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JOINT STRATEGIC PLAN

FY 2018 - 2022
U.S. Department of State
U.S. Agency for International Development

F E B R UA RY 2 0 1 8
STATE-USAID JOINT STRATEGIC GOAL FRAMEWORK

Goal 1: Protect America’s Security at Home and Abroad

1.1: Counter the 1.2: Defeat ISIS, al- 1.3: Counter 1.4: Increase capacity 1.5: Strengthen U.S.
Proliferation of Qa’ida and other instability, and strengthen border security and
Weapons of Mass Transnational terrorist transnational crime, resilience of our protect U.S. citizens
Destruction (WMD) organizations, and violence that partners and allies to abroad
and their Delivery and counter state- threaten U.S. interests deter aggression,
Systems sponsored, regional, by strengthening coercion, and malign
and local terrorist citizen-responsive influence by state and
groups that threaten governance, security, non-state actors
U.S. national security democracy, human
interests rights, and rule of law

Goal 2: Renew America’s Competitive Advantage for Sustained Economic Growth and Job Creation

2.1: Promote American prosperity by 2.2: Promote healthy, educated and 2.3: Advance U.S. economic security
advancing bilateral relationships and productive populations in partner by ensuring energy security,
leveraging international institutions countries to drive inclusive and combating corruption, and promoting
and agreements to open markets, sustainable development, open new market-oriented economic and
secure commercial opportunities, and markets and support U.S. prosperity and governance reforms
foster investment and innovation to security objectives
contribute to U.S. job creation

Goal 3: Promote American Leadership through Balanced Engagement

3.1: Transition nations from 3.2: Engage international 3.3: Increase partnerships 3.4: Project American values
assistance recipients to fora to further American with the private sector and and leadership by
enduring diplomatic, values and foreign policy civil society organizations to preventing the spread of
economic, and security goals while seeking more mobilize support and disease and
partners equitable burden sharing resources and shape foreign providing humanitarian
public opinion relief.

Goal 4: Ensure Effectiveness and Accountability to the American Taxpayer

4.1: Strengthen the 4.2: Provide modern and 4.3: Enhance workforce 4.4: Strengthen security and
effectiveness and secure infrastructure and performance, leadership, safety of workforce and
sustainability of our operational capabilities to engagement, and physical assets
diplomacy and development support effective diplomacy accountability to execute
investments and development our mission efficiently and
effectively

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Message from the Secretary ...............................................................................................11

Message from the Administrator .....................................................................................13

Overview ....................................................................................................................................15

Mission Statements ................................................................................................................19

Stakeholder Engagement .....................................................................................................19

Use of Evidence .......................................................................................................................21

Goal 1: Protect America’s Security at Home and Abroad .....................................23


Strategic Goal Overview ....................23
Strategic Objective 1.1: Counter the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction
(WMD) and their Delivery Systems .........................................................................................24
Strategic Objective Overview .....................24
Strategies for Achieving the Objective ......................................................................................24
Cross-Agency Collaboration ......................................................................................................25
Risk ................................................................................................................................................25
Performance Goals ......................................................................................................................25

Strategic Objective 1.2: Defeat ISIS, al-Qa’ida and other transnational terrorist
organizations, and counter state-sponsored, regional, and local terrorist groups that
threaten U.S. national security interests ................................................................................25
Strategic Objective Overview .....................................................................................................25
Strategies for Achieving this Objective .....................................................................................26
Cross-Agency Collaboration ......................................................................................................26
Risk ................................................................................................................................................27
Performance Goals ......................................................................................................................27

Strategic Objective 1.3: Counter instability, transnational crime, and violence that
threaten U.S. interests by strengthening citizen-responsive governance, security,
democracy, human rights, and the rule of law .....................................................................27
Strategic Objective Overview .....................................................................................................27
Strategies for Achieving the Objective ......................................................................................28
Cross-Agency Collaboration ......................................................................................................29
Risk ................................................................................................................................................29
Performance Goals ......................................................................................................................29

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Strategic Objective 1.4: Increase capacity and strengthen resilience of our partners
and allies to deter aggression, coercion, and malign influence by state and non-state
actors .............................................................................................................................................29
Strategic Objective Overview .....................................................................................................29
Strategies for Achieving the Objective ......................................................................................30
Cross-Agency Collaboration ......................................................................................................31
Risk ................................................................................................................................................31
Performance Goals ......................................................................................................................31

