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Appendix A

Sample Title Page

PERFORMANCE OF SECONDARY SCHOOLS UNDER DIFFERENT


ORGANIZATIONAL DIMENSIONS

A THESIS
Presented to
Faculty of Graduate Studies
and Teacher Education Research
Philippine Normal University
Mindanao

In Partial Fulfillment
of the Requirements for the Degree
MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
with Specialization in Educational Management

VALERIA V. PRESENTASYON

March 2008
Appendix B
Sample Approval Sheet

CERTIFICATE OF APPROVAL

The thesis/dissertation attached hereto, titled PERFORMANCE OF SECONDARY


SCHOOLS UNDER DIFFERENT ORGANIZATIONAL DIMENSION, prepared and
submitted by VALERIA V. PRESENTASYON in partial fulfillment of the requirements for
the degree of MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION/DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY with
specialization in Educational Management, is hereby recommended for oral examination.

JOSE M. OCAMPO JR. ALEJANDRO G. IBAÑEZ


Adviser Adviser

Approved in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in
Education/Doctor of Philosophy by the Oral Examination Committee.

_____________________________ _________________________
Member Member

____________________________ _________________________
Member Chairman

Accepted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in
Education/Doctor of Philosophy.

GABRIEL G. URIARTE
Head, Department of Educational Management,
Measurement and Evaluation

DANILO K. VILLENA
Dean, College of Education
Appendix C
Sample Abstract

iii

ORGANIZATIONAL DIMENSION

ABSTRACT

Keywords:

The study investigates the organizational dimensions affecting performance of secondary


schools by determining the relationships of selected internal organizational variables;
respondents consisting of 30 principals, 25 subject coordinators and 292 teachers from 30
secondary schools (14 private and 16 public) in the province of Romblon and Marinduque
used two sets of questionnaire, (one for principals, the other for teachers) and were
interviewed, focused group discussion (FGD) was also conducted; statistical technique used
were frequencies, percentages, means and standard deviations, partial correlation, t – test of
independent means, one-way analysis of variance, the Pearson Correlation and Step – wise
Regression analysis; concludes that teachers want to satisfy their intrinsic need for recognition,
challenge, achievement and commitment in the exercise of their profession; democratic
leadership tend to hold more students longer, intrinsic reward; recommends job rotation,
enrichment and enlargement as steps to intrinsic rewards for teachers; awareness of teachers
perception of this type of leadership, a continuous review of the school’ reward system and
seminar on teaching methods.
Appendix D
Sample Acknowledgement Page

ACKNOWLEDGMENT

In the researcher’s desire to come up with this manuscript, many individuals were
involved whom she would like to recognize and acknowledge for without their inspiration,
talents, wisdom, assistance, and precious time she would not have succeeded in her endeavor:

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX, thesis adviser, whose expertise in the field of


Statistics is truly an advantage and whose friendship, generosity, kindness, and constant
encouragement had motivated the researcher to embark on this relatively challenging study;

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX, thesis co-adviser, whose comprehensive


knowledge in the fields of Psychology and Values Education has valuably strengthened the
foundation of this study;

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX, of the Department of Psychology, Barber School


of Arts and Sciences, University of British Columbia-Okanagan, Kelowna, British Columbia,
Canada, whose graciousness in subjecting the researcher’s data to other statistically- based
procedures, the parallel analyses and the MAP test, was do disarming;

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX, XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX,
and XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX, members of the Oral Examination Committee, who
gave insightful suggestions for the enhancement of this work;

The researcher’s deceased parents, XXXXXand XXXXX, and the late younger brother,
XXXXX, whose memory has always been a source of strength and inspiration;

The researcher’s reasons for existence and emotional anchors, husband XXXX and
children, XXXXand XXXXX, whose addition to her life have become an even greater source
of inspiration to strive for a much better tomorrow;

for Mother Mary’s intercession;

and most of all, for God’s unceasing blessings…

Daghang kaayong salamat!...

XXXXXXXXXXXX
Appendix E
Sample Dedication Page

to

God, the almighty,


for the constant source of “energy”

Nathan, Francis, and Fatima

for being the “constant forces” and the “orchestra”,

both literally and figuratively,

who drive me to attain “greater heights”

and “harmony” in life…

this thesis is FOR you…

Appendix F
Sample Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE

TITLE PAGE…..………………………………………………………………….. i
APPROVAL SHEET…..………………………………………………………….. ii
ABSTRACT……………………………………………………………………… iii
DEDICATION…………………………………………………………………… v
AKNOWLEDGEMENT…………………………………………………………… xiv
LIST OF TABLES………..……………………………………………………….. xvi
LIST OF FIGURES…………………………..………………………………..…. xviii
LIST OF APPENDICES…………………… ……………………………………

Chapter 1 The Problem and Its Background………………………………… 1


1.1 Introduction……………………………………………………………. 6
1.2 Conceptual Framework………………………………………………… 8
1.3 Research Paradigm……………………………………………………. 9
1.4 Statement of the Problem……………………………………………… 10
1.5 Significance of the Study……………………………………………… 11
1.6 Scope and Delimitation of the Study………………………………….. 12
1.7 Definition of Terms……………………………………………………

Chapter 2 Review of Related Literature 16


2.1 Conceptual Literature….………………………………………………… 21
2.2 Research Literature….………………………………………………… 25
Chapter 3 Methods and Procedures
3.1 Research Design………………………………………………………… 30
3.2 Participants of the Study……………….................……………………… 32
3.3 Instrument of Data Collection…. ……………………………………….. 34
3.4Data Gathering Procedure………..……………………………………… 35
3.5 Data Analysis……...…………………………………………………….. 37

Chapter 4 Presentation, Analysis and Interpretation of Data


4.1 Profile of the Respondents……………………………………………… 38
4.1.1 Type of High School Attended………………………………… 38
4.1.2 Location of High School Attended……………………………. 39
4.1.3 High School GPA……………………………………………… 41
4.1.4 PNU Admissions Test (PNUAT) Over-all and Sub-test Scores. 42
4.1.5 Academic Variables…………………………………………… 47
4.2 Respondents’ Performance in the Licensure Examination for Teachers
(LET)……………………………………………………………………
50
4.3 Correlation of LET Performance with Admissions and Academic
Variables………………………………………………………………..53
4.4 Predictors of LET Performance………………………………………… 59
4.4.1 Regression Analysis for the BEED Sample…………………… 59
4.4.2 Regression Analysis for the BSED Sample…………………… 62

Chapter 5 Summary, Conclusions and Recommendations


5.1 Summary……………………………………………………………….. 69
5.2 Conclusions…………………………………………………………….. 72
5.3 Recommendations……………………………………………………… 73

REFERENCES..…………………………………………………………………… 76
APPENDICES….…………………………………………………………………. 79
A Appointment of Thesis Committee……………………………………. 80
B Inter-correlation Matrix (BEED Group)………………………………. 81
C Inter-correlation Matrix (BSE Group)………………………………… 85
D Regression Output for the BEED Group………………………………. 88
E Regression Output for the BSED Group………………………………. 91

CURRICULUM VITAE…………………………….…………………………… 97
Appendix G
Sample List of Tables

LIST OF TABLES

TABLE PAGE

1 Intercorrelations of Total Fluency, Flexibility and Originality of the


Three Tasks (Verbal Form)…………………………………… 54

2 Intercorrelations of Total Fluency, Flexibility, Originality and


Elaboration of the Three Tasks (Non-Verbal Form)…………… 55

3 Intercorrelations of Task Items in the Fluency Scale (Verbal


Form)…………………………………………………………….. 56

4 Intercorrelations of Task Items in the Flexibility Scale (Verbal


Form) First Trial Run……………………………………………... 58

5 Intercorrelations of Task Items in the Originality Scale (Verbal


Form) First Trial Run……………………………………………... 60

6 Total Intercorrelations of Task Items in the Fluency, Flexibility and


Originality Scale (Verbal Form) First Trial Run……………... 61

7 Intercorrelations of Task Items in the Fluency Scale (Non-Verbal


Form) First Trial Run…………………………………………….. 63

8 Intercorrelations of Task Items in the Flexibility Scale (Non-Verbal


Form) First Trial Run……………………………………... 65

9 Intercorrelations of Task Items in the Originality Scale (Non-Verbal


Form) First Trial Run……………………………………... 66

10 Intercorrelations of Task Items in the Elaboration Scale (Non-


Verbal Form) First Trial Run……………………………………... 68
Appendix H
Sample List of Figures

