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REGIONAL COLLEGE

OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES & RESEARCH


Affiliated to M.J.P Rohilkhand University, Bareilly
Pilibhit Bypass, Bareilly (UP)

PROJECT ON

“ESCORT LIMITED”

Session:2017-18

Submitted By:
DEVINDER SINGH
B.Com (Honours) IInd Year
REGIONAL COLLEGE
OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES & RESEARCH
Affiliated to M.J.P Rohilkhand University, Bareilly
Pilibhit Bypass, Bareilly (UP

CERTIFICATE

THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT THE PROJECT TITLED

“ESCORT LIMITED”

HAS BEEN PREPARED BY

DEVINDER SINGH

AS PER REQUIREMENT OF CURRICULUM OF B.COM. (HONOURS)- II Year.

THIS WORK IS AS PER GUIDELINES LAID OUT FOR THE SAME AND IS WORTHY OF APPROVAL.

Date : Signature of Panel of Teacher


REGIONAL COLLEGE
OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES & RESEARCH
Affiliated to M.J.P Rohilkhand University, Bareilly
Pilibhit Bypass, Bareilly (UP

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
I AM EXTREMELY THANKFUL TO ALL THOSE WHO HAVE HELPED ME IN
COMPLETION OF MY PROJECT

“ESCORT LIMITED”

MY PROJECT WOULD NOT HAVE COMPLETED WITHOUT THE ENCOURAGEMENT, GUIDANCE AND
MOTIVATION PROVIDED TO ME BY

Dr. Anjali Chaudhary &


Dr. Priya Verma
LASTLY, I WOULD THANK ALMIGHTY GOD FOR GIVING ME COURAGE, WILL AND INTELLIGENCE
TO COMPLETE THIS WORK.

Signature of Student
DEVINDER SINGH
CONTENT LIST

CHAPTERS PAGE NO.

 Certificate

 Acknowledgement

 Content list

 Main content

 List of tables and figure

 Abstract

 Research Methodology

 Limitations of projects

1. CHAPTER 1

Introduction of the company

2. CHAPTER 2

Organization structure

3. CHAPTER 3

Complete product range

4. CHAPTER 4

Plant locations

5. CHAPTER 5

Market share product wise


6. CHAPTER 6

Marketing strategies

7. CHAPTER 7

Competitors

8. CHAPTER 8

Data analysis

9. CHAPTER 9

Findings & Recommendations

10. CHAPTER 10

Conclusion

 BIBLIOGRAPHY
MAIN CONTENT LIST

CHAPTER PAGE NO.

1. CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION OF THE COMPANY

1.1 INTRODUCTION

1.2 THE STORY OF BRITANNIA

1.3 MILE STONES

2. CHAPTER 2: ORGANIZATION STRUCTURE

2.1 ORGANIZATION STRUCTURE

2.2 FUNCTIONAL AREAS

3. CHAPTER 3: COMPLETE PRODUCT RANGE

3.1 PRODUCT PROFILE

4. CHAPTER 4: PLANT LOCATIONS

4.1 PLANT LOCATION

5. CHAPTER 5: MARKET SHARE PRODUCT WISE

5.1 MARKET SHARE REPORT

6. CHAPTER 6: MARKETING STRATEGIES

6.1 MARKETING MIX

6.2 MARKETING EFFECTIVENESS

6.3 MARKET STRATEGY

7. CHAPTER 7: COMPETITORS

7.1 COMPETITORS PROFILE

8. CHAPTER 8: DATA ANALYSIS

8.1 DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION


9. CHAPTER 9: FUTURE PLANS

9.1 FUTURE PLANS

9.2 BRITANNIA TO KICKSTART

10. CHAPTER 10: FINDINGS & SUGESSTIONS

11. CHAPTER 11: CONCLUSIONS

 BIBLIOGRAPHY
LIST OF TABLES
Table No. Page No.

1. Table no. 1

2. Table no. 2

3. Table no. 3

4. Table no. 4

5. Table no. 5

6. Table no. 6

7. Table no. 7
LIST OF FIGURES
Figure No. Page No.

1. Figure No. 1

2. Figure No. 2

3. Figure No. 3

4. Figure No. 4

5. Figure No. 5

6. Figure No. 6

7. Figure No. 7

8. Figure No. 8

9. Figure No. 9
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Research is a common language refers to a search of knowledge. Research is scientific &

systematic search for pertinent information on a specific topic, infect research is an art of

scientific investigation. Research Methodology is a scientific way to solve research problem. It

may be understood as a science of studying how research is don’t scientifically. In it we study

various steps that are generally adopted by researchers in studying their research problem. It is

necessary for researchers to know not only know research method techniques but also

technology.

The scope of Research Methodology is wider than that of research methods.

The research problem consists of series of closely related activities. At times, the first step

determines the native of the last step to be undertaken. Why a research has been defined, what

data has been collected and what a particular methods have been adopted and a host of similar

other questions are usually answered when we talk of research methodology concerning a

research problem or study. The project is a study where focus is on the following points:

RESEARCH DESIGN

A research design is defined, as the specification of methods and procedures for

acquiring the Information needed. It is a plant or organizing framework for doing the study and

collecting the data. Designing a research plan requires decisions all the data sources, research

approaches, Research instruments, sampling plan and contact methods.

Research design is mainly of following types: -

1. Exploratory research.

2. Descriptive studies
3. Casual studies

EXPLORATORY RESEARCH

The major purposes of exploratory studies are the identification of problems, the

more precise Formulation of problems and the formulations of new alternative courses of action.

The design of exploratory studies is characterized by a great amount of flexibility and ad-hoc

veracity.

DESCRIPTIVE STUDIES

Descriptive research in contrast to exploratory research is marked by the prior

formulation of specific research Questions. The investigator already knows a substantial

amount about the research problem. Perhaps as a Result of an exploratory study, before the

project is initiated. Descriptive research is also characterized by a Preplanned and structured

design.

CASUAL OR EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN

A casual design investigates the cause and effect relationships between two or more

variables. The hypothesis is tested and the experiment is done. There are following types of

casual designs:

I. After only design

II. Before after design

III. Before after with control group design

IV. Four groups, six studies design

V. After only with control group design.

VI. Consumer panel design

VII. Exposit facto design


Area of study: The study is exclusively done in the area of marketing. It is a process requiring

care, sophistication, experience, business judgment, and imagination for which there can be no

mechanical substitutes.

Sampling Design: The random sampling is done because any probability sampling procedure

would require detailed information about the universe, which is not easily available further, it

being an exploratory research.

Sample Procedure: In this study “random sampling procedure is used. Random sampling is

preferred because of some limitation and the complexity. Area sampling is used in combination

with random sampling so as to collect the data from different regions of the city and to increase

reliability.

Sampling Size: The sampling size of the study is 100 Respondents.


LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY
Limitations are influences that the researcher cannot control. They are the shortcomings,

conditions or influences that cannot be controlled by the researcher that place restrictions on your

methodology and conclusions of this project report are as follow:

1. It was an academic effort and limited to cost, time and geographical area.

2. Numbers of respondents were restricted due to the time factor.

3. Scattering from respondents and dealers.

4. There is a lack of time.

5. Research is limited to Bareilly city.

6. Respondents are from different back ground.

7. Respondents are from different age group.

8. Respondents have different income level.


CHAPTER 1

INTRODUCTION OF THE

COMPANY
1.1 INTRODUCTION

In today’s competitive world with fast depleting material resource, and with all its limitations, it

has become imperative to develop human resources and its effectiveness. The continued

effectiveness and efficiency of an organization to some extent depend on the ability of its

employees to produce at high levels of efficiency, and to keep abreast with role, which the job

demands. Training should be a long terms investment in human resources.