Strategic Objective 1.5: Strengthen U.S. border security and protect U.S. citizens
abroad ....................31
Strategic Objective Overview .....................................................................................................31
Strategies for Achieving the Objective ......................................................................................32
Cross-Agency Collaboration ......................................................................................................33
Risk ................................................................................................................................................33
Performance Goals ......................................................................................................................33

Goal 2: Renew America’s Competitive Advantage for Sustained Economic


Growth and Job Creation ....................................................................................................35
Strategic Goal Overview .............................................................................................................35
Strategic Objective 2.1: Promote American prosperity by advancing bilateral
relationships and leveraging international institutions and agreements to open
markets, secure commercial opportunities, and foster investment and innovation to
contribute to U.S. job creation .................................................................................................36
Strategic Objective Overview .....................................................................................................36
Strategies for Achieving the Objective ......................................................................................37
Cross Agency Collaboration ......................................................................................................37
Risk ................................................................................................................................................38
Performance Goals ......................................................................................................................38

Strategic Objective 2.2: Promote healthy, educated and productive populations in


partner countries to drive inclusive and sustainable development, open new markets
and support U.S. prosperity and security objectives ...........................................................39
Strategic Objective Overview .....................................................................................................39
Strategies for Achieving the Objective ......................................................................................39
Cross Agency Collaboration ......................................................................................................41
Risk ................................................................................................................................................41
Performance Goals ......................................................................................................................41

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Strategic Objective 2.3: Advance U.S. economic security by ensuring energy security,
combating corruption, and promoting market-oriented economic and governance
reforms .........................................................................................................................................42
Strategic Objective Overview .....................................................................................................42
Strategies for Achieving the Objective ......................................................................................42
Cross Agency Collaboration ......................................................................................................44
Risk ................................................................................................................................................44
Performance Goals ......................................................................................................................44

Goal 3: Promote American Leadership through Balanced Engagement .........47


Strategic Goal Overview .............................................................................................................47
Strategic Objective 3.1: Transition nations from assistance recipients to enduring
diplomatic, economic, and security partners ........................................................................48
Strategic Objective Overview .....................................................................................................49
Strategies for Achieving the Objective ......................................................................................49
Cross Agency Collaboration ......................................................................................................50
Risk ................................................................................................................................................50
Performance Goals ......................................................................................................................50

Strategic Objective 3.2: Engage international fora to further American values and
foreign policy goals while seeking more equitable burden sharing .................................51
Strategic Objective Overview .....................................................................................................51
Strategies for Achieving the Objective ......................................................................................51
Cross Agency Collaboration ......................................................................................................51
Risk ................................................................................................................................................52
Performance Goals ......................................................................................................................52

Strategic Objective 3.3: Increase partnerships with the private sector and
civil-society organizations to mobilize support and resources and shape foreign
public opinion ..............................................................................................................................51
Strategic Objective Overview .....................................................................................................51
Strategies for Achieving the Objective ......................................................................................51
Cross Agency Collaboration ......................................................................................................51
Risk ................................................................................................................................................52
Performance Goals ......................................................................................................................52

Strategic Objective 3.4: Project American values and leadership by preventing the
spread of disease and providing humanitarian relief ..........................................................52
Strategic Objective Overview .....................................................................................................52
Strategies for Achieving the Objective ......................................................................................53
Cross Agency Collaboration ......................................................................................................53
Risk ................................................................................................................................................53
Performance Goals ......................................................................................................................53

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Goal 4: Ensure Effectiveness and Accountability to the American


Taxpayer .....................................................................................................................................57
Strategic Goal Overview .............................................................................................................57
Strategic Objective 4.1: Strengthen the effectiveness and sustainability of our
diplomacy and development investments .............................................................................58
Strategic Objective Overview .....................................................................................................58
Cross Agency Collaboration ......................................................................................................59
Risk ................................................................................................................................................59
Performance Goals ......................................................................................................................60

