You are on page 1of 14

REASONS TO MEASURE EFFECTIVENESS

Assessing the effectiveness of ads both before they are implemented and after the final versions
have been completed and fielded offers a number of advantages

1. AVOIDING COSTLY MISTAKES

2. EVALUATING ALTERNATIVE STRATEGIES

3. INCREASING THE EFFICIENCY OF ADVERTISING IN GENERAL

4. DETERMINING OF OBJECTIVE ARE ACHIEVED
REASONS NOT MEASURE EFFECTIVENESS
Companies give a number of reasons for not measuring the effectiveness
of advertising and promotions strategies

1. COST

2. RESEARCH PROBLEMS

3. DISAGREEMENT ON WHAT TO TEST

4. THE OBJECTIONS OF CREATIVE

5. TIME
CONDUCTING RESEARCH TO MEASURE
ADVERTISING EFFECTIVENESS
WHAT TO TEST:
Source Factors. An important question is whether the spokesperson being
used is effective and how the target market will respond to him or her.
Message Variables. Both the message and the means by which it is
communicated are bases for evaluation.
Media Strategies. Media decisions need to be evaluated. Research may be
designed to determine which media class, sub class or specific vehicles
generate the most effective results
Budgeting Decisions. A number of studies have examined the effects of
budget size on advertising effectiveness and the effects of various ad
expenditures on sales
WHEN TO TEST
Virtually all test measures can be classified according to when
they are conducted.
--
Pretests. Are measures taken before the campaign is implemented

Postests. Occur after the ad or commercial has been in field.
WHERE TO TEST
LABORATORY TESTS. In laboratory tests, people are brought to a particular location
where they are shown ads and/ or commercials. The testers either ask questions about
them or measure participants’ responses by other methods – for example, pupil dilations,
eye tracking , or galvanic skin response.

FIELD TESTS. Are tests of the ad or commercial under natural viewing situations,
complete with the realism of noise, distractions and the comforts of home.
HOW TO TEST
The set of nine principles, called PACT (Positioning Advertising Copy
Testing
1. Provide measurements that are relevant to the objectives of the advertising
2. Require agreement about how the results will be used in advance of each specific test.
3. Provide multiple measurements (because single measurements are not adequate to assess as
performance).
4. Be based on a model of human response to communication – the reception of a stimulus, the
comprehension of the stimulus and the response to the stimulus.
5. Allow for consideration of whether the advertising stimulus should be exposed more than once.
6. Require that the more finished a piece of copy is, the more soundly it can be evaluated and
require, as a minimum, that alternative executions be tested in the same degree of finish.
7. Provide controls to avoid the biasing effects of the exposure context.
8. Take into account basic considerations of sample definition.
9. Demonstrate reliability and validity.
THE TESTING PROCESS
CONCEPT GENERATION
• A concept generation is an idea which provides a solution to the
product designer spec (PDS).
• Can be a complete solution, a partial solution or a far out idea.
• Idea generation or what we mean as Concept generation is cheap
and it doesn’t cost too much (time and resources) to generate a lots
of pure ideas.
• A good concept generation process will produce ALL of the ideas.
CONCEPT TESTING
-is which conducted very early in the campaign development process
in order to explore the targeted consumers response to a potential ad
or campaign or have the consumer evaluate advertising alternatives.

• FOCUS GROUPS – is one of the most commonly used methods of concept
testing because it is the first step in research process. The number of focus
groups used may vary depending on group consensus.

• ROUGH TEST – must indicate how the finish commercial would perform.

• COMPREHENSION AND REACTION TEST – are designed to assess those
responses.
• CONSUMER JURIES – it is the method being used as a
consumers representative of the target market to
evaluate the probable success of an Ad

• HALO EFFECT – it is called the “Halo Effect” because
sometimes, participants rate an ad good on all
characteristics they like and over look specific
weaknesses. This tendency distorts the ratings and
defeats the ability to control for specific components.
PRETESTING OF FINISH ADS
One of the more commonly employed studies among marketing researchers due t
o testing the Ad in final form and it provides better information.

• PORTFOLIO TEST
- are a laboratory methodology designed to expose a group of respondents to
a portfolio consisting of both control and test Ads.

• READABILITY TEST
- this method eliminate many of the interviewee biases associated with other t
est and avoids gross errors in understanding.

• DUMMY ADVERTISING VEHICLES
- it provides more natural setting than the portfolio test.
PRETESTING FINISHED BROADCAST ADS
• THEATER TESTS. Measures changes in product preferences, may also me
asure
- Interest in an d reaction to the commercial
- Reaction from an adjective checklist
- Recall of various aspects included
- Interest in the brand presented
- Continuous (frame-by-frame) reactions

• ON-AIR TESTS. Some of the firms conducting theater tests also insert the c
ommercials into actul TV programs in certain tests markets.
• PHYSIOLOGICAL MEASURES. A less
common methods of pretesting involves a
laboratory setting in which physiological
responses are measured
- Pupil dilation
- Galvanic skin response
- Eye tracking
- Brainwaves. Electroencephalographic
(EEG) measures
MARKET TESTING OF ADS
The fact the ad and/or campaign has been implemented does not mean t
here is no longer need for testing. The marketer must find out how the ad
is doing in the field.

• INQUIRY TESTS. Designed to measure advertising effectiveness on
the basis of inquiries generated from ads appearing, often referred
to as “’Bingo card”

• RECOGNITION TESTS. Perhaps the most common posttest.
Percentage of people remember seeing the ad

• RECALL TESTS.