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AREA of STUDY 2015-2018: STANDARD AND ADVANCED Discovery Teacher Resource: The Motorcycle Diaries By Ernesto

AREA of STUDY 2015-2018:

STANDARD AND ADVANCED Discovery Teacher Resource:

The Motorcycle Diaries

By Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara

Discovery Teacher Resource: The Motorcycle Diaries By Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara created by Pamela Cohen B.A. Hons.

created by

Pamela Cohen B.A. Hons. Dip.Ed

Publication Details and Copyright Information

First published in 2014

Copyright © Pamela Cohen: The Cohen Curricula

ISBN: 978-0-9925283-2-4

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

DIGITAL DOWNLOAD

This digital text is sold subject to the condition that it shall not, by way of trade or otherwise, be lent, resold, hired out or otherwise circulated without the publisher’s prior consent.

The digital work may be printed by the purchaser. The purchase allows for a single student or teacher use and that of the class being taught. If multiple teachers wish to access the work then a school license must be purchased.

The worksheets may be printed or photocopied for class use by the purchasing teacher with no restraint. Modification by the purchasing teacher is acceptable under the terms of use.

Acknowledgement of the intellectual property on all worksheets must be maintained.

Extracts from The Motorcycle Diaries have been licensed via The Copyright Agency on behalf of the Australian publisher Ocean Press

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HOW TO USE THIS RESOURCE

Time is a critical factor for all of us who want to deliver the highest quality teaching resources to our Higher School Certificate (HSC) English students. Whether you are an experienced or beginning teacher, having an all encompassing resource with a syllabus aligned program, teaching notes and worksheets allows you more time to focus on providing feedback on the work students produce.

This study guide specifically focussing on The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara is integrally aligned with the new HSC syllabus documentation. The intent is to provide you with a teaching module that contains a scope and sequence for teaching the text, explicit teaching notes and a wide range of text specific resources. A series of example and blank worksheet templates in the resource will provide your students with opportunities to develop their own ideas and encourage a personal response to their core and related texts.

BOSTES allocates 45 indicative hours to the AoS course. Depending on your school timetable this accounts for about 50 lessons plus assessment allocation. This specific text study guide for The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara (2003) provides a series of workshops that can be integrated into the teaching of your Discovery unit. Each activity is supported by the resources as listed in the program. Home study, exam preparation and revision resources are included. Scaffolds and checklists for peer-to-peer and teacher-student feedback are provided. The blank resources can be photocopied as many times as you wish. Please respect the copyright notice on the resources.

Each resource is explained in terms of how it can be applied in the classroom and how to explain its purpose and value to your students. A series of summaries and study questions specific to The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara are provided as a separate booklet. Each diary entry has been broken down to determine which aspects relate to the concept of Discovery. The questions help students focus on a conceptual understanding of the text and embed language analysis that will assist them to understand how composers present their ideas about discovery either explicitly or implicitly. The specific requirements of the rubric have been addressed by adding glossaries to assist in developing student knowledge and familiarity with techniques that can be used for writing about the text. The explicit scaffolds and sentence starters will assist in developing vocabulary and structure.

As a teacher of the Standard and Advanced English HSC courses I have used resources such as these every day in my classroom. As a life long learner I actively seek feedback from my students on how to create or develop resources that are useful, practical and effective. The systematic process of teaching the unit - of deconstructing text and developing analytical skills - has resulted in greater engagement, greater confidence and improved work output. The resources have been tested and refined and work.

I look forward to your feedback as a colleague. Please send me an email or add questions and comments to the blog if you would like clarification on how to use or apply any aspects of the study guide.

Pamela Cohen

on how to use or apply any aspects of the study guide. Pamela Cohen ©Pamela Cohen
on how to use or apply any aspects of the study guide. Pamela Cohen ©Pamela Cohen

©Pamela Cohen

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on how to use or apply any aspects of the study guide. Pamela Cohen ©Pamela Cohen
on how to use or apply any aspects of the study guide. Pamela Cohen ©Pamela Cohen
 

SUGGESTED TEACHING PROGRAM

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Lesson 1: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara: Introduction and tone of the text.

Discovery syllabus description and worksheets

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Introductory lessons prior to the explicit teaching of the text would cover:

The Motorcycle Diaries summary and questions booklet

Purpose bookmarks

school assessment documentation outcomes relevant to the Standard or Advanced course Discovery description from the syllabus an overview of Paper 1 in terms of the HSC examination requirements Exemplar papers for students to create goals and plan for success

Technique bookmarks

At this stage there would be the assumption that students:

have read the text( if not, a reading scope and sequence could be handed out) have read through the discovery description from the syllabus have copies of syllabus outcomes have been provided with the discovery dot point worksheet and the purpose and non-fiction techniques bookmarks

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Students to finalise their syllabus description sheets and begin annotating with passages from the diary entries they have read to date.

have been provided with the booklet of home study questions and had the home study

have been provided with the booklet of home study questions and had the home study expectations explained to them

Provide an overview of the text to orient students in the Discovery objective.

 

For example:

Work on study questions in the question booklet

Pre revolutionary ‘Che’; Powerful insight into the man who would discover and construct an agenda that resulted in his revolutionary stance. Text aligns with similar narratives of daring and adventure recognisable in other coming of age texts, both fiction and non-fiction. Discovery: physical, spiritual, emotional and philosophical is evident in his highly descriptive writing including:

his description, discussion and evaluation of places he visits for the first time his willingness
his description, discussion and evaluation of places he visits for the first time
his willingness to share personal insights into his emotional reaction to events and people
the tolerance, respect and affection in his relationship with Alberto Granado , his travelling
companion
his naïve love for Chichina and deep love for family and more importantly, his growing love and
admiration for Latin America, its people and its hardships
his developing political awareness – his discussion of the extent of poverty and inequity that he
witnesses would impact on the later ‘Che’, the revolutionary
insight and appreciation of social customs and cultural awareness of others – tolerance, respect,
compassion, community - allows reader to discover a world beyond their own experience
Self awareness – a growing sense of self actualisation and knowing of his purpose
Begin the study of the text by reading the opening diary entry to students.
Identify the aspects that relate to ‘Discovery’ using the syllabus description
Have students develop a dot point breakdown of the discovery description. A worksheet for this
purpose is provided in the package
Have students complete a verb activity. Have students go through this first (or a diary entry of their
choice) and highlight the verbs, noting them down in the order they occur. Students should
verbally discuss and evaluate the cumulative value of the verbs to determine the tone of the diary
entry. Discussion would take place relating to what we can learn about Guevara’s vernacular, his
education, his mood in relation to the events he is describing and his love of language. Look for
personification and tone. Identify if the verbs shift in tone throughout the entry; this will provide
students with an introductory feel for Guevara’s purpose and agenda in sharing his experience.
What can we discover about Guevara and Alberto, about courage, determination, persistence,
creativity, self discovery and grasping hold of opportunities as they arise?
Encourage students to write up a paragraph using their material. Create a thesis focus by providing
the question:
‘Discovery is only relevant if it changes the world beyond the individual experience’
©Pamela Cohen
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4 5 6 Lesson 2: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara

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4 5 6 Lesson 2: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara :
4 5 6 Lesson 2: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara :

Lesson 2: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara : Elements of a non- fiction text workshop

Provide students with the worksheets of structural and figurative techniques relevant to a non-fiction text.

Go through the worksheet on the board modelling by using an example diary entry from the text. Have students select a diary entry and have them fill out the worksheets identifying the structural elements they should be looking for. Once completed you can use your summary sheet for the diary entry to prompt students to add further detail in terms of the techniques and the links to the Discovery concept. The previous lesson on grammatical structures within a diary entry can be revisited in terms of how non-fiction texts such as diaries and memoirs use language to emphasise personal views and responses to experience. Refer here to first person, anaphora, cumulation of phrases and the more complex ideas such as irony and paradox.

Use the quote: Then I realized one fundamental thing: to be a revolutionary doctor, or to be a revolutionary, there must first be a revolution. The isolated effort, the individual effort, the purity of ideals, the desire to sacrifice a lifetime to the noblest of ideals means naught if that effort is made alone, solitary…’ (page 168)

Encourage students to explore the fact that self realisation (personal discovery) inherently presents the idea that it is the responsibility of the individual to act in such a way as to edify rather than impact negatively on others. You could raise discussion on how and why non-fiction texts are more effective than fiction texts at presenting these moral lessons? Guevara’s need to share his experience can be discussed here. Pose questions that challenge a range of perspectives , for example:

is it hubristic to think we should be influenced, manipulated or persuaded to accept Che’s journey as a didactic on how we should understand our world? is this journey Che’s journey as a didactic on how we should understand our world?
is this journey of discovery more important than that of the spiritual awakening of Ghandi or Krishna? journey as a didactic on how we should understand our world? is it beneficial to read
is it beneficial to read such inspiring journeys to develop our own spirit of adventure and daring? Does spiritual awareness such as that which evolved in this text reflect on the need for young people to expand their understanding of a world beyond their own comfort zones?our world? is this journey of discovery more important than that of the spiritual awakening of

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a world beyond their own comfort zones? The Cohen Curricula TEPA worksheets Purpose bookmarks HOME STUDY
a world beyond their own comfort zones? The Cohen Curricula TEPA worksheets Purpose bookmarks HOME STUDY

TEPA worksheets

Purpose bookmarks

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Work on study questions in the question booklet

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TEPA worksheets Purpose bookmarks HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the question booklet Page 6
TEPA worksheets Purpose bookmarks HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the question booklet Page 6
TEPA worksheets Purpose bookmarks HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the question booklet Page 6
TEPA worksheets Purpose bookmarks HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the question booklet Page 6
4 5 6 Lesson 3: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara

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4 5 6 Lesson 3: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara :TEPA
4 5 6 Lesson 3: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara :TEPA

Lesson 3:

Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara :TEPA

Example sheet is provided.

Provide students with a TEPA lesson. Explain how the structure works and model an example on the board. Hand out TEPA sheets and explain how students can use to record their identification of techniques, evidence, purpose and analysis. A workshop for you as a teacher is provided in this resource. Use the video lesson from the blog if required.Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara :TEPA Example sheet is provided. Explicitly teach the concept of purpose. Use the

Explicitly teach the concept of purpose. Use the purpose word bookmark or list and apply it to a diary entry. Have students use a range of sentence starters to assist them to write sentences on purpose.resource. Use the video lesson from the blog if required. Allocate questions for a specific diary

Allocate questions for a specific diary entry and have students discuss how language shapes a response to the Discovery conceptstarters to assist them to write sentences on purpose. Create and model a teacher sample TEPA

Create and model a teacher sample TEPA sheet for this diary entry to assist students with developing purpose and analysishow language shapes a response to the Discovery concept Have students develop their TEPA sheets in

Have students develop their TEPA sheets in terms of analysis. As analysis is the most difficult aspect for students to work through, explain that it simple means that after determining how the language chosen has been constructed for a specific purpose, discuss the most significant lesson that can be learned when related to the ‘Discovery’ concept . If you have completed earlier discussion be learned when related to the ‘Discovery’ concept. If you have completed earlier discussion on Discovery as suggested in the Discovery Teacher Resource and students have created dot points drawn from the syllabus description they should be able to make quite insightful connections here.

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make quite insightful connections here. The Cohen Curricula TEPA workshop and worksheets HOME STUDY Work on
make quite insightful connections here. The Cohen Curricula TEPA workshop and worksheets HOME STUDY Work on
make quite insightful connections here. The Cohen Curricula TEPA workshop and worksheets HOME STUDY Work on

TEPA workshop and worksheets

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TEPA workshop and worksheets HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the question booklet Page 7
1 3 4 5 6 Lesson 4: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto

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1 3 4 5 6 Lesson 4: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’

Lesson 4:

Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara : Context

After the initial lessons on the text students should be able to recognise structural elements of a non-fiction text and some understanding of how the grammatical and figurative techniques convey the concept of

‘Discovery’.

Before students continue they need to gain an understanding of context and how it provides depth to their analysis.

Provide the context sheets to students.

Explicitly teach the seven contexts. Have relevant examples from across the text. There is a video on our website that has a brief general description but more specific descriptions are provided below. Discuss from the outset that the contexts do not work in isolation; they can interrelate and show for example, how social and cultural aspects are linked inherently to history or to politics.

Social aspects of work, education, relationships, leisure: You could discuss Guevara’s family relationships and expectations interrelates with the cultural heritage; discuss the political implications- family investment in education, social class; his friendship with Alberto and the changing nature of that friendship during the journey.

Cultural rituals, traditions, heritage; cultural markers such as language, food and customs: You could explore Guevara’s discussion of the different foods they were able to experience during their journey that had cultural significance to play and celebration; examine ways of celebrating; marital expectations; use of language; relationship between identity and language.

Political balance of power roles in the text: discuss government and governance and its influence on groups and individuals; examine the power relationships between individuals in terms of knowledge, experience, age, social hierarchy or gender; explore the political aspirations drawn from experience; explore the economic and social deprivation raised as issues that have affected Guevara.

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as issues that have affected Guevara. The Cohen Curricula Context workshop and worksheets HOME STUDY Work
as issues that have affected Guevara. The Cohen Curricula Context workshop and worksheets HOME STUDY Work
as issues that have affected Guevara. The Cohen Curricula Context workshop and worksheets HOME STUDY Work

Context workshop and worksheets

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Curricula Context workshop and worksheets HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet Page 8
Curricula Context workshop and worksheets HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet Page 8
Historical – specific historical references, either implicitly or explicitly stated: discussion of places and spaces
Historical – specific historical references, either implicitly or explicitly stated: discussion of places and
spaces inhabited by groups; historical resonance of South America; historical artefacts
Gender – masculinity and/or femininity rather than sexual determinant – masculine traits and the need to
pursue expectations, feminine traits and how these construct views and perspectives; how specific gender
expectations are placed on individuals or are challenged by individuals; how gender relates to political
notions of self; shifts between Alberto’s macho behaviour and the less intimidating behaviour of Guevara.
Religious – any spiritual dimension – references to specific religions and their impact on how individuals
or groups can exist or are constrained or benefited in their experience of discovering self or ideas;
metaphysical dimensions of the individual and their response to circumstances that results in spiritual
growth or change as they discover their identity or their moral and values proximity: examine the role of
the nuns in the leper colonies; explore the concept of a growing spiritual awareness in Guevara as he
learns of his own capacity to empathise with those less fortunate than himself.
Intellectual – reading positions that are evident in the text – communism versus capitalism as a discourse
that limits or attracts opportunities to discover aspects of human behaviour; dominant versus resistant
responses to social constructs that impact on an individual’s ability to discover more about the world, a
specific event, themselves or insight into others. Binary opposition theory – ethical debates on whether
discovery is a valid interpretation of right and wrong, good and evil, happiness or despair, understanding
or ignorance ranging across the perspectives of those who have the power to discover and those who suffer
disenfranchisement through birth or socio-political/economic deficit.
Students will see examples of some or all of these contexts in each diary entry. Those diary entries that are
chosen to analyse should have the context analysis sheets applied. Extra descriptions of a more generic
nature are provided in the context workshop which will assist students to locate context in their own
choice of related material.
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1 3 4 5 6 Lesson 5: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto

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1 3 4 5 6 Lesson 5: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’
1 3 4 5 6 Lesson 5: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’

Lesson 5:

Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara: Close study of a passage of the core text.

Select a passage that incorporates strong technical evidence and a range of contextual material.

Deconstruct the diary entry or passage with students teacher directed. You could use one of the

summaries provided to model ways of engaging with the concept.

If possible, place the passage on the white board using a data projector or hand out photocopy passage for students to annotate (if copyright allows).

Brainstorm with students identifying and annotating the techniques and the contextual material. Have a class discussion testing opinions and validating how the contexts are revealed through the language. Examine the implications of the passage in terms of gaining a deeper insight into the Discovery concept.

Have students begin writing up their context sheets.

Have students fill out TEPA sheets for the passage incorporating context into their analysis.

Question focus:

‘How does context shape our understanding of personal discovery?’

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understanding of personal discovery?’ The Cohen Curricula HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet
understanding of personal discovery?’ The Cohen Curricula HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet
understanding of personal discovery?’ The Cohen Curricula HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet

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of personal discovery?’ The Cohen Curricula HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet Page
of personal discovery?’ The Cohen Curricula HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet Page
1 3 4 5 6 Lesson 6: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto

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1 3 4 5 6 Lesson 6: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’
1 3 4 5 6 Lesson 6: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’

Lesson 6:

Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara

Students, either individually or in pairs, are to select a passage of text and deconstruct for context, techniques and links to the ‘Discovery’ concept. Fill out appropriate analysis sheets. Once completed

provide students with the relevant summary worksheet and questions and have them add further to their own writing. Students could use the sentence starters to assist them to develop more sophistication in their

phrasing.

Students should develop a paragraph using the question from the previous lesson. Students can use the paragraph scaffold and the checklist to assist them to develop a detailed response.

Once the paragraph has been written students can use the checklist to identify areas of improvement in terms of structure and language. If students are working ahead of the class they can be working on the questions from the study guide. Have students discuss their interpretations of the question with a peer before writing their responses. All responses should use the TEPA paragraph process:

Topic sentence: restate the question and direct the reader to the argument/thesis being asserted Context

Topic sentence: restate the question and direct the reader to the argument/thesis being asserted Context sentence: state the passage discussed and the concept of discovery it addresses TEP: The chosen technique and evidence that defends the thesis; explain the authorial purpose in choosing the specific language.

A: what is the most insightful idea that is revealed from the textual reference; what

A: what is the most insightful idea that is revealed from the textual reference; what is the most significant lesson we can learn.

Connecting word: TEP: The chosen technique and evidence that defends the thesis; explain the authorial

Connecting word: TEP: The chosen technique and evidence that defends the thesis; explain the authorial purpose in choosing the specific language.

A: what is the most insightful idea that is revealed from the textual reference; what

A: what is the most insightful idea that is revealed from the textual reference; what is the most significant lesson we can learn.

Final sentence: begin with an evaluative adverb or evaluative phrase: Significantly, Purposefully, Insightfully,

Final sentence: begin with an evaluative adverb or evaluative phrase: Significantly, Purposefully, Insightfully, Cleverly, The extent to which… and state how effective the text is in presenting insight into the thesis argued.

Cleverly, The extent to which… and state how effective the text is in presenting insight into

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insight into the thesis argued. The Cohen Curricula TEPA workshop and worksheets Paragraph Scaffold
insight into the thesis argued. The Cohen Curricula TEPA workshop and worksheets Paragraph Scaffold

TEPA workshop and worksheets

Paragraph Scaffold

Peer-to-peer checklist

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Paragraph Scaffold Peer-to-peer checklist HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet Page 11 ©Pamela
Paragraph Scaffold Peer-to-peer checklist HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet Page 11 ©Pamela
Paragraph Scaffold Peer-to-peer checklist HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet Page 11 ©Pamela
1 3 4 5 6 8 9 Lesson 7: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries

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1 3 4 5 6 8 9 Lesson 7: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by

Lesson 7:

Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara : Values

A key aspect of ‘Discovery’ is responsibility. Whether the discovery is literal scientific or medical for example, or a personal discovery a spiritual or moral awakening - there is an inherent need for

responsibility. The discovery of Australia which resulted in the dispossession of First Nations sovereignty could be argued as being morally irresponsible. Discovery of a roll of money on a bus may be exciting but

the finder has a moral responsibility to hand the money in and find the owner. By studying then testing the values that become evident through the world of text, students become more aware and self discover the

impact they can have on society. Values are those things we adhere to, that we know and understand to be real and true for ourselves. For example, we know it is wrong to lie, steal, deceive, cheat, abuse,

discriminate or have prejudice against others. What we do not always understand, however, is that these things happen everyday, by individuals, groups and governments. When we ‘discover’ how this occurs in our own lives or more globally, to others, we begin to realise how values are an important part of establishing our personal ethical position. Students should access the list of values in the resource and select a range of values that apply to a specific diary entry, for example, when Ernesto and Alberto are forced to steal or lie or manipulate to get food.

Have students complete a close reading of a range of diary entries from the text and evaluate the extent to which the author’s language choice reveal his own values and as such, exposes how these values are not upheld for all individuals. The diary entries that highlight the less than appropriate behaviour enacted by Alberto or the values that demonstrate Ernesto’s admiration for the miners as well as the actions in the leper colony are appropriate for examples. Using the worksheet, students should identify at least four values evident in their chosen diary entries and then identify the relevant techniques and evidence used to convey the values. Students should develop a paragraph on values that uses the following statement as a focus:

‘It is easy to become disillusioned when we discover others do not share our values.

Students should use their values TEPAs to write the paragraph. Purpose should focus on what exactly the author wants us, as his reader to discover about the world and our place in it. Analysis should focus on the lessons we should learn and how we have the ability to change and shift the perspectives of others.

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and shift the perspectives of others. The Cohen Curricula Values workshop and worksheet HOME STUDY Work
and shift the perspectives of others. The Cohen Curricula Values workshop and worksheet HOME STUDY Work

Values workshop and worksheet

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Cohen Curricula Values workshop and worksheet HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet Page
Cohen Curricula Values workshop and worksheet HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet Page
Cohen Curricula Values workshop and worksheet HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet Page
1 3 4 5 6 8 9 13 Lesson 8: ‘ Focus: Core text: The

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1 3 4 5 6 8 9 13 Lesson 8: ‘ Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle
1 3 4 5 6 8 9 13 Lesson 8: ‘ Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle

Lesson 8:

Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara : LIMP

Literal

Inferential

Metaphysical

Philosophical

Explicitly teach the LIMP workshop. Provide the limp questions and assist students to develop their

understanding of each of the concepts in relation to ‘Discovery’. This workshop is very intense but fulfils the syllabus concept of taking students beyond literal interpretations. A video workshop is available for

this concept. Definitions are provided below.

Literal: obvious, explicit

Example: direct references to discovery: the third diary entry of Guevara’s text entitled ‘discovery of the ocean’ (translation) (page 34). Literal references to discoveries: objects found; places found; personal experiences of locating something for the first time. Page 42, discovering or realising the damage to the bike and then links to inferential with the realisation of the challenges that would impact on future experiences or discoveries.

Inferential: inferred meaning, metaphorical notions or suggestions, euphemistic connotations.

Examples: Diary Entry Two: ‘…lovesick pause’ (translation) (page37). References to explorers, expeditions. Page 38 the realisation of the friend’s wife not being happy to see them infers self realisation; Page 40 suggests freedom, imagination and anticipation all suggest how the aspects of discovery benefit an individual providing hope and sustains intention. Page 44, the use of italics around the verb discovered inferring negative connotations relating to tourism’s influence on San Martin de los Andes.

