sites, the company has al-
ready realized numerous benefts from
the project’s frst phase, including sev-
eral that Weckel mentioned in his com-
ments. With the Contact Center platform,
Cooper has been able to considerably im-
prove its call-center ef ciency, and the
Netelligent Aware call-recording sys-
tem has enabled employee coaching and
training, which has improved customer
service.
Reducing costs
Additionally, the 8-digit dial plan has
directly reduced the cost to make a call,
and the sof phones from Cisco have
allowed remote and mobile users to use
the global IP network as opposed to build-
ing cellular-phone expenses. Te Cisco
Mobility feature has improved commu-
nication by having a single-reach number
that can reach an individual regardless of
that person’s location.
Te increased communications ef cien-
cy required some Layer 1 infrastructure up-
grades, reports CXtec’s Tim Dufy. “Tat is
typically the case,” when a user transitions
from traditional phone service to an IP-based system. “But it
does vary by customer. Category 5e is the minimum cabling
requirement,” he says. “Some already have it installed, but in
most cases they do not—especially in older facilities.”
Troughout the deployment of cabling systems and the uni-
fed-communications equipment, CXtec worked with Cooper
Industries to ensure the project ran smoothly. “We had an
on-site presence throughout,” says CXtec’s Dufy, “from
initial pre-sales interactions, we had a team that met with Coo-
“Category 5e is the
minimum cabling require-
ment. Some already have
it installed, but in most
cases, they do not—
especially in older facilities.”
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___
'. ¦
'....
¦. . . .
Pre-terminated Network Cabling System
RapidNetRail. Utilizes zero rack mount space in
a standard 24” cabinet* by incorporating RapidNet
within the cabinet’s vertical rails. Choose copper,
fiber or both – all within the same rail. An innovative
new way to maximize your data center real estate
without increasing its size.
Learn more at www.hellermann.tyton.com/cm3
RapidNet
*in collaboration with
DAMAC Products Inc.
20

January 2009

Cabling Installation & Maintenance www.cablinginstall.com
per representatives as well as reps from Cisco. Once the project
was established and deployment was underway, the interac-
tion varied from weekly update calls to actually deploying the
technology on-site.”
Partnering for success
Because of Cooper’s dispersed locations, CXtec partnered with
another service-providing company. Depending on the loca-
tion being upgraded, either CXtec resources or those of its
partner were on site.
Overall, Cooper Industries’ implementation of a unifed
communications system has been successful because of the
ability of the technology vendors, CXtec, and Cooper to work
together. A collaboration of Netelligent’s expertise, Cisco’s
equipment and tools, and CXtec’s relationships with both re-
sulted in a smooth implementation. .
I
n October 2008, Gartner (www.gartner.com) present-
ed the Top 10 Strategic Technologies for 2009 at its
Symposium/ITxpo. Included with the likes of virtualization
and green IT was unified communications. The analyst
firm defines a “strategic technology” as one with the
potential for significant impact on the enterprise in the
next three years.
“Strategic technologies affect, run, grow, and transform
the business initiatives of an organization,” explained
David Cearley, vice president and distinguished analyst at
Gartner. “Companies should look at these opportunities
and evaluate where these technologies can add value to
their business services and solutions, as well as develop
a process for detecting and evaluating the business value
of new technologies as they enter the market.”
Specifically related to unified communications, Gartner
said: “During the next five years, the number of different
communications vendors with which a typical organiza-
tion works will be reduced by at least 50%. This change is
driven by increases in the capability of application serv-
ers, and the general shift of communications applications
to common off-the-shelf server and operating systems. As
this occurs, formerly distinct markets—each with distinct
vendors—converge, resulting in massive consolidation in
the communications industry. Organizations must build
careful, detailed plans for when each category of com-
munications function is replaced or converged, coupling
this step with the prior completion of appropriate adminis-
trative team convergence.” —P.M.
Gartner: Unified communications
a top strategic technology for 2009
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Built with your system
in mind.
www.cablofil.com
800-658-4641
8319 State Route 4
Mascoutah, IL 62258 USA
UFS from Cablofil is a wire mesh tray system for
underfloor cable management that’s adaptable to any
installation. It’s self-supporting so it won’t void the warranty
of your floor and 2’ tray sections can be installed through a
single floor opening. Multiple height supports are available
in kits, making UFS easy to order and install. And UFS
integrates with our 10’ tray — an industry first.
UNDER FLOOR CABLE MANAGEMENT MADE EASY.
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4 Tesseneer Drive
Highland Heights, KY 41076
Telephone: (800) 424-5666
(859) 572-8000
www.generalcable.com
Share your ideas. We’re listening: Datacom@GeneralCable.com
OUR BEST IDEAS COME FROM YOU
You asked for a 10 Gig cable that prevents alien crosstalk, and we responded. General Cable
has developed a unique solution…finally, an Unshielded-Twisted Pair (UTP) 10 Gig cable that
performs like a Shielded or Foiled-Twisted Pair (STP/FTP) cable. General Cable’s revolutionary
Mosaic Twisted Pair

design saves time and money over a shielded installation and provides
industry-leading protection from outside noise sources, also known as alien crosstalk (PSANEXT).
Flex-Separator
TM
optimizes internal
pair geometry to yield
superior electrical
performance while
maintaining cable
flexibility. This unique
miniaturized cross-
web stabilizes each
pair and creates an
overall smaller, round
cable profile.
The Mosaic Crossblock
TM
is made up of individual
metallic blocks separated
by an insulating layer.
Since there is no
metal-to-metal contact,
there is no path for
current to flow longitudi-
nally, and thus, no need
for grounding. Each
block contains eddy
currents that act together
to cancel the electric
field outside the cable.
Visit us at BICSI Orlando, Booth #712
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www.cablinginstall.com data center
www.cablinginstall.com Cabling Installation & Maintenance

January 2009

23
Multimode opti-
cal fbers have always ofered
users the most cost-efective
choice to achieve the benefts of fber-optic transmission
in premises applications. Te simple reason is that the
electronics are less expensive than those used to power
singlemode fbers. While TR-42, the User Premises Tele-
communications Cabling Requirements Engineering
Committee, has recognized both mul-
timode and singlemode optical fber
for private-network structured cabling,
this was because a combined system
has always provided the best value for
the end user who might need single-
mode fber to support long distances or
very high data rates.
Te good news is that the newest
generations of multimode fbers can
support the same high data rates as sin-
glemode, including 40 and 100 Gbits/sec,
while retaining the cost savings associ-
ated with multimode fbers.
TR-42 initially recognized 62.5-μm multimode fber in
ANSI/TIA-568, Te Commercial Building Cabling Stan-
dard. As newer applications and optical sources came
along, the higher-bandwidth capabilities of 50-μm f-
ber became recognized as well. As transmission speeds
increased, the market shifed from 62.5-μm to 50-μm
fber and, more recently, to 50-μm laser-optimized fber
(OM3). Tis trend will be accelerated with the advent of
40/100-Gigabit Ethernet (GbE) because there is no OM1
or OM2 objective at these next-generation speeds.
The next speed generations
Te current objectives for both 40 and 100 GbE are to
cover a distance of at least 100 meters on
OM3 fber. Te 100-meter value will al-
low for extremely low-cost transceivers,
but is well short of the 300-meter dis-
tance allowed by TR-42 in the TIA-942
data center standard; and no one seems
excited about having to use singlemode
electronics and singlemode fber for
every link in their network that reached
farther than 100 meters.
In a survey presented at the Institute
of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
(IEEE; www.ieee.org) 802.3 meeting in
July 2008, 20 diverse end users were asked to consider
three options. (Note that OM4 is a higher-bandwidth
multimode fber that will be discussed in greater detail
later in this article). Te three options were:
A) OM3 to 100 meters (requires one optical module);
B) OM3 to 150 or 200 meters; OM4 to 250 meters
(requires one optical module);
C) OM3 to 100 meters; OM3 to 150 or 200 meters; OM4
to 250 meters (requires two optical modules).
Te survey results were overwhelmingly (16 or 20) in
favor of Option B: OM3 to 150 or 200 meters and OM4
to 250 meters. A minority (4 of 20) favored Option C:
OM3 to 100 meters. All survey participants believed the
100-meter transmission length limit suggested by 802.3
would increase the cost of data centers at 40/100-Gbit/sec
speeds by forcing them to use a more expensive single-
mode system to meet their link-length requirements.
An ad hoc subgroup within 802.3 is studying ➤
Multimode fibers
rise to the challenge
An update on the current state of optical fiber
in standards, including the definition of OM4.
This article was developed on behalf of the Telecommunications Industry
Association’s Fiber Optics LAN Section (www.fols.org) by Sharon Bois,
multimode fiber product line manager at Corning Optical Fiber; David
Mazzarese, technical manager of fiber-systems engineering at OFS; and
Olaf Storaasli, product manager for optical fiber at Draka Communications.
FOLS members include 3M; Berk-Tek, a Nexans company; CommScope;
Corning; Draka Communications; Fluke Networks; OFS; Ortronics
Legrand; Panduit; Sumitomo Electric Lightwave; Superior Essex; and Tyco
Electronics.
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Cabling Installation & Maintenance www.cablinginstall.com
extended reach, and working on extending
the multimode distance from the current “at
least 100 meters on OM3” to somewhere be-
tween 150 and 250 meters. Technical feasi-
bility for these extended distances has been
shown. What remains is to identify the dis-
tance and technical path that will provide the
best, lowest-cost solution. Te goal is to en-
sure that multimode fber customers contin-
ue to get the best bang for their buck.
One possible path to achieve the extended
distance would be through the use of a high-
er-bandwidth fber. Unfortunately, the transceiver specifca-
tions that are currently proposed for the 40/100-GbE standards
are such that a higher-bandwidth fber, on its own, doesn’t pro-
vide much beneft. Te sources have such broad spectral widths
that the efects of higher bandwidth may only extend the dis-
tance by a few percent. But a higher-bandwidth fber, combined
with tighter transceiver specifcations or a chip added to the
host board, could support link lengths of at least 250 meters
on multimode fber.
Developers of standards using the Fibre Channel (FC) pro-
tocol also have started talking about next-generation speeds.
Tis set of standards increases speeds by a factor of 2 with each
generation. Standards are currently in place for 8-Gbit FC, with
discussions around creating a 16-Gbit standard on the hori-
zon. In a Fibre Channel meeting last year, participants agreed
that a multimode fber with signifcantly higher bandwidth
should be developed/characterized to support 16-Gbit/sec
serial transmission over 150 meters.
OM4 fiber standardization
Standardization activities of OM4 multimode fber are active in
two fber standards groups: TIA and IEC (International Elec-
Multimode fiber capabilities
Core
diameter
Effective modal
bandwidth @ 850 nm
OFL bandwidth
(@850/1300 nm)
10G link
length
40G/100G
link length
OM1 50 μm or
62.5 μm
n/a 200/500 MHz.km 33 m n/a
OM2 50 μm or
62.5 μm
n/a 500/500 MHz.km 82 m n/a
OM3 50 μm 2000 MHz.km 1500/500 MHz.
km
300 m 100 m**
* Fiber type is per ISO/IEC 11801
** 100 m on OM3 is the current objective in IEEE 802.3ba
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www.cablinginstall.com Cabling Installation & Maintenance

January 2009

25
trotechnical Commission; www.iec.ch). Both the IEEE 802.3
(Ethernet) and Fibre Channel application standards groups
have expressed interest in a higher-data-rate multimode fber
above and beyond the performance currently ofered by OM3
fber. Tis has prompted the ISO/IEC premises wiring cable
committee to request the development of a new high-data-rate
multimode fber standard.
OM3 and OM4 are referred to as “laser-optimized” multi-
mode fbers because they are specifcally designed for use with
high-performance, low-cost vertical-cavity surface-emitting
lasers (VCSELs). Careful processing to precisely control the
fber’s refractive index profle is paramount to minimize
modal dispersion—or, diferential mode delay (DMD).
By limiting DMD, all modes (light paths) in the fber arrive
at the transceiver at the same time, minimizing pulse spread-
ing and thus maximizing bandwidth. Bandwidth is ensured by
thorough DMD testing afer the fber is manufactured. Tus,
these higher-bandwidth fbers provide a combination of lon-
ger reach and lower system implementation cost for current
(e.g., 10-Gbit/sec) and more importantly, future higher-data-
rate multimode fber systems.
Standardized in 2002, OM3 fber has a minimum efective
modal bandwidth (EMB) of 2,000 Mhz∙km at 850 nm using
VCSEL transceivers. Tis is suf cient bandwidth to operate a
10-Gbit/sec Ethernet system up to 300 meters. An OM4 fber
is expected to specify a minimum EMB of 4,700 MHz∙km at
850 nm—more than twice the bandwidth of OM3.
OM3 fbers are backward-compatible and can support leg-
acy applications that use LED transmitters operating at either
850 or 1,300 nm. Tere is a general consensus among the fber
manufacturers that OM4 will also be backward-compatible;
however, the standard is still in the early stages of development
and the exact specifcations have not been fnalized.
TIA standards committee TR-42.12, Optical Fibers and
Cables, is developing the specifcation to be named TIA/EIA-
492AAAD “Detail specifcation for OM4 850-nm laser-opti-
mized, 50-μm core diameter/125-μm cladding diameter class
1a graded-index multimode optical fbers.” Tis standard is
scheduled to be ratifed in mid-2009. In parallel, IEC SC 86A
Working Group 1 initiated work on the OM4 fber standard-
ization in April 2008. Te A1 MMF standard 60793-20-10 will
be revised to include a higher grade A1a.3 (OM4) fber.
Laser-optimized 50-μm fbers (OM3 and the future OM4)
will support 10-Gbit/sec transmission over 300 to 550 meters.
For 40- and 100-Gbit/sec transmission, they will support at
least 100 meters, but eforts are underway to increase that dis-
tance to 150 to 250 meters. Tis longer distance would cover the
majority of LAN and data center link-length requirements.
By enabling signifcantly lower-cost transceivers, multimode
fber systems continue to be the low-cost, future-ready solution
for premises networks of yesterday, today, and tomorrow.
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Internet
Dependent station
Dependent
station
(Client)
Dependent
station
(Client)
Dependent
station
(Client)
Dependent
station
(Access point)
Enabling station (Access point)
Enabling
beacon
Enabling beacon
Enabling
beacon
Enabling
beacon
LAT 37 23518 / LON 122 02.625
75’ above the ground
Enabling station (Access point)
LAT 37 23518 / LON 122 02.625
75’ above the ground
802.11 network overview
Source: Wi-Fi Alliance
Clients
www.cablinginstall.com wireless
www.cablinginstall.com Cabling Installation & Maintenance

January 2009

27
In late September of last
year, the IEEE (www.ieee.
org) approved for publica-
tion the 802.11y wireless
standard, enabling high-powered Wi-Fi equipment to
operate in and “cooperative use” of the mostly vacant
3650 to 3700 MHz band. In essence, the amendment
to the 802.11-2007 standard, in conjunction with the
FCC’s (www.fcc.gov) 3650 MHz Order established in
2005, allows for increased wireless operation for more
users at a much higher power than via traditional Wi-Fi
equipment—up to 3 miles or more—and, according to
the FCC will “create a spectrum environment that will
encourage multiple entrants and stimulate the expan-
sion of broadband service,” especially in rural areas.
Te Wi-Fi Alliance (www.wi-f.org), a non-proft in-
dustry association of more than 300 member companies
devoted to promoting the growth of WLANs, recently
published a discussion paper on the 802.11y standard, “A
New Regulatory and Technical Environment for Wire-
less Broadband.” In its report,
the Alliance notes that the key
intentions of the FCC order in-
clude “to lower the cost of entry
and compliance while allowing
market forces to derive maxi-
mum value from the available
spectrum through shared use.”
Te Order requires robust co-
existence capabilities, and the
Alliance says that “Wi-Fi technology is especially well
suited to meet the requirements for avoiding interfer-
ence…Because the contention-based protocol used by
Wi-Fi technology senses and responds to a broad range
of potential technologies, 100% of the 3650 MHz band is
available to networks using the 802.11y protocol.”
Te 3650 MHz band has been largely vacant due to
the range limitations of radio waves and intentional fre-
quency spacing to avoid interference, but the Alliance
report notes, “Te expectation is that successful
In a typical 802.11y deployment, a
licensed operator installs a few
enabling stations over a geo-
graphically large oil field, then uses
dependent stations at each truck or
rig. The enabling stations man-
age the regulatory aspects of the
network, with oversight from the
operator’s IT department.