Strategic Objective 4.2: Provide modern and secure infrastructure and operational
capabilities to support effective diplomacy and development .........................................60
Strategic Objective Overview .....................................................................................................60
Strategies for Achieving the Objective ......................................................................................61
Cross Agency Collaboration ......................................................................................................62
Risk ................................................................................................................................................62
Performance Goals ......................................................................................................................62

Strategic Objective 4.3: Enhance workforce performance, leadership, engagement,


and accountability to execute our mission efficiently and effectively .............................63
Strategic Objective Overview .....................................................................................................63
Strategies for Achieving the Objective ......................................................................................63
Cross Agency Collaboration ......................................................................................................64
Risk ................................................................................................................................................64
Performance Goals ......................................................................................................................65

Strategic Objective 4.4: Strengthen security and safety of workforce and physical
assets .............................................................................................................................................65
Strategic Objective Overview .....................................................................................................65
Strategies for Achieving the Objective ......................................................................................65
Cross Agency Collaboration ......................................................................................................66
Risk ................................................................................................................................................66
Performance Goals ......................................................................................................................67

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MESSAGE FROM THE SECRETARY
I am pleased to submit the Joint Strategic Plan of to achieve sustained economic growth and job
the U.S. Department of State and the United States creation. We must promote American leadership
Agency for International Development (USAID) through balanced engagement and principled re-
for Fiscal Years 2018 to 2022. The Department alism to ensure the effectiveness of our mission
and USAID share the goal of promoting and and accountability to the American taxpayer. The
demonstrating democratic values and advancing Joint Strategic Plan (JSP) articulates these foreign
a free, peaceful, and prosperous world on behalf policy and development priorities, thereby plac-
of the American people. Together we work to ing strategic clarity, operational effectiveness, and
advance America’s interests by strengthening our accountability to the American people. The JSP
allies and alliances, deepening our security rela- also identifies performance goals against which
tionships, and countering threats to the American we will measure our progress.
people and our homeland. Our agencies cooper-
ate closely to ensure that our foreign policy and Driven by our democratic principles, the Depart-
development activities are successfully achieving ment of State and USAID will work to achieve
the objectives of the National Security Strategy of the goals of the JSP. Doing so with the utmost
the United States. effectiveness requires future-focused leadership, a
closer alignment of resources with strategic pri-
The United States faces a 21st century global en- orities, and modernized tools and systems that
vironment that presents challenges to our nation- allow us to better utilize our time and succeed in
al and economic security from traditional state our mission. I have confidence our foreign pol-
actors, as well as unconventional threats from icy and development goals will be accomplished
non-state actors. Regardless of the forms these through the efforts of our patriotic and dedicated
threats take, or the methods they use, we must re- Department of State and USAID personnel, who
main vigilant against those who would do harm serve faithfully each day to ensure our citizens’
to our nation, our people, and our way of life. We right to life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness.
must leverage America’s competitive advantages

Rex W. Tillerson
Secretary of State

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MESSAGE FROM THE ADMINISTRATOR
For over half a century, the United States Agen- Under this plan, USAID programs support broad-
cy for International Development (USAID) has er efforts to counter the drivers of violence and
played a critical role in furthering American in- instability; respond to the challenges caused by
terests around the globe. USAID is the world’s displacement and mass migration; and strengthen
leading development and humanitarian assis- citizen-responsive governance, democracy, and
tance agency, and an important contributor to the human rights, to underpin global stability.
objectives of the National Security Strategy of the
United States. Our work will also support U.S. Government ef-
forts to combat corruption, transnational crime,
Our development assistance has helped countries and extremism that threaten American citizens
increase educational attainment, boost life expec- and our economy. It will help prevent global out-
tancy, reduce poverty, and transition from being breaks and epidemics of infectious disease be-
aid recipients to become economic and security fore they reach our borders, as part of the Global
partners. Health Security Agenda.

While America faces an unprecedented array of We will help create markets for American jobs
national security threats, USAID’s international and services by promoting inclusive economic
development efforts support the U.S. Govern- growth and development abroad.
ment’s response to counter and prevent them.
We will continue to project American values by
Our ultimate goal is a future in which foreign as- responding to humanitarian crises, combatting
sistance is no longer needed. We are working to- human trafficking, working to end preventable
ward a world of safe, prosperous, self-reliant, and child and maternal death, and halting the spread
economically integrated countries that work to- of HIV/AIDS as part of the President’s Emergency
gether to solve common problems. I believe that Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR).
reaching the goals outlined in this Joint Strategic
Plan (JSP) will move us closer to that day. USAID We will do all of this while stressing our respon-
is committed to working hand-in-hand with the sibility and accountability in managing taxpayer
Department of State to achieve the strategic goals funds.
and objectives in the JSP.
This JSP will ensure USAID remains an indis-
pensable force of good in the world, a critical tool
in the United States’ national-security toolbox,
and, perhaps most important, help create a world
in which one day foreign assistance will no longer
be needed.

Mark Green
USAID Administrator

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OVERVIEW
The Department of State is the lead U.S. foreign organizations, private companies, academic insti-
affairs agency within the Executive Branch and tutions, faith-based groups, and non-governmen-
the lead institution to conduct American diplo- tal organizations (NGOs). The Secretary of State
macy. Established by Congress in 1789 and head- and USAID Administrator are appointed by the
quartered in Washington, D.C., the Department is President and confirmed by the Senate.
the oldest and most senior executive agency of the
U.S. Government. The head of the Department, As the world’s premier international development
the Secretary of State, is the President’s princi- agency and a catalytic actor driving development
pal foreign policy advisor. The Secretary imple- results, USAID supports U.S. national security
ments the President’s foreign policies worldwide and economic prosperity, demonstrates American
through the Department and its employees. The generosity, and promotes a path to self-reliance
Department of State protects and advances the and resilience. USAID plays a critical role in our
interests of American citizens and America’s sov- nation’s efforts to ensure stability, prevent conflict
ereignty by: and build citizen-responsive local governance.
Through the Agency’s work and that of its partner
• Leading and uniting the free world around organizations, development assistance from the
American values to uphold liberty; American people is transforming lives, commu-
nities, and economies around the world. USAID’s
• Strengthening our allies and alliances;
investments in evidence-based programs are:
• Deepening our security relationships and
partnerships around the world; • Providing humanitarian assistance -- with
relief that is timely and effective in response
• Countering threats and adversaries; to disasters and complex crises;
• Creating enduring advantages at home by • Promoting global health -- through
opening markets abroad; activities that save lives and protect
• Helping developing nations establish Americans at home and abroad;
investment and export opportunities for • Supporting global stability -- work that
American businesses; and advances democracy and good governance,
• Preserving peace through international and helps to promote sustainable
cooperation on global security challenges development, economic growth, and peace;
such as nuclear proliferation, terrorism, • Catalyzing innovation and partnership --
human trafficking, and the spread of by identifying new and innovative ways to
pandemics (including HIV), humanitarian engage with the private sector; and
crises, and narcotics trafficking.
• Empowering women and girls and
As the U.S. Government’s lead international de- protecting life -- through support for
velopment and humanitarian assistance agency, women’s equal access to opportunities and
the United States Agency for International De- implementation of the “Protecting Life in
velopment (USAID) helps societies realize their Global Health Assistance” policy.
potential. USAID plans its development and as-
sistance programs in coordination with the De-
partment of State and collaborates with other U.S.
government agencies, multilateral and bilateral

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OVERVIEW

The Department of State and USAID are pleased


to provide this Joint Strategic Plan (JSP) for Fis-
cal Years (FY) 2018 to 2022, which sets forth the
Secretary of State’s and USAID Administrator’s
vision and direction for both organizations in the
coming years.

The JSP supports the policy positions set forth


by President Trump in the National Security
Strategy and presents how the Department and
USAID will implement U.S. foreign policy and
development assistance.

The JSP will be used by the Department and US-


AID as a management tool to define success in
international diplomacy and development, and
as the foundation against which we will measure
progress made towards the goals and objectives
set forth herein. The JSP is also the guiding
document for the development of all bureau and
mission strategic plans for FY 2018-2022.

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MISSION STATEMENTS

Department of State USAID


Mission Statement Mission Statement

On behalf of the American people, we pro- On behalf of the American people, we pro-
mote and demonstrate democratic values mote and demonstrate democratic values
and advance a free, peaceful, and prosperous abroad, and advance a free, peaceful, and
world. prosperous world.

The U.S. Department of State leads America’s In support of America’s foreign policy, the
foreign policy through diplomacy, advocacy, U.S. Agency for International Development
and assistance by advancing the interests of leads the U.S. Government’s international
the American people, their safety and eco- development and disaster assistance through
nomic prosperity. partnerships and investments that save lives,
reduce poverty, strengthen democratic gover-
nance, and help people emerge from humani-
tarian crises and progress beyond assistance.

STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT
The Joint Strategic Plan (JSP) is shaped by Pres- the strategic objectives based on guidance provid-
idential directives and policies, the December ed by senior leadership. To ensure equities were
2017 National Security Strategy, previous strate- represented, all bureaus at both agencies were
gic planning efforts, and ongoing Department of invited to provide input and feedback on the JSP.
State’s Impact Initiative and USAID’s ReDesign In addition, senior officials of the Department
efforts aligned to the Office of Management and and USAID met with representatives from eigh-
Budget’s M-17-22 “Comprehensive Plan for Re- teen interagency partners1 to analyze and discuss
forming the Federal Government and Reducing the strategic objectives of the FY 2018-2022 Joint
the Federal Civilian Workforce.” The Department Strategic Plan. The Department and USAID also
and USAID developed this JSP through a consul- engaged their Congressional oversight commit-
tative process involving the senior leadership of tees to explain the goals and objectives of this
the two agencies. Representatives from key bu- planning effort.
reaus at the Department and USAID developed

1 Interagency partners include U.S. Departments of Commerce, Defense, Energy; Health and Human Services-Office of Global
Affairs , Homeland Security, Justice, Labor, Treasury, Broadcasting Board of Governors, Export-Import Bank, Foreign Claims
Settlement Commission, Intelligence Community, select Multilateral Development

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USE OF EVIDENCE
The Department of State and USAID draw upon mation will be even more reliable for informing
evidence from a host of internal and external decisions to implement this strategy.
sources to inform, guide, and implement this
strategy. The Department and USAID review and The Department and USAID are planning for
assess current environments, our partners’ capa- future evidence building and have a number of
bilities and gaps, and ongoing U.S. and interna- evaluations planned across a diverse set of pro-
tional programmatic and operational efforts to grams and activities. These evaluations will iden-
identify and achieve shared objectives. Evaluation tify whether and why activities achieve desired
findings, monitoring data, and other assessments outcomes, document the potential of innovative
measure how programs and projects benefit com- approaches, and assess customer satisfaction on
munities and groups; how changes in the contexts service delivery.
may affect the success of projects; and how inter-
ventions and diplomatic activities support host USAID uses evaluation for many purposes and
countries on their own journeys to build peace, produces over 100 evaluation reports each year.
self-reliance, and prosperity. Accountability Re- The most common uses are to inform decisions
view Boards and timely third-party information about ongoing project management, the design
and analysis from other U.S. government agen- of new projects or activities, and to judge project
cies, host country partners, other donor agencies, performance. USAID evaluations also influence
and NGOs also inform strategies, programs, and decisions by host governments and other donors,
operations. Key sources of information include document good practices and lessons learned,
foreign government officials, local NGOs and and inform country or sector strategies. Inde-
businesses that the Department of State and US- pendent evaluations are required for all USAID
AID personnel in the field communicate with ev- projects, whether at the whole of project level or
ery day. This evidence is captured in diplomatic to examine a specific activity within a project, and
reporting and in publicly available reports such as therefore there are USAID evaluations spanning
annual country Investment Climate Statements. all programmatic areas.

Effectiveness, accountability, learning, and trans- To better understand the effectiveness of our pro-
parency are the central principles that drive our grams, the Department will be evaluating pro-
use of evidence and data to achieve this strategy. grams in areas to include stabilization efforts,
Over the long term, the Department and USAID gender-based violence, trade projects, security
will continue to collect evidence from a variety of sector, and criminal justice reform. Through im-
sources, including monitoring and evaluation of plementing recommendations from these eval-
operations and foreign assistance projects to as- uations, the Department will improve program
sess whether programs, processes, and functions methodology, deployment strategies, service de-
are performing as expected and why. Monitoring livery, and the efficiency and effectiveness of re-
and evaluation assure accountability, identify best source allocation.
practices, assess return on investment, and in-
form policy and planning decisions. Once efforts Additional information on the Department of
to strengthen systems for collecting evidence on State and USAID’s use of evidence and evaluation
foreign assistance programs per the 2016 Foreign is available in the Congressional Budget Justifica-
Aid Transparency and Accountability Act are ful- tion (Annexes 1 and 2) and in the Annual Per-
ly implemented by the Department and USAID, formance Plan (APP) and Annual Performance
evidence from monitoring and evaluation infor- Report (APR).

Banks, the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC), U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP), Millennium Challenge Corporation
(MCC), Peace Corps; and the U.S. Trade and Development Agency.
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GOAL 1:
PROTECT AMERICA’S SECURITY AT HOME
AND ABROAD
Strategic Goal Overview tional terrorist groups that threaten the American
homeland.
Protecting the security of all Americans is the Ad-
ministration’s highest priority. The United States The Department and USAID must address the
will remain a global superpower that advances a conditions that enable these threats to persist.
stable and prosperous world built upon strong, Through diplomacy and development, the De-
sovereign, and resilient nations who respect each partment and USAID work to reduce poor gov-
other’s independence and work together to up- ernance and weak institutions, lack of economic
hold international norms. Today, the United opportunity, corruption, and persistent human
States and our allies face many threats, including rights abuses, which otherwise contribute to
rogue states seeking to acquire weapons of mass transnational crime, illegal immigration, and the
destruction; terrorists seeking to advance hate- spread of pandemic diseases. We work together
ful ideologies; drug traffickers seeking to profit with countries to address significant challenges
on weak borders; and cyber criminals seeking to and crises such as natural disasters, water scar-
exploit the openness of the Internet. We are com- city, and land degradation, which can exacerbate
mitted to sustaining and strengthening America’s political instability and social unrest. The United
longstanding alliances while forging new ones to States alone cannot solve these problems. We will
counter these and other threats. The Department use American influence and selectively target our
of State and USAID will oppose state and non- resources to address instability in regions vital to
state rivals who seek to sow instability and uproot U.S. strategic interests. We will press America’s
the security and prosperity of the United States national and regional partners to take greater
and its allies. A stable and prosperous world de- responsibility for directly addressing the under-
pends upon strong, sovereign, and resilient na- lying causes of violence, extremism, and fragility
tions who respect each other’s independence and in their regions. While nations must chart their
work together to uphold international norms. own paths, the United States will support those
that seek to bolster the rights and democratic as-
The gravest threats to U.S. national security are pirations of their people and assist them along
the spread of weapons of mass destruction and their journey to self-reliance, while recognizing
terrorism. The threat of nuclear war remains a that societies that empower women to participate
grim reality and must be countered. North Ko- fully in civic and economic life are more prosper-
rea’s unlawful nuclear and ballistic missile pro- ous and peaceful.
grams pose a direct threat to the foundations of
international peace and security. Iran’s aggressive America has long been a force for good in the
development and testing of sophisticated ballistic world and a champion of effective and account-
missiles is in defiance of United Nations (UN) Se- able democratic governance, rule of law, econom-
curity Council Resolutions. The Department will ic freedom, and resilience. American leadership,
continue to marshal international efforts to iso- diplomacy and development are indispensable to
late North Korea, Iran, and other states that seek prevent and mitigate unforeseen crises and de-
to acquire weapons of mass destruction (WMD) liver sustainable security and prosperity for the
unlawfully. The Department and USAID will ad- American people and the homeland, and preserve
vance the overall U.S. strategy to defeat the Islam- the American way of life.
ic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) and other transna-

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GOAL 1: PROTECT AMERICA’S SECURITY AT HOME AND ABROAD

At the same time, the Department will work to a nuclear weapon or develops an ICBM, the latter
protect American citizens and interests overseas. of which was primarily designed to deliver a nu-
Consular and infrastructure protection programs clear payload.
play a critical role in protecting American bor-
ders, transportation systems, and critical infra- In addition to traditional WMD threats, emerging
structure. The Department will ensure robust technologies blur the lines between materials and
consular policies and systems; strengthen borders equipment that can be used either for commer-
to protect the homeland; and will work with part- cial use or for conventional and nuclear weapons.
ners to deny access to individuals who pose risks Worldwