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Faculty of Science

School of Medical Sciences

PHSI2005/2905: Integrated Physiology A 2005 & 2905


(Advanced)
Semester 1 , 2018 | 6 Credit Points | Coordinator: Dr Michael Morris (2005) & Dr Atomu
Sawatari (2905) & Dr Haydn Allbutt (2905) (PHSI2005@physiol.usyd.edu.au)

1 Introduction
PHSI2005 is the standard stream and PHSI2905 is the Advanced stream for these Units.
Entry into the Advanced stream is limited to ~40 students selected from applications lodged
prior to the start of semester through the Sydney Student portal. It is available only to selected
students who have achieved a WAM of 75 (or higher) in their Junior Units of Study.
These Units of Study cover Basic Concepts in Physiology and look in detail at the physiology
of 3 systems – the Nervous System, Musculoskeletal System, and Cardiovascular System.
You will see that despite the very different roles of these 3 systems they are nevertheless highly
interacting and overlapping. In particular, the lecture series on:
Cellular Neurophysiology highlights interactions between the Nervous System and
Musculoskeletal System.
The Cardiovascular System highlights interactions with the Nervous and Endocrine
Systems.
Exercise Physiology draws together interactions between the Nervous, Cardiovascular
and Musculoskeletal Systems that occur during exercise.
Each block of lectures on a system is concluded with a review lecture.
Note also that for these systems, there is considerable emphasis on linking molecular
mechanisms to physiological outcomes and that the physiology of all systems work at the
molecular, cellular, organ, and whole-organism levels.
The practical components for these Units link strongly to the lecture material and involve
experiments on humans and isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and
data analysis. Both oral and written communication skills are emphasised, as well as group
learning.
There are 5 practicals – in cellular neurophysiology, skeletal muscle physiology, motor nervous
system, sensory nervous system, and the cardiovascular system.

The Charles Perkins Centre and the Lt/KuraCloud Education Platform


All practical and tutorial sessions will be held in the CPC, which provides world-class teaching
facilities. The use of this Centre has significantly improved the student learning experience. In
addition, we have moved to a new cloud-based education platform, Lt/KuraCloud, which
integrates with new equipment. To a very large extent, pre-practical, practical, and post-practical
work will now be done through this online software, which you can access securely in the CPC,
and at any time in other places in the Uni, your home, etc.

Your Feedback and Evaluation


Your feedback to us is often insightful, extremely helpful, and is welcomed and encouraged in
these Units of Study. If you have suggestions about how to improve either the Normal or
Advanced streams in PHSI2X05, please don't hesitate to speak to your Tutors or to your course
co-ordinators: Michael Morris for the overall Unit of Study and Atomu Sawatari or Haydn
Allbutt for the Advanced stream.
We will try to deal with any burning issues raised by you as quickly as possible. You are
encouraged to complete the on-line Unit of Study evaluation at the end of the semester. This has
been very helpful in improving these Units of Study. Some of the changes that have been
implemented specifically as a result of the evaluations and student feedback include:
Improved integration of lecture content and practicals
Development of formative, on-line quizzes with feedback
Returning marked assessments in a timely manner
More resource materials for scientific writing and reference formatting
Increasing formative assessment in practical report writing
Redistribution of assessments throughout the semester
Reweighting of individual assessment components
Tutorial sessions which include a combination of self-directed and group learning plus
spot sessions to review key concepts
Comprehensive feedback on summative assessments

Intermediate Physiology Merit Award


This award is given annually to the student who demonstrates the highest proficiency over the
year in Intermediate Physiology as evidenced by their combined final mark. To be eligible, you
must be enrolled in Science or a Science Combined degree and have completed PHSI2X05 and
PHSI2X06 in the same year.
1.1 Assumed Knowledge and Prohibitions
Prerequisites PHSI2005: P 6cp from CHEM1XXX or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1)
Prohibitions PHSI2005: PHSI2905 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406
or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808
or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808

Prerequisites PHSI2905: A mark of 75 or above in CHEM1XXX or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1)


Prohibitions PHSI2905: PHSI2005 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406
or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808

2 Course Aims, Learning Objectives and


Graduate Attributes

2.1 Course Aims


These Units are your introduction to Physiology – the science of the function of whole organisms and their parts, and the
mechanisms that underpin function.

You will begin to understand basic concepts in Physiology (e.g., homeostasis, sensing and responding to the


environment) and the molecular events that allow these things to happen (e.g., cell-to-cell communication, feedback
responses, and signalling pathway activity). In particular, a series of Concept Lectures outlines the basis of many of
these concepts. You will come across these basic concepts repeatedly in all other lectures, practicals and tutorials.

The practicals and other tutorial work are closely aligned with the lecture material so that you will begin to


understand how theory informs scientific experimentation and vice-versa. At the conclusion of these Units you should
have a firm grasp of the principles of Physiology as applied to the 3 physiological systems that are covered and the
interactions between them, and broadly be able to apply these same principles appropriately to other systems. For
example, different systems such as the respiratory system and the gastrointestinal tract are explored in Semester 2
PHSI2006/2906 (Integrated Physiology B).

Feedback will be extensive but not exhaustive: Now that you are in 2nd year, more of
the responsibility of engaging and learning will fall to you. The staff are there to help you
to a very considerable degree but there will not be an endless stream of individual
feedback. Rather, the Discipline of Physiology has agreed that feedback be a little more
limited compared to 1st year Units of Study, consistent with your advancing maturity in
scientific matters and to encourage you to become more independent with respect to
learning and thinking.
Moving to 3rd Year: The Semester 1 and 2 Units in 2nd year Physiology provide the
basis for undertaking 3rd year Units in Physiology which begin to focus, for example, on:
(i) The comparison of normal physiology and abnormal physiology (pathophysiology).
(ii) Exploring areas of current research interest (such as ion channels in disease,
embryology and stem cells, and cancer). (iii) Research technologies, and research and
development. (iv) Gaining experience in a research-lab environment.
Research Lab Experience and Beyond 3rd Year: Finally, you may be interested in
undertaking research in Physiology. It's never too early to explore the possibilities: (i) The
Faculty of Medicine has competitive Summer Research Scholarships which can be gained
by 1st, 2nd, and 3rd year students. (ii) The Discipline of Physiology also offers Summer
Research Scholarships to 3rd year students who commit to doing Honours in the
Discipline. (iii) Honours research and Postgraduate Masters and PhD degrees are also
available. We strongly encourage you to talk to academic staff and research students about
these prospects.
2.2 Learning Outcomes
After completing this unit, you should have:
1. An understanding of the basic concepts and language of Physiology, including the meaning and importance of
homeostasis.
2. An understanding of how we, and the systems of which we are comprised, sense the interior and external
environments and respond to changes in these environments.