Essentials of an
802.11y network
The recently approved standard will allow for
high-powered Wi-Fi-enabled communications
at distances of 3 miles or more.
STEVE SMITH is executive editor for Cabling Installation & Maintenance.
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__________
28

January 2009

Cabling Installation & Maintenance www.cablinginstall.com
deployment of [the Wi-Fi] model in the 3650 MHz band can
and should lead to a much broader allocation of spectrum for
lightly licensed networks utilizing a contention-based pro-
tocol mechanism—eventually including most of the known
unused or underused radio spectrum.”
Light licensing means that licensees pay a small fee for a
nationwide, non-exclusive license, and then pay an additional
nominal fee for each deployed high-powered base station.
Potential installations include industrial automation and
control, campus and enterprise networks, and public safety
and security networks. In one scenario of a potential 802.11y
installation, a fre station locates an enabling station (see
description below) on its communications tower, and uses
dependent stations on each fre truck and
laptop. Te incident commander controls
the enabling station using a Public Safety
band radio.
Wi-Fi Alliance discussion paper excerpt
Trough the courtesy of the Alliance, the fol-
lowing excerpts from their white paper de-
scribe the major elements and operation
overview of an 802.11y network:

Enabling stations. An enabling station is a high-powered
fxed station with authority to control when and how a
dependent station can operate. An enabling station commu-
nicates an initial enabling signal to its dependents over the
air. Te enabling station may then direct supporting enable-
ment messages to be exchanged over the air, over another
dependent station, or by mechanisms that rely on transport
via higher layers. As with all high-powered stations, GPS co-
ordinates and altitude information of enabling stations are
registered in a public database to enable stations experienc-
ing interference to locate interfering stations and seek inter-
ference mitigation. Enabling stations must include location
information in every beacon.

Dependent stations. Dependent stations are devices in the
network that are not registered, but instead receive authori-
zation to transmit from a registered enabling station over the
air. Failure to receive the enabling beacon at regular, defned
intervals requires a dependent station to suspend transmis-
sion until it is re-enabled. A dependent station may be fxed
or mobile.

Regulatory class information. Each device in a network
must be able to operate within regulatory requirements of
any channel available to it. Prior to 802.11y, channel switch-
ing only occurred within a particular band, where only trans-
mit power limits may have changed. Future implementations
will be able to move outside of the original band, comply-
ing with the regulatory requirements specifed by the regula-
tory class octet in every beacon.
Together, these new elements support three signifcant new
mechanisms defned in 802.11y:

Dynamic Station Enablement (DSE). [Tis is] the process
by which an enabling station grants permission and dic-
tates operational procedures to dependent stations. Te light-
ly-licensed structure of the FCC regulations for 3650 MHz
calls for the creation of procedures to govern the use of the
band and treatment of violations. DSE supports the light-
ly-licensed regulatory model by empowering the network
operator to ensure appropriate operation of base stations
and the dependent stations they enable. Beyond addressing
the regulatory requirements for the 3650 MHz Order, DSE
ofers the promise of other channel management and coor-
dination benefts.
1
For example, since the enabling station
is not required to serve as the access point for each of its de-
pendent stations, DSE can reduce the likelihood of a depen-
dent station contributing to radio interference by allowing
the dependent station to complete the enablement process via
a geographically closer access point and ultimately through
a channel other than the air (e.g., the Internet).
1

Contention-based protocol incorporating regulatory class
information. 802.11y devices can sense both 802.11 and non-
802.11 devices and identify available spectrum as small as
5MHz. 802.11y access point beacons identify the country
and the regulatory domain for their physical location. By
incorporating both channel use and regulatory class infor-
mation, 802.11y devices can identify available channels and
adjust operating parameters to the laws of the country in
which the access point resides.

Extended Channel Switch Announcement (ECSA). A meth-
odology to coordinate a move from one channel to anoth-
er with less contention or to change channel bandwidth.
1
Specifcally, an enabling station can identify the channel
with the least aggregate interference to all of the stations
that are connected to it on a completely dynamic basis. Tis
capability ensures the best signal-to-noise ratio and lowest
power levels possible. ECSA also incorporates regulatory
class information—if a channel switch moves the network
to a new regulatory domain, the station shifs to the approved
frequencies and channels for the new domain. ECSA orig-
inates in 802.11y, and is now being applied retroactively to
802.11n and the other proposed concepts across 802.11.
The improved quality of service (QoS) made pos-
sible by higher power levels will make Wi-Fi tech-
nology more attractive for intensive applications like
Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP).
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With Sentry

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www.cablinginstall.com Cabling Installation & Maintenance

January 2009

29
Network operation overview
Te frst requirement for establishing an IEEE 802.11y network
is determining if the area to be covered is in an exclusion zone.
If it is outside of the protected regions, the network operator
must fle for a license, pay a small fee, and regis-
ter the location of the enabling station in a public
database. Dependent stations, fxed and mobile,
may then be added to the network based on their
ability to receive and decode the enabling beacon.
Once enabled, each dependent station continually
tests its ability to receive and decode an enabling
beacon. Failing this test, the dependent station at-
tempts to reacquire the beacon, with a fnite number of attempts
before ceasing trying for a predetermined amount of time.
Tis requirement prevents congestion caused by stations that
may be truly out of range of an enabling beacon. Enabling
stations continually test for interference. If interference is de-
tected, the enabling station must silence the network and
search for a clear channel. When a new channel is identifed,
ECSA directs all of the devices in the network to move to the
new channel, which may include a change in regulatory class,
as specifed by the regulatory class octet.
Potential installations include industrial automa-
tion and control, campus and enterprise net-
works, and public safety and security networks.
Low-cost chipsets and the capability to efectively man-
age interference through contention-based protocols make
Wi-Fi technology an excellent ft for applications in this spec-
trum. Te improved quality of service (QoS) made possible by
higher power levels will make Wi-Fi technology more
attractive for intensive applications like Voice over Internet
Protocol (VoIP).
Ed. note—Te complete discussion paper may be viewed at:
http://wi-f.org/fles/kc/WFA_11y_Primer_fnal.pdf
References
1. Blue, Scott. 2008. Te Sensible Guide to 802.11y. Sensible Ra-
dio Corp. (www.sensibleradio.com/11y.pdf)
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_________________________________
Almost every day you’re asked to make on-the-job compromises.
But compromise the performance of your network? Not a chance.
Build a better network with NextLAN Systems. Gain the benefits of two industry
leaders combining their expertise to jointly engineer, manufacture and support a
broad range of structured cabling systems. NextLAN connectivity and cables are
independently tested - as a system - to ensure repeatable performance. And
NextLAN systems are backed by a lifetime warranty*. Visit www.NextLANsystems.com
for more information.
*Limited lifetime channel and product warranty on all certified installations. © 2008 Leviton Manufacturing Co., Inc. and Superior Essex Inc. All Rights Reserved.
PERFORMANCE WITHOUT COMPROMISE
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Compiled by Steve Smith
wwww.cablinginstall.com Cabling Installation & Maintenance

January 2009

31
W
hen Miami, FL-based Concord
Electric Contractors was tasked
to upgrade the computer and media in-
frastructure for the Immaculata-LaSalle
High School, the limited room for cable
runs presented an installation challenge.
Concord found the solution in Isotec’s
(www.isotec.com) new SIMTRA Ferrite-
Barrier power cables, which are designed
to be both a space and time saver.
“Te Immaculata-LaSalle installa-
tion posed signifcant design issues be-
cause of the lack of space to run wires,”
says David Linenfelser, electrical su-
pervisor at Concord Electric Contrac-
tors. “Te Isotec SIMTRA power cables
became the only solution for the instal-
lation because the unique design of the
SIMTRA wire allows for multi-format
media and low-voltage cabling to co-ex-
ist in the same conduit as the 120 volt AC
power cable without interference, while
only having to run one cable.”
SIMTRA cables conform with NEC
specifcation sections 725.136, 760.136,
770.133, 800.133, 800.179, 820.133 and
830.133, and are designed to elimi-
nate transients and interference. Each
conductor of the power cable is sur-
rounded by a proprietary ferrite bar-
rier that provides shielding within the
cable itself, thereby attenuating surges and
minimizing interference that can corrupt
the signal in adjacent low-voltage cables.
Te Immaculata-LaSalle project re-
quired several diferent types of cable
to be run to each classroom. For in-
stance, each classroom has cables run-
ning to the teacher’s desk that provide
interconnections for the video projec-
tor, DVD, audio amplifer and comput-
er networking, in addition to power for
each student desk.
Barrier cable technology allows for
power, low-voltage in one conduit
Survey: wireless is hottest thing on campus

