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Patrick McEvoy-Halston English359 Dry'M.

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21 March 2002

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meditationon the giving andreceivingof Sonnet94 canbe understood Shakespeare's as

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the advice. The sonnethasus compare potentialbeneft ttre iot6n4"d."aAirb.-tfre'frnmoved" C+J h$q-"tight receivefrom attending the nanator'sargument, to versus realharm,or pain, the

to theymay therebyexperience from havingallowedtheir "praiseworthy'status be manipulated
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into becoming a new found sourceof worry for them.

the_mselves to The first quahainlists qualitieswhich allow the intended readers recogniz.e asthe subjectof the sonnet.They "mov[e] others"Vq: andthusarepowerflll, but "are I (v), themselves stone" of as !)rT$, which implies that they offer otherslittle sense what they are quatrainsecures thinking andhow they arefeeling. The second their continuedattentionby judging the fore-mentioned qualitiesworthy of praise. The readers, now halfiray into the poem andthus likely eagerto completeit, experience re-orientation the third quatrainin which in a (not they arecompared a differentsubstance a stone)situated a differentlocal,i.e., to a to in flower underthe summer'ssun. The readers'self-perception beingshaped they are"ripeo' is so
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fo(t final judgqent otlb"*Jn the terminating lgl"putatable" to its intended couplet--one

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The flower metaphor helpl incline the intended readers closelyaffendto the third to quatrain because it--suggesting openness with the associations so tp_llfe--conhasts dramatically offeredearlierof a life lived "as [a] stone"\f41. Thenarator beginsthe third quatrain(with the
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mentionof a flower) asif he wereaboutto speak pleasures of missed(but to be experienced) by

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the unmoved;but he usesthis apt metaphorfor invoking all of ttleir sensesto make the intended

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readers suddenly feel Whereas vulnerable. before howtheywere"seen"(their'faces"$3af, was

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asflowers, they tthe,mselves

knowtheymay'taken"in a varietyof ways.e flow{ustesl A flowersmells.Butbecause the narrator the tasting smelling once describes flowerassoeasily and disagreeably time(summer) readers moves (sothatit mightb€better belike theunchanging on to weqd), wheotheintended
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only finishthesonnet integrate newwayof imagining anil this the,mselves-as temporarily they stsong perpetually but vulnerable--into coresenserof their themselves, migbtwishthatthey ' hadneverallowed thernselves attend thesonnet. to to

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pain The isreal; Off::l *"

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will prove considerable; en<ls *LTo *. allde' on ___

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(IJ4)? narrator intended helpor to harm. Canhebedeeply to "seen "orishetoo "asstone"

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