1.2 THE STORY OF ESCORT LTD.

The genesis of Escorts goes back to 1944 when two brothers, Mr. H. P. Nanda and Mr. Yudi
Nanda, launched a small agency house, Escorts Agents Ltd. in Lahore. Over the years, Escorts
has surged ahead and evolved into one of India's largest conglomerates. In this journey of six
decades, Escorts has had the privilege of being associated with some of the world leaders in the
engineering manufacturing space like Minneapolis Moline, Massey Ferguson, Goetze, Mahle,
URSUS, CEKOP, Ford Motor Company, J C Bamford Excavators, Yamaha, Claas, Carraro,
Lucky Goldstar, First Pacific Company, Hughes Communications, Jeumont Schneider, Dynapac
.These valued relationships be it technological or marketing, are our highly cherished
experiences treasures, which have helped us inculcate best in class manufacturing practices and
to emerge as a technologically independent world class engineering organization.

Escorts Limited is all set to face the future by drawing on its 50 years of experience, its inherent
strengths and a strong presence in the core sector providing complementary product line and a
vast marketing network combining them with India’s intrinsic cost advantages to become a
global source point for high value engineering products. In order to meet the challenges in the
future and to leave an indelible mark on the industrial scenario, Escorts has restructured the
group along six business lines, each headed by an independent CEO. The business groups are as
follows:-

1. Agri- Machinery Group

2. Construction-Equipment
3. Automotive Ancillaries

4. Financial Services

1.2 Mission

“Escorts Endeavour’s to transform lives in rural and urban India by leading the revolution in
agricultural mechanization, modernization of automotive and railway technology, as well as
transformation of Indian construction industry”

1.3 Quality Policy

We shall strive to continuously improve to meet the ever – rising expectation of our customers at
the lower cost. Each one of us must fulfill the need of our customer, both internal and external
with the highest degree of commitment thereby creating a quality organization geared to ensure
total customer satisfaction and the sustained health and prosperity of our business.

1.3 MILE STONES


1944 - Launch of Escorts (Agents) Ltd.

1948 - Pioneered farm mechanization in the country by launching Escorts Agricultural Machines

Limited, with a franchise from the U.S. based Minneapolis Moline, for marketing tractors,

implements, engines & other farm equipment. Launch of Escorts (Agriculture and Machines)

Ltd.1949 - Franchise of Massey Ferguson tractors for northern India.

1951 - Escorts established India's first private Institute of Farm Mechanization at Delhi.

1953 - Escorts (Agents) Ltd. and Escorts (Agriculture and Machines) Ltd. merged to form

Escorts Agents Pvt. Ltd.

1954 - 1st industrial venture of Escorts to manufacture piston rings in collaboration with Goetze

of Germany, in an era when joint ventures of Indian firms with foreign companies were virtually

unheard of.

1958 - Started importing Massey Ferguson tractors from Yugoslavia for marketing the same in

India.
1959 - Collaboration with Mahle of Germany to manufacture pistons. Soon, Escorts became the

largest producer of piston assemblies in India.

1960 - Set up of Escorts Limited

1961 - Setting up of manufacturing base at Faridabad for manufacture of tractors in collaboration

with URSUS of Poland and 50% indigenous components. Launch of Escort brand of tractors

collaboration with CEKOP of Poland for manufacture of motorcycles and scooters. Escorts

moves into high gear by nurturing the two wheeler culture. The first Rajdoot motorcycle rolls off

the assembly line.

1969 - Escorts Tractors Limited was born a technical and financial joint venture with the global

giant Ford Motor Company, USA, to manufacture Ford tractors in India. The years ahead saw

Escorts grow as the largest tractor manufacturer in India.

Escorts Institute of Farm Mechanization (EIFM) established at Bangalore

Escorts Employees Ancillaries Ltd. (EEAL), a unique venture in industrial democracy comes

into being.

1971- 1st February, the first tractor FORD 3000 rolled out of the factory. Escorts diversifies and

starts manufacturing construction equipment.

1974 - Crossing national boundaries, Escorts exports for the first time. After winning a global

tender, 400 tractors were exported to Afghanistan, which was perhaps the world's largest ever

airlift of tractors.

1977 - Escorts enters the world of self-developed technology by setting up its first independent

R&D Center. Escorts Scientific Research Centre marked its beginning at Faridabad by

developing its own Engines for E-27 and E-37. Due to constant technology absorption,
indigenization level touched 72% for FORD tractors. 2nd plant at Bangalore for manufacturing

piston assemblies was set up.

1979 - Collaboration with JCB Excavators Ltd., UK for manufacture of excavators.

1980 - Foray into healthcare, Escorts Hospital and Research Center set up in Faridabad.

1983 - Escorts Tractors Limited (ETL) established a state-of-the-art research and development

centre to spearhead newer breakthroughs in Farm Mechanisation and to maintain industry

leadership. Line concept introduced for engine block machining. 11,000 ton floating dry-dock

Escorts I launched.

1984 - JV Escorts - Yamaha to manufacture motorcycles.

1988 - Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre (EHIRC), a world class cardiac care facility

launched in New Delhi.

1993 - FORD 3620 tractor launched.

1998 - POWERTRAC series of tractors launched. MoU was signed with Long Manufacturing

Company, USA for setting up a Joint Venture in USA.

1999 - MoU for Joint Venture with a Polish Company POL-MOT was signed for assembly,

manufacturing and marketing of Farm Machinery.

2004 - Divested Escotel Mobile Telecommunications to Idea Cellular TS16949 certification for

Agri Machinery Group.

2005 – Divested Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre (EHIRC) to Fortis Healthcare.

2006 - Divested in Carraro India Ltd.

2008 - ECEL launches Fully Hydraulic Crawler Cranes

2009 - ECEL has recently commissioned its state-of-art manufacturing plantrolling out pick-n-

carry cranes and vibratory compactors.


CHAPTER 2

ORGANISATION

STRUCTURE
2.1 ORGANIZATION STRUCTURE

Management

Name Designation

Ajay Mandahr Chief Executive Officer

Ajay Sharma Co. Secretary & Compl. Officer

Ajay Sharma Secretary

Amanppreet Singh Bhatia Group Head - HR

Bharat Madan Group Chief Financial Officer

D J Kakalia Director

Dipankar Ghosh Chief Executive Officer

G B Mathur Director

Hardeep Singh Director

Nikhil Nanda CEO

Nikhil Nanda Managing Director

Nitasha Nanda Director

P H Ravikumar Director

Rajan Nanda Chairman & Managing Director


Ravi Dharm Narain Addnl.Independent Director

Ravi Menon Chief Executive Officer

Sutanu Behuria Director

Vibha Paul Rishi Director

2.2 FUNCTIONAL AREAS

HR Practices:

Today companies are trying to reinvent HR practices. Likewise Goodyear tyre also is

continuously adopting new changes that can be in mutual benefit of their employees and

organization’s business. Goodyear tyre human resource team is reconfiguring their HR processes

and run innovative employee engagement programs to improve motivation among employees

and reduce costs.

Goodyear tyre HR practices includes-

 Talent Acquisition and Talent Management

 Resourcing from referrals, online portals, campus placements and walk ins.