Proprietary design of Isotec Inc.’s SIMTRA wire allows for
multi-format media and low-voltage cabling to co-exist
without interference in the same conduit as a 120 volt AC
power cable.
Power outlets for each stu-
dent computer were posi-
tioned next to each desk, but
there was not space available
for multiple conduit runs. By
using SIMTRA power ca-
bles, however, Concord Elec-
tric Contractors was able to
pull the projector wiring, TV
cable, speaker wire, data
cable, and AC power all in
one conduit into the room,
breaking out Category 5 Eth-
ernet cable and AC for the
individual student stations.
Also, since the cable could be
run through the small space
in the foor, installers were
able to eliminate the extra
step of supporting the cables every four
feet— required when running low-volt-
age cable through ceilings.
“A big beneft of the SIMTRA cable is
time savings on a job and streamlining
the installation to meet code,” explains
Linenfelser. “Also, whenever you go
through a classroom wall, the building
codes consider it a frewall, and that
requires a whole new set of rules. What’s
benefcial with SIMTRA is that we actu-
ally run one large conduit from the class-
rooms to the main room where the high
voltage and low voltage all converge,
eliminating the need for multiple pene-
trations of the frewalls. [For] Immacu-
lata-LaSalle, SIMTRA cable actually
made this installation possible.”
A
recent survey indicates that near-
ly three out of four colleges and
universities plan to expand their wire-
less networks over the next two years.
Tat is one of the key fndings in the lat-
est member survey by ACUTA (www
acuta.org), the Association for Informa-
tion Communications Technology Pro-
fessionals in Higher Education, which
surveyed members at its 2008 Fall Sem-
inar in Boston.
Te survey asked members to iden-
tify the most signifcant change in their
cabling and wiring infrastructure over
the last several years. Sixty percent said
that change was deployment of wireless
networks, compared with 13% pointing
to installation of fber-optic cable and
another 13% citing rewiring projects for
technology upgrades.
Two out of three survey respon-
dents said it was the demand for
“connectivity anywhere” that drove their
key networking change, while 40%
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___
______
32

January 2009

Cabling Installation & Maintenance www.cablinginstall.com
ARLINGTON, VA—The Telecommunications Industry Association
(www.tiaonline.org) has updated the 568-C.3 Optical Fiber
Cabling Components standard, which specifies cable and
component transmission performance requirements for premises
optical-fiber cabling. Significant technical changes include:
incorporating the performance specifications for 850nm laser-
optimized 50/125-μm multimode cables previously found in
ASNI/TIA/EIA-568-B.3-1; specifications for indoor-outdoor cable,
including minimum bend radius and maximum pulling tensions;
and array connector specifications. Copies of the document are
available at: www.global.ihs.com
STERLING, VA— As the data center continues to evolve and
mature, business-oriented goals are driving the adoption of
Ethernet as the single network technology, according to a new
Current Analysis Advisory Report, “One Love, One Data Center,
One Network.” According to the report’s
author, Steven Schuchart, Current Analysis principal analyst/
data center, “For there to be truly agile, cost optimized, and
efficient data centers, the network must be transitioned to a
single technology. That technology is Ethernet. There is significant
opportunity to break the old networking paradigms and advocate
one network technology for the data center.” In the report,
Schuchart looks at why Ethernet is the natural choice for a single
network, including its wide deployment, and the willingness of
Ethernet’s vendors to work together to ensure that the technology
is compatible, regardless of brand or origin. For a complimentary
copy of the full report, visit: www.currentanalysis.com/f/2008/
onenetwork/
LITTLE NECK, NY—In February, Leviton (www.leviton.com) will
open a new 450,000-square-foot distribution center in Lebanon,
TN. The fully automated facility will serve as one of the company’s
two state-of-the-art domestic warehouse and distribution
hubs. The Tennessee center will service customers east of the
Mississippi River, and feature the company’s commercial-grade
occupancy sensors, light switches, outlets, and commercial
networking devices.
ANAHEIM, CA—To help facilities managers and engineers
address power issues, Electrorack (www.electrorack.com)
has designed a downloadable Power Distribution Catalog that
highlights a wide selection of Power Distribution Units (PDUs),
power consumption monitoring solutions, and mounting methods.
Electrorack’s PDU options are designed to give facilities managers
the ability to closely monitor current draw, and determine where
and how to distribute power via a selection of current, voltage,
mounting options and plug types. Voltage ranges are 120, 208,
208/3-Phase), and amperage ranges are 15, 20, 30, 50 and 60.
Short runs…
said the evolution of communication
styles was a major factor. Meeting grow-
ing capacity needs and migration to Voice
over IP and Unifed Communications
were other drivers cited, at 33% and 23%
respectively.
Te single greatest beneft of their
change, said responding ACUTA mem-
bers, was network access anywhere and
anytime (42%); user convenience (23%);
network ef ciencies (17%); and greater
bandwidth (10%).
On the downside, 56% of respondents
said the cost of their change was their
greatest challenge, while another 21%
said locating and installing the many
wireless access points needed for cover-
age was their biggest hurdle.
Asked about the next signifcant step
in their campus networking, 71% said
expansion of their wireless network—or
installation of one if they haven’t done so
already—is in their plans. Another 19%
pointed to additional rewiring projects
as information communications tech-
nology evolves. As far as the timeframe
for their next big steps, 73% of respon-
dents expect to take those steps within
one year.
Finally, asked to identify how their
ongoing changes afect both them and
their departments, respondents said
the highest impact issues are ever-tight-
ening budgets, a greater need for long-
range planning, the need to learn new
technology skills, the fact that growing
campuses mean more responsibility for
their departments, and the challenge of
fnding employees with the right mix of
skills.
“The fact that wireless network-
ing is the biggest change for our mem-
bers and their schools isn’t surprising in
itself,” says Jeri Semer, executive director
of ACUTA. “But this survey shows the
impact that wireless networks, as well as
other forms of technology evolution, are
having on information communications
technology departments.”
Semer adds, “While wireless net-
works do make communications and
computing far more convenient on cam-
puses, they do have their challenges in
terms of cost and management. Te
same is true for other advancing tech-
nologies as well.”
“While wireless networks do make communications
and computing far more convenient on campuses,
they do have their challenges in terms of cost and
management.”
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January 2009

33
High-speed networking alliances plan to merge
T
he Ethernet Alliance (www.
ethernetalliance.org) and the Road
to 100G Alliance plan to transition as
one organization under the Ethernet
Alliance. Both industry organizations
promote the advancement of high-per-
formance Ethernet networking.
Te non-proft Road to 100G Alliance
seeks to provide seamless interopera-
bility among the disparate, standards-
based components required to build
high-capacity network elements. Te
Ethernet Alliance seeks to promote
industry awareness, acceptance, and
advancement of technology and prod-
ucts based on existing and emerging
IEEE 802 Ethernet standards.
“Te Road to 100G Alliance has met
and exceeded its expectations in terms
of exposing the challenges of develop-
ing 100G platforms,” says Bill Weisinger,
chairman of the Road to 100G Alliance.
“With the challenges well understood, it
is the right time for us to join with the
Ethernet Alliance and fulfll the balance
of our goal—to establish a comprehen-
sive ecosystem of suppliers and users
to accelerate the adoption and ongoing
development of high-performance net-
working solutions.”
Brad Booth, chairman of the board
for the Ethernet Alliance, notes, “Te
demand for bandwidth is growing in ev-
ery market segment—from consumer to
enterprise to service and content provid-
ers. Te Ethernet Alliance praises the
Road to 100G Alliance and its members
on highlighting the challenges of 100G
and is honored they believe the Ether-
net Alliance is the organization to fur-
ther their goal.”
Booth adds, “Given the alignment of
our visions and strategies, the combina-
tion of our two organizations will greatly
advance the development of the high-
speed Ethernet ecosystem, benefting
customers worldwide.”
In November 2007, the IEEE 802.3
working group authorized the forma-
tion of the IEEE P802.3ba task force to
begin work on a draf standard for 40
Gigabit and 100 Gigabit Ethernet. Late
last fall, the task force completed review
of the frst draf of IEEE P802.3ba, which
keeps the task force on track for standard
ratifcation by mid-2010.
The Ethernet Alliance has also
announced an internship program as
part of its Ethernet Alliance Univer-
sity Program (EAUP). Te program
promotes internship opportunities by
connecting corporate members with cur-
rently enrolled student of EAUP aca-
demic members. Te Alliance accepts
student resumes and makes them avail-
able to corporate members via its online
database.
“As someone who graduated from a co-
operative engineering program, I know
that today’s university students will have
a direct infuence on helping shape Eth-
ernet technologies in the years to come,”
says Booth.
TAMPA, FL—This month, BICSI (www.bicsi.org) will inaugurate
five new board members elected to serve 2-year terms on the
board of directors. Members approved: Christine Klauch, RCDD,
NTS as secretary; Mel Lesperance, RCDD, as U.S. Southeast
Region director; Michael Collins, RCDD, U.S. South-Central
Region director (incumbent); Todd Strand, RCDD, NTS, OSP,
U.S. Western Region director; Richard Smith, RCDD, NTS, OSP,
Canadian Region director (incumbent).
LEXINGTON, KY—ACUTA, the Association for Information
Communications Technology Professionals in Higher Education
(www.acuta.org) has moved its annual conference from
summertime to April 19-22 at the Hyatt Regency Atlanta, GA.
“Summer is a very busy season for major technology projects on
campus, so we were receiving feedback from members that it was
difficult for them to get to the annual conference in the summer
months,” says executive director Jeri Semer. The conference and
13th annual forum will emphasize technology and management
education, information sharing, and networking among peers.
BEAVERTON, OR—The International Telecommunication Union’s
Standardization Sector (ITU-T) has consented the PHY and
architecture portions of the ITU-T G.hn specification, as part
of standardization efforts for next-generation home networking.
According to HomeGrid Forum (www.homegridforum.org), the
consent demonstrates momentum for G.hn as a worldwide
standard that will unify the networking of content and devices over
any wire—coax cable, phone, and power lines.
Short runs…
“The demand for bandwidth is growing in every
market segment—from consumer to enterprise to
service and content providers.”
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______________
____
Recently Archived Events