3. Working knowledge of the concepts of homeostasis, transport of molecules and ions across membranes, cell
signalling, and cell-to-cell communication through practicals, tutorials, oral and written presentations.

4. Sound understanding of the interaction between body systems and the molecular mechanisms underpinning the
physiology of the nervous system, muscle mechanics, the cardiovascular system and the effects of exercise
upon them.

5. How to safely undertake specific experiments on humans and animal tissue, record data, analyse it using simple
mathematical and statistical principles, and draw appropriate conclusions.

6. An ability to find and analyse information in the scientific literature, judge its reliability and significance, and
integrate the information to present a cohesive and logical ‘story’.

7. The ability to engage in team and group work for scientific investigations and for the process of learning.

8. Responsibility and independence as a learner and as a scientist.

2.3 Graduate Attributes

Graduate Attributes are generic attributes that encompass not only technical knowledge but
additional qualities that will equip students to be strong contributing members of professional
and social communities in their future careers. The overarching graduate attributes identified by
the University relate to a graduate’s attitude or stance towards knowledge, towards the world,
and towards themselves. These are understood as a combination of five overlapping skills or
abilities, the foundations of which are developed as part of specific disciplinary study. For
further details please refer to the Science faculty website at:
http://www.itl.usyd.edu.au/graduateAttributes/facultyGA.cfm?faculty=Science

Learning
Graduate Attributes
Outcomes

A Research and Inquiry

A1. Apply scientific knowledge and critical thinking to identify, define and
analyse problems, create solutions, evaluate opinions, innovate and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
improve current practices.
A2. Gather, evaluate and deploy information relevant to a scientific problem. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
A3. Design and conduct investigations, or the equivalent, and analyse and
5, 6, 7, 8
interpret the resulting data.
A4. Critically examine the truth and validity in scientific argument and
5, 6, 7, 8
discourse, and evaluate the relative importance of ideas.
A5. Disseminate new knowledge and engage in debate around scientific issues. 5, 6, 7, 8
A6. Value the importance of continual growth in knowledge and skills, and
recognise the rapid, and sometimes major, changes in scientific knowledge 4, 6, 7, 8
and technology.

B Information Literacy

B1. Use a range of searching tools (such as catalogues and databases)


4, 5, 6, 7, 8
effectively and efficiently to find information.
B2. Access a range of information sources in the science disciplines, for
example books, reports, research articles, patents and company standards. 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8

B3. Critically evaluate the reliability and relevance of information in a


5, 6, 7, 8
scientific context.
B5. Use information technology to gather, process, and disseminate scientific
5, 6, 7, 8
information.

C Communication

C1. Explain and present ideas to different groups of people in plain English. 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8
C2. Write and speak effectively in a range of contexts and for a variety of
5, 6, 7, 8
different audiences and purposes.
C3. Use symbolic and non-verbal communication, such as pictures, icons and
1, 2, 3, 6, 8
symbols as well as body language and facial expressions, effectively.
C4. Present and interpret data or other scientific information using graphs,
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8
tables, figures and symbols.
C5. Work as a member of a team, and take individual responsibility within the
6, 7, 8
group for developing and achieving group goals.
C6. Take a leadership role in successfully influencing the activities of a group
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
towards a common goal.
C7. Actively seek, identify, and collaborate with others in a professional and
5, 7, 8
social context.

D Ethical, Social and Professional Understanding

D1. Demonstrate an understanding of the significance and scope of ethical


principles, both as a professional scientist and in the broader social
6, 7, 8
context, and a commitment to apply these principles when making
decisions.

E Personal and Intellectual Autonomy

E1. Evaluate personal performance and development, recognise gaps in


6, 7, 8
knowledge and acquire new knowledge independently.
E2. Demonstrate flexibility in adapting to new situations and dealing with
5, 6, 7, 8
uncertainty.
E3. Reflect on personal experiences, and consider their effect on personal
7, 8
actions and professional practice.
E4. Set achievable and realistic goals and monitor and evaluate progress
6, 7, 8
towards these goals.
E5. Demonstrate openness and curiosity when applying scientific understanding
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
in a wider context.

2.4 Threshold Learning Outcomes

The Threshold Learning Outcomes (TLOs) are the set of knowledge, skills and competencies
that a person has acquired and is able to demonstrate after the completion of a bachelor degree
program. The TLOs are not equally weighted across the degree program and the numbering
does not imply a hierarchical order of importance.

Learning
Threshold Learning Outcomes
Outcomes

1 Understanding science

1.1 Articulating the methods of science and explaining why current scientific
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
knowledge is both contestable and testable by further inquiry
1.2 Explaining the role and relevance of science in society 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

2 Scientific knowledge

2.1 Demonstrating well-developed knowledge in at least one disciplinary area 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8


2.2 Demonstrating knowledge in at least one other disciplinary area 4, 6

3 Inquiry and problem solving

3.1 Gathering, synthesising and critically evaluating information from a range


3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
of sources
3.2 Designing and planning an investigation 6, 7, 8
3.3 Selecting and applying practical and/or theoretical techniques or tools in
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
order to conduct an investigation
3.4 Collecting, accurately recording, interpreting and drawing conclusions
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
from scientific data

4 Communication

4.1 Communicating scientific results, information or arguments, to a range of


3, 5, 6, 7, 8
audiences, for a range of purposes, and using a variety of modes

5 Personal and professional responsibility

5.1 Being independent and self-directed learners 6, 7, 8


5.2 Working effectively, responsibly and safely in an individual or team context
5, 7
5.3 Demonstrating knowledge of the regulatory frameworks relevant to their
5, 6, 8
disciplinary area and personally practising ethical conduct

3 Study Commitment

The current standard work load for a 6 credit point unit of study is 3-7 hours per week of
face-to-face teaching contact hours and an additional 6 hours per week of student work of
independent study. Below is a breakdown of our expectations for this unit. It should be noted
that ‘Independent Study’ is based on what we believe to be the amount of time a typical student
should spend to achieve a pass for an item of assessment. Times are a guide only.