LIST OF FIGURES

FIGURES PAGE

1 Rafting Route……………………………………………… 6

2 Province Map of Camarines Norte………………………… 8

3 Conceptual Paradigm……………………………………… 9

4 Playing Route in Rowing in a Bunch of Banana Trunks…… 14

5 Push-off from the Wall and Gliding……………………….. 19

6 Chart on Water Resources………………………………... 36

7 Chart of Water Activities Indulged in by the Respondents.. 38

8 Chart on Community Related Water Activities…………... 41

9 Common Materials Used as Indigenous Materials Used as


Indigenous Devices………..…………………………........... 46

10 Standing Near the Wall as a Preparatory Position in the Push-off


the Wall to get the Other Side of the Pool………… 50
Appendix I
Sample List of Appendices

LIST OF APPENDICES

APPENDIX PAGE

A Behavioral Indicators which may Correspond to the Possible


Components of Creative Thinking………………………………... 269

B Evaluating the First Draft of Task Items that Measure Creative


Thinking………………………………………………………….. 272

C Report of Item Evaluation Form…………………………………. 276

D Intercorrelations of Task Items in the Fluency scale (Verbal Form)


Second Trial Run…………………………………………………. 277

E Intercorrelations of Task Items in the Flexibility Scale (Verbal Form)


Second Trial Run………………………………………….. 278

F Intercorrelations of Tasks Items in the Originality Scale (Verbal Form)


……………………………………………………………... 279

G Intercorrelations of Task Items in the Total Fluency, Flexibility and


Originality Scale (Verbal Form) Second Trial Run…………... 280

H Intercorrelations of Task Items in the Fluency Scale (Non-Verbal


Form) Second Trial Run………………………………………….. 281

I Intercorrelations of Task Items in the Flexibility Scale (Non-Verbal


Form) Second Trial Run………………………………….. 282

J Intercorrelations of Task Items in the Originality Scale (Non-Verbal


Form) Second Trial Run………………………………….. 283
Appendix J
Sample Reference Style and Format

References

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Burnout ( Unpublished master’s thesis). Philippine Normal University, Manila.

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Appendix K
Sample Curriculum Vitae

CURRICULUM VITAE

Name XXXXXXXXXX X. XXXXXXXXXXXX

Date of Birth December 21, 1959

Place of Birth Balele, Tanauan, Batangas

Educational Attainment

Doctorate Degree Doctor of Education with Specialization in Educational Administration


Philippine Normal University, 2007

Master’s Degree Master of Education (Human Resource Studies)


University of South Australia; 1994

Collegiate Bachelor of Science in Education


Major: Mathematics
Minor: General Science
The National Teachers College; 1978

Master of Arts in Education (Mathematics)


(Academic Requirements)
The National Teachers College; 1985

Honors, Scholarships/Study Grants and Awards Received

Recipient, University Staff Development Program (UNISTAFF)


Scholarship, Institute for Socio-cultural Studies, University of
Kassel, Germany [ A Scholarship Grant from German Exchange
Service ( DAAD)] April- July 2004.
Awarded as Fellow of Royal Institute of Mathematics ( FRIMath),
Singapore, March 2005

Recipient: SEAMEO-RECSAM Scholarship in Science and


Mathematics Penang, Malaysia, April-June 1989

SEDP Masteral Fellowship Program


University of South Australia Underdale, SA
February 1995-November 1996

Science Laboratory Management


SEAMEO-RECSAM, Penang, Malaysia
July-September 198

Work Experiences

2004- Present Asst Schools Division Superintendent

2000- 2004 Officer – in Charge, Office of the Asst.


Superintendent, DepEd – Muntinlupa City

1996- 2000 Education Supervisor 1 for Mathematics DepEd -


Pasay City

1991-1996 Head Teacher III (Mathematics Department)


Pasay City East High School, Pasay City

1985-1991 Secondary School Teacher (Physics)


Makati High School, Makati City

1978-1985 Secondary School Teacher (Math-Science)


Mabini High School, Tanauan City
Researchers Conducted

Mathematical Problem Solving and Problem Posing in


College Algebra Classes ( Paper Presented in the
Division 1 Meeting of the NRC), February 2004
Teacher Preparation in Science and Mathematics: A
Situation Analysis. Technical Papers. National Academy
of Science and Technology, Department of Science and
Technology, 1998
Appendix L
Sample Page with Running Head and Pagination
Appendix M
Sample Hard Cover

PERFORMANCE OF SECONDARY SCHOOLS UNDER DIFFERENT


ORGANIZATIONAL DIMENSIONS

VALERIA V. PRESENTASYON

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
PHILIPPINE NORMAL UNIVERSITY
TAFT AVENUE, MANILA

March 2008
Appendix N
Sample Hard Cover on Spine