TIA Standards Update
Sponsored by: APC, Berk-Tek, Chatsworth
Products and Harger

10GBase-T Technology and
Systems Update
Sponsored by: Belden, Fluke Networks
and Panduit

Wireless LAN: Standards, Architectures,
Testing
Sponsored by: Fluke Networks, Microsemi
and Ortronics
■ Green Cabling
Sponsored by: ADC, Berk-Tek, Chatsworth
Products, Corning and Ortronics

10-Gigabit Cost Comparisons
Sponsored by: Berk-Tek, Ortronics and
Tyco Electronics
To view archived Webcasts now, visit:
www.cablinginstall.com/webcast
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www.cablinginstall.com Cabling Installation & Maintenance

January 2009

35
Compiled by Steve Smith New Products
High-def signal extender
The AT-HDRS is a HDMI over
CAT5/5e/6 receiver unit designed to
work with the AT-HD19SS, Atlona’s new
HD video distribution system. Tis unit
lets users deploy additional HD moni-
tors as their AV system expands. Te
AT-HD19SS, when combined with the
AT-HDRS, is designed to form a fexi-
ble, expandable solution by which high
defnition video and audio can be rout-
ed to multiple remote displays. Tese
units take HD video at resolutions up
to 1080p over a HDMI 1.2a connection,
and then extend that signal over a sin-
gle CAT5/5e/6 cable up to 200 feet. At
each display end, the cable is connected
to the AT-HDRS receiver units that fea-
ture an adjustable equalizer, which the
company claims “ensures perfect sig-
nal quality with no degradation.” Te
AT-HD19SS and AT-HDRS HD vid-
eo distribution system can be cas-
caded, allowing for an infinite
number of display locations. Tese
units are suitable for in-store
video displays, digital signage, as well as
education and worship facility installa-
tions. Expected MSRP is $149 each.
ATLONA TECHNOLOGIES
www.atlona.com
Data center UPS
APC’s Symmetra PX 250/500kW Tree-
Phase uninterruptible power sup-
ply (UPS) system for the data center
is designed for ultra-high ef ciency,
nearly silent operation and N+1 redun-
dancy. Tis modular power solution is
built for growth-oriented high density
and higher power installations look-
ing to maximize virtualization eforts
in the data center. Te APC Symmetra
PX 250/500kW ofers 25kW ultra-high
ef ciency double conversion online
inverter power modules, extended life
hot-swap batteries, a large touch-screen
graphical user interface, and a side-
mounted maintenance bypass panel
with subfeed distribution. It also ofers
maximum data center confguration
fexibility, allowing the unit to ft in the
same row as IT equipment, or against
a wall to save foor space. In the future,
APC says the Symmetra PX 250/500kW
will be capable of being paralleled up to
2 MW. Te system also features auto-
mated predictive diagnostic capabili-
ties, increased overload capacity, and
on-the-fy frmware upgrades, which are
designed for highly redundant, ef cient,
and simplifed UPS architecture.
APC/SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC
www.apcc.com
HDTV network camera
Te AXIS Q1755 Network Camera is de-
signed for securing areas where greater
image detail is required, such as airports,
passport controls, and casinos. It is built
for HDTV 1080i or 720 resolution, 16:9
aspect ratio, and supports both H.264 and
Motion JPEG in full frame rate. With day
and night functionality and progressive
output, this camera is designed to pro-
vide exceptional quality images even of
fast moving objects in all lighting con-
ditions. It features 10x optical zoom
and 12x digital zoom paired with auto
focus. Te AXIS Q1755 includes video
intelligence, such as enhanced video
motion detection, audio detection, and
detection of camera tampering (such
as blocking or spray-painting). In addi-
tion, it incorporates a Gatekeeper func-
tionality, which automatically zooms in
when there is activity in the scene and
then zooms out afer a preset time inter-
val. Te camera ofers an advanced suite
of security and network management
capabilities, including HTTPS encryp-
tion, IEEE 802.1X authentication, IPv4/
IPv6 and Quality of Service.
AXIS COMMUNICATIONS
www.axis.com
Passive cooling exhaust duct
Confgurable heights and a collapsible
design are now ofered in the Vertical
Exhaust Duct, a passive cool-
ing solution used with the
company’s F-Series Tera-
Frame cabinet system. It
isolates and guides hot ex-
haust air from the back
of the cabinet to the
drop ceiling plenum,
creating a closed hot
air return path to
the cooling system.
Airfow is not lim-
ited to fan capacity,
and there are no ad-
ditional power costs,
fan replacements, or
power redundancy
requirements. With a
2-piece telescoping design, the Ver-
tical Exhaust Duct meets varying ceil-
ing height requirements; it is available
in a short version, extending from 20 to
34 inches for low ceilings, and a tall ver-
sion reaching 34 to 60 inches. A fexible
gasket creates a seal around the opening
in the drop ceiling, eliminating the need
for ceiling grid alterations.
CHATSWORTH PRODUCTS
www.chatsworth.com
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www.usconec.com
customerservice@usconec.com
800 769 0944
US Conec offers standards based and contract manufactured
products for all of your high density optical connectivity needs.
As leaders in multi-fiber connector technology, we are constantly
expanding our product offerings using over 15 years of
experience in materials, precision molding and advanced
metrology.
IBC

Brand Cleaners
• Cost effective dry cleaning solutions for connectors
residing in bulkhead adapters and unmated on cable
assemblies
• Highly effective for removal of oil, dust, solvent residue and
a host of other common contaminants encountered during
installations
• IBC™ Brand Cleaner SC for 2.5mm connectors is
designed for SC, ST, FC and E2000 with UPC & APC
polishes
• IBC™ Brand Cleaner LC for 1.25mm connectors is
designed for standard LC and MU with UPC & APC polishes
• IBC™ Brand Cleaner MPO is designed for male and
female MPO compatible connectors including MTP
®
Brand connectors
New Products
Cabling distribution system
For high performance and fexible copper or fber-optic cabling
in server rooms and data centers, this modular distribution sys-
tem is available in
1U and 3U heights,
in stainless steel or
with black lacquer-
ing, and equipped
with distribution
boxes to terminate
the thin trunk cables.
Copper distribution
boxes provide RJ-45 ports at the front and a Telco adapter or
LSAplus contacts at the rear. Fiber-optic boxes provide an MPO
adapter as rear input and an internal fber duct to the front side
fber-optic ports. Tis system lets you complete up to 48 pre-ter-
minated fber-optic or copper ports per height unit. Te copper
solution allows a 10 Gbit/sec data transfer a maximum distance
of 60 meters, while the fber solution lets you transfer up to
10 Gbits/sec with a maximum permanent link length of 90
meters. By using pre-connected, thin trunk cables, this distribu-
tion subsystem allows for simplifed changes or extensions that
can be performed without interruption of operations.
DAETWYLER CABLES
www.daetwyler-cables.com
Hardened, bend-insensitive fiber
Draka Communications has developed advanced connectorized
cables through the combination of the company’s BendBright-
XS bend-insensitive fber cable and Megladon’s Hardened Lens
Connector (HLC) ScratchGuard connector technology. Avail-
able immediately in patch cord products, the solution is de-
signed as a high performance, scratch-resistant, bend-insensitive
fber-optic cable assembly. Riser, plenum, and low-smoke zero
halogen (LSZH) cables are available with ultra or angle polish
hardened lens connectors.
DRAKA COMMUNICATIONS
www.drakaamericas.com
Wall-mount boxes
OWB-X outdoor wall
boxes are designed for
audio/visual, IT and con-
trol installations. Covers
have “fip up” cable entry
doors so that the main
cover door can be locked
once the cables are con-
nected. Two box styles
are available that will
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OFS’ LaserWave fiber exceeds the OM3 standard for
today’s high-speed networks — and tomorrow’s. And
since LaserWave fiber delivers DMD specified in the
0 – 5 micron range, you get up to twice the bandwidth for
lasers that launch power in the fiber’s center. Enjoy fast,
reliable transmission and easier connectivity. To learn more,
ask your cabler about OFS or visit ofsoptics.com/fiber.
Get your network up to
speed with LaserWave
®
fiber.
New Products
www.cablinginstall.com Cabling Installation & Maintenance