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influence on San Martin de los Andes. The Cohen Curricula LIMP workshop and worksheets HOME STUDY
influence on San Martin de los Andes. The Cohen Curricula LIMP workshop and worksheets HOME STUDY
influence on San Martin de los Andes. The Cohen Curricula LIMP workshop and worksheets HOME STUDY

LIMP workshop and worksheets

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Metaphysical: the spiritual experiences of humanity; the connection between man and nature at a spiritual
Metaphysical: the spiritual experiences of humanity; the connection between man and nature at a spiritual
level. Experience as lessons that enrich or educate or challenge the soul.
Examples: Page 49, the realisation or discovery of the power of nature when the stag runs across their
path, the realisation and appreciation of the power of nature; page 54, Guevara’s realisation that his
relationship would not endure and the consequences this held for his future; page 59, recognitions of the
responsibility and privilege placed upon when the newspaper story is released. Pages 66-68, shifting
fortunes and discovery of relationships and reception and how it changed after their loss of the bike.
Philosophical: questions raised by the text and how these questions suggest issues that resonate across
time with both mythical and factual interrelationships.
Examples include: the caption for the final image which reveals the philosophical underpinnings of the
‘Che’ that would evolve as a result of the discoveries of self and nature of the poverty and medical need
throughout South America; Page 85, the discovery that individuals make as a result of experience that
helps them to empathise and understand the nature of revolution and its impact on mankind- and extends
across history; Page 86, the revisiting of the past and reviewing of experience as a means of reflectively
questioning our response to experience; page 103, the discourse surrounding history as a means of
connecting past, present and future.
©Pamela Cohen
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1 3 4 5 6 8 9 13 Lesson 9: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle

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1 3 4 5 6 8 9 13 Lesson 9: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries
1 3 4 5 6 8 9 13 Lesson 9: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries

Lesson 9:

Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara : LIMP (continued)

Have students expand and locate examples of the metaphysical and philosophical aspects of discovery developed in the text. These aspects are higher order and will provide a shift from the literal and add

insight to their responses.

Students should use the TEPA sheets Students should incorporate contextual insights

Students should incorporate their understanding of values Students may use the paragraph scaffold and checklist

Use the quote: ‘And then, for the last time, I heard the ocean’s warning. Its vast and jarring rhythm

hammered at the fortress within me and threatened its imposing serenity.’ (Page 37) and three other references from other diary entries throughout the text.

Write two paragraphs that resolve the question:

‘To what extent is spiritual discovery reliant on the individual being open to learning from experience?

Have students complete the peer to peer checklist after writing their paragraphs.

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after writing their paragraphs. The Cohen Curricula LIMP worksheets HOME STUDY Work on study questions in
after writing their paragraphs. The Cohen Curricula LIMP worksheets HOME STUDY Work on study questions in
after writing their paragraphs. The Cohen Curricula LIMP worksheets HOME STUDY Work on study questions in

LIMP worksheets

HOME STUDY

Work on study questions in the booklet

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The Cohen Curricula LIMP worksheets HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet Page 15

©Pamela Cohen

The Cohen Curricula LIMP worksheets HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet Page 15
The Cohen Curricula LIMP worksheets HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet Page 15
10 11 14 Lesson 10: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara:

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10 11 14 Lesson 10: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara: collation
10 11 14 Lesson 10: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara: collation
10 11 14 Lesson 10: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara: collation

Lesson 10:

Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara: collation and evaluation of paragraphs and notes taken to date.

Use checklists to ensure paragraphs have structural integrity, accurate quotation and technique identification, explore sophisticated ideas and use vocabulary appropriate to audience, purpose and context. All work should link to ideas and conceptual underpinnings of the ‘Discovery’ description. Use the summaries to ensure students are locating the discovery concept and the interesting or significant aspects of the text. Provide the sentence starters to assist them with developing stronger sentence beginnings and synthesis.

Students should complete their notes, complete and re-evaluate their paragraphs in light of the checklists and attend to details to ensure they have a strong bank of resources that can be adapted to a range of essay questions and text types.

Lesson 11:

Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara : Related Text One

Students are to bring in the first of two related texts they have chosen, annotating it for aspects of the text that correlates or contrasts with the ideas about discovery in the core text. A list of related material is available on our blog.

Students should spend this lesson:

developing the related text analysis sheet relevant to their text type. beginning a detailed conceptual and technical deconstruction of the text using the context, values and LIMP worksheets.available on our blog. Students should spend this lesson: ensuring the selections of the text for

ensuring the selections of the text for analysis present opportunities to link to their core text.beginning a detailed conceptual and technical deconstruction of the text using the context, values and LIMP

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to link to their core text. The Cohen Curricula HOME STUDY Students to bring in a
to link to their core text. The Cohen Curricula HOME STUDY Students to bring in a

HOME STUDY

Students to bring in a related text to the next lesson

Work on study questions in the booklet

Related Text analysis sheets LIMP worksheets Context worksheet Values worksheets
Context worksheet Values worksheetsRelated Text analysis sheets LIMP worksheets

HOME STUDY

Complete analysis sheets for Related Text one

Work on study questions in the booklet

Page 16

HOME STUDY Complete analysis sheets for Related Text one Work on study questions in the booklet

©Pamela Cohen

HOME STUDY Complete analysis sheets for Related Text one Work on study questions in the booklet
HOME STUDY Complete analysis sheets for Related Text one Work on study questions in the booklet
HOME STUDY Complete analysis sheets for Related Text one Work on study questions in the booklet

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Lesson 12: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara : Related Texts
Lesson 12: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara : Related Texts
Lesson 12: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara : Related Texts
Lesson 12: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara : Related Texts
Lesson 12: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara : Related Texts

Lesson 12:

Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara : Related Texts (continued from previous lesson)

Develop a comparative worksheet for Related Text One and The Motorcycle Diaries Begin writing a series of conceptual paragraphs for these two texts The Motorcycle Diaries Begin writing a series of conceptual paragraphs for these two texts

Focus your arguments on the statement:

‘The discovery is only the beginning; what comes next is what really matters.’

To what extent is this statement true of the texts you have studied?

Lesson 13:

Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara : Related Text Two

Students are to bring in the second related text they have chosen, annotating it for aspects of the text that correlates or contrasts with the ideas about discovery in the core text.

Students should spend this lesson:

developing the related text analysis sheet relevant to their text type. beginning a detailed conceptual and technical deconstruction of the text using the context, values and LIMP worksheets. ensuring the selections of the text for analysis present opportunities to link to their core textthe text that correlates or contrasts with the ideas about discovery in the core text. Students

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opportunities to link to their core text The Cohen Curricula Comparative worksheets Paragraph scaffolds HOME STUDY
opportunities to link to their core text The Cohen Curricula Comparative worksheets Paragraph scaffolds HOME STUDY

Comparative worksheets

Paragraph scaffolds

HOME STUDY

Work on study questions in the booklet

Related Text Analysis sheets

HOME STUDY

Work on study questions in the booklet

Page 17

in the booklet Related Text Analysis sheets HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet

©Pamela Cohen

in the booklet Related Text Analysis sheets HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet
in the booklet Related Text Analysis sheets HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet
in the booklet Related Text Analysis sheets HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet

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1 8 9 11 13 Lesson 14: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto
1 8 9 11 13 Lesson 14: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto

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1 8 9 11 13 Lesson 14: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’
1 8 9 11 13 Lesson 14: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’

Lesson 14:

Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara : Related Text Two (continued from previous lesson)

Guevara : Related Text Two (continued from previous lesson) Develop a comparative worksheet for Related Text

Develop a comparative worksheet for Related Text One and The Motorcycle Diaries

Begin writing a series of conceptual paragraphs for these two texts

Focus your arguments on the statement:

‘To discover is to learn.’

To what extent is this statement true of the texts you have studied?

Lesson 15:

Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara : Drafting an introduction

Model how an effective introduction is written. Use the question from Lesson 14.

Sentence 1: Topic sentence: restate the question, reworded or restated with the addition of a thesis Sentence 2: State the titles of the texts, correctly formatted ( which texts should be underlined,introduction is written. Use the question from Lesson 14. which in inverted commas, dates in brackets

which in inverted commas, dates in brackets etc)

Sentence 3: Present a sentence that identifies three to four clear conceptual argument that will be explored across your range of textsunderlined, which in inverted commas, dates in brackets etc) Sentence 4: Write a concluding sentence that

Sentence 4: Write a concluding sentence that restates the thesis and makes a link to the key concept to be discussed in the first paragraph topic sentence.a sentence that identifies three to four clear conceptual argument that will be explored across your

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in the first paragraph topic sentence. The Cohen Curricula Blank TEPA worksheets HOME STUDY Work on
in the first paragraph topic sentence. The Cohen Curricula Blank TEPA worksheets HOME STUDY Work on

Blank TEPA worksheets

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Work on study questions in the booklet

HOME STUDY

Work on study questions in the booklet

Page 18

STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the

©Pamela Cohen

STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the
STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the
STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the

1

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4 5 6 4 5 6 Lesson 16: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by

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4 5 6 4 5 6 Lesson 16: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto
4 5 6 4 5 6 Lesson 16: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto

Lesson 16:

Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara : Introductions

Students will use this lesson to write their introduction, peer mark and use the checklist in the large essay rubric. Students should use the scaffolds provided and the TEPA sheets they have developed to date.

Lesson 17:

Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara : Drafting a conclusion

The conclusion is the most significant part of the essay in terms of leaving the marker with the sense that the student has grasped, developed deep understanding and located insights and truths from their study of their chosen texts.

Model the writing of an effective conclusion. Use the question from Lesson 14. Provide an exemplar if available. Make a scaffold from the exemplar. If unavailable provide a sample scaffold as below:

Sentence 1: Restate the question in assertive language and use an evaluative adverb or phrase Sentence2: present the greatest insight or lesson that can be drawn from the first conceptual argumentexemplar. If unavailable provide a sample scaffold as below: Sentence 3: present the greatest insight or

Sentence 3: present the greatest insight or lesson that can be drawn from the second conceptual argumentlesson that can be drawn from the first conceptual argument Sentence 4: present the greatest insight

Sentence 4: present the greatest insight or lesson that can be drawn from the third conceptual argumentlesson that can be drawn from the second conceptual argument Final sentence: use an evaluative adverb

Final sentence: use an evaluative adverb or phrase and nail home the greatest lesson that can be learned from the studied texts.argument Sentence 4: present the greatest insight or lesson that can be drawn from the third

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can be learned from the studied texts. The Cohen Curricula HOME STUDY Work on study questions
can be learned from the studied texts. The Cohen Curricula HOME STUDY Work on study questions

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Work on study questions in the booklet

HOME STUDY

Work on study questions in the booklet

Page 19

STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the

©Pamela Cohen

STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the
STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the
STUDY Work on study questions in the booklet HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the
1 2 4 5 6 9 11 Lesson 18: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries

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1 2 4 5 6 9 11 Lesson 18: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by
1 2 4 5 6 9 11 Lesson 18: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by

Lesson 18:

Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara : Writing a comparative concept essay

Students will use this lesson to draft an essay using the work prepared over the past weeks.

The focus is on the idea of adapting the analysis and arguments developed throughout the writing process

to a more generic question.

Question Focus:

‘To what extent have the texts you have studied provided you with insight into to concept of discovery?’

Students should access the conceptual essay scaffold and develop as detailed a draft as possible.

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develop as detailed a draft as possible. The Cohen Curricula Essay Scaffold HOME STUDY Students should
develop as detailed a draft as possible. The Cohen Curricula Essay Scaffold HOME STUDY Students should

Essay Scaffold

HOME STUDY

Students should complete their draft essay at home and type up.

Use checklists to refine your essay.

Page 20

©Pamela Cohen

should complete their draft essay at home and type up. Use checklists to refine your essay.
should complete their draft essay at home and type up. Use checklists to refine your essay.
should complete their draft essay at home and type up. Use checklists to refine your essay.
should complete their draft essay at home and type up. Use checklists to refine your essay.
As Above Lesson 19: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara: Timed

As Above

As Above Lesson 19: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara: Timed writing.
As Above Lesson 19: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara: Timed writing.

Lesson 19:

Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara: Timed writing.

Students will be learning about the challenges of writing a timed essay in this lesson and having to adapt prepared ideas to a new question.

Question Focus:

‘The most significant discovery is that which reveals the possibilities for change and growth’

Teacher will need a stopwatch (maybe two).

Explain process to students and place the following times as visible reminders.

Introduction: 6 minutes Paragraph one: 5 minutes Paragraph Two: 5 minutes Paragraph Three: 5 minutes Paragraph Four: 5 minutes Paragraph Five: 5 minutes Paragraph Six: 5 minutes Conclusion: 4 minutes

Try to keep up momentum, stop students with a countdown from ten seconds at the end of each time period. Give students 30 seconds break between paragraphs. Collect essays.

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between paragraphs. Collect essays. The Cohen Curricula Stopwatch HSC style writing booklets Question . Page 21
between paragraphs. Collect essays. The Cohen Curricula Stopwatch HSC style writing booklets Question . Page 21
between paragraphs. Collect essays. The Cohen Curricula Stopwatch HSC style writing booklets Question . Page 21

Stopwatch HSC style writing bookletsQuestion .

QuestionStopwatch HSC style writing booklets .

.

Page 21

Collect essays. The Cohen Curricula Stopwatch HSC style writing booklets Question . Page 21 ©Pamela Cohen

©Pamela Cohen

Collect essays. The Cohen Curricula Stopwatch HSC style writing booklets Question . Page 21 ©Pamela Cohen
Collect essays. The Cohen Curricula Stopwatch HSC style writing booklets Question . Page 21 ©Pamela Cohen
13 14 Lesson 20: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara :

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13 14 Lesson 20: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara : Feedback
13 14 Lesson 20: Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara : Feedback

Lesson 20:

Focus: Core text: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara : Feedback

Hand essays back out to students. Students are to use the checklist and mark the first dot point. Essay should then be passed on the student sitting next to them to mark the next dot point. Continue in this fashion until all dot points have been completed.

in this fashion until all dot points have been completed. Comments can be made if they

Comments can be made if they are constructive and supportive. Work to be handed back to the student to be revised. Students should identify three areas in need of improvement.

Discuss the benefits of this type of group activity and gain feedback on what students can learn from each other.

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what students can learn from each other. The Cohen Curricula HOME STUDY Work on study questions
what students can learn from each other. The Cohen Curricula HOME STUDY Work on study questions

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Work on study questions in the booklet

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©Pamela Cohen

can learn from each other. The Cohen Curricula HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the
can learn from each other. The Cohen Curricula HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the
can learn from each other. The Cohen Curricula HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the
can learn from each other. The Cohen Curricula HOME STUDY Work on study questions in the

STANDARD’ SYLLABUS OUTCOMES – RELATE TO YOUR STUDY OF CORE AND RELATED TEXTS

Outcome ( insert key words or outcomes here)

Link to study of core and related texts

1.

Hint: Look for aspects of the text that we can agree or disagree with, can empathise with or realise similar reactions to the author; examine how we engage with the content and setting; examine how the context/s create parallels or contrasts with our own experiences.

2.

Hint: the correlatives between the core and related texts - use related text analysis sheets to develop insights then link to the core text through concepts and contexts.

3.

Hint: evidence of metalanguage including grammatical and figurative language, structural features, analytical phrasing, sophisticated vocabulary relevant to the ‘Discovery’ concept. Sentence starters may be useful here.

4

Hint: the specific language analysis that takes place in relation to your core and related text material. TEPA process will develop this aspect of the syllabus

5.

Hint: ability to recognise the specific aspects of technology for example, in film or websites or multimedia texts; medium as representational quality of a text or text type; medium as in artwork, or in terms of text type including play scripts; ways of delivering the material radio program, transcript, blog etc.

6.

Hint: close study of the text; detailed, concise textual references relevant to the argument and concept; personal response, avoid use of commonly available study summaries and engage with the text itself. Use of TEPA and LIMP worksheets will enhance close engagement.

7.

Hint: synthesis is the links made between the core and related text material. You need to find close links in terms of the concepts or contexts, link similar ways the texts reveal ideas about discovery; use the worksheets for values; use TEPA; use purpose bookmarks and context worksheets.

8.

Hint: independent ideas are significant here, what insights can you bring to your study of the text; you need to be interpretive in terms of understanding and locating insights in texts; you need to write and think about your texts in imaginative ways allowing yourself to experience the text by reflecting on how the ideas have been experienced from your own perspective. TEPA, LIMP, CONTEXT, VALUES

9.

Hint: the ways in which you have used scaffolds or other processes to deconstruct and then write about texts TEPA sheets, comparative sheets, using LIMP etc.

10.

Hint: writing in a synthesised manner using specific scaffolds that allow for the development of arguments; for example, essays, speeches, blog discussions, debates, feature articles; developing conceptual arguments. Use the relevant worksheets in the resource package.

11.

Hint: writing imaginative texts - narratives, drama scripts; internal monologues and the use of relevant stylistic features; original ideas; developed use of figurative language; use of personification, setting, plot structures, thematic concerns.

12.

Hint: use of editing and peer checklists and rubrics

13.

Hint: works through drafts and revises work taking into account the feedback received.

through drafts and revises work taking into account the feedback received. ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula
through drafts and revises work taking into account the feedback received. ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula

©Pamela Cohen

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Page 23

drafts and revises work taking into account the feedback received. ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page
drafts and revises work taking into account the feedback received. ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page

‘ADVANCED’ SYLLABUS OUTCOMES: LINKS TO CORE AND RELATED TEXTS

Outcome( insert key words or outcomes here)

Link to study of core and related texts

1.

Hint: Can we make value judgements about the effect of authorial context and align this or contrast with that of our own. Examine how context creates parallels or contrasts that negate or authenticate our response.

2.

Hint: the correlatives between the core and related texts - use related text analysis sheets to develop insights then link to core texts through concepts and contexts.

2A.

Hint: texts are valued for their historical survival; for their literary value, for their longevity, for the universal nature of the experience they present and for the insights they allow us to access.

3.

Hint: evidence of metalanguage including grammatical and figurative language, structural language, analytical phrasing, sophisticated vocabulary. Sentence starters may be useful here. Register is sustained in writing of analytical and interpretive texts.

4.

Hint: Verbs are ‘explain and ‘analyse’ -‘ be detailed, how has the technique itself assisted in developing insight into the concept; analyse clear ability to deconstruct the text for relevance and effect.

5.

Hint: make value judgements; discuss nuances of text form and structures; film, websites or multimedia texts; medium as representational quality of visual or written text.

6.

Hint: critical, concise textual references; personal response, high level of engagement with the text itself. Use TEPA and LIMP worksheets to enhance close engagement.

7.

Hint: synthesis is the act of making links made between the core and related text material. Link concepts or contexts, link similar ways the texts reveal ideas about discovery; use the worksheets for values; use TEPA; use purpose bookmarks and context worksheets

8.

Hint: independent, insightful, interpretive, imaginative, experience the text by reflecting on how the ideas have been experienced from your own perspective. TEPA, LIMP, CONTEXT, VALUES

9.

Hint: the ways in which you have used scaffolds or other processes to deconstruct and then write about texts TEPA sheets, comparative sheets, using LIMP, CONTEXT and VALUES.

10.

Hint: writing in a synthesised manner using specific scaffolds that allow for the development of arguments; for example, essays, speeches, blog discussions, debates, feature articles; developing conceptual arguments. Use the relevant worksheets in the resource package

11.

Hint: writing imaginative texts - narratives, drama scripts; internal monologues and the use of stylistic features; original ideas; developed use of figurative language; use of personification, setting, plot structures, thematic concerns.

12.

Hint: use of editing and peer checklists and rubrics

12A.

Hint: reflect on drafts and make value judgments about alternate ways of writing or reading the text; alternate text types and transferability of writing across a range of textual forms.

13.

Hint: works through drafts and revises work taking into account the feedback received.

through drafts and revises work taking into account the feedback received. ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula
through drafts and revises work taking into account the feedback received. ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula

©Pamela Cohen

The Cohen Curricula

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drafts and revises work taking into account the feedback received. ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page
drafts and revises work taking into account the feedback received. ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page

‘DISCOVERY’ DESCRIPTION WORKSHOP

IDEAS RELATING TO DISCOVERY DRAWN FROM SYLLABUS DESCRIPTION (fill in using the separate sentences from the Discovery description)

Examples from The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara

Finding something  

Finding something

 
Serendipitous or planned  

Serendipitous or planned

 
Relate to the human experience  

Relate to the human experience

 
Can cause stress  

Can cause stress

 
Reveal or expose values  

Reveal or expose values

 
Speculative  

Speculative

 
Perspectives  

Perspectives

 
Contexts  

Contexts

 
Life – changing  

Life changing

 
Re-evaluated  

Re-evaluated

 
Equates with discoveries we have experienced ourselves  

Equates with discoveries we have experienced ourselves

 
  Equates with discoveries we have experienced ourselves   ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 25
  Equates with discoveries we have experienced ourselves   ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 25

©Pamela Cohen

The Cohen Curricula

Page 25

  Equates with discoveries we have experienced ourselves   ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 25
  Equates with discoveries we have experienced ourselves   ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 25
Discovery as a result of learning something new from the text

Discovery as a result of learning something new from the text

Dealing with those aspects of discovery that are assumed or taken for granted

Dealing with those aspects of discovery that are assumed or taken for granted

How we can use text to find out more about ourselves and the world

How we can use text to find out more about ourselves and the world

How the language in the text can be challenging in some ways and lead us

How the language in the text can be challenging in some ways and lead us to discover new meanings and interpretations

How new words can provide us with a greater understanding of the society’s we adopt

How new words can provide us with a greater understanding of the society’s we adopt and try to understand

How new language provides us with a vocabulary to assists us to explore new ideas

How new language provides us with a vocabulary to assists us to explore new ideas and access new places

How some things we encounter in our experiences will provoke us to question our own

How some things we encounter in our experiences will provoke us to question our own or other’s values

How we can provoke others with our new ideas and discoveries challenging them to explore

How we can provoke others with our new ideas and discoveries challenging them to explore new ways of engaging with the world

Being open to experiences that might lead to a change in our understanding of our

Being open to experiences that might lead to a change in our understanding of our identity

Becoming excited by new concepts and ideas that would previously have been unavailable to us

Becoming excited by new concepts and ideas that would previously have been unavailable to us

Realising our own potential for growth when engaging in new and exciting discoveries

Realising our own potential for growth when engaging in new and exciting discoveries

our own potential for growth when engaging in new and exciting discoveries ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen
our own potential for growth when engaging in new and exciting discoveries ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen

©Pamela Cohen

The Cohen Curricula

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potential for growth when engaging in new and exciting discoveries ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page
potential for growth when engaging in new and exciting discoveries ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page

Discovery in The Motorcycle Diaries

Begin your analysis by grounding yourself in the Discovery concept. Read the BOSTES Discovery rubric carefully and identify those aspects that reflect ideas you have observed in your initial reading of the text. Fill out the table below using the vocabulary drawn from the syllabus as stimuli to express your understanding of ‘Discovery’. Provide your definition or explanation of the word in terms of how it applies to the concept and then provide evidence from the film that associates with the vocabulary and the definition you have produced.