 Payroll Administration

 Compensation Management

 Workforce Management
CHAPTER 3

COMPLETE PRODUCT

RANGE
3.1 PRODUCT PROFILE

Farmtrac - XP-37 Champion Tractor

Product Details:
Brand Escorts

Horse Power 30-40

Model XP-37 Champion

PARAMETERS SPECIFICATIONS

ENGINE

No of Cylinders 3

Power at Rated ERPM(HP) 36.4

Power at Rated ERPM(HP) In MKT. 37

Rated ERPM 2200


TRANSMISSION

Type 8+2 Constant Mesh

Location of gr shifting Center Shift

Rear Axle Type Straight Axle

Farmtrac - XP-41 Champion Tractor

Product Details:
Brand Escorts

Model XP-41 Champion

PARAMETERS SPECIFICATIONS

ENGINE

No of Cylinders 3
Power at Rated ERPM (HP) 40.5

Power at Rated ERPM (HP) In MKT. 41.0

Rated ERPM 2200

TRANSMISSION

Type 8+2 Constant Mesh

Location of gr shifting Center Shift

Rear Axle Type Straight Axle

Farmtrac - 45 Smart Tractors


CHAPTER 4

PLANT LOCATIONS
4.1 PLANT LOCATION

Location Details - Escorts Formatted: Centered


Formatted Table

Formatted: Centered
Location Type Address
Formatted: Centered

Corporate Office 15/5, Mathura Road, Formatted: Centered


Formatted: Centered, Line spacing: 1.5 lines
Faridabad - 121003
Haryana - India
Phone : 2250222, 22504275, 22504254
Fax : 2250060 , 2250036
Email : corpsect@ndb.vsnl.net.in
Internet : N.A.

Factory/plant 18/4, Mathura Road, Formatted: Centered


Formatted: Centered, Line spacing: 1.5 lines
Faridabad - 121007
Haryana - India
Phone :
Fax :
Email : N.A.
Internet : N.A.

Factory/plant Plot No.2, Sector 13, Formatted: Centered


Formatted: Centered, Line spacing: 1.5 lines
Faridabad - 121007
Haryana - India
Phone :
Fax :
Email : N.A.
Internet : N.A.

Factory/plant Plot No. 114-115, Sector 24, Formatted: Centered


Formatted: Centered, Line spacing: 1.5 lines
Faridabad - 121003
Haryana - India
Phone :
Fax :
Email : N.A.
Internet : N.A.

Factory/plant Plot No. 9, Sector 1, Integrated Industrial Estate, Pant Nagar, Formatted: Centered
Formatted: Centered, Line spacing: 1.5 lines
Rudrapur - 263145
Uttarakhand/Uttaranchal - India
Phone :
Fax :
Email : N.A.
Internet : N.A.

Investor Service Centre P Block, 2/90, Ist Floor, Opposite PVR Rivoli, Connaught Circus, Formatted: Centered
Formatted: Centered, Line spacing: 1.5 lines
New Delhi - 110001
Delhi - India
Phone : 43587400
Fax : 43587432
Email : N.A.
Internet : N.A.

Investor Service Centre Times Square A Wing Unit No 1, 3rd Floor, Andheri-Kurla Road, Formatted: Centered
Formatted: Centered, Line spacing: 1.5 lines
Andheri (East),
Mumbai - 400018
Maharashtra - India
Phone : 67868607
Fax : 67868687
Email : N.A.
Internet : N.A.
Factory/plant Plot No. 219, Sector - 58, Ballabhgarh, Formatted: Centered
Formatted: Centered, Line spacing: 1.5 lines
Faridabad - 121004
Haryana - India
Phone :
Fax :
Email : N.A.
Internet : N.A.

Factory/plant Plot No. 3, Sector 13, Formatted: Centered


Formatted: Centered, Line spacing: 1.5 lines
Faridabad - 121007
Haryana - India
Phone :
Fax :
Email : N.A.
Internet : N.A.

Formatted: Centered
CHAPTER 5

MARKET SHARE
5.1 MARKET SHARE REPORT

Escorts Ltd., incorporated in the year 1944, is a Mid Cap company (having a market cap of Rs

10719.35 Crore) operating in Auto sector.

Escorts Ltd. key Products/Revenue Segments include Tractors Agricultural which contributed Rs

4152.61 Crore to Sales Value (99.64 % of Total Sales), Sale of services which contributed Rs

6.45 Crore to Sales Value (0.15 % of Total Sales), Scrap which contributed Rs 4.13 Crore to

Sales Value (0.09 % of Total Sales), Other Operating Revenue which contributed Rs 2.69 Crore

to Sales Value (0.06 % of Total Sales) and Export Incentives which contributed Rs 1.70 Crore to

Sales Value (0.04 % of Total Sales)for the year ending 31-Mar-2017.

For the quarter ended 31-12-2017, the company has reported a Standalone sales of Rs 1205.03

Crore, down -.55 % from last quarter Sales of Rs 1211.68 Crore and up 10.56 % from last year

same quarter Sales of Rs 1089.91 Crore Company has reported net profit after tax of Rs 91.98

Crore in latest quarter.

The company’s top management includes Dr.Sutanu Behuria, Mr.D J Kakalia, Mr.G B Mathur,

Mr.Hardeep Singh, Mr.Nikhil Nanda, Mr.P H Ravikumar, Mr.Rajan Nanda, Mr.Ravi Dharm

Narain, Mrs.Vibha Paul Rishi, Ms.Nitasha Nanda. Company has S N Dhawan & Co. as its

auditoRs As on 31-12-2017, the company has a total of 122,576,878 shares outstanding.


CHAPTER 6

MARKETING

STRATEGIES
6.1 MARKETING MIX

PRODUCT MARKETING

Product marketing deals with the first of the "4P"'s of marketing, which are Product, Pricing,

Place, and Promotion. Product marketing, as opposed to product management, deals with more

outbound marketing tasks. For example, product management deals with the nuts and bolts of

product development within a firm, whereas product marketing deals with marketing the product

to prospects, customers, and others. Product marketing, as a job function within a firm, also

differs from other marketing jobs such as Marcom or marketing communications, online

marketing, advertising, marketing strategy, etc.

A Product Market is something that is referred to when pitching a new product to the general

public. The people you are trying to make your product appeal to is your consumer market. For

example: If you were pitching a new video game console game to the public, your consumer

market would probably be a younger/teenage market (depending on the type of game). Thus you

would carry out market research to find out how best to release the game. Likewise, a massage

chair would probably not appeal to younger children, so you would market your product to an

older generation.

PRODUCT PRICING

Pricing is one of the four p's of the marketing mix. The other three aspects are product,

promotion, and place. It is also a key variable in microeconomic price allocation theory. Price is

the only revenue generating element amongst the 4ps,the rest being cost centers. Pricing is the

manual or automatic process of applying prices to purchase and sales orders, based on factors

such as: a fixed amount, quantity break, promotion or sales campaign, specific vendor quote,

price prevailing on entry, shipment or invoice date, combination of multiple orders or lines, and
many others. Automated systems require more setup and maintenance but may prevent pricing

errors.

The effective price is the price the company receives after accounting for discounts, promotions,

and other incentives.

Price lining is the use of a limited number of prices for all your product offerings. This is a

tradition started in the old five and dime stores in which everything cost either 5 or 10 cents. Its

underlying rationale is that these amounts are seen as suitable price points for a whole range of

products by prospective customers. It has the advantage of ease of administering, but the

disadvantage of inflexibility, particularly in times of inflation or unstable prices.

A loss leader is a product that has a price set below the operating margin. This results in a loss to

the enterprise on that particular item, but this is done in the hope that it will draw customers into

the store and that some of those customers will buy other, higher margin items.

Promotional pricing refers to an instance where pricing is the key element of the marketing

mix.