In class activities Hours Independent Study Hours


Lectures (35 @ 1 hour each) 35 Reading for lectures (35 @ 0.5 hour each)
18
PHSI2005/2905 PHSI2005/2905
Practicals (5 @ 3-4 hours 17 Post-prac tutorial preparation (3 @ 2 hour each)
6
each) PHSI2005 PHSI2005
Prac Tutorials (3 @ 3 hour 9 Preparation for laboratory work including pre-prac
10
each) PHSI2005 exercise sheets (5 @ 2 hours each) PHSI2005
Revision for mid-semester quizz PHSI2005/2905 8
Total 61
Preparation of lab report PHSI2005 12
Preparation for post-prac quizzes (3 @ 2 h each)
6
PHSI2005
Revision for exam PHSI2005/2905 12
Revision of assumed knowledge in statistics, hypothesis
6
writing and testing, and graphing and tabulating

Total 78

Study Tips
You need to be in control of your own study strategy and it is up to you to devise a study plan
that best suits you. Many resources are available to assist your learning including online
activities on Blackboard, tutorial sessions on Key Practical Learning Concepts, post-prac
tutorial sessions, advice from tutors and demonstrators during the Inquiry Based Learning
exercise, and a range of textbooks.
How effectively you learn the material presented depends not only on how it is presented/taught
but also on how actively you deal with it. It is critically important that you:
Attend lectures and take good lecture notes.
Actively restructure your knowledge by reviewing you notes, and correct and/or add to
them soon after the lecture.
Read the relevant sections in the recommended textbook and other textbooks.
The Unit of Study Guide on Blackboard contains Lecture Outlines and Learning Objectives
for each topic area. These can be very helpful when organizing your study. The learning
objectives are designed to highlight the key concepts lecturers will be assessing.
A review lecture is scheduled after a block of lectures on a given topic. You are encouraged
to email questions to the lecturers prior to the review so that s/he can prepare material for
discussion. These sessions may be brief if no questions are received.
Here are a few tips to help you take responsibility for your own learning:
1. Always try to understand the concepts involved, in addition to rote-learning the facts: The
two go hand in hand and you should never underestimate the power of having basic information
at your fingertips. Written exams, for example, require you to remember facts rapidly 'on
demand' and many questions focus on applying facts to explaining and connecting concepts.
Imagine a conversation with your employer: S/he will expect you to have certain facts at instant
recall and not have to run off to the internet every time you need to remember something you
should already know. Having that information instantly available will impress your employer
and allow you to get rapidly to the point of the conversation. The alternative will frustrate your
employer, leave him/her deeply unimpressed, and you won't get to the real point of the
conversation.
2. Be prepared: Read the pre-prac and prac notes, background lecture material, and textbook
BEFORE attending a class based on it.
Take advantage of Lt/KuraCloud, the tutorial sessions, review lectures, and other on-line
resources to improve your knowledge and understanding. Explore the Blackboard site: There are
several sections on Blackboard designed to help you improve your generic skills as well as
increase your basic knowledge.
3. Be organised: Summarise lectures into shorter units integrated with other sources of relevant
material.
Initiate your own assessments by making use of questions at the end of the chapters in your
textbook or the learning objectives provided by all lecturers, as well as thinking creatively about
the ways in which you could be asked to show that you have understood the material covered.
4. Be consistent: Work steadily from the beginning of semester.
5. Be critical and integrate your learning: How do the facts relate to the concepts?
6. Be appropriately collaborative: Learn from others and teach others inside class situations
like pracs and tutorials, and outside them through study groups and the online meeting forum
Piazza.
7. Be confident: See yourself as an achiever who has the right to ask questions.
8. Be curious: Don't be afraid to follow the odd or the unexpected, and be willing to learn from
your mistakes.
9. Take responsibility: Support is there, but naivety and laziness, ignorance of the rules and
regulations that govern the University and your place in it, and selfishness will obviously not be
well tolerated.

4 Learning and Teaching Activities


Weekly Schedule
Go to Blackboard for the full timetable for PHSI2005 and PHSI2905 or
visit https://admin.medsci.usyd.edu.au/timetables/
It is essential that you check Blackboard frequently for any lecture and/or
practical/tutorial changes, etc.
DO NOT rely on your personal timetable for room locations. It does not take into account
that in the one timeslot tutorials, pracs, etc. take place in different locations.
For PHSI2005, tutorial/practical classes are held on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and
Thursdays. You must attend your allocated group. Under special circumstances you can obtain
written permission from the Student Liaison Officer to change premanently to a different class
for the semester. For PHSI2905, classes are held on Wednesday afternoons. Always bring your
lecture notes to the practical and tutorial classes.
Practical/tutorial sessions are held at various locations in the Charles Perkins Centre and require
your active participation. In the tutorials, you will continue to review and analyse the data
obtained in the practicals, and integrate this with the theoretical concepts presented in the core
lectures. The tutorial sessions include a summative assessment quiz relating to the prac sessions,
and these will contribute to your final UoS mark.
Practical classes involving animal tissue
Some Physiology practical classes involve students working with tissue dissected from toads.
The toads are first humanely killed and the tissue dissected by a skilled technician under a
protocol approved by the University of Sydney Animal Ethics Committee. If you have ethical
objections to participating in such practical classes you should either change your enrolment
(before the end of week 4) or do all of the following:
1. go to the Physiology Student Liaison Office to complete a form certifying your ethical
concerns then
2. contact the Unit of Study coordinator to obtain an alternative assessment task and
3. complete and submit the alternative assessment task as instructed.
These practical classes are held in the CPC X-Lab and a strict dress code applies. You must
wear a lab coat, fully enclosed shoes with low heels and with out webbing, safety glasses or
your prescription lenses, and have long hair tied back. You will not be admitted to the X-Lab if
you do not meet these standards.
5 Teaching Staff and Contact Details

Unit Coordinator Email

Dr Michael
Morris
(2005) & Dr
Atomu
Sawatari PHSI2005@physiol.usyd.edu.au
(2905) & Dr
Haydn
Allbutt
(2905)
 
Teaching Staff Email Room Phone Note

***ALL ***ALL
PHSI2005@physiol.usyd.edu.au
ENQUIRIES ENQUIRIES
Rm 139, Coordinator
Dr Michael Medical 9036 PHSI2905,
Morris Foundation 3276 Lecturer
Building and Tutor
Room N121 Coordinator
Dr Atomu Anderson 9036 PHSI2905,
Sawatari Stuart 7127 Lecturer
Building and Tutor
Room N243
Coordinator
Dr Haydn Anderson 9351
PHSI2905
Allbutt Stuart 2515
and Tutor
Building
Level 5 100
Prof. Max 9351
Mallett St, Lecturer
Bennett 0872
Camperdown
Room E216
Dr Sharon Anderson 9351 Lecturer
Herkes Stuart 6536 and Tutor
Building
Level 3,
Dr Andrew Charles 9351
Lecturer
Hoy Perkins 2514
Centre
Room E203
Student
Ms Louise Anderson 9351
Liaison
Harrison Stuart 3478
Officer
Building
Room N348
A/Prof. Bill Anderson 9351 Lecturer
Phillips Stuart 4598 and Tutor
Building
Room E216
Dr Melissa Anderson 9351
Tutor
Cameron Stuart 5228
Building
Room E211
Dr Meloni Anderson 9351
Tutor
Muir Stuart 6514
Building
Room N639,
Dr Dan Stone Lab, 9351
Tutor
Johnstone Anderson 5162
Stuart
Room N650,
Protti Lab,
Dr Dario 9351
Anderson Tutor
Protti 3928
Stuart
Building

6 Learning Resources
Textbooks
The following textbook is recommended for the core lecture stream:
Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach by Dee Silverthorn, 7th ed., 2015-2016.
In addition, Medical, Fisher, Bosch and Burkitt-Ford libraries have copies of other appropriate
textbooks such as those by Marieb, Johnson, Berne and Levy, Guyton, and Rhoades and
Pflanzer.
Learning Management System (LMS)
Blackboard is used for this UoS.
UoS Outline, Audiovisual files of lectures, Lecture Outlines & Learning Objectives, and
PowerPoint presentations
The following are available on the Blackboard site:
Online Unit of Study Outline, which lists a huge number of important things, including
assessment timetable and weighting.
Detailed Lecture Outlines and Learning Objectives for each of the 3 physiology systems taught
in these Units.
PDFs of PowerPoint lecture slides.
Where possible, audiovisual files of lectures are uploaded soon after each lecture. Teaching staff
have no control over the quality, capture and uploading of these files.
Practice quizzes and practice exam questions
Blackboard contains on-line formative multiple choice quizzes for each practical. These are not
marked, you can do them as often as you like, and they contain detailed information on each
possible answer.
Lt/KuraCloud also provides you a large number of exercises including MCQs, which support
your learning experience and prepare you for various summative assessment tasks.
A large number of practice exam questions is also available on Blackboard.
Other support material on Blackboard and Lt/KuraCloud
These include guides to understanding and using concept maps, formulating hypotheses,
performing simple graphing and statistical analyses, essay and report writing, reference
formatting and a generic skills guide.

Lt/KuraCloud
The Lt/KuraCloud online site will be your portal for access to most of your pre-practical work,
formative pre-prac quizzes, pracs and prac data that you have collected, and the post-practical
work you will have to do/have done. It can be accessed by secure login any time from anywhere.
Access details will be given by Blackboard Announcement.

7 Assessment Tasks

You are responsible for understanding the University policy regarding assessment and
examination, which can be found at
http://sydney.edu.au/policies/showdoc.aspx?recnum=PDOC2012/267&RendNum=0
***ASSESSMENTS, INCLUDING COMPULSORY ASSESSMENTS***
Assessment in this unit will be formative (for self assessment) and summative (for marks).
Failure to complete 15% or more of the summative assessments for this Unit will result in
an Absent Fail (AF) if you do not have approved Special Consideration(s) and/or Special
Arrangement(s). The following are examples: If you do not hand in the Prac Report, you will
receive an AF. If you do not sit the Mid-Semester Quiz and also do not hand in one of the
Pre-Prac Sheet assessments, you will receive an AF. If you do not sit the Mid-Semester Quiz
and also do not sit one of the Post-Prac Quizzes, you will receive an AF.
Therefore, you are expected to attempt all summative assessment components in this Unit.
If you fail to sit an exam, fail to submit an assessment, or fail to participate in an
assessment you may be ineligible to pass the Unit of Study. Information on the grading of
late submissions is given under Assessment Grading (below).
***ASSESSMENTS AND SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS/ARRANGEMENTS***
In circumstances where you have applied for Special Consideration or Arrangement for any
creative assessment (in this case the Practical Report) and that application is ultimately
approved, you may be given an extension up to and including the amount of time you are
considered to have been affected. E.g., if you were impaired for 3 days, you may be granted an
extension of 0, 1, 2 or 3 days.
Since it takes time for paperwork to be processed, and/or you may have submitted your
application after the due date, you may receive notice of a new due date after that new due
date has passed. You will help yourself considerably if you: (i) lodge your application forms as
soon as possible, (ii) ensure you submit your assignment as soon as you are able regardless of
any application for Special Consideration. Note that submission of the Special Consideration or
Arrangement applications in no way guarantees they will be approved.
If the assignment is completed or submitted within that approved period of extension, no
academic penalty will be applied. If it is not received by the new date then lateness penalties will
apply.
Note that you may not be allowed to pass this Unit if you fail to complete 15% or more of
the assessment tasks, even if you have approved Special Consideration(s) and/or Special
Arrangement(s).
***MARKING ASSESSMENTS***
The policy in this Unit of Study is to not remark assessments. You may ask for
clarification/explanation from the Unit-of-Study coordinator.
***ATTENDANCE AT PRACTICAL AND TUTORIAL SESSIONS***
Attendance at all practical classes and tutorials is compulsory and rolls will be marked. It
is your responsibility to ensure your attendance has been recorded before leaving the class. 2%
of your final Unit of Study mark will be lost for each session you do not attend and for
which you have not been granted Special Consideration or Arrangement. It is not possible
to schedule make-up sessions outside of the scheduled week.
You may be ineligible to pass the Unit of Study if you attend less than 80% of these classes,
even if you have approved Special Consideration(s) and/or Special Arrangement(s).
***SWAPPING PRACTICAL/TUTORIAL SESSIONS***
Generally speaking, swapping between different practical/tutorial sessions will not be allowed
and in some cases is impractical. If you are unable to attend your scheduled class for some good
reason (e.g., illness, misadventure, or some prior approved Special Arrangement) you should
send an email as soon as you can to PHSI2005@physiol.usyd.edu.au requesting to attend a
session later in the week (if possible). As part of this process, you may be required to submit an
application for Special Consideration. If you cannot attend a session later in the week, you may
well need to submit an application for Special Consideration.
Note that applications for Special Arrangement (as opposed to Special Consideration) must be
submitted well in advance. Remember that any submission of the Special Consideration or
Arrangement applications in no way guarantees they will be approved.
***COMPULSORY ASSESSED PRACTICAL REPORT FOR PHSI2005***
The practical report is a compulsory assessment. If you fail to hand it in on time, late
submission penalites will apply. If you do not submit this assessment, you will Absent Fail. If
you submit more than 4 days after the due date, this will be considered a failure to submit
and you will Absent Fail. If you do not attend the practical on which the report is written, you
may not receive a mark for the practical report.
If you have an approved Special Consideration/Arrangement which provides you with an
extension, then you must hand in by that new date or late submission penalties will apply. If you
hand in more than 4 days after the new due date, this will be considered a failure to submit and
you will Absent Fail. Please especially note what has been described in further detail above:
Since it takes time for paperwork to be processed, and/or you may have submitted
your Special Consideration application after the due date, you may receive notice of a new
due date after that new due date has passed.
No extensions will be granted past the date that marks begin to be returned to students, even if
you are granted further Special Consideration, in which case you will be deemed not to have
successfully completed this Unit.
***ASSESSED PRE-PRAC ASSESSMENT SHEETS***
These must be handed in before the start of your particular prac session. They will not be
accepted after this, and you will receive a mark of zero, unless you have approved Special
Consideration/Arrangement. However, even with approved Special
Consideration/Arrangement, you must hand in the assessment as soon as possible
afterwards. For example, if you receive approved Special Consideration for the day of your
prac, you must hand in the assessment no later than the next day. If you fail to do this, you will
receive a mark of zero. Even with approved Special Consideration/Arrangement, pre-prac
assessment sheets will not be accepted once these sheets are returned by the markers to students
in the following week.
***ASSESSED POST-PRAC QUIZZES***
These will be held in the form of multiple-choice quizzes in a tutorial slot following the prac
session. No supplementary post-prac quizzes will be held.
***MID-SEMESTER QUIZ***
No supplementary mid-semester quiz will be held. If you miss the mid-semester quiz and you
do not have an approved Special Consideration or Arrangement you place yourself at
considerable risk of an AF (Absent Fail) for this Unit.
The quiz covers all lecture material previously given in the Unit.
***FINAL EXAM***
If you miss the Final Exam and you have an approved Special Consideration you may sit for the
Replacement Exam. Only one timeslot will be allocated for the Replacement. If you cannot
attend the Replacement and have an approved Special Consideration for the time of the
Replacement you will be considered not to have successfully completed this Unit.
The University and the School of Medical Sciences sets the Exam Period and Replacement
Exam period well ahead of time. Unless your circumstances are exceptional, you must be
available to take your Exam or your Replacement Exam during these periods. For example,
starting your overseas holiday during the Exam Period (because you thought the Exam would be
scheduled earlier in the period) or being away during the Replacement Exam period (because
you didn't think you would need to sit a Replacement Exam) will not be considered an
acceptable excuse.
***LECTURES***
Although presence at lectures is not monitored, failure to attend may result in your missing out
on hand-outs or particular instructions. Absence will not be accepted as an excuse for not being
aware of lecture material, unless Special Consideration has been granted and it is clear that you
could not gain reasonable access to that material in a suitable timeframe.