Discovery vocabulary locate definitions

Quote from the text

Example from The Motorcycle Diaries- what are you looking for?

discovering   Look for examples of truth, spiritual awakening, realisation, new worlds, new ideas, religious

discovering

 

Look for examples of truth, spiritual awakening, realisation, new worlds, new ideas, religious awareness

rediscovering   God, life, a sense of self, knowledge of the power of nature, values

rediscovering

 

God, life, a sense of self, knowledge of the power of nature, values

impulsive   Leaving university, giving away money

impulsive

 

Leaving university, giving away money

unforeseen   Death of La Ponderosa

unforeseen

 

Death of La Ponderosa

planned   Process of survival

planned

 

Process of survival

serendipitous   Getting lifts, finding food

serendipitous

 

Getting lifts, finding food

fortuitous   Finding shelter

fortuitous

 

Finding shelter

essential   Money

essential

 

Money

food fortuitous   Finding shelter essential   Money ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 27
food fortuitous   Finding shelter essential   Money ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 27

©Pamela Cohen

The Cohen Curricula

Page 27

fortuitous   Finding shelter essential   Money ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 27
fortuitous   Finding shelter essential   Money ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 27
inquisitiveness Learning about leprosy

inquisitiveness

Learning about leprosy

desire to learn Medicine, leprosy

desire to learn

Medicine, leprosy

evocative Landscapes, poverty

evocative

Landscapes, poverty

awesome Landscapes, kindness, humility

awesome

Landscapes, kindness, humility

emotional Loss of Chichina

emotional

Loss of Chichina

spiritual self awareness, vulnerability of man in nature

spiritual

self awareness, vulnerability of man in nature

intellectual Rationalisation of education and science

intellectual

Rationalisation of education and science

imagined Potential futures

imagined

Potential futures

challenging Hunger, climate

challenging

Hunger, climate

uncomfortable Getting into trouble

uncomfortable

Getting into trouble

disturbing Extent of poverty

disturbing

Extent of poverty

uncomfortable Getting into trouble disturbing Extent of poverty ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 28
uncomfortable Getting into trouble disturbing Extent of poverty ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 28

©Pamela Cohen

The Cohen Curricula

Page 28

Getting into trouble disturbing Extent of poverty ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 28
Getting into trouble disturbing Extent of poverty ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 28
inflammatory Arguments over money

inflammatory

Arguments over money

innovative How to find food

innovative

How to find food

ingenious Making money

ingenious

Making money

speculative Potential impact of the journey

speculative

Potential impact of the journey

insightful Self awareness

insightful

Self awareness

thought provoking Realisation of need

thought provoking

Realisation of need

responsibility For South America

responsibility

For South America

self realisation Rationale of experience through reflective narration

self realisation

Rationale of experience through reflective narration

values Learning how to respect others and self

values

Learning how to respect others and self

transform New ideas and realisations as a result of time spent in the leprosy clinic

transform

New ideas and realisations as a result of time spent in the leprosy clinic

New ideas and realisations as a result of time spent in the leprosy clinic ©Pamela Cohen
New ideas and realisations as a result of time spent in the leprosy clinic ©Pamela Cohen

©Pamela Cohen

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and realisations as a result of time spent in the leprosy clinic ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen
and realisations as a result of time spent in the leprosy clinic ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen

Considerations for Discovery: apply to core and related texts

Consider the following as you progress through the workshops and worksheets in this resource. Apply these ideas and questions to every reference you select in an attempt to locate the deepest insights possible.

The syllabus uses the word ‘assumption’. If we look at a thesaurus, synonyms such as ‘supposition’, ‘postulation’, ‘best guess’, ‘conjecture’, ‘hypothesis’, ‘theory’, ‘notions’ and ‘belief’ become evident. How can we apply this vocabulary to the concept of discovery and to your text? We can consider why some discoveries need to be revisited in terms of their value at the time they were made and how that has changed as historical or social change has taken place or been acknowledged? We can, therefore, examine to what extent our chosen text engages with a shift in perspectives or with historical revisionism in relation to original expectations of the discovery.

What have you, in your own experiences, discovered in the literal sense? For example:

a

the wonders of a specific scientific understanding of something

a

deeper understanding of another person or concept that you can identify shifted your perspective something wondrous or awesome that you did not know existed

a

an untruth

a

the brilliance of another human being devastation at betrayal and the capacity for another person to hurt you reality over myth or fairy tale

your ability to do something you could not do before because you can master a skill you have newly discovered and developed

a

secret place you went to with your friends

realisation about something that you did not have before

truth

reality that was confronting

realisation of your own capacity to change the world through your actions and reactions an ability to control your own emotional response

revelation that has changed you or that you know has changed others the blunt realities of experience

discoveries or inventions made because you were doing something you should not have been doing

surprises

a

a

unexpected events that have the capacity to change everything discoveries that need to happen or that you become aware of as you are forced to acknowledge or accept events or happenings around you of experience discoveries or inventions made because you were doing something you should not have been

the discovery of the ability to create, construct or invent: art, music, cooking, sculpture, building a toy or complex object, mastering the skills to make your creative venture a possibility, scientific discovery, technological discovery

examining where the impetus for discovery begins – in dreams, imagined possibilities and futures, from a need to break free from the in dreams, imagined possibilities and futures, from a need to break free from the mundane; to find self as well as others that might stimulate a new passion, a new freedom. What do you do with this awareness of skill? How can you benefit yourself? How can you benefit others? How can you contribute to the world? What happens to the discovery when it is shared? How do we protect it? How do we negotiate? How do we deal with criticism? How do we deal with rejection? How do we deal with praise and approbation? What are the economic benefits? What are the social benefits? How do we provide access or restrict access? Should all discoveries be shared?

secrets – are they, by default, meant to be discovered? Why do we keep them? When are they, by default, meant to be discovered? Why do we keep them? When they become known what are the merits or harms caused? How do we react if we are the benefactor? How do we react if we are not? Once revealed a secret cannot be reclaimed? What is the implication here for all discoveries once it has occurred we are changed completely, nothing will be exactly the same again. Why? What do we do from this point? What if someone reveals a secret that is damaging to us? How do we react? What if the secret exposes us for our beliefs, our values? Do we have to justify those and if we do, how do we explain? How do we excuse? How do we mete out retribution? How do we submit to justice? How do we use the experience to learn some aspect of human

experience that we can then share later and advocate for others or prevent similar secrets dominating and constraining others to a certain perspective? Do secrets, once revealed, change our perspective of the teller or the keeper? How is this a deficit? What happens when we lose faith in someone we trust? What do we have to rediscover or locate in ourselves in order to rationalise our perspective of others and the world?

An emotional discovery, where the event impacts on you in such a way as you become aware of your ability or inability to process the event and react joyfully, tearfully, sometimes both; experiences of elation, excitement, affirmation or anger, resentment, bitterness, sadness, bittersweet etc.to rationalise our perspective of others and the world? Intellectual realisation; as we gain knowledge we

Intellectual realisation; as we gain knowledge we have shifts in intellectual realisations, what do we realise? When do we develop cognitive shifts that assist us to appreciate - or at times - regret the discoveries or rethink our reactions to past discoveries, become nostalgic about those discoveries and have to revise or re-enact or refute in the face of shifting cognitive relativityor anger, resentment, bitterness, sadness, bittersweet etc. Physical discoveries, visceral reactions that make us aware

Physical discoveries, visceral reactions that make us aware of the impact of the discovery: taste, touch, see, hear, smell; sensory and real, tangible; how these visceral reactions can resonate over a short or long period of time; enduring consequences of such experienceor refute in the face of shifting cognitive relativity Spiritual discovery, sense of something bigger than

Spiritual discovery, sense of something bigger than ourselves has drawn us to this place or realisation; what it means to know and understand and then to take responsibility; be aware of the consequences on our psyche and our emotions and our identity; accept, or reject something that has a significant impact on our lives.period of time; enduring consequences of such experience Renewal of spirit and revisionism of original ideas,

Renewal of spirit and revisionism of original ideas, maturity and responses that shift our attitudes towards our parents and siblings or friends and communityreject something that has a significant impact on our lives. Inner revelations and awareness of our

Inner revelations and awareness of our own prejudices and willingness to change as we undergo transformative thought processes – if we didn’t know we would not have had to change, we often wish – if we didn’t know we would not have had to change, we often wish we didn’t find out, why the regret? What can we do as we renew the spirit and find a new perspective of self and of others? How can we empower ourselves and others with this information? Is empowerment and enfranchising ourselves and others the key to survival or self realisation?

What happens when we discover something that makes us very uncomfortable? An awareness of ourselves we did not have before. The fact that we are short, tall, nice, nasty, smart, not so smart, savvy, naïve, likeable, unlikeable etc. What do we do with these discoveries? How do we react? How do we take responsibility and to what extent do we own and accept rather than blame and reject? How do we then evolve and make those uncomfortable things comfortable? What resources do we need psychologically and spiritually? Who do we go to for help if we need it? How do we develop the resilience to overcome those discoveries that make us feel negative about ourselves? How do we develop awareness so we don’t become hubristic about those better physical, intellectual How do we develop awareness so we don’t become hubristic about those better physical, intellectual or spiritual attributes we may have?

When do the discoveries we make force us to change something about ourselves and the world. Do we have responsibility here? If we are confronted by what we see and experience and what we are exposed to what can we do? What should we do? If we are provoked how do we begin a process of change? What needs to change? Education? Perspective? Understanding of others? The positive influences and negative connotations of not changing? How do we rationalise our changing awareness? How are we justifying rather than accepting? How are we arguing and excusing rather than revising and recalibrating? Why are we so provoked? Are we taking time to examine the contextual information that has formed our original response and evaluated the underpinnings of that response? What is the potential for self, society and the world if we decide to shift our perspective? How do we now rationalise our changed perspective/s? Is the thought revolutionary? What will we discover about ourselves and others when we begin to voice our new understandings of how a discovery has led us to them?physical, intellectual or spiritual attributes we may have? What happens when we ourselves are discovered? Is

What happens when we ourselves are discovered? Is it a positive sense of discovery, a contribution we can make to others and society and the world and is it favourable and admired; does it lead to approbation and affirmation – or the obverse, how do we avoid falling into hubris? What if we are or the obverse, how do we avoid falling into hubris? What if we are discovered for what we are not or what others assume we are not? How do we react when we feel exposed, denigrated, relegated to something less than what we thought we were, discarded, dispossessed, devastated by untruth, misrepresented? How do we recover? How long does it take to recover? How do other’s discoveries impact on us and cause these reactions? What resolutions can be made and how can we reinvent ourselves? Should we have to justify our being? Should we accept the inevitable? Did we need to be discovered? Do we wish we were not discovered? What would be different.

to be discovered? Do we wish we were not discovered? What would be different. ©Pamela Cohen
to be discovered? Do we wish we were not discovered? What would be different. ©Pamela Cohen

©Pamela Cohen

The Cohen Curricula

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discovered? Do we wish we were not discovered? What would be different. ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen
discovered? Do we wish we were not discovered? What would be different. ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen

Audience

Guevara’s text demands audience interaction. The reliance on audience to acknowledge, accept or reject the premise of the text and to understand its context leads to a discussion of reception. The diary entries engage explicitly with the social, cultural and political voice of the author. The text leads to discoveries in relation to self-awareness and the ability to challenge our sense of self and our response to others through deeper understandings of the human condition.

Audience reception in relation to ideas such as:

Audience

Aspects of Discovery

Enduring qualities and lessons to be learned

Political idealism

     

Social expectations

     

The social narrative explored through experience

     

Creativity, intellect and truth

     
narrative explored through experience       Creativity, intellect and truth      
narrative explored through experience       Creativity, intellect and truth      

PURPOSE BOOKMARKS

to persuasively construct

to persuasively construct

to persuasively construct

to persuasively construct

to persuasively construct

to persuasively construct

to educate

to educate

to educate

to educate

to educate

to educate

to highlight

to highlight

to highlight

to highlight

to highlight

to highlight

to infer

to infer

to infer

to infer

to infer

to infer

to provide insight

to provide insight

to provide insight

to provide insight

to provide insight

to provide insight

to clarify

to clarify

to clarify

to clarify

to clarify

to clarify

to suggest

to suggest

to suggest

to suggest

to suggest

to suggest

to introduce

to introduce

to introduce

to introduce

to introduce

to introduce

to provoke

to provoke

to provoke

to provoke

to provoke

to provoke

to develop

to develop

to develop

to develop

to develop

to develop

to evoke

to evoke

to evoke

to evoke

to evoke

to evoke

to specify

to specify

to specify

to specify

to specify

to specify

to construct

to construct

to construct

to construct

to construct

to construct

to illuminate

to illuminate

to illuminate

to illuminate

to illuminate

to illuminate

to challenge

to challenge

to challenge

to challenge

to challenge

to challenge

to exemplify

to exemplify

to exemplify

to exemplify

to exemplify

to exemplify

to create

to create

to create

to create

to create

to create

to differentiate

to differentiate

to differentiate

to differentiate

to differentiate

to differentiate

to develop

to develop

to develop

to develop

to develop

to develop

to denote

to denote

to denote

to denote

to denote

to denote

to connote

to connote

to connote

to connote

to connote

to connote

connote to connote to connote to connote to connote to connote ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula
connote to connote to connote to connote to connote to connote ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula

©Pamela Cohen

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to connote to connote to connote to connote to connote ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page
to connote to connote to connote to connote to connote ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page

CONTEXT

On the following pages are a series of context worksheets. There is a worksheet for each of seven contexts as set out in the program. Context is a challenging notion for students, both in terms of how to recognise it in text and in how to write about it effectively and synthetically.

The syllabus refers explicitly to a range of contexts. The seven contexts in this program allow for deep reading of the text and assists students to ‘see’ or ‘hear’ the authorial voice taking shape. Evaluating how their own contexts, under similar headings develop an interpretation that is personal and relatable assists them to develop and recognise personal voice in their own work.

These worksheets provide students with concrete things to look for in texts that apply to the context. Writing using contextual material is covered in the sentence starters and in the annotated sample paragraph section.

Teaching context can begin with asking students what they think it might mean. Provide a definition such as ‘the meanings that surround and inform text’. List the seven contexts on the board and brainstorm where any of the following are explored in the text.

Context

Aspects to look for in the text

 

How it might be revealed in the text

social

Look for aspects of work, education, relationships both intrapersonal and interpersonal, leisure experiences

both intrapersonal and interpersonal, leisure experiences Facts, statements about work/education/leisure Emotional

Facts, statements about work/education/leisure Emotional and/or rational discourse on the impact of work, education and leisure. Relationship dialogue and reflection Formal and informal conversations between individuals or protagonists

informal conversations between individuals or protagonists   Social expectations discussed explicitly or implied
 
  Social expectations discussed explicitly or implied throughout the text

Social expectations discussed explicitly or implied throughout the text

cultural

Look for significance of traditions, rituals, heritage, language etc.

Food and drink Language discussion Family celebrations Clothing that has specific cultural significance or identifiers

political

balance of power roles in the text

political balance of power roles in the text Mention of government imposition of intervention and opinion

Mention of government imposition of intervention and opinion as a result Roles of individuals in the text, natural or assumed hierarchies Social class Enfranchisement or disenfranchisement due to cultural or social expectations

discuss government and

governance and its influence on groups and individuals; examine the power relationships between individuals in terms of

knowledge, experience, age, social hierarchy or gender

examine the power relationships between individuals in terms of knowledge, experience, age, social hierarchy or gender
examine the power relationships between individuals in terms of knowledge, experience, age, social hierarchy or gender
examine the power relationships between individuals in terms of knowledge, experience, age, social hierarchy or gender
examine the power relationships between individuals in terms of knowledge, experience, age, social hierarchy or gender

historical

specific historical references, either implicitly or explicitly stated

references, either implicitly or explicitly stated Facts, dates, historical references that define responses to

Facts, dates, historical references that define responses to events.

Assumptions that the reader understands or identifies key facts, events, personalities and ideas in the

Assumptions that the reader understands or identifies key facts, events, personalities and ideas in the texts relating to specific historical data.

The idea that the text itself contributes to the history of society, culture and people.

 
 

religious

Religious aspects may include any spiritual dimension whether formal or informal.

include any spiritual dimension whether formal or informal. References to specific religions and their impact on

References to specific religions and their impact on how individuals or groups can exist, are constrained or benefited in their experience of discovering self or ideas

metaphysical dimensions of the individual and their response to circumstances that results in spiritual growth

metaphysical dimensions of the individual and their response to circumstances that results in spiritual growth or change as they discover their identity or their moral and values proximity

gender

Gender aspects explore masculinity and/or femininity rather than sexual determinant

masculinity and/or femininity rather than sexual determinant masculine traits and the need to pursue expectations

masculine traits and the need to pursue expectations

feminine traits and how these construct views and perspectives

traits and how these construct views and perspectives   how specific gender expectations are placed on
 
  how specific gender expectations are placed on individuals or are challenged by individuals how gender

how specific gender expectations are placed on individuals or are challenged by individuals

how gender relates to political notions of self

how gender relates to political notions of self intellectual Intellectual reading positions that are

intellectual

Intellectual reading positions that are evident in the text that may be of a social, academic or cultural nature,

text that may be of a social, academic or cultural nature, communism versus capitalism as a

communism versus capitalism as a discourse that limits or attracts opportunities to discover aspects of human behaviour

dominant versus resistant responses to social constructs that impact on an individual’s ability to discover

dominant versus resistant responses to social constructs that impact on an individual’s ability to discover more about the world, a specific event, themselves or insight into others

 
  Binary opposition theory – ethical debates on whether discovery is a valid interpretation of right

Binary opposition theory ethical debates on whether discovery is a valid interpretation of right and wrong, good and evil, happiness or despair, understanding or ignorance ranging across the perspectives of those who have the power to discover and those who suffer disenfranchisement through birth or socio-political/economic deficit.

suffer disenfranchisement through birth or socio-political/economic deficit. ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 35
suffer disenfranchisement through birth or socio-political/economic deficit. ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 35

©Pamela Cohen

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disenfranchisement through birth or socio-political/economic deficit. ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 35
disenfranchisement through birth or socio-political/economic deficit. ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 35

SOCIAL CONTEXT WORKSHEET: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara

Context questions

Evidence

Inferences and insights made apparent that assist a deeper reading of the text.

Links to ‘Discovery’ concept.

Links to related texts.

What aspects of social context are evident in the text (education, work, family relationships and friendships - professional or personal, leisure etc)

       

How is social context used by the composer to reveal insights into the experiences of self?

       

How is social context used by the composer to reveal insights into the experiences of others?

       

How does your social context affect or shape your response to the text?

       
    How does your social context affect or shape your response to the text?  
    How does your social context affect or shape your response to the text?  

CULTURAL CONTEXT WORKSHEET: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara

Context questions

Evidence

Inferences and insights made apparent that assist a deeper reading of the text.

Links to ‘Discovery’ concept,

Links to related texts

What cultural contexts are engaged with in your text? (may include traditions, heritage, language, celebrations, rituals, identity, religious beliefs, food, clothing)

       

How does the text’s cultural context reveal insights into the experiences of self?

       

How does the text’s cultural context reveal insights into the experiences of others?

       

How does your cultural context affect or shape your response to the text?

       
affect or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen
affect or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen

©Pamela Cohen

The Cohen Curricula

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or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula
or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula

POLITICAL CONTEXT WORKSHEET: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara

Context questions

Evidence

Inferences and insights made apparent that assist a deeper reading of the text.

Links to ‘Discovery’ concept,

Links to related texts

What is the political context? (Examine

       

relationships of power, government power, bullying, force, demands, any character or individual that is forced or coerced into acting in a certain way or who is restricted from acting in a certain way by a higher power).

How does the text’s political context reveal insights into the experiences of self?

       

How does the text’s political context reveal insights into the experiences of others?

       

How does your political context affect or shape your response to the text?

       
affect or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen
affect or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen

©Pamela Cohen

The Cohen Curricula

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or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula
or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula

HISTORICAL CONTEXT WORKSHEET: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara

Context questions

Evidence

Inferences and insights made apparent that assist a deeper reading of the text.

Links to ‘Discovery’ concept,

Links to related texts

Identify the author’s historical context?

       

How does the text’s historical context reveal insights into the experiences of self?

       

How does the text’s historical context reveal insights into the experiences of others?

       

How does your historical context affect or shape your response to the text?

       
affect or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen
affect or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen

©Pamela Cohen

The Cohen Curricula

Page 39

or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula
or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula

GENDER CONTEXT WORKSHEET: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara

Context questions

Evidence

Inferences and insights made apparent that assist a deeper reading of the text.

Links to ‘Discovery’ concept,

Links to related texts

What gender contexts are present in the text? (Examine the roles of males and females and whether they present stereotypes or challenge stereotypes).

       

How does the text’s gender context reveal insights into the experiences of self?

       

How does the text’s gender context reveal insights into the experiences of others?

       

How does your gender context affect or shape your response to the text?

       
affect or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen
affect or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen

©Pamela Cohen

The Cohen Curricula

Page 40

or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula
or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula

RELIGIOUS CONTEXT WORKSHEET: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara

Context questions

Evidence

Inferences and insights made apparent that assist a deeper reading of the text.

Links to ‘Discovery’ concept,

Links to related texts

How has religious context influenced the writing of his text?

       

How does the text’s religious context reveal insights into the experiences of self?

       

How does the text’s religious context reveal insights into the experiences of others?

       

How does your religious context affect or shape your response to the text?

       
affect or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen
affect or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen

©Pamela Cohen

The Cohen Curricula

Page 41

or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula
or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula

INTELLECTUAL CONTEXT WORKSHEET: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara

Context questions

Evidence

Inferences and insights made apparent that assist a deeper reading of the text.

Links to ‘Discovery’ concept,

Links to related texts

What is the intellectual context explored in the text ideas about life, philosophy the big ideas the text deals with?

       

How does the text’s intellectual context reveal insights into the experiences of self?

       

How does the text’s intellectual context reveal insights into the experiences of others?

       

How does your understanding of the various intellectual contexts evident in this text affect or shape your response to the text?

       
text affect or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The
text affect or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The

©Pamela Cohen

The Cohen Curricula

Page 42

or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula
or shape your response to the text?         ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula

TECHNIQUE, EVIDENCE, PURPOSE, ANALYSIS (TEPA) WORKSHOP

Rationale: T.E.P.A, an acronym for Technique, Evidence, Purpose and Analysis was devised to assist students to learn how to write sentences that reflected the HOW and WHY of text construction.

The strategy is highly effective in that it allows students to see clearly how they can write analytically about text.

Students are initially reading texts, beginning with reading for pleasure and to develop insight into the context and ideas. Discussion on these areas takes place followed up by questions that can identify character, setting, themes, issues, ideas and a range of contexts.

Once the initial reading and discussion has taken place students then need to learn how to write about the language and how it has revealed or shaped meaning.

The techniques can be deconstructed quite explicitly and should be done so in the first instance to look for any manipulation of tone or metaphorical inferences evident in the verbs and adjectives; taking note of punctuation and sentence structure will allow analysis of pace or emphasis; adjectives often present visual descriptions that have metaphorical or metaphysical meaning. Adverbs in conjunction with verbs, assists with developing tone, characterisation and personification. Accumulation of any of these features can present insight into the author’s perspective, their need to express evocative and emotional reactions to people and events. Phrasing and phrases presents opportunity to study cumulation as a device to reinforce and emphasise. Look for euphemism, look for extended metaphor or synecdoche; metonymy can be constructed through successive phrases, emotional outbursts or metaphysical insights can be revealed as the mind and writer processes them in the writing of the text.

The evidence aspect of TEPA is self explanatory, textual references from the prescribed and related material.

Purpose: the list of purpose words provided in this resource can be applied and tested against the textual references to ascertain the composer’s agenda. This aspect of your analysis is significant as it determines the insight you have into the way in which the techniques have been used to intentionally shape meaning,

Analysis is always the hardest aspect of the process for students. Analysis can often be used as the totality of the textual deconstruction process. This aspect of the process should focus on the greatest lessons that can be learned from the text, the bigger world ideas and realisations we can draw from the text. An example has been provided to assist you with your understanding of how to use a TEPA sheet then to turn the analysis into a coherent paragraph.

Textual Reference:

Nearing 30, Alberto is seeing the Atlantic for the first time and is overwhelmed by this discovery that signifies an infinite number of paths to all ends of the earth.Page 34

TECHNIQUE, EVIDENCE, PURPOSE, ANALYSIS (TEPA) WORKSHEET EXAMPLE

Conceptual focus drawn from syllabus description: ‘finding something new’, ‘rediscovering’, ‘life changing’

Technique

Evidence

Purpose

Analysis

verb and numeral

‘Nearing 30’

identifies physical age of Alberto infers his lack of travel and experience, educates on age difference;

Discovery can occur at any age; it makes even more impact when experience is later in life as the lack of former experience can be regretted or the new experience can be better appreciated.

inference

verb phrase, literal and metaphysical notion

‘seeing for the first time’

implies Ernesto has seen the ocean before and had the restorative, powerful experience and as his description implies, recognises the sensual, transformative power of the ocean

For Alberto, ‘seeing’ is both literal and metaphysical; he is confronted emotionally and spiritually by the power of the ocean. The accumulation of verbs ‘building’ and ‘swelling’ from the previous sentence is reflected here suggesting when we have the opportunity to be amazed, at any age, we realise the capacity to be transformed and renewed in perspective- whether that is about ourselves or our understanding of the world and our insignificance in the face of nature’s magnificence.

explicitly states this is the first time Alberto has had this experience a significant visual and sensory discovery in anyone’s life experience

verb

‘overwhelmed’

to express Alberto’s emotional reaction

discovery of something so spectacular takes us beyond our expectations; we often develop a sense of impotence in the presence of nature’s magnificence

Conceptual metaphor

‘discovery’

Presents an explicit link to the concept,

Metaphorically references the newness of the experience embedded with the expectations of the experience; has shifted his previous sense of self to a deeper one; Ernesto’s revelations are insightful in so much as they express his feelings, his emotions, we do not hear Alberto’s exact words – the silence in itself expresses the awareness Ernesto has of his own sense of rediscovery through Alberto’s experience.

verb

‘signifies’

To demonstrate the symbolic nature of knowing;

identifies a manifestation of the expectations of the journey beyond this moment in time

Extended metaphor of paths and earth

‘Infinite number of paths to all ends of the earth’

To evoke the exploratory nature of the journey, exploration has no end, the world that is their experience has endless opportunities to expand the mind and take them beyond the limitations of the earth they know.

tidal power, nature of exploration and the historical role of oceans as a force of new experience, new discovery, endless opportunity, finding self, learning about the world and others. Revolutionary nature of new experience and the ramifications, benefice and potential the journey ahead of them will hold both physically and metaphorically, philosophical change, metaphysical realisation.

Adjective ‘infinite’

will hold both physically and metaphorically, philosophical change, metaphysical realisation. Adjective ‘infinite’
will hold both physically and metaphorically, philosophical change, metaphysical realisation. Adjective ‘infinite’

TECHNIQUE, EVIDENCE, PURPOSE, ANALYSIS (TEPA) WORKSHEET

Conceptual focus drawn from syllabus description:

 

Technique

Evidence

 

Purpose

 

Analysis

Grammatical features Quotes/references from/to the text to inform… to educate… to provide insight… to challenge…

Grammatical features

Quotes/references from/to the text

to inform… to educate… to provide insight… to challenge… to engage… to highlight… to argue…

Deepest meaning contexts or concepts Effectiveness

Figurative language features Structural elements Links to syllabus Lessons to be learned

Figurative language features

Structural elements

Links to syllabus Lessons to be learned

concepts Effectiveness Figurative language features Structural elements Links to syllabus Lessons to be learned
concepts Effectiveness Figurative language features Structural elements Links to syllabus Lessons to be learned

STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS OF A NON FICTION TEXT: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara

Structural Element

 

Purpose

Effect

Link to ‘Discovery’ concept

Not a complete list but starting point:

( provide an example)

Diary entries

 

to provide a sequential record of experience

Effectively takes the reader on the journey building up a view of the richness of experience

 

First person narration

 

to allow insight into the personal nature of an individual’s experience

Allows the reader to access personal thoughts and reactions, makes the text personal and reveals the social and political voice of the author

 

Reflective voice

 

to evocatively present the reader with an understanding of the growth he underwent as a result of his experience

At times, Guevara reflects on earlier experiences or life prior to the journey and thus demonstrates the ability to continue growth and change as we move into adulthood

 

Diary entry titles suggesting narrative form

to construct narrative quality to the text revealing the metaphysical meaning of each entry.

The intentional rewriting of notes and diary into narrative form elaborates on the experiences by adding reflective detail from memory

 

Intertextual insertion of letters written by Guevara

to provide access into what he wrote home and highlight the nature of his relationships with family provides a different ‘voice’.

emphasise a perspective of him as a child and son as well as an adventurer and explorer, allows the reader to understand the deeply human nature of a mythical historical figure

 

Intertextual

quotation

and

insertion

if

Provide evidence of Guevara’s cultural positioning and love of literature

Effectively reinforces the emotional and psychological aspects of the human condition as they applied to this man and this experience.

 

poems

Use of photographs

 

To provide visual and factual evidence of the journey and experiences.

Reinforces significant episodes providing veracity to the text as a whole

 
significant episodes providing veracity to the text as a whole   ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula
significant episodes providing veracity to the text as a whole   ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula

©Pamela Cohen

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significant episodes providing veracity to the text as a whole   ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula
significant episodes providing veracity to the text as a whole   ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula

FIGURATIVE ELEMENTS OF A NON-FICTION TEXT: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara

Figurative Elements

Purpose

Effect

Link to ‘Discovery’ concept

( brief list use longer list to extend)

Metaphor and extended metaphor

Extensive use throughout the text to illustrate the emotional insights offered by Guevara’s experience

Adds deeply personal impact of the experience; cultural metaphors reinforce the passion Guevara has for South America;

 

Verb, adverbial and adjectival use, accumulation and phrasing

to evocatively convey emotions, visual descriptions of landscape, add tone, personify events and especially ‘La Ponderosa’.

Convey the reality and humanity of the experience; the language choices reveal the deeply intellectual reactions of Guevara to his surroundings and those he interacts with.

 

Irony

to reveal how the lessons that need or can be learned from the experience are often paradoxical in nature

At times created humour, other times deeply sad and evocative as the experience resonates provoking empathy and dismay from the reader in regards to the socio-political and socio-economic hardships evident in South America

 

Tone (Google: ‘List of Tone Words’. you will find lists of sophisticated language that can evocatively present the depth of this technique always suggest how it is constructed verb/adverb use etc.)

to expose/construct/reveal/provide insight into the personal reactions and feelings of the author.

The atmosphere/tone/mood established through the language choices reveals the breadth of human experience for both Guevara and those he interacts with during and after his journey.

 

Reflective voice

To demonstrate the enduring nature of the experience for Guevara.

Highlights the revisiting of the diaries post journey and the need to share the experience to allow insight into the development of the individual as they discover a world beyond themselves.

 
of the individual as they discover a world beyond themselves.   ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula
of the individual as they discover a world beyond themselves.   ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula

©Pamela Cohen

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of the individual as they discover a world beyond themselves.   ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula
of the individual as they discover a world beyond themselves.   ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula

FIGURATIVE ELEMENTS BLANK WORKSHEET

Figurative Element

Purpose

Effect

Link to ‘Discovery’ concept

.

WORKSHEET Figurative Element Purpose Effect Link to ‘Discovery’ concept . ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page
WORKSHEET Figurative Element Purpose Effect Link to ‘Discovery’ concept . ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page

©Pamela Cohen

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Element Purpose Effect Link to ‘Discovery’ concept . ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 48
Element Purpose Effect Link to ‘Discovery’ concept . ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 48

NON FICTION LANGUAGE FEATURES BOOKMARKS

Metaphor Simile Personification Allusion Alliteration Alliterative Connotation Allegory Foreshadowing Flashback Tone Irony Epiphany Superlative Hyperbole Paradox Sarcasm Verbal irony Idiom Reflective voice Anecdote Bias Factual evidence Intertextual use of interview or expert statistics Point of view Sequencing of discussion or argument Connotative and emotive language Objective language Subjective language Humour: parody, satire Tone Cumulation

Metaphor Simile Personification Allusion Alliteration Alliterative Connotation Allegory Foreshadowing Flashback Tone Irony Epiphany Superlative Hyperbole Paradox Sarcasm Verbal irony Idiom Reflective voice Anecdote Bias Factual evidence Intertextual use of interview or expert statistics Point of view Sequencing of discussion or argument Connotative and emotive language Objective language Subjective language Humour: parody, satire Tone Cumulation

Metaphor Simile Personification Allusion Alliteration Alliterative Connotation Allegory Foreshadowing Flashback Tone Irony Epiphany Superlative Hyperbole Paradox Sarcasm Verbal irony Idiom Reflective voice Anecdote Bias Factual evidence Intertextual use of interview or expert statistics Point of view Sequencing of discussion or argument Connotative and emotive language Objective language Subjective language Humour: parody, satire Tone Cumulation

Metaphor Simile Personification Allusion Alliteration Alliterative Connotation Allegory Foreshadowing Flashback Tone Irony Epiphany Superlative Hyperbole Paradox Sarcasm Verbal irony Idiom Reflective voice Anecdote Bias Factual evidence Intertextual use of interview or expert statistics Point of view Sequencing of discussion or argument Connotative and emotive language Objective language Subjective language Humour: parody, satire Tone Cumulation

Metaphor Simile Personification Allusion Alliteration Alliterative Connotation Allegory Foreshadowing Flashback Tone Irony Epiphany Superlative Hyperbole Paradox Sarcasm Verbal irony Idiom Reflective voice Anecdote Bias Factual evidence Intertextual use of interview or expert statistics Point of view Sequencing of discussion or argument Connotative and emotive language Objective language Subjective language Humour: parody, satire Tone Cumulation

or argument Connotative and emotive language Objective language Subjective language Humour: parody, satire Tone Cumulation
or argument Connotative and emotive language Objective language Subjective language Humour: parody, satire Tone Cumulation
or argument Connotative and emotive language Objective language Subjective language Humour: parody, satire Tone Cumulation
or argument Connotative and emotive language Objective language Subjective language Humour: parody, satire Tone Cumulation
or argument Connotative and emotive language Objective language Subjective language Humour: parody, satire Tone Cumulation
or argument Connotative and emotive language Objective language Subjective language Humour: parody, satire Tone Cumulation
or argument Connotative and emotive language Objective language Subjective language Humour: parody, satire Tone Cumulation
or argument Connotative and emotive language Objective language Subjective language Humour: parody, satire Tone Cumulation
or argument Connotative and emotive language Objective language Subjective language Humour: parody, satire Tone Cumulation
or argument Connotative and emotive language Objective language Subjective language Humour: parody, satire Tone Cumulation
Objective language Subjective language Humour: parody, satire Tone Cumulation ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 49
Objective language Subjective language Humour: parody, satire Tone Cumulation ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 49