January 2009

37
allow for either fush “in wall” or sur-
face “on wall” mounting. Te back box
is currently available with four difer-
ent connector mounting confgurations.
Te internal connector mounting styles
handle standard gang plates, the compa-
ny’s assortment of IPS inserts, and XLR-
type connectors. A blank plate is supplied
for custom fabricating. Te enclosures are
constructed in NEMA-4 style and with
the integral door will meet the NEMA-3
and 3R ratings providing protection
against falling dirt, rain, sleet and snow.
Locking doors in brushed aluminum
are standard, with other color and style
options available upon request.
FSR
www.fsrinc.com
Visible fault locator
Tis handheld visible fault locator (GAO
811) is designed to fnd faults in fber
jumpers, patch panels, enclosures, con-
nectors and couplers. Te fault location
is made visible from a macro bend point,
break, problem coupler or connector, or a
mechanical splice that is not well aligned.
GAO 811 handheld laser source is able to
remedy the limitation of the dead zone of
an OTDR and detect fber fault positions
accurately. It is suitable for optical net-
work installation and maintenance.
GAO TEK INC.
www.gaotek.com
Panel-mount cable tie
Te 7x12-mm Fir Tree Push Mount Tie
features a fr tree design that provides
a single mounting solution for a wide
range of cable and wire bundling appli-
cations, specifcally mounting wire har-
nesses in oval and rectangular 7x12-mm
panel holes and blind assembly holes. Te
fr tree base locks and secures the bun-
dle onto the panel by latching onto the
opposite side of the panel surface. Te
disc on top of the fr tree covers the in-
sertion hole, reducing the ingress of dust,
dirt, and water. Te outside serrated tie,
with 50-pound tensile strength, comes in
two strap lengths to accommodate bun-
dle sizes from 6.5 to 8.5 inches.
HELLERMANNTYTON
www.hellermann.tyton.com
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38

January 2009

Cabling Installation & Maintenance www.cablinginstall.com
New Products
Rack cooling solution
Hewlett Packard’s HP 10K G2 Air Duct
rack cooling solution is designed to
eliminate ex-
isting hot spots
and optimize
air cooling in
the data cen-
ter, and mini-
mize hot and
cold air mixing
together. This
rack cool -
ing solution
suits racks us-
ing 5 to 14 kW
power. Te air
duct is adjust-
able for difer-
ent top ceiling
plenum heights
and has no fans
or moving parts.
It uses pressure
from the com-
puter room air
conditioning (CRAC) unit to extract air
from the rack. Te unit can be retroftted
to existing problem racks and can work
with single or multiple racks.
HEWLETT PACKARD
www.hp.com/go/infrastructure
FTTx visual fault locators
Te pocket-sized FFL-050 fber fault
locator and FFL-100 visual fault loca-
tors are designed for simplifed trouble-
shooting of fber-optic cabling, espe-
cially for FTTx installations. Te tools
are de-signed to quickly locate such
problems as sharp bends, breaks, bad
splices, lack of continuity, and fber
damage. Tese fault locators emit a vis-
ible laser light into the fber, and as the
light escapes from the damaged points
along the fber in a continuous or fash-
ing illumination, technicians can quickly
diagnose, troubleshoot, and fx a prob-
lem. Te FFL-050 and FFL-100 VFL are
equipped with a 2.5-mm interface, com-
patible with such connectors as SC, ST,
and FC; a 1.25-mm adapter enables con-
nection to LC and MU connectors. Tese
VFLs can also be used to perform end-to-
end continuity tests and fber tracing and
identifcation.
JDSU
www.jdsu.com
Unified camera solution
Maestro is a two-module unifed cam-
era solution designed for simplifed secu-
rity installation and setup. Te P800 mas-
ter controller interfaces with encoders
and I/O, and provides microsecond syn-
chronization, power, and safety on Cat-
egory 5e cables for up to eight or more
cameras and light sources—all from a
single power supply. Te P800 handles
all timing, triggering, synchroniza-
tion, sorting, and reject activations. Te
C12 connecting module is a camera and
light controller, connected to the P800
with a 100-meter (maximum) Category
5e cable. Tis module powers and trig-
gers any camera while providing syn-
chronized confgurable high current
pulses for LEDs or lasers. Maestro mod-
ules are compatible with all cameras, light
sources, I/O, and machine vision sof-
ware libraries, and suited for single
camera to multi-camera Web inspec-
tion systems.
LMI TECHNOLOGIES
www.LMItechnologies.com
WAP ceiling enclosures
Two new plenum-rated ceiling enclosures
are designed specifcally for Aruba Net-
works’ wireless enterprise deployments,
and are designed to provide a secure, and
aesthetic means to mount the access point.
Model 1052-AN (pictured) is designed for
Aruba Networks’ AP-60, 70, 120 and 124
access points with detachable antennas.
Te 1052-AN door also has mounting lo-
cations for AP-ANT-13B antennas. Mod-
el 1055-AN is designed for the AP-65, 121,
and 125 access points with non-detach-
able antennas. Te 1055-AN features an
impact resistant, RF transparent ABS
dome through which the non-detach-
able antennas can transmit. Both models
have locking doors and are UL-listed.
OBERON INC.
www.oberonwireless.com
Cable identifier, organizer
PatchSee is a cable identifer system that
is also designed to solve disorganized
cable rack conditions. Te design incor-
porates two plastic optical fbers built in
to standard Category 5, 6 and 6A patch
cords, along with LED light injection.
Users can identify and secure both ends
of a patch cord without tracing cables
or disconnections. PatchSee also helps
defne various cable line functions by
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January 2009

39
providing 16 color-coded, removable
clips that snap on to the RJ-45 connec-
tors. Te clips negate the need for main-
taining varied color patch cord lengths,
reduce inventories, and eliminate the need
for cable labels. Suited for data process-
ing, networking, of ce automation, in-
dustrial control and telecom panels, these
cable identifers meet EIA/TIA stan-
dards and are compatible with computer
cabling equipment and switches. A
25-year product use warranty accom-
panies each PatchSee patch cord. Key
specifications include: Zero-halogen,
PVC sheathed (UTP) types; 11 standard
lengths, 2 to 16 f. (0.6 to 4.9 m) plus a
long-length direct cable 20.1 to 165 f.
(6.1 to 50 m); operations to 10-Gbits/sec
bandwidth (Cat 6A). A free demon-
stration kit explores the light identifer
function, as well as a sample operating
“starter kit.”
MITSUBISHI INTERNATIONAL
OPTICAL PRODUCTS
www.patchsee-solution.com
Shielded 6A system
Te PowerCat 6A shielded solution is
designed to support 10 Gigabit Ether-
net/ 10GBase-T/IEEE 802.3an while be-
ing backward compatible for 10Base-T,
100Base-T, and 1000Base-T. Tis end-to-
end solution consists of straight and an-
gled Category 6A shielded patch panels,
cable, patch cords, and the new die-cast
Datagate shielded 6A jack. Te 24- and
48-port 6A shielded patch panels are sup-
plied with rear cable management trays for
cable strain relief and organization, and
the angled panel provides enhanced port
access, minimizing patch cord bend radi-
us while eliminating the need for horizon-
tal cable rack managers. Te die-cast zinc
alloy body housing of the Datagate jack
protects against EMI and features a pro-
prietary spring-loaded shutter that pro-
tects from dust and contaminants as well
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_______________
_______
New Products
40