The price/quality relationship refers to the perception by most consumers that a relatively high

price is a sign of good quality. The belief in this relationship is most important with complex

products that are hard to test, and experiential products that cannot be tested until used (such as

most services). The greater the uncertainty surrounding a product, the more consumers depend

on the price/quality hypothesis and the more of a premium they are prepared to pay. The classic

example of this is the pricing of the snack cake Twinkies, which were perceived as low quality

when the price was lowered. Note, however, that excessive reliance on the price/quantity

relationship by consumers may lead to the raising of prices on all products and services, even

those of low quality, which in turn causes the price/quality relationship to no longer apply.
Premium pricing (also called prestige pricing) is the strategy of consistently pricing at, or near,

the high end of the possible price range to help attract status-conscious consumers. A few

examples of companies which partake in premium pricing in the marketplace include Rolex and

Bentley. People will buy a premium priced product because:

1. They believe the high price is an indication of good quality;

2. They believe it to be a sign of self worth - "They are worth it" - It authenticates their

success and status - It is a signal to others that they are a member of an exclusive group;

3. They require flawless performance in this application - The cost of product malfunction

is too high to buy anything but the best - example : heart pacemaker.

The term Goldilocks pricing is commonly used to describe the practice of providing a "gold-

plated" version of a product at a premium price in order to make the next-lower priced option

look more reasonably priced; for example, encouraging customers to see business-class airline

seats as good value for money by offering an even higher priced first-class option. Similarly,

third-class railway carriages in Victorian England are said to have been built without windows,

not so much to punish third-class customers (for which there was no economic incentive), as to

motivate those who could afford second-class seats to pay for them instead of taking the cheaper

option. This is also known as a potential result of price discrimination.

The name derives from the Goldilocks story, in which Goldilocks chose neither the hottest nor

the coldest porridge, but instead the one that was "just right". More technically, this form of

pricing exploits the general cognitive bias of aversion to extremes. This practice is known

academically as "framing". By providing three options (i.e. small, medium, and large; first,

business, and coach classes) you can manipulate the consumer into choosing the middle choice
and thus, the middle choice should yield the most profit to the seller, since it is the most chosen

option.

Demand-based pricing is any pricing method that uses consumer demand - based on perceived

value - as the central element. These include : price skimming, price discrimination and yield

management, price points, psychological pricing, bundle pricing, penetration pricing, price

lining, value-based pricing, geo and premium pricing. Pricing factors are manufacturing

cost,market place,compitition,maket condition,Quality of product.

Multidimensional pricing is the pricing of a product or service using mutliple numbers. In this

practice, price no longer consists of a single monetary amount (e.g., sticker price of a car), but

rather consists of various dimensions (e.g., monthly payments, number of payments, and a

downpayment). Research has shown that this practice can significantly influence consumers'

ability to understand and process price information

PROMOTION

Promotion involves disseminating information about a product, product line, brand, or

company. It is one of the four key aspects of the marketing mix. (The other three elements are

product marketing, pricing, and distribution.)

Promotion is generally sub-divided into two parts:

 Above the line promotion: Promotion in the media (e.g. TV, radio, newspapers, Internet

and Mobile Phones) in which the advertiser pays an advertising agency to place the ad

 Below the line promotion: All other promotion. Much of this is intended to be subtle

enough that the consumer is unaware that promotion is taking place. E.g. sponsorship,

product placement, endorsements, sales promotion, merchandising, direct mail, personal

selling, public relations, trade shows


The specification of these four variables creates a promotional mix or promotional plan. A

promotional mix specifies how much attention to pay to each of the four subcategories, and how

much money to budget for each. A promotional plan can have a wide range of objectives,

including: sales increases, new product acceptance, creation of brand equity, positioning,

competitive retaliations, or creation of a corporate image.

DISTRIBUTION

Distribution (or place) is one of the four elements of marketing mix. An organization or set of

organizations (go-betweens) involved in the process of making a product or service available for

use or consumption by a consumer or business user.

Channels

A number of alternate 'channels' of distribution may be available:

 Selling direct, such as via mail order, Internet and telephone sales

 Agent, who typically sells direct on behalf of the producer

 Distributor (also called wholesaler), who sells to retailers

 Retailer (also called dealer or reseller), who sells to end customers

 Advertisement typically used for consumption goods

Distribution channels may not be restricted to physical products alone. They may be just as

important for moving a service from producer to consumer in certain sectors, since both direct

and indirect channels may be used. Hotels, for example, may sell their services (typically rooms)

directly or through travel agents, tour operators, airlines, tourist boards, centralized reservation

systems, etc.

There have also been some innovations in the distribution of services. For example, there has

been an increase in franchising and in rental services - the latter offering anything from
televisions through tools. There has also been some evidence of service integration, with services

linking together, particularly in the travel and tourism sectors. For example, links now exist

between airlines, hotels and car rental services. In addition, there has been a significant increase

in retail outlets for the service sector. Outlets such as estate agencies and building society offices

are crowding out traditional grocers from major shopping areas.

CHANNEL MOTIVATION

It is difficult enough to motivate direct employees to provide the necessary sales and service

support. Motivating the owners and employees of the independent organizations in a distribution

chain requires even greater effort. There are many devices for achieving such motivation.

Perhaps the most usual is `incentive': the supplier offers a better margin, to tempt the owners in

the channel to push the product rather than its competitors; or a competition is offered to the

distributors' sales personnel, so that they are tempted to push the product.

MONITORING AND MANAGING CHANNELS

In much the same way that the organization's own sales and distribution activities need to be

monitored and managed, so will those of the distribution chain.

In practice, many organizations use a mix of different channels; in particular, they may

complement a direct salesforce, calling on the larger accounts, with agents, covering the smaller

customers and prospects.

SERVICE

A service is the non-material equivalent of a good. A service provision is an economic activity

that does not result in ownership, and this is what differentiates it from providing physical goods.

It is claimed to be a process that creates benefits by facilitating either a change in customers, a

change in their physical possessions, or a change in their intangible assets.


By supplying some level of skill, ingenuity,and experience, providers of a service participate in

an economy without the restrictions of carrying stock (inventory) or the need to concern

themselves with bulky raw materials. On the other hand, their investment in expertise does

require marketing and upgrading in the face of competition which has equally few physical

restrictions.

Any service can be completely, consistently and cleary specified by means of the following 12

standard attributes

1. Service Consumer Benefit(s)

2. Service-specific Functional Parameter(s)

3. Service Delivery Point

4. Service Consumer Count

5. Service Readiness Time(s)

6. Service Support Time(s)

7. Service Support Language(s)

8. Service Fulfillment Target

9. Maximum Impairment Duration per Incident

10. Service Delivering Duration

11. Service Delivery Unit

12. Service Delivering Price

The meaning and content of these attributes are:

1. Service Consumer Benefits describe the (set of) benefits which are callable, receivable and

effectively utilizable for any authorized service consumer and which are provided to him as soon
as he requests the offered service. The description of these benefits must be phrased in the terms

and wording of the intended service consumers.

2. Service-specific Functional Parameters specify the functional parameters which are

essential and unique to the respective service and which describe the most important dimension

of the service output, e.g. maximum e-mailbox capacity per registered and authorized e-mail

service consumer.

3. Service Delivery Point describes the physical location and/or logical interface where the

benefits of the service are made accessible, callable and receivable to the authorized service

consumers. At this point and/or interface, the preparedness for service delivery can be assessed

as well as the effective delivery of the service itself can be monitored and controlled.

4. Service Consumer Count specifies the number of intended, identified, named, registered and

authorized service consumers which are allowed and enabled to call and utilize the defined

service for executing and/or supporting their business tasks or private activities.

5. Service Readiness Times specify the distinct agreed times of day when

 the described service consumer benefits are

o accessible and callable for the authorized service consumers at the defined service

delivery point

o receivable and utilizable for the authorized service consumers at the respective

agreed service level

 all service-relevant processes and resources are operative and effective

 all service-relevant technical systems are up and running and attended by the operating

team
 the specified service benefits are comprehensively delivered to any authorized requesting

service consumer without any delay or friction.

The time data are specified in 24 h format per local working day and local time, referring to the

location of the intended service consumers.

6. Service Support Times specify the determined and agreed times of day when the usage and

consumption of the contracted services is supported by the service desk team for all identified,

registered and authorized service consumers within the service customer's organizational unit or

area. The service desk is the single point of contact for any service consumer inquiry regarding

the contracted and delivered services. During the defined service support times, the service desk

can be reached by phone, e-mail, web-based entries and/or fax, respectively. The time data are

specified in 24 h format per local working day and local time, referring to the location of the

intended service consumers.

7. Service Support Languages specifies the languages which are spoken by the service desk

team(s) to the service consumers calling them.

8. Service Fulfillment Target specifies the service provider's promise of effective and seamless

delivery of the defined benefits to any authorized service consumer requesting the service within

the defined service times. It is expressed as the promised minimum ratio of the counts of

successful individual service deliveries related to the counts of called indivdual service

deliveries. The effective service fulfillment ratio can be measured and calculated per single

service consumer or per consumer group and may be referred to different time periods (workday,

calenderweek, workmonth, etc.)

9. Maximum Impairment Duration per Incident specifies the allowable maximum elapsing

time [hh:mm] between


 the first occurrence of a service impairment, i.e. service quality degradation or service

delivery disruption, whilst the service consumer consumes and utilizes the delivered

service,

 and the full resumption and complete execution of the service delivery to the content of

the affected service consumer.

10. Service Delivering Duration specifies the promised and agreed maximum period of time for

effectively delivering all specified service consumer benefits to the requesting service consumer

at the defined service delivery point.

11. Service Delivery Unit specifies the basic portion for delivering the defined service consumer

benefits. The service delivery unit is the reference and mapping object for all cost for service

generation and delivery as well as for charging and billing the consumed service volume to the

service customer who has ordered the service delivery.

12. Service Delivering Price specifies the amount of money the service customer has to pay for

the consumption of distinct service volumes. Normally, the service delivering price comprises

two portions

 a fixed basic price portion for basic efforts and resources which provide accessibility and

usability of the service delivery functions, i.e. service access price

 a price portion covering the service consumption based on

o fixed flat rate price per authorized service consumer and delivery period without

regard on the consumed service volumes,

o staged prices depending on consumed service volumes,

o fixed price per particularly consumed service delivering unit.


SERVICE DELIVERY

The delivery of a service typically involves six factors:

 The accountable service provider and his service suppliers (e.g. the people)

 Equipment used to provide the service (e.g. vehicles, cash registers)

 The physical facilities (e.g. buildings, parking, waiting rooms)

 The requesting service consumer

 Other customers at the service delivery location

 Customer contact

The service encounter is defined as all activities involved in the service delivery process. Some

service managers use the term "moment of truth" to indicate that defining point in a specific

service encounter where interactions are most intense.

Many business theorists view service provision as a performance or act (sometimes humorously

referred to as dramalurgy, perhaps in reference to dramaturgy). The location of the service

delivery is referred to as the stage and the objects that facilitate the service process are called

props. A script is a sequence of behaviours followed by all those involved, including the

client(s). Some service dramas are tightly scripted, others are more ad lib. Role congruence

occurs when each actor follows a script that harmonizes with the roles played by the other actors.

In some service industries, especially health care, dispute resolution, and social services, a

popular concept is the idea of the caseload, which refers to the total number of patients, clients,

litigants, or claimants that a given employee is presently responsible for. On a daily basis, in all

those fields, employees must balance the needs of any individual case against the needs of all

other current cases as well as their own personal needs.


6.2 MARKETING EFFECTIVENESS

Marketing effectiveness is the quality of how marketers go to market with the goal of

optimizing their spending to achieve good results for both the short-term and long-term. It is also

related to Marketing ROI and Return on Marketing Investment (ROMI).

Marketing effectiveness has four dimensions:

 Corporate – Each company operates within certain bounds. These are determined by

their size, their budget and their ability to make organizational change. Within these

bounds marketers operate along the five factors described below.

 Competitive – Each company in a category operates within a similar framework as

described below. In an ideal world, marketers would have perfect information on how

they act as well as how their competitors act. In reality, in many categories have

reasonably good information through sources, such as, IRI or Nielsen. In many industries,

competitive marketing information is hard to come by.

 Customers/Consumers – Understanding and taking advantage of how customers make

purchasing decisions can help marketers improve their marketing effectiveness. Groups

of consumers act in similar ways leading to the need to segment them. Based on these

segments, they make choices based on how they value the attributes of a product and the

brand, in return for price paid for the product. Consumers build brand value through

information. Information is received through many sources, such as, advertising, word-

of-mouth and in the (distribution) channel often characterized with the purchase funnel,

McKinsey & Company concept. Lastly, consumers consume and make purchase

decisions in certain ways.


 Exogenous Factors – There are many factors outside of our immediate control that can

impact the effectiveness of our marketing activities. These can include the weather,

interest rates, government regulations and many others. Understanding the impact these

factors can have on our consumers can help us to design programs that can take

advantage of these factors or mitigate the risk of these factors if they take place in the

middle of our marketing campaigns.

There are five factors driving the level of marketing effectiveness that marketers can achieve:

1. Marketing Strategy – Improving marketing effectiveness can be achieved by employing

a superior marketing strategy. By positioning the product or brand correctly, the

product/brand will be more successful in the market than competitors’ products/brands.

Even with the best strategy, marketers must execute their programs properly to achieve

extraordinary results.

2. Marketing Creative – Even without a change in strategy, better creative can improve

results. Without a change in strategy, AFLAC was able to achieve stunning results with

its introduction of the Duck (AFLAC) campaign. With the introduction of this new

creative concept, the company growth rate soared from 12% prior to the campaign to

28% following it. (See references below, Bang)

3. Marketing Execution – By improving how marketers go to market, they can achieve

significantly greater results without changing their strategy or their creative execution. At

the marketing mix level, marketers can improve their execution by making small changes

in any or all of the 4-Ps (Product, Price, Place and Promotion) (Marketing) without

making changes to the strategic position or the creative execution marketers can improve

their effectiveness and deliver increased revenue. At the program level marketers can
improve their effectiveness by managing and executing each of their marketing

campaigns better. It's commonly known that consistency of a Marketing Creative strategy

across various media (e.g. TV, Radio, Print and Online), not just within each individual

media message, can amplify and enhance impact of the overall marketing campaign

effort. Additional examples would be improving direct mail through a better call-to-

action or editing web site content to improve its organic search results, marketers can

improve their marketing effectiveness for each type of program. A growing area of

interest within (Marketing Strategy) and Execution are the more recent interaction

dynamics of traditional marketing (e.g. TV or Events) with online consumer activity (e.g.

Social Media). (See references below, Brand Ecosystems) Not only direct product

experience, but also any stimulus provided by traditional marketing, can become a

catalyst for a consumer brand "groundswell" online.

4. Marketing Infrastructure (also known as Marketing Management) – Improving the

business of marketing can lead to significant gains for the company. Management of

agencies, budgeting, motivation and coordination of marketing activities can lead to

improved competitiveness and improved results. The overall accountability for brand

leadership and business results is often reflected in an organization under a title within a

(Brand management) department.

5. Exogenous Factors - Generally out of the control of marketers external or exogenous

factors also influence how marketers can improve their results. Taking advantage of

seasonality, interests or the regulatory environment can help marketers improve their

marketing effectiveness.
6.3 MARKET STRATEGY

A marketing strategy can serve as the foundation of a marketing plan. A marketing plan

contains a set of specific actions required to successfully implement a marketing strategy. For

example: "Use a low cost product to attract consumers. Once our organization, via our low cost

product, has established a relationship with consumers, our organization will sell additional,

higher-margin products and services that enhance the consumer's interaction with the low-cost

product or service."

A strategy consists of a well thought out series of tactics to make a marketing plan more

effective. Marketing strategies serve as the fundamental underpinning of marketing plans

designed to fill market needs and reach marketing objectives. Plans and objectives are generally

tested for measurable results.

A marketing strategy often integrates an organization's marketing goals, policies, and action

sequences (tactics) into a cohesive whole. Similarly, the various strands of the strategy , which

might include advertising, channel marketing, internet marketing, promotion and public relations

can be orchestrated. Many companies cascade a strategy throughout an organization, by creating

strategy tactics that then become strategy goals for the next level or group. Each one group is

expected to take that strategy goal and develop a set of tactics to achieve that goal. This is why it

is important to make each strategy goal measurable.

TYPES OF STRATEGIES

Marketing strategies may differ depending on the unique situation of the individual business.

However there are a number of ways of categorizing some generic strategies. A brief description

of the most common categorizing schemes is presented below:


 Strategies based on market dominance - In this scheme, firms are classified based on their

market share or dominance of an industry. Typically there are three types of market

dominance strategies:

o Leader

o Challenger

o Follower

 Porter generic strategies - strategy on the dimensions of strategic scope and strategic

strength. Strategic scope refers to the market penetration while strategic strength refers to

the firm’s sustainable competitive advantage.

o Product differentiation

o Market segmentation

 Innovation strategies - This deals with the firm's rate of the new product development and

business model innovation. It asks whether the company is on the cutting edge of

technology and business innovation. There are three types:

o Pioneers

o Close followers

o Late followers

 Growth strategies - In this scheme we ask the question, “How should the firm grow?”.

There are a number of different ways of answering that question, but the most common

gives four answers:

o Horizontal integration

o Vertical integration

o Diversification
o Intensification

A more detailed scheme uses the categories:

 Prospector

 Analyzer

 Defender

 Reactor

 Marketing warfare strategies - This scheme draws parallels between marketing strategies

and military strategies.


CHAPTER 7

COMPETITORS
7.1 COMPETITORS PROFILE

The Tractor Industry of India plays an important role in the agriculture sector of India. In India, Formatted: Font: Times New Roman, 12 pt
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Agriculture accounts for 25% of the GDP. The Indian Tractor Industry is the largest in the world,

accounting for one third of the global production. It is therefore considered to be a vital sector of

the Indian Economy. Since 1960, The Indian Tractor Industry has come a long way. 93% of the

tractor industry is concentrated in 12 major states namely, Andhra Pradesh, Bihar, Gujarat,

Haryana, Karnataka, Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh, Orissa, Punjab, Rajasthan, Tamil Nadu and

Uttar Pradesh. Here is a list of the names of big players in the Indian Tractor Industry.

JOHN DEERE INDIA PRIVATE LIMITED Formatted: Font: Times New Roman, 14 pt, All caps
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John Deere India Private Limited is a subsidiary of Deere & Company, USA in India. Its factory,

located at Sanaswadi, Pune, manufactures 5000 Series agricultural tractors. The Indian

operations of Deere & Company include a technology center located at Magarpatta City Pune

and John Deere Water Vadodara. The technology center provides services in the areas of

Information technology, engineering, supply management, embedded systems and technical

authoring for company’s operations world wide. John Deere Water, formed by the acquisitions

of Plastro Irrigation Systems, T-Systems International, and Roberts Irrigation Products, is one of

the leading irrigation companies in the world today.


MAHINDRA & MAHINDRA Formatted: Font: Times New Roman, 14 pt, All caps
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Mahindra Tractors is the world’s largest tractor company by volume. For over two decades, the

company has been the leader in the Indian tractor market, which is also the largest tractor market

in the world. Over the years, Mahindra Tractors grew by leaps and bounds to become a trusted

name across all six continents of the world. And today the company is more poised than ever to

cultivate many more dreams across the globe. M&M’s Farm Equipment Sector origins lie in a

joint venture in 1963 between the Company, International Harvester Inc., and Voltas Limited,

and was named International Tractor Company of India (ITCI). In 1977, ITCI merged with

M&M and became its Tractor Division. After M&M’s organizational restructuring in 1994, this

division was called the Farm Equipment Sector.


TRACTORS AND FARM EQUIPMENT LIMITED (TAFE) Formatted: Font: Times New Roman, 14 pt, All caps
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TAFE is a US$ 1 Billion tractor major incorporated in 1960 at Chennai in India, in collaboration

with Massey Ferguson (now owned by AGCO corporation, USA). TAFE acquired the Eicher

tractors business, its engine plant at Alwar and transmissions plant at Parwanoo through a wholly

owned subsidiary “TAFE Motors and Tractors Limited in 2005. TAFE Motors and Tractors

Limited is a wholly owned subsidiary of TAFE, which was set up in 2005 when TAFE acquired

Eicher tractors, the Eicher engines plant at Alwar and the Eicher transmissions plant at

Parwanoo. Apart from being among the top three tractor manufacturers in the world, TAFE is

also involved in making diesel engines, gears, panel instruments, engineering plastics, hydraulic

pumps, plantations and passenger car distribution through other divisions and wholly owned

subsidiaries.
SONALIKA (INTERNATIONAL TRACTORS LTD.) Formatted: Font: Times New Roman, 14 pt, All caps
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International Tractors Limited was incorporated on October 17, 1995 and began manufacturing

tractors designed by Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute (CMERI). Its engines

were initially designed on the successful HMT brand of engines, and gearbox as per PTL design.

ITL currently is manufacturing Sonalika tractors between 30 HP to 90 HP, and the CERES brand

between 60HP to 90HP. ITL went into collaboration with Renault Agricultural of France in July

2000. Renault Agriculture is a subsidiary of the Renault Group. Renault Agriculture was bought

by CLAAS of Germany in 2003. Incidentally CLAAS already has a strong presence in India

market producing its Crop Tiger range of Combine Harvesters in a plant in Faridabad (near New

Delhi) since 1992. CLAAS opened a new plant in Punjab at Morinda in 2006. Sonalika is now

having collaboration with YANMAR(Japan), and raised its production to 200 tractors per day.
NEW HOLLAND Formatted: Font: Times New Roman, 14 pt, All caps
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New Holland Fiat India is a 100% subsidiary of USD 15bn. CNH Global, – the World’s largest

Agricultural Equipments Company, the Leading manufacturer of Agricultural and construction

equipment manufacturer in the world. a majority owned subsidiary of Fiat Group. Spread across

60 acres in the Greater Noida District of Uttar Pradesh, the state-of-the-art plant with an initial

investment of over Rs. 250 Crores, is designed on the lines of New Holland’s international

manufacturing facilities. The company has focused its strength in agricultural mechanisation to

build a world-class tractor company in India. It’s rationale for investment in India to be driven

primarily by its long involvement and in-depth understanding of the Indian agricultural industry.

Last year it produced over 23,000 tractors in 35-75 Hp segment with over a 90 per cent

indigenisation. Not just India, tractors made by New Holland India have made their mark in the

rest of the world.


BALWAN TRACTORS (FORCE MOTORS LTD.) Formatted: Font: Times New Roman, 14 pt, All caps
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Formerly known as Bajaj Tempo Ltd. until 2005, Force Motors Ltd., makers of India’s

ubiquitous 3-wheeler Tempos since 1957 in a collaboration with Vidal & Sohn Tempo Werke,

Germany. In 1999 began production of Ox and Ox 45 Brand Tractors both which incorporated

transmission technology from the German manufacturer ZF. Additional line Balwan was

introduced in 2004 and between the lines Force Motors offers a line of two-wheel and four-

wheel tractors in a horsepower range from 10 to 50 HP. In India BALWAN 600 launched

shortly. It has a 60 HP engine. Balwan Tractors are one of the good tractors in India for

agricultural purposes. They have a Benz engine.