7.1 Summative Assessments

Percentage Learning
Assessment Task Brief Description Due Date
Mark Outcomes
Prac Sheets Group A Category: Submitted 15 Weekly (weeks: 4, 1, 2, 3, 4,
(Monday) work 6, 9 and 11) 5, 8
Type: Written
assignment

Individual or group
assessment: Individual
PHSI2005 Pre-Prac Category: Submitted 15 Weekly (weeks: 4, 1, 2, 3, 4,
Sheets Group B work 6, 9 and 11) 5, 8
(Tuesday) Type: Written
assignment

Individual or group
assessment: Individual
PHSI2005 Pre-Prac Category: Submitted 15 Weekly (weeks: 4, 1, 2, 3, 4,
Sheets Group C work 6, 9 and 11) 5, 8
(Wednesday) Type: Written
assignment

Individual or group
assessment: Individual
PHSI2005 Pre-Prac Category: Submitted 15 Weekly (weeks: 4, 1, 2, 3, 4,
Sheets Groups D & E work 6, 9 and 11) 5, 8
(Thursday) Type: Written
assignment

Individual or group
assessment: Individual
PHSI2005/2905 Category: Exam 14 Week 7 1, 2, 3, 4, 8
Mid-Semester Quiz Type: In-semester exam Friday, 27 April 2018
from 10.00 am to
Individual or group 11.00 am
assessment: Individual
PHSI2005 Skeletal Category: Submitted 16 Week 12 1, 2, 3, 4,
Muscle Practical Report work Friday, 01 June 2018 6, 8
Type: Written from 09.00 am to
assignment 04.00 pm

Individual or group
assessment: Individual
PHSI2005 Post-Prac Category: In-class 15 Weekly (weeks: 5, 8 1, 2, 3, 4,
Quizzes Group A assessment and 13) 5, 8
(Monday) Type: Tutorial quiz or
small test or small
continuous assessment

Individual or group
assessment: Individual
Length: 15 minutes
PHSI2005 Post-Prac Category: In-class 15 Weekly (weeks: 5, 8 1, 2, 3, 4,
Quizzes Group B assessment and 13) 5, 8
(Tuesday) Type: Tutorial quiz or
small test or small
continuous assessment

Individual or group
assessment: Individual
Length: 15 minutes
PHSI2005 Post-Prac Category: In-class 15 Weekly (weeks: 5, 8 1, 2, 3, 4,
Quizzes Group C assessment and 13) 5, 8
(Wednesday) Type: Tutorial quiz or
small test or small
continuous assessment

Individual or group
assessment: Individual
Length: 15 minutes
PHSI2005 Post-Prac Category: In-class 15 Weekly (weeks: 5, 8 1, 2, 3, 4,
Quizzes Groups D & E assessment and 13) 5, 8
(Thursday) Type: Tutorial quiz or
small test or small
continuous assessment

Individual or group
assessment: Individual
Length: 15 minutes
PHSI2005/2905 Final Category: Exam 40 Exam Period 1, 2, 3, 4,
Exam Type: Final exam 5, 6, 8

Individual or group
assessment: Individual
Length: 120 minutes
PHSI2905 Extension Category: Submitted 10 Week 13 1, 2, 3, 4,
Prac Report 1 work Wednesday, 06 June 5, 6, 7, 8
Type: Assignment 2018 at 11.30 pm
PHSI2905 Extension Category: Submitted 5 Week 13 1, 2, 3, 4,
Prac Abstract 1 work Wednesday, 06 June 5, 6, 8
Type: Assignment 2018 at 11.30 pm
PHSI2905 Video Tutorial Category: Submitted 15 Week 13 1, 2, 3, 4,
work Tuesday, 05 June 5, 6, 7, 8
Type: Assignment 2018 at 11.30 pm
PHSI2905 Educational Category: Submitted 10 Week 8 1, 2, 3, 4,
Literature Review work Wednesday, 02 May 5, 6, 8
Type: Assignment 2018 at 11.30 pm
PHSI2905 Script 6 Week 7 1, 2, 3, 4,
Thursday, 26 April 5, 6, 7, 8
2018 at 11.30 pm

Descriptions of Summative Assessments

Prac Sheets Group A (Monday)


The Pre-Prac Sheets are intended to prepare you for the theory behind, and the practical aspects
of, undertaking the prac classes.

PHSI2005 Pre-Prac Sheets Group B (Tuesday)


The Pre-Prac Sheets are intended to prepare you for the theory behind, and the practical aspects
of, undertaking the prac classes.

PHSI2005 Pre-Prac Sheets Group C (Wednesday)


The Pre-Prac Sheets are intended to prepare you for the theory behind, and the practical aspects
of, undertaking the prac classes.

PHSI2005 Pre-Prac Sheets Groups D & E (Thursday)


The Pre-Prac Sheets are intended to prepare you for the theory behind, and the practical aspects
of, undertaking the prac classes.

PHSI2005/2905 Mid-Semester Quiz


This Quiz tests you on the theory of the physiological systems covered in lectures so far. It
consists of ~30 multiple choice questions. No supplementary quiz will be held. If you do not
sit the quiz, you place your self at considerable risk of receiving an Absent Fail for this Unit of
Study.

PHSI2005 Skeletal Muscle Practical Report


This is a detailed report of the prac, set out much like a published scientific paper. It is intended
to hone your skills in all aspects of scientific learning and practice including good concise
writing, the proper presentation of data and analysis of data, logical flow of information and
ideas, and the reasoned discussion of results.

This is a compulsory assessment. Failure to submit the Prac Report, regardless of any approved
application for Special Consideration or Arrangement, will result in you receiving an Absent
Fail for this Unit of Study. Approved applications for Special Consideration or Arrangement
may result in a changed submission date. This changed date may be retrospective from the
date of approval and will be limited in duration! See Assessment Summary (above) for
details.
Submission made more than 4 days after the due will be considered a failure to submit.

PHSI2005 Post-Prac Quizzes Group A (Monday)


The Post-Prac Quizzes are intended to test your knowledge of the theory behind, and the
practical aspects of, the prac classes.

PHSI2005 Post-Prac Quizzes Group B (Tuesday)


The Post-Prac Quizzes are intended to test your knowledge of the theory behind, and the
practical aspects of, the prac classes.

PHSI2005 Post-Prac Quizzes Group C (Wednesday)


The Post-Prac Quizzes are intended to test your knowledge of the theory behind, and the
practical aspects of, the prac classes.

PHSI2005 Post-Prac Quizzes Groups D & E (Thursday)


The Post-Prac Quizzes are intended to test your knowledge of the theory behind, and the
practical aspects of, the prac classes.
PHSI2005/2905 Final Exam
The final exam is 2 h. It will cover all of the lecture material undertaken throughout the
semester. The format of the exam will be 1 h Multiple Choice Questions plus 1 h Short Answer
Questions. If a Replacement Exam is held, the format may vary from the original paper. Only
one timeslot will be available for sitting the Replacement Exam.

PHSI2905 Extension Prac Report 1


This assessment is a group report detailing the findings from the Advanced extension practical
(neuromuscular junction). The format will be akin to what would be expected of a published
scientific paper. The task will assess all aspects of scientific (written) communication, including
proper organization of your report, the analysis and visual presentation of data, clear and
concise explanation of findings, and appropriate discussion of results.

PHSI2905 Extension Prac Abstract 1


This assessment is a brief, individually written abstract or summary of the first group report.
The format will be akin to what would be expected of an abstract for a published scientific
paper. The exercise will require you to summarize your report in a concise, well organized and
easily understandable manner.

PHSI2905 Video Tutorial


This assessment is a group project in which students will create a video tutorial on an aspect of
physiology covered in this unit of study. This assessment will examine scientific
communication using multimedia and the ability to breakdown complex ideas into simpler
explanations, and use visual and audio material to aid in that explanation.

PHSI2905 Educational Literature Review


This assessment is an individual task in which each student will interrogate the literature to find
what constitutes "good" educational material. The aim is that your findings from this task will
inform your group work in the creation of your video tutorial. This will be submitted as a
literature review.

PHSI2905 Script
In order to provide feedback during the semester this assessment task is to write up the
script/shot log that you will use to create your video tutorial. This is a group project in which
you should describe fully what the audience will see when watching your tutorial. Include the
dialogue, graphics, special effects, shot descriptions and audio. In addition to allowing us to
provide feedback on your planned multimedia project before you go to the effort of filming and
editing it, this task will also put into place the planning which will assist you in producing a
more effective video.

7.2 Formative Assessments

Learning
Assessment Task Date Available
Outcomes
PHSI2005 Key Practical Learning Concepts Always Available 1, 3, 7, 8
PHSI2005 Nerve Post-Prac Tutorial Week 5 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8
(week starting Sunday, 08 April
2018)
PHSI2005/2905 Formative Quizzes - Nerve Prac Always Available 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8
PHSI2005 Muscle Post-Prac Tutorial Week 8 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8
(week starting Sunday, 29 April
2018)
PHSI2005/2905 Formative Quizzes - Muscle Prac Always Available 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8
PHSI2005 Cardiovacular Post-Prac Tutorial Week 13 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8
(week starting Sunday, 03 June
2018)
PHSI2005/2905 Formative Quizzes - Always Available 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8
Cardiovascular Prac
PHSI2005 Optional Draft Practical Report Week 9 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8
Friday, 11 May 2018

Descriptions of Formative Assessments

PHSI2005 Key Practical Learning Concepts


This consists of 2 lessons in KuraCloud covering some basics in Hypothesis Writing and
Testing, Simple Statistics and Simple Graphing and Tabulating. You should already be familiar
with all the concepts presented in these online tutorials but they can be used for revision. These
concepts are critical to the scientific method in general but also will specifically be helpful for
writing your Prac Report.

PHSI2005 Nerve Post-Prac Tutorial


You will engage in group work, and will be asked to present verbally answers to tutorial
questions. This will help you further prepare for the summative Post-Prac Quiz to he held at the
end of this tutorial session.

PHSI2005/2905 Formative Quizzes - Nerve Prac


The KuraCloud Pre-Practical Lesson for this prac contains a series of formative exercises
including a number of MCQs. In addition, an online Blackboard quiz will be released after you
have done the prac. It consists of MCQs for which comprehensive explanations are shown for
each possible answer. You can take this quiz as often as you like.

PHSI2005 Muscle Post-Prac Tutorial


You will engage in group work, and will be asked to present verbally answers to tutorial
questions. This will help you further prepare for the summative Post-Prac Quiz to he held at the
end of this tutorial session.

PHSI2005/2905 Formative Quizzes - Muscle Prac


The KuraCloud Pre-Practical Lesson for this prac contains a series of formative exercises
including a number of MCQs. In addition, an online Blackboard quiz will be released after you
have done the prac. It consists of MCQs for which comprehensive explanations are shown for
each possible answer. You can take this quiz as often as you like.

PHSI2005 Cardiovacular Post-Prac Tutorial


You will engage in group work, and will be asked to present verbally answers to tutorial
questions. This will help you further prepare for the summative Post-Prac Quiz to he held at the
end of this tutorial session.

PHSI2005/2905 Formative Quizzes - Cardiovascular Prac


The KuraCloud Pre-Practical Lesson for this prac contains a series of formative exercises
including a number of MCQs. In addition, an online Blackboard quiz will be released after you
have done the prac. It consists of MCQs for which comprehensive explanations are shown for
each possible answer. You can take this quiz as often as you like.

PHSI2005 Optional Draft Practical Report


You can choose to hand in a draft report for consideration by your tutor, who will return it with
comments to assist you in completing the report. Students who take advantage of this generally
obtain better marks than their peers.