January 2009

Cabling Installation & Maintenance www.cablinginstall.com
CLASSIFIED
Cabling in Canada?
Call
416-222-0617
www.connectivitywerx.com
as ejects improperly seated patch cords.
Te Datagate shielded jack has been de-
signed for high-speed data transmissions,
with typical applications including da-
ta centers, storage area networks, server
farms, and riser backbones.
MOLEX
www.molexpn.com
Mini Ethernet converter
Te miConverter GX/T is a 1000Base-X
Fiber to 10/100/1000Base-T Ethernet
media converter and, according to the
manufacturer, is the frst miniature un-
managed media converter that supports
Gigabit jumbo frames up to 10,240 bytes.
As newer IP networks move towards us-
ing jumbo frames to reduce network over-
head and to reduce CPU utilization, the
miConverter GX/T is designed to pro-
vide top performance and afordability
for what previously was exclusive to more
expensive Ethernet equipment. Te mi-
Converter GX/T supports Small Form
Pluggable (SFP) transceivers for standard
and CWDM wavelengths, as well as a va-
riety of fxed fber connectors. It is pow-
ered by any PC, laptop or other device
with a high-powered (1.0, 1.1 and 2.0) USB
port, and is also available with external
U.S. and international AC power supplies.
Te international model features optional
interchangeable connectors for compati-
bility with the diferent electrical outlets
found around the world. Te GX/T deliv-
ers plug-and-play installation with gigabit
fber auto-negotiation supporting connec-
tivity found in many core fber devices,
and manual confguration to support leg-
acy gigabit fber devices.
OMNITRON SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY
www.omnitron-systems.com
Secured connector
Secure Keyed LC Fiber Solutions are
designed to help maintain the integrity
and security of critical information net-
works by preventing inadvertent or un-
authorized access to optical fber network
ports. Te solutions are built to provide
a simplifed way to physically prevent
unauthorized connections by blocking
access to specifc optical ports, whether at
a workstation outlet or in a telecommu-
nications room or data center. Tey are
built around a core set of secure keyed
duplex LC adapters and connectors, as
well as a set of MPO 12-fber adapters
and connectors. Te LC duplex and MPO
adapters, along with their matching
secure keyed connectors, have a propri-
etary built-in keying feature designed
to prevent tampering and access to re-
stricted networks. Te keying feature
cannot be reproduced inside a standard
LC adapter or connector. Tese secure
keyed components are especially suited
for sites that have multiple co-located
networks that need separate security
access in areas such as of ce worksta-
tions, telecommunications wiring clos-
ets, and Internet service access facilities.
ORTRONICS/LEGRAND
www.ortronics.com
Fiber for extreme bends
CasaLight Xtreme bend optimized
fber is targeted at demanding FTTH
applications.
It is designed
for horizontal
cabling from
the riser shaft
to the frst point
of presence in-
to the customer
premises, where
the pathway
would encoun-
ter bending ra-
dii down to
7.5 mm. In the
most demand-
ing appl ica-
tions, CasaLight
Xtreme allows for bending radii down to
5 mm, and has been designed to with-
stand 90º bends under tension as well as
installation with staple guns when used
in Prysmian specialty MDU cables. It
maintains full compatibility with stan-
dard equipment, connectors, and fber
already installed in accordance with ITU
Recommendation G.652.Hi.
PRYSMIAN CABLES & SYSTEMS
www.prysmian.com
Fiber cassette enclosures
Opticom QuickNet rack-mount fber
cassette enclosures (FCE-U Series) are
designed to provide a fexible and mod-
ular system for managing fber termina-
tions, connections, and patching in data
center and SAN installations. Tese en-
closures are available in 1, 2, and 4U
versions, accommodate up to 96 fbers
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__________
New Products
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January 2009

41
per rack space, and provide patch feld
access via a slide-out, tilt-down drawer.
FCE-U enclosures are compatible with
all pre-terminated, feld-terminated, and
splicing applications using QuickNet
cassettes and fber adapter panels.
PANDUIT
www.panduit.com/opt37
No-solder coax
Te 2EZ SVGA cable is built to elimi-
nate the need for soldering connectors in
the feld. Tis coax cable can be routed
through walls, conduits, and ceilings us-
ing normal installation procedures, with-
out concern over connector damage. It is
equipped with a CMP jacket for installs
involving plenum environments, and
features an XLR designed to provide im-
proved strain relief at 360º to resist dam-
age with a 50-pound pull force (compared
to the original EZ-Pull din connecter,
which was capable of a 15-pound pull
force). Te 2EZ is also is built to with-
stand heaving through 3/4-inch conduit
that includes sweep 90º bends, and is rat-
ed at SVGA at 200 f., XGA at 150 f., and
XSGA at 100 f. resolution. High resolu-
tions are available at 50 f. Te 2EZ cables
can be ordered to length, and equipped
with an optional pulling grip/pulling eye
as well as a connector type that can be
equipped with optional wall plates.
RAPCO HORIZON CO.
www.rapcohorizon.com
Angled fiber splices
For restoration or permanent splice ap-
plications, two new Fibrlok products in
the Angle Fiber Splice AS Series are de-
signed for on-site installation of 250- and
900-μm fber for analog video appli-
cations. Specifcally designed for cable
television or fber-to-the-home (FTTH)
networks, the Fibrlok II Angle Fiber
Splice 2529-AS can splice any combi-
nation of 250- and 900-μm fbers. Te
Fibrlok 250μm Angle Fiber Splice 2540-
AS can splice 250-μm fber with a smaller
form factor. Both provide low optical
refections across temperature extremes.
Tese angle fber splices have metal-
lic splice elements that have been opti-
mized to lock keyed, angle cleave
fbers in permanent align-
ment. Te resulting
angle cleave splice
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NEW FR0M 0IR0A 1ELE00M
ENHAN0E0 B0IL0IN0
EN1RAN0E 1ERMINALS
AN0 PR01E01I0N M000LES
F0R PR01E01IN0 V0IP, X0SL, 11 AN0 0A16e.
|:( | +| :(ntt | :+ :t| | 1ää. I11. ä11ä ' :| (:tt t| t::n. ::n
42

January 2009

Cabling Installation & Maintenance www.cablinginstall.com
New Products
bulletin boards
directs refections out the fber side. Each
angle fber splice has a green end cap to
identify it as the angle splice version
afer installation. Te Fibrlok angle splice
is tested for premise and fber-to-the-
premise (FTTP) applications for indoor
and outdoor locations. Splices are RoHS
compliant.
3M COMMUNICATION MARKETS DIVISION
www.3m.com/telecommunications
Fiber termination kits
Tese fber-optic feld termination kits
are designed to eliminate the need for
curing ovens, speeding up termination
time on the job, and reducing overall
downtime of networks. Te kits are suit-
able for both singlemode and multimode
terminations. Te basic kit includes
adhesives and primers, a fber scraps
bin, polishing pads, pre-saturated IPA
wipes, lint-free wipes, syringes and nee-
dles, cleave tool, and polishing puck. Te
other two models contain the tools of
the basic kit plus options such as light
meters and microscopes.
SENKO ADVANCED COMPONENTS
www.senko.com
Round floor box
for raised floors
Te FloorSource CRFB Series Floor Box
is a round raised foor box designed for
ease of installation and fexible confgu-
ration for power, data, and audio/visual
applications. Te box fts into a standard
raised foor air difuser opening, provid-
ing access to recessed devices. In addition
to raised foor applications, this UL-list-
ed foor box is also approved for use in
elevated platforms and stages in lecture
halls, houses of worship, theaters, and con-
cert halls. CRFB Series Floor Boxes have
multiple trade size knockouts to feed four
separate compartments that accommodate
power, communication, and audio-visual
services. Removable dividers allow boxes
to be feld-confgured or reconfgured to
accommodate single services or multiple
combinations in one unit.
WIREMOLD/LEGRAND
www.wiremold.com
Shallow-depth UPS
Three SmartPro Shallow-Depth Rack-
mount UPS systems are designed to meet
the needs of network/telecom wiring clos-
ets requiring a shallower mounting depth,
higher load capacity, and longer runtime
than can be provided by standard-sized
rackmount UPS systems. These sys-
tems feature a mounting depth as small
as 17.75 inches, a higher output capacity
compared to standard-sized rack-mount
UPS systems, plus the ability to safely con-
nect a higher wattage equipment load to a
single UPS system. SMART3000CRMXL
features a 3000 VA /2880 watt capaci-
ty, a 4U height and a 17.75 inch depth.
SMART2200CRMXL features a 2200
VA/1900 watt capacity, a 4U height and
a 17.75 inch depth. SMART1500CRMXL
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_______
__________________________
_________
www.textender.com
800-432-2638
Extend T1/E1 over:
Data Comm for Business, Inc.
Wire
Up to Several Miles
of 2-pair Wire
Fiber
Miles of Fiber
Ethernet
IP/Ethernet
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43
New Products
h
o
t