INDOFARM TRACTORS Formatted: Font: Times New Roman, 14 pt, All caps
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Founded in Baddi, Himachal Pradesh, India in 1999, Indo Farms builds tractors in the 33 to 90

hp ranges. company is also manufacturing 9 to 18 ton cranes and 15 to 50 kv silent gen sets.

ursus Poland is its technical partners. indo farm tractors are becoming famous in Indian tractor

customers because of their better working performance, quality and resaonable prices. company

is exporting their products to many developed countries like: New Zealand, UK, Poland,

Germany etc. tractor manufacturing is fully computerised and marketing team is very dedicated

and experienced.
MAHINDRA GUJARAT TRACTOR LIMITED (MGTL) Formatted: Font: Times New Roman, 14 pt, All caps
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The company was originally incorporated in the state of Gujarat in 1963 with technical

collaboration with Motokov-Praha of Czechoslovakia as Gujarat Tractor Corporation Ltd. It was

taken over by Mahindra & Mahindra Limited on 17 December 1999 (holds 60% equity) and re-

christened Mahindra Gujarat Tractor Ltd as part of Mahindra Group. The company is engaged in

manufacturing of tractors in a range of 30-60 hp which are marketed under Shaktimaan brand.

They were previously marketed under the Mahindra Gujarat name, and before that the

‘Hindustan’ name. Mahindra Gujarat Tractor Limited (MGTL) has its Head Office at ‘Vadodara’

(formerly Baroda), Gujarat. Sri S.O. Tyagi is the Head- MGTL, and Sri Balmukund Verma is the

General Manager (Marketing).


ANGAD TRACTORS (SAS MOTORS LIMITED) Formatted: Font: Times New Roman, 14 pt, All caps
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SAS Motors Limited, the manufacturer of ‘Angad’ Tractors, is a public limited company

incorporated in April 2003. Its flagship product is ‘Angad’ 240 D tractor. The company is

engaged in sourcing, assembling, manufacturing, and marketing of ‘Angad’ brand tractors and

farm machineries. SAS Motors also provides a range of agricultural equipments. Angad Tractors

(SAS Motors Limited) main mission is to make low cost tractors, power tillers, and other farm

machineries designed on ‘appropriate technology ’ platform available to the Indian farmers.

Currently, SAS Motors Limited currently manufactures Tractors(ranging from 15-35

horsepower), Power Tillers, Mini Tillers / Power Weeders and Agricultural Machineries such as

Rotavator etc.

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CHAPTER 8

DATA ANALYSIS
8.1 DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION Formatted: Indent: Left: 0"

(1) For how long you are using Escort’s Products?

Use duration respondent Percentage %


(base 100)
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Below 1year 35 35%
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1-2 year 28 28%
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2-3 year 27 27%
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More than 3year 10 10%
TABLE No. 1 – Responses of customers towards duration of using Escort’s Producst?
Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

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DURATION OF USE Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

10

35 BELOW 1YRS

27 1-2YRS
2-3YRS
MORE THAN3YRS

28

Fig No. 1 – Responses of customers towards duration of using Escort’s Products.


Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

INTERPRETATION:
Out of 100 customers, maximum number of customers are using Samsung mobile phone for 1year,and
minimum number of customers are using Escort’s Products for more then 3 years.
(2)Are you satisfied with the after sale services?

TABLE No. 2- Responses of customers towards satisfaction level for after sales services.

Satisfaction level respondents Percentage% Formatted Table


(base 100)
Yes 70 70% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

NO 20 20% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

Cannot say 10 10% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

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satisfaction level of after sale services Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

10

20 yes
no
can not say

70

Fig.NO.2-Customers response towards after sale services

INTERPRETATION
Out of 100 customers maximum number of customers are satisfied with after sale services. This means
after sale services of Escort’s Products are satisfactory.
(3) Are you satisfied with the prices in context to features available?

TABLE No.3- Responses of customers towards prices in context to features available.

Satisfaction with price in Respondents Percentage%


Context to features
Yes 73 73% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

No 21 21% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

Can not say 06 06% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman


COMPARISION OF PRICES IN CONTEXT TO Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

FEATURES

21

YES
NO
CAN NOT SAY
73

Fig No. 3 – Responses of customers towards price in context to features available.

INTERPRETATION
Out of 100 customers, maximum number of customers are in favor of price w.r.t features available. So it
is clearly seen that price of Escort’s Products is also a motivational factor for customers.
(4)Are you satisfied with variety of Escort’s Products available?

TABLE No. 4- Responses of customers towards satisfaction level of variety of Escort’s Products
available.

Satisfaction with variety of Respondents Percentage%


mobiles available
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Yes 37 37%
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No 51 51%

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Cannot say 12 12%

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Satisfiction with availability of varity of Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

mobile

12

37 yes
no
can not say
51

Fig No. 4- Responses of customers towards satisfaction level of variety of Escort’s Products
available.

INTERPRETATION
Out of the response of 100 customers, it is clear that maximum number of customers are not happy with
the variety of Escort’s Products available in the market. It means that Samsung is lacking behind in this
field till now.
(5)Are you aware about new Product’s available in market?

TABLE No. 5- Responses of customers towards awareness about new product’s available in
market.

Awareness level about new Respondents Percentage%


product’s
Yes 13 13% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

No 87 87% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

Can not say 0 0% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman


Awareness about new product's available Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

13

yes
no
can not say

87

Fig.No.5-Customers awareness about newly launched Escort’s product’s.

INTERPRETATION
It is clearly shown that out of 100 customers, maximum number of customers are not aware about the
newly launched Escort’s Products, . It implies customer awareness about new sets is very low. This
means they have to work on their promotional strategies.
(6) Will you suggest other to use Escort’s product’s?

TABLE No. 6- Responses of customers for suggestion to others to use Escort’s product’s.

Suggest others Respondents Percentage%

Yes 67 67% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

No 17 17% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

Can’t say 16 16% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

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suggestion to others Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

16

yes
17 no
can not say

67

Fig No. 6- Responses of customers for suggestion to others to use Escort’s product’s.

INTERPRETATION
Out of 100 customers, maximum number of customers seems ready for suggesting others to use Escort’s
product’s. This means customers are having positive attitude towards Escort’s product’s.
(7)Do you face any problem while using Other Product’s ? Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

TABLE No. 7- Responses of customers towards facing problems while using Other Product’s.

Problems faced while using Respondents Percentage%

Yes 73 73% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

No 27 27% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

Can not say 0 0% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman


problems faced while using other products Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

27

yes
no
can not say

73

Fig No. 7- Responses of customers towards facing problems while using other product’s.

INTERPRETATION
Out of 100 customers, maximum number of customers do not face any problems and few of them faces
some technical problems. This shows that Escort’s Produc’ts can be easily operated.
(8) Are you satisfied with the performance of Escort’s Product’s on following parameter?

TABLE No.8- Responses of customers towards satisfaction level with the performance of Escort’s
Product’s on different parameter.

Satisfaction level Respondents Percentage%


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Yes 63 63%
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No 30 30%
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Can’t say 07 07%
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80 Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman


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70

60

50
yes
40
no
30 can not say
20

10

0
battery backup features can not say

Fig No. 8- Responses of customers towards satisfaction level with the performance Escort’s Product’s on
different parameter.
INTERPRETATION
IN CASE OF BATTERY BACKUP
Out of 100 customers, maximum number of customers are satisfied Escort’s Product’s
IN CASE OF FEATURES
Out of 100 customers, maximum customers seem satisfied. few customers are not satisfied.
(9)Which is the most influencing advertising media?

TABLE No. 9- Responses of customers towards most influencing advertisement media.

Influencing media Respondents Percentage%


T.V 27 27% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

Hording 06 06% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

Newspaper 37 37% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

Magazine 02 02% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman


Others 28 28% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman
Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman


advertising media Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

28 27
T.V
Hoarding
newspaper
magazine
2 6
other (specify)

37

Fig No. 9- Responses of customers towards most influencing advertisement media

INTERPRETATION
Out of 100 customers, maximum number of Escort’s Product’s customers are influenced by the television
mode of advertisement media. So they have to work on other modes also.
(10) Would you like to switch to other product’s in future?

TABLE No.10- Responses of customers towards switching to other product’s in future.

Switch to other product’s in Respondents Percentage%


Future
Yes 35 35% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

No 42 42% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

Cannot say 23 23% Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

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change product's Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman

23

35

yes
no
can not say

42

Fig NO.10-Response of customers towards switching to other product’s in future

INTERPRETATION
Out of 100 customers, maximum number of customers seems ready to continue with product’s, So we can
say that the Samsung mobile phones are up to the satisfactory level of customers.

Formatted: Indent: Left: 0"


CHAPTER 9

FUTURE PLANS
9.1 FUTURE PLANS

Nikhil Nanda, the managing director of Escorts, loves to talk about the Empathy Programme he Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font
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recently initiated in his company, which requires everybody to spend a week in a village. "You Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font
color: Auto
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can be consumer-centric only if you know the customer and live his life," says the 40-year-old.
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Its effect on the employees, Nanda claims, has been transformational.Transformation - or, by Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font
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extension, rejuvenation - is what the Faridabad-headquartered maker of tractors, construction Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font
color: Auto
equipment, railway parts and automobile components has needed for a long time. Once India's

blue-chip engineering company, it has over the years exited businesses like motorcycles, telecom

and healthcare, lost market share in its frontline business of tractors, struggled with a mountain

of debt (thanks to the telecom foray) and has faced investor apathy.In the last four years or so

that he has been running Escorts, Nanda claims he has recovered some ground: market share in

tractors has increased from less than 10 per cent to over 11 per cent, cash generated internally

has been used to retire a large portion of the debt, profit margins have improved and new

products have been launched. For him, the biggest endorsement came first in August 2013

when Rakesh Jhunjhunwala bought 4.98 per cent of the company from the open market and then Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font
color: Auto
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in April 2014 when the ace investor scaled up his stake to 5.47 per cent.Still, Escorts is valued at color: Auto
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just a tad above Rs 1,600 crore, which is less than half of its total assets of Rs 3,492 crore (as on color: Auto
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March 31, 2014). This makes Escorts an attractive acquisition target, but the battle-scarred color: Auto
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Nanda family (it had thwarted a raid by NRI businessman Swraj Paul in the 1980s) has fortified color: Auto
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its hold on the company by raising its stake to over 41 per cent in recent years. Escorts' current
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share price of around Rs 130 is almost the same as five years ago, way short of its peak of Rs
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237 in November 2010, but more than double of its low of Rs 49.70 in March 2013.Farm Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font
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trendsAnalysts say the stress in the farm sector and the slowdown in construction have held Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font
color: Auto
back the Escorts stock. In the last several quarters, two of its four lines of business - construction Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font
color: Auto

equipment and automobile components - have been in the red. In an earnings conference call on Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font
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November 7, senior company executives told analysts that the construction equipment vertical

will be EBITDA-positive in the quarter ending March 2015. Some complain that with four

verticals, they don't know in which business category to slot the company. Nanda says the

market sees Escorts as a tractor company, and he could look at segregating the businesses Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font
color: Auto

sometime in the future.Have Nanda's efforts paid off? A look at the company's last ten quarterly Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font
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results shows that its net income has been range-bound, though net profit peaked in April-June

2013 and has fallen steadily after that. (See On a see-saw.) The loss in July-September 2014, the

last quarter for which Escorts has declared results, is due to "exceptional items" of Rs 31.27 Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font
color: Auto

crore.Nanda wants to raise the company's EBITDA (earnings before income, taxation, Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font
color: Auto

depreciation and amortisation) margin from 8.5-9 per cent now to 14 per cent in five years' time.

His plan revolves around new product development, a renewed thrust on exports, and some

serious cost cutting.According to Nanda, Escorts has invested over Rs 400 crore on new tractor Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font
color: Auto

technology in the last five years. Its new "Diesel Saver" engine, he says, saves 1.5 litres of the Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font
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fuel every hour when used for farming and 2 litres when used for haulage.

Banks, he claims, tell customers that the savings can help them skip at least one monthly loan

installment. The anti-lift technology, developed in-house by Escorts, keeps the nose of the tractor

from lifting steeply when pulling a heavy load. The problem was fixed by shifting the center of

gravity and hitch point forward, increasing the wheel base and installing a heavier front axle.For
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very small tractors, which are used in orchards and vineyards, Escorts has tied up with Ferrari
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Tractors. It has also come out with a four-wheel-drive tractor and a sleek line called "Executive
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Series". Escorts sells under three brands which are clearly positioned in the market: Steeltrac for Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font
color: Auto
below 20 horsepower (the company outsources these tractors to a manufacturer in Gujarat),

Powertrac (25 HP to 50 HP) and Farmtrac (45 HP and above). The product range, Nanda

indicates, could expand further through strategic partnerships and acquisitions in the

future.Nanda wants to sell The Heritage Series of the Farmtrac line in Europe. Though it might

be at the top end of the Indian market, it is targeted at the bottom of the pyramid in Europe. "We

are positioning ourselves as a small and simple (no-frills) tractor meant to be used as an

auxiliary," says Nanda. The company has tied up with almost 125 multi-brand dealers in Europe

and hopes to expand to other geographies next. The company, Nanda says, is working with

Porsche Consulting of Germany and Carraro Agritalia of Italy for more "world series" tractors.

In 2014, Escorts exported close to 1,000 tractors; Nanda wants to raise the number to 2,500 this Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font
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year.Pricing powerBut volumes alone will not expand the profit margin, analysts say. They Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font
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expect the export price tags to be light as Escorts is a new entrant and will have to play the price Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font
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game to gain a foothold in the market. Also, the softness in the market has robbed tractor makers Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font
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of pricing power, though the fall in commodity prices could help. (Escorts raised prices by Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font
color: Auto

around 1 per cent in August last year.) Nanda says he has appointed McKinsey to suggest Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font
color: Auto

savings in the tractors business and The Boston Consulting Group to do the same for the

automobile components and construction equipment businesses. In order to save costs, about 350

employees have been given voluntary retirement and internal audit has been outsourced to Grant

Thornton.

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9.2 BRITANNIA TO KICKSTART


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CHAPTER 10

FINDINGS &

SUGGESTIONS
FINDINGS
SUGGESTIONS
CHAPTER 11

CONCLUSION
CONCLUSION
BIBLIOGRAPHY
BIBLIOGRAPHY

WEBSITE- INTRANET:

 www.goodyeartyreescort’s.co.in m Field Code Changed


Formatted: Default Paragraph Font, Font: (Default) +Body
(Calibri), 11 pt, Not Bold
WEBSITE- INTERNET:-

 www.birlayahoo.com Field Code Changed

 www.google.com

 www.sail.com

 www.bhushan.com

 www.essar.com

MAGAZINES

 Tisco News

BOOKS

 Marketing management- Philip Kotlar

 Marketing management- Kevin Lana Keller

 Marketing management- Abraham koshy

 Marketing management- Mithileshwar jha