©Pamela Cohen

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language Subjective language Humour: parody, satire Tone Cumulation ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 49
language Subjective language Humour: parody, satire Tone Cumulation ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 49

FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE FEATURES

Technique

Evidence

Purpose

Analysis

Explicit link to Discovery

(provide an explicit example from the poem)

(see purpose word list)

(discussion of effect in relation to the terms of the question)

Alliteration Repetition of the same sound at the beginning of two or more words or within a phrase or stanza

       

Allegory Metaphorical story, usually with moral purpose that adds layers to the narrative being explored by the poet

       

Allusion When the text alludes to or makes reference, either implicitly or explicitly to another text or idea

       

Anachronism Presenting ideas that are not consistent with the time and place of the text out of place for example light bulbs in a movie set in the 16 th century

       
bulbs in a movie set in the 16 t h century         ©Pamela
bulbs in a movie set in the 16 t h century         ©Pamela

©Pamela Cohen

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in a movie set in the 16 t h century         ©Pamela Cohen
in a movie set in the 16 t h century         ©Pamela Cohen
 

Technique

Evidence

Purpose

Analysis

Explicit link to Discovery

(locate from the syllabus)

 

(provide an explicit example from the poem)

(see purpose word list, some examples provided.)

(discussion of effect in relation to the terms of the question)

Assonance

       

Internal rhyme of vowel sounds

Antonym

       

A

word opposite in meaning to

another

Accumulation

       

Building up of evidence accumulation of verbs or

adjectives for effect

Anthropomorphism

       

A

form of personification giving

human characteristics to an

animal, god or entity

Caesura

       

An interruption or break in the line of poetry to emphasise a thought or create a deliberate

pause

    An interruption or break in the line of poetry to emphasise a thought or
    An interruption or break in the line of poetry to emphasise a thought or

Technique

Evidence

Purpose

Analysis

Explicit link to Discovery

(provide an explicit example from the poem)

(see purpose word list, some examples provided.)

(discussion of effect in relation to the terms of the question)

Cliché An overused phrase or idea that reveals a lack of original thought

       

Climax The most intense point of the poem, may be anywhere in the structure

       

Colloquialism Informal language or idiom

       

Colloquial voice

       

Use of a conversational tone in the poetry

Couplet A pair of lines that usually rhyme and have the same metre ( beat)

       
the poetry Couplet A pair of lines that usually rhyme and have the same metre (
the poetry Couplet A pair of lines that usually rhyme and have the same metre (

Technique

Evidence

Purpose

Analysis

Explicit link to Discovery

(provide an explicit example from the poem)

(see purpose word list, some examples provided.)

(discussion of effect in relation to the terms of the question)

Epiphany Sudden and insightful realisation

       

Irony Cynical expression using language that is opposite to what would be expected saying something is ‘lovely’ when it is ugly using a sarcastic tone

       

Juxtaposition Placing ideas or language side by side for comparison or contrast

       

Metaphor A comparison that says one thing is another

       

Metonymy Using one word to express a complete idea crown for monarchy and all it implies

       
Using one word to express a complete idea – crown for monarchy and all it implies
Using one word to express a complete idea – crown for monarchy and all it implies
 

Technique

 

Evidence

Purpose

Analysis

Explicit link to Discovery

 

(provide an explicit example from the poem)

(see purpose word list, some examples provided.)

(discussion of effect in relation to the terms of the question)

Oxymoron

       

Placing

of

two

completely

opposite

ideas

together

bittersweet

Paradox A statement or notion that contradicts itself

         

Personification Giving human attributes to non human objects

         

Rhetorical questions Questions that are not intended to elicit a physical response

       

Sensory language Language that explores sight sound, touch, taste and smell

         
  Sensory language Language that explores sight sound, touch, taste and smell        
  Sensory language Language that explores sight sound, touch, taste and smell        

Technique

Evidence

Purpose

Analysis

Explicit link to Discovery

(provide an explicit example from the poem)

(see purpose word list, some examples provided.)

(discussion of effect in relation to the terms of the question)

Simile A comparison between objects using like or as

       

Slang Extremely informal language may use expletives

       

Symbolism Symbols used to express ideas- dove for peace, heart for love etc

       

Synecdoche Similar to metonymy where one word is used to express a bigger idea in a metaphorical manner take up your pen pen is a synecdoche for writing down your ideas

       

Tone The mood, atmosphere or feeling that is developed through the composer’s language choices

       
mood, atmosphere or feeling that is developed through the composer’s language choices        
mood, atmosphere or feeling that is developed through the composer’s language choices        

LITERAL, INFERENTIAL, METAPHYSICAL, PHILOSOPHICAL (LIMP) ANALYSIS WORKSHOP

 

Avoiding exaggeration, metaphor, or embellishment; factual; prosaic: a literal description; a literal mind.

Literal:

Literal: Who: Who is the composer? Who is the target audience? Who are the characters? Identify

Who: Who is the composer? Who is the target audience? Who are the characters? Identify each character individually and identify the literal descriptors used for each.

What: What contexts inform the composer’s writing of the t ext (social, cultural, political, historical,

What: What contexts inform the composer’s writing of the text (social, cultural, political, historical, gender, religious, intellectual)? What contexts relate to the target audience? What is the theme of the text? What issues does the text examine? What ideas does the composer use to convey themes and issues? What values are inherent to the text? What level of vocabulary has been used and why is this significant to the study of texts?

Where: Where was the text written and is the geographical context of the composer important

Where: Where was the text written and is the geographical context of the composer important to the overall concept the text conveys? Where is the text set?

When: When was the text composed? Does the time period a text is composed in

When: When was the text composed? Does the time period a text is composed in inform a particular reading of the text? Why? How? Does the time period a text is written exclude the responder from aspects if the text? How? What time period is the text set in? How do you know? What vocabulary or language/film techniques are used to describe time, space and locality? How effectively does the composer convey a sense of place or time?

How: How has the text been composed? What is its diary entry structure? What modality

How: How has the text been composed? What is its diary entry structure? What modality of vocabulary has been used? What language features does the composer use? How effectively have they been used?

Why: Why was this text composed? Is there any evidence to suggest authorial purpose for

Why: Why was this text composed? Is there any evidence to suggest authorial purpose for the text? Why is this text important/significant?

suggest authorial purpose for the text? Why is this text important/significant? ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula
suggest authorial purpose for the text? Why is this text important/significant? ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula

©Pamela Cohen

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purpose for the text? Why is this text important/significant? ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 56
purpose for the text? Why is this text important/significant? ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula Page 56

Inferential:

Based on interpretation; not directly expressed

Inference is/are the meaning/s provided in text that is/are open to interpretation. These interpretations depend

Inference is/are the meaning/s provided in text that is/are open to interpretation. These interpretations depend on your understanding of metaphor, allusion and allegory in texts. Metaphors: One thing conceived as representing another; a symbol Metaphorical can be simple metaphors a direct reference or comparison to one object or idea by using another. Metaphorical meaning can also be gleaned from an analysis of literary features such as similes, personification, onomatopoeia and oxymoron. Allusions: An instance of indirect reference: an allusion to classical mythology in a poem Allusions to other texts are often used by composed to add depth to the meaning in texts. They may infer contextual information or add an extra layer of meaning to the text. Allusions can be implicitly or explicitly stated yet are inferential in meaning when used in the composition of texts. What allusions are made in the text? Do the allusions require a reading of other texts or biographical material of other composers? What are the possible intentions of the composer in using these allusions? Allegory: a representation of an abstract or spiritual meaning through concrete or material forms; figurative treatment of one subject under the guise of another. Allegorical meaning is usually implicitly stated rather than explicitly stated. References to religious symbols, stories or beliefs can provide added meaning that exposes the composer’s context as well as suggests the universal understandings of spiritual concepts in society. What allegories appear in the text? What texts, beliefs or religious concepts might they refer to? What abstract idea/s is the composer asking the reader to engage with? Why would the composer use this technique in his text? Motifs: a recurring subject, theme, idea, etc., esp. in a literary, artistic, or musical work. Composers often use recurring symbols in their texts to add metaphorical meaning. The use of the symbols can relate to a character, a setting or the theme of the text. What repeated motifs are used in the text? How do they provide deeper meaning? How effective are the motifs in providing insight into the themes, issues, ideas, characters or setting of the text.

How effective are the motifs in providing insight into the themes, issues, ideas, characters or setting
How effective are the motifs in providing insight into the themes, issues, ideas, characters or setting
How effective are the motifs in providing insight into the themes, issues, ideas, characters or setting
How effective are the motifs in providing insight into the themes, issues, ideas, characters or setting
How effective are the motifs in providing insight into the themes, issues, ideas, characters or setting
insight into the themes, issues, ideas, characters or setting of the text. ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen
insight into the themes, issues, ideas, characters or setting of the text. ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen

©Pamela Cohen

The Cohen Curricula

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into the themes, issues, ideas, characters or setting of the text. ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula
into the themes, issues, ideas, characters or setting of the text. ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula

Metaphysical:

Pertaining to the study of texts that are highly intellectual and philosophical, usually reflect the spiritual aspects of an individuals experience, can use wit and conceit as a means of expressing thought, opinion and ideas,

Studying a text for its metaphysical qualities provides opportunities to see beyond the literal and

Studying a text for its metaphysical qualities provides opportunities to see beyond the literal and metaphorical meaning to develop an understanding of the possible spiritual depth behind texts. Composers often write quite serious texts as a criticism of society or to inform and educate us about aspects of a society. The use of puns, euphemisms, parody and specific choice of descriptors often provides clues as to the metaphysical nature of the text. Reflective voice and moments of spiritual enlightenment clearly create opportunities to explore more about ourselves and the world we exist in. What techniques have been used? Do events in the text suggest the composer is challenging a society, culture, laws, processes or individuals to shift and change?

culture, laws, processes or individuals to shift and change? What deeply held concerns are related in
What deeply held concerns are related in text challenging new audiences to engage with individuals

What deeply held concerns are related in text challenging new audiences to engage with individuals and the world with a greater sense of humanity, respect, tolerance and compassion?

How does the text engage with the concept of spiritual renewal and personal growth?

How does the text engage with the concept of spiritual renewal and personal growth?

Philosophical:

Examining texts for views or theories on profound questions in ethics, metaphysics, logic, and other related fields.

What views does the composer present that suggest a deeper engagement with the text is required? What theories does the text present? e.g. Freudian Feminist etc Does the text raise questions of ethics or morals? What other questions does the text raise about the world? Does the text challenge us to appreciate or engage with ideas beyond our own experience?

text challenge us to appreciate or engage with ideas beyond our own experience? ©Pamela Cohen The
text challenge us to appreciate or engage with ideas beyond our own experience? ©Pamela Cohen The

©Pamela Cohen

The Cohen Curricula

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us to appreciate or engage with ideas beyond our own experience? ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula
us to appreciate or engage with ideas beyond our own experience? ©Pamela Cohen The Cohen Curricula

LIMP WORKSHEET: The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara

 

Examples

Purpose