p
r
o
d
u
c
t
s
features a 1500 VA/1440 watt capacity, a 2U height and a
19.5 inch depth.
TRIPP LITE
www.tripplite.com
High-impact camera dome
Te Roughneck line of impact-resistant camera domes now
includes analog and IP models. Designed for use in poten-
tially harsh conditions, such as correctional facilities, ware-
houses, and loading docks, these models feature digital noise
reduction, allowing them to perform in light levels as low as
0.3 lux. A heater is available in the IP model to allow for oper-
ation outdoors and in all weather conditions. Cameras feature
a 3.3 to 12-mm varifocal auto iris lens, and may be positioned
both horizontally and vertically. Te camera’s mounting base
screws directly to walls and ceilings. Te dome may also be
hung in a pendant confguration or in-ceiling using acces-
sory kits. Both models may be used within a ViconNet dig-
ital video management system. MSRP for the analog model
is $594; $1164 for the IP model with heater.
VICON INDUSTRIES
www.vicon-cctv.com
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________________________________
_____________
The index of Advertiser’s is published as a service. The publisher does not assume any liability for errors or omissions.
Senior Vice President/Group Publishing Director
Christine Shaw
Tel: (603) 891-9178; fax: (603) 891-9297
cshaw@pennwell.com
Publisher
Tim Pritchard
Tel: (603) 891-9447
timp@pennwell.com
Associate Publisher/National Sales Manager
Ed Murphy
PennWell Technology Group
98 Spit Brook Road
Nashua, NH 03062-5737
Tel: (603) 891-9260; fax: (603) 891-9245
edm@pennwell.com
Digital Media Account Manager
Maureen Christenson
Tel: (603) 891-9423
maureenc@pennwell.com
Reprint Sales
Diane Troyer
Tel: (603) 891-9385; fax: (603) 891-9245
dianet@pennwell.com
List Rental
Bob Dromgoole
Tel: (603) 891-9128
bobd@pennwell.com
INTERNATIONAL SALES
Australia, New Zealand/Glenn Clarke
Fax: +61 3 9 568 4955
glennclarke@build.com.au
France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Andora, Greece,
Spain, Portugal, Western Switzerland/Luis Matutano
Tel: +33 1 39 66 16 87; fax: +33 1 39 23 84 18
luism@pennwell.com
Austria, Eastern Europe, Germany,
Northern Switzerland/Holger Gerisch
Tel: +49 8801-302430; fax: +49 8801 913220
holgerg@pennwell.com
India/Rajan Sharma
Tel: +91 11 686 1113; fax: +91 11 686 1112
rajan@interadsindia.com
Israel/Dan Aronovic
Tel: +972 9 899 5813
aronovic@actcom.co.il
Italy/Vittorio Rossi Prudente
Tel: +39 0 49 87 87 584; fax: +39 0 49 66 04 98
prudente@aviationweek.com
U.K. & Scandinavia/Tony Hill
Tel: +44 0 1442-239547
tonyh@pennwell.com
Russia/Anton Antoniuk
Tel: +7 095 234 5678; fax: +7 095 234 5665
anton@ccc.ru
Asia Sales Manager/Adonis Mak
Tel: +852 2 838 6298; fax: +852 2 838 2766
adonism@actintl.com.hk
Japan/Manami Konishi
Tel: +81 3 5771 8886; fax: +81 3 5771 8887
manami.konishi@ex-press.jp
Korea/Paek Kwon
Tel: +82 2 420 1293 or 1213; fax: +82 2 420 1294
pkwon@kescor.co.kr
Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand/Grace Leung
Tel: +65 6 836 2272; fax: +65 6 735 9653
gleung@publicitas.com
Taiwan/Anita Chen
Tel: +886 2 8751 5162; fax: +886 2 8751 8861
anita_chen@globalitmedia.com
44

January 2009

Cabling Installation & Maintenance www.cablinginstall.com
INDEX OF ADVERTISERS
COMPANY PAGE PHONE WEB
Bel Stewart Connector 12 717-235-7512 www.stewartconnector.com
Belden/CDT C3 888-768-6625 www.trapezenetworks.com
Berk-Tek 16 800-BERK-TEK www.berktek.com
BTR, a division of Ria Connect 24 732-380-8145 www.btr-netcom.com
Byte Brothers 39 800-999-2983 www.bytebrothers.com
Cablofil Inc. 21 800-658-4641 www.cablofil.com
Chatsworth Products 1 800-834-4969 www.chatsworth.com
Circa Telecom 42 800-783-6556 www.circatelecom.com
Connectivitywerx 40 416-222-0617 www.connectivitywerx.com
Corning Cable Systems C2 800-743-2671 www.corning.com/zeux
Damac Products, Inc. 25 714-228-2900 www.damac.com
Datacom For Business 43 800-432-2638 www.textender.com
Diamond Ground Products 43 805-493-3837 www.diamondground.com
Draka Comteq 18 800-879-9862 www.drakaamericas.com
Eaton 19 877-785-4994 www.epdu.com
General Cable Company 22 800-424-5666 www.generalcable.com
Hellerman Tyton 20 www.hellerman.tyton.com/cm3
Hitachi Cable Manchester Inc. 9 800-772-0116 www.hcm.hitachi.com
Hook and Hanging Hardware 42 805-583-9920 www.HookandHanger.com
JDSU 11, 13 866-228-3762 www.jdsu.com/know
Leviton Voice and Data Division 10 800-922-6229 www.leviton.com
Live Wire & Cable 42 888-897-6008 www.live w-com
LS Cable America, Inc. 26 201-266-2530
Oberon, Inc. 43 877-867-2312 www.oberonwireless.com/
1053c.php
OFS Optics (Corporate) 37 www.ofsoptics.com/fiber
Optical Cable Corp. 2 800-622-7711 www.occfiber.com
Panduit Corp. C4 800-777-3300 www.panduit.com/cb32
Server Technology 29 800-835-1515 www.servertech.com
Siemon Company 5 www.siemon.com
Snake Tray 15 800-308-6788 www.snaketray.com
Specified Technologies Inc. 41 800-992-1180 www.stifirestop.com
Superior Essex 6 www.spsx.com/comm/
predictable.aspx
Superior Essex 30 www.NextLANsystems.com
US Conec Inc. 36 800-769-0944 www.usconec.com
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©2009, Belden Inc.
Wired+Wireless=Belden
The addition of Trapeze Networks to
the Belden Total Enterprise Networks™
family of signal transmission solutions now
allows you to naturally extend your wired
infrastructure with a dynamic Wireless LAN.
Trapeze Networks WLANs are unmatched for
reliability, performance, manageability and
security – a perfectly matched extension to
your Belden structured cabling.
Unlike other companies, only Belden delivers
a comprehensive, end-to-endsolution offering
the reliability and security on which your busi-
ness depends. In addition to comprehensive
wired and wireless network systems, our
newTotal Enterprise Networks also provide
cabling networks for audio/video systems,
alarm, security and many other management
applications. With Belden, you can be sure
your wired and wireless infrastructures are
properly designed to work together for
optimal performance.
Trapeze Networks set a newstandard for
wireless reliability when it introduced NonStop
Wireless networking. Unlike others, Trapeze
Networks WLANs run continuously, even
when subjected to a variety of equipment
failures, extreme traffic conditions or main-
tenance that would cripple typical wireless
networks. Voice calls continue uninterrupted,
sessions are securely maintained and users
have always-on access to mission-critical
network services.
“The company’s NonStop Wireless is
more than a slogan. Its use of virtual controller
cluster functionality is highly innovative.”
– Stan Schatt, ABI Research
For more information, call us at 1.888.768.6625
or visit www.trapezenetworks.com today.
Long known for its
industry-leading structured
cabling system, Belden now
extends your wired network
with Trapeze Networks
®
NonStop Wireless™ for the
Always-on Enterprise.
See us at BICSI, Booth 519.
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New information technologies continue to be adopted at remarkable rates. High
speed data networks, IP Telephony, building systems, WiFi and Power over
Ethernet (PoE) devices are becoming more prevalent as building owners, developers,
and tenants realize the benefits of structured cabling deployment.
PANDUIT Connected Building Solutions leverage best-in-class network connectivity
to extend the reach of the IP-based network to all building system devices to deliver:

Reduced capital and operational expenses – converged networks are physically
available where and when needed, and provide more efficient moves, adds,
and changes

Improved visibility of key operational data – converged networks allow for
continuous monitoring of building systems, enhanced security, and increased
productivity of maintenance and repair

Green, energy efficient buildings – converged networks enable Enhanced
Commissioning and Energy Performance for a LEED rated building
As a leading technology developer and provider, the PANDUIT Solution is
strategically aligned with the Cisco Connected Real Estate (CCRE) initiative to
maximize the benefits of a converged networking environment.
PANDUIT Connected Building Solutions
converge building system networks into a
common IT infrastructure for reduced costs and
increased efficiencies.
PANDUIT is a Global Leader
Providing Innovative End-To-End
Network Connectivity Solutions
that Enable the Deployment
of Technology.

Copper Cabling Systems

Zone Cabling Systems

Fiber Cabling Systems

Network Management and
PoE Systems

Outlets

Raceway Systems

Fiber Routing Systems

Racks and Cable Management

Network Grounding Systems

Network Identification Systems

Network Cable Ties and
Accessories
Visit us at www.panduit.com/cb32
Contact Customer Service by email: cs@panduit.com
or by phone: 800-777-3300 and reference ad #cb32
PANDUIT is a Solutions Enabler Partner for IP Communications within the Cisco Technology Developer Program.
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