7.3 Assessment Grading


Final grades in this unit are awarded at levels of HD (High Distinction), D (Distinction), CR
(Credit), P (Pass) and F (Fail) as defined by Academic Board Resolutions: Course Work Policy
2014. Details of the grade results are available in Schedule 1 of the following document:
http://sydney.edu.au/policies/showdoc.aspx?recnum=PDOC2014/378&RendNum=0
Assessed exercises may not be revised and resubmitted for re-marking. If you wish to appeal an
academic decision, you should refer to the University Policy at:
http://sydney.edu.au/policies/showdoc.aspx?recnum=PDOC2012/253&RendNum=0
You are responsible for handing in/presenting assesment tasks on time and attending exams
when they are scheduled. Being unaware of due dates and exam dates is NOT a valid excuse for
late submission or non-attendance.
***COLLUSION AND PLAGIARISM***
Plagiarism software will be used to assess if submitted work such as the Practical Report
indicates collusion (i.e., the provision of information to other students which they then
unethically taken advantage of) and plagiarism (claiming work to be your own which is not your
own).
Marking penalties range up to 100% and formal investigation by the University may occur,
which can result in a reduced final grade for the UoS.
Further important and detailed information is provided and can be accessed in the Learning
and Teaching Policies section and at the following link:
https://sydney.edu.au/students/academic-dishonesty-and-plagiarism.html
Any ignorance on your part of these policies and their implications will not be accepted as an
excuse if you transgress.
***LATE SUBMISSIONS***
You will not receive a mark if your Pre-Prac Sheets for a particular prac have not been
submitted by the start of the practical session. If you miss the prac session (e.g., due to illness or
misadventure) you must submit the Pre-Prac Sheets as soon as possible after that otherwise you
will receive a mark of zero.
You will not receive a mark for the Post-Prac Quizzes if you fail to attend your scheduled
tutorial session. If you miss the tutorial session (e.g., due to illness or misadventure), you should
arrange to attend a different session in that week (if possible).
In terms of submission of the compulsory Practical Report: If you have no legitimate reason (see
below for excuses we do not accept) for submitting after the due date then your assessment will
be dealt with in the following way:
Your assessment will be forwarded to the relevant marker and assessed. The final mark awarded
will, however, be multiplied by a relevant factor depending on how many days overdue your
assessment is. For example, if your assessment is one day overdue the awarded mark will be
reduced by 10% of full marks, two days late by 20%, three days late by 30%, and 4 days late by
40%. Thus, if the assessment is judged to be worth 18 out of 20 and it was four days late, the
final mark awarded will be 10 out of 20 (18 - 0.4*20).
No mark will be awarded if the assessment is submitted more than 4 days after the due
date and you will be considered not to have submitted the report.
Failure to submit the report or submitting more than 4 days late will result in an Absent
Fail for this Unit.
Saturdays and Sundays count as normal days and lateness penalties will be incurred. For
example, if the due date is Friday and you submit on Monday (i.e., three days late), then your
awarded mark will be reduced 30% of full marks.
What excuses for lateness of submission will not be accepted?
This list is by no means exhaustive but gives examples of problems that can be avoided if you
plan ahead instead of leaving written assignments to the last minute:
1. My computer crashed
2. My file wouldn't print
3. The disc is corrupted
4. My lab partner had the results
5. I had to move on the weekend
6. I couldn't find the references in the library
7. I had to work on the weekend
8. I had a cold last week
9. I had to play football on the weekend
10. I tried to submit just before the deadline and submission seemed to fail.
We do recognize, however, that real computer problems may occur. Here are some suggestions
to minimize the impact of these:
1. Make electronic back-ups of your work in progress.
2. Keep printed copies of your work in progress. These can be used to prove that you are
experiencing genuine technical problems.

8 Academic Integrity
While the University is aware that the vast majority of students and staff act ethically and
honestly, it is opposed to and will not tolerate academic dishonesty or plagiarism and will treat
all allegations of dishonesty seriously.

All students are expected to be familiar and act in compliance with the relevant University
policies, procedures and codes, which include:
Academic Honesty in Coursework Policy 2015
Academic Honesty Procedures 2016
Code of Conduct for Students
Research Code of Conduct 2013 (for honours and postgraduate dissertation units)
They can be accessed via the University's Policy Register: http://sydney.edu.au/policies (enter
'Academic Honesty' in the search field).

Students should never use document-sharing sites and should be extremely wary of using online
'tutor' services. Further information on academic honesty and the resources available to all
students can be found on the Academic Integrity page of the University website:
http://sydney.edu.au/elearning/student/EI/index.shtml.

8.1 Academic Dishonesty and Plagiarism

Academic dishonesty involves seeking unfair academic advantage or helping another student to
do so.

You may be found to have engaged in academic dishonesty if you:


Resubmit (or 'recycle') work that you have already submitted for assessment in the same
Resubmit (or 'recycle') work that you have already submitted for assessment in the same
unit or in a different unit or previous attempt.
Use assessment answers hosted on the internet, including those uploaded to document
sharing websites by other students.
Have someone else complete part or all of an assessment for you, or do this for another
student.
Except for legitimate group work purposes, providing assessment questions and answers
to other students directly or through social media platforms or document ('notes') sharing
websites, including essays and written reports.
Engage in examination misconduct, including using cheat notes or unapproved electronic
devices (e.g., smartphones), copying from other students, discussing an exam with another
person while it is in progress, or removing confidential examination papers from the
examination venue.
Engage in dishonest plagiarism.
Plagiarism means presenting another person's work as if it is your own without properly or
adequately referencing the original source of the work.

Plagiarism is using someone else's ideas, words, formulas, methods, evidence, programming
code, images, artworks, or musical creations without proper acknowledgement. If you use
someone's actual words you must use quotation marks as well as an appropriate reference. If
you use someone's ideas, formulas, methods, evidence, tables or images you must use a
reference. You must not present someone's artistic work, musical creation, programming code
or any other form of intellectual property as your own. If referring to any of these, you must
always present them as the work of their creator and reference in an appropriate way.

Plagiarism is always unacceptable, regardless of whether it is done intentionally or not. It is


considered dishonest if done knowingly, with intent to deceive, or if a reasonable person can see
that the assessment contains important material copied from other sources and not properly
referenced. The University understands that not all plagiarism is dishonest and provides
students with opportunities to improve their academic writing, including their understanding of
scholarly citation and referencing practices.

8.2 Use of Similarity Detection Software

All written assessments submitted in this unit of study will be submitted to the similarity
detecting software program known as Turnitin. Turnitin searches for matches between text in
your written assessment task and text sourced from the Internet, published works and
assessments that have previously been submitted to Turnitin for analysis.

There will always be some degree of text-matching when using Turnitin. Text-matching may
occur in use of direct quotations, technical terms and phrases, or the listing of bibliographic
material. This does not mean you will automatically be accused of academic dishonesty or
plagiarism, although Turnitin reports may be used as evidence in academic dishonesty and
plagiarism decision-making processes.

9 Learning and Teaching Policies


ACADEMIC DISHONESTY IN COURSEWORK

A critical Graduate Attribute is to develop strategies to learn independently while also enhancing
learning through group work such as practical and problem-based learning exercises or otherwise
appropriately cooperating with other students.

An essential aspect of behaving ethically in this regard is to avoid engaging in collusion (e.g., by
providing to other students complete or near-complete copies of assessable material, or parts thereof,
which they can use to unfair advantage) and plagiarism (using the work of others and claiming it to be
your own).

This is once again to remind you that the University has strict policies about collusion,
plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty because they represent unacceptable
practices which devalue your Degree, reflect badly on the University and, if undetected, provide
you with an unethical advantage over other students.

In short, DO NOT engage in collusion, plagiarism or any other forms of academic dishonesty or
student misconduct. Serious penalties apply and are often applied.

For full details of applicable university policies and procedures in this area, see the Policies Online site
at https://sydney.edu.au/students/academic-dishonesty-and-plagiarism.html

The Faculty of Science undergraduate forms and procedures can be found


at http://sydney.edu.au/science/cstudent/ug/forms.shtml

Academic Policies relevant to student assessment, progression and coursework:


Academic Dishonesty in Coursework. All students must submit a cover sheet for all
assessment work that declares that the work is original and not plagiarised from the work
of others. The University regards plagiarism as a form of academic misconduct, and has
very strict rules that all students must adhere to. For information see the document
defining academic honesty and plagiarism at:

https://sydney.edu.au/policies/showdoc.aspx?recnum=PDOC2012/254&RendNum=0
Coursework assessment policy. For information, see the documents outlining the
University assessment policy and procedures at:

https://sydney.edu.au/policies/showdoc.aspx?recnum=PDOC2014/378&RendNum=0 and
https://sydney.edu.au/policies/showdoc.aspx?recnum=PDOC2012/267&RendNum=0.

The Faculty process is to use standards based assessment for units where grades are
returned and criteria based assessment for Pass / Fail only units. Norm referenced
assessment will only be used in exceptional circumstances and its use will need to be
justified to the Undergraduate Studies Committee.
Special consideration for acute illness or misadventure may be considered if your ability
to undertake or complete an assessment component is severely affected or you are unable
to attend a compulsory class. If your ability to attend a practical or tutorial class, complete
an assessment on time, or exam performance is affected by illness or misadventure, you
should consider submitting Special Consideration.
Applications for special consideration and special arrangements are managed by the University’s Student
Administration Services (SAS). Start by going to the SAS site
Administration Services (SAS). Start by going to the SAS site
(http://sydney.edu.au/students/special-consideration-and-arrangements.html). Applications
must be no later than three (3) working days after the assessment occurrence or due date
(unless a reasonable explanation for a delay is provided).
Longer term health or emotional issues are best managed with adjustments to course
assessments as part of an Academic Plan developed in discussion between the Student and
Disabilities Support ( http://www.usyd.edu.au/stuserv/disability/index.shtml). Note that a
program formulated with the help of Disabilities Support does not necessarily exempt you
from having to make applications for Special Consideration as and when needed.
Special Arrangements may be granted for certain personal circumstances (e.g., the birth
of a child) or religious or cultural commitments or for essential community commitments.
Examples include compulsory legal absence (e.g., jury duty), elite sporting or cultural
commitments (representing the University, state or country), or Australian Defence Force
or Emergency Service commitments (e.g., Army Reserve). Applications for Special
Arrangement must be made as soon as you are aware of the issue or the application
will be declined. Do not leave such application to the last minute.
Note that, unlike some other faculties, the Faculty of Science does not offer 'Simple
Extensions' for assessments. ALL requests for an extension of time on an assessment
must be made by applying for Special Consideration or Special Arrangements as
outlined above.

YOU SHOULD ALSO SEE THE SECTIONS ON ASSESSMENT SUMMARY


AND ASSESSMENT GRADING FOR OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION ON
SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS/ARRANGEMENTS AND ASSESSMENT
SUBMISSIONS FOR THIS UNIT OF STUDY.
Below is a brief summary of the procedure regarding Special Consideration application:
1) Complete you application on line.
2) Upload all relevant supporting medical or other official documents. Note that, for
example, medical or other official documentation which post-date the date of illness
or misadventure greatly reduce the veracity of your application and your application
may be declined when this is taken into consideration.
3) It is up to you, not the Student Centre, Faculty Office, or University to ensure that
your documentation is complete. Incomplete applications can be declined.
4) Keep all originals of your documents.
If you are genuinely too ill to attend a class or exam, you are advised to email
to PHSI2005@physiol.usyd.edu.au physiol.usyd.edu.au as soon as possible. Regardless of
whether or not you recieve advice, your application for Special Consideration with
supporting documentation must follow within the number of days stipulated under the
policy. If you cannot attend the End-of-Semester Exam or the Replacement Exam your
result will be marked as Did Not Finish.
If you have chronic health problems, it is advisable that you register with Disability
Services http://www.usyd.edu.au/stuserv/disability/index.shtml. They can help facilitate
Special Consideration Requests and provide special equipment during assessments.
Registration with Disability Services does not automatically provide you with extended
assessment dates or other considerations. You must adhere to the University's policies and
assessment dates or other considerations. You must adhere to the University's policies and
provide all relevant documentation for your applications within the appropriate
timeframes.
Misadventure due to computer, printer or other electrical malfunctions will not be an
acceptable reason for Special Consideration.
Special Arrangements for Examination and Assessment. In exceptional circumstances,
alternate arrangements for exams or assessment may be made provided you make
application as far ahead of time as possible. There is no guarantee that such arrangements
can be made. Concessions for outside work arrangements, holidays and travel, sporting
and entertainment events will not normally be given unless the circumstances are
exceptional. The policy, guidelines and application form including examples of
circumstances under which you might be awarded a Special Arrangement for an
examination or assessment task can be found at:
http://sydney.edu.au/students/special-consideration-and-arrangements.html
Student Appeals against Academic Decisions. Students have the right to appeal any
academic decision made by a School or the Faculty. The appeal must follow the
appropriate procedure so that a fair hearing is obtained. The formal application form can
be obtained at:
https://sydney.edu.au/science/cstudent/ug/forms.shtml#appeals
Replacement Exams for End-of-Semester Examinations
Students who apply for and are granted either Special Arrangement or Special Consideration for
End-of-Semester Examinations in units offered by the Faculty of Science will be expected to sit
any Replacement Exams within the time period stipulated by the Faculty. Information on the
timing of both the End-of-Semester Exams and Replacement Exams is forwarded to all students
well in advance. If you cannot attend the End-of-Semester Exam or the Replacement Exam (and
your applications have been approved for not attending) your result will be marked as Did Not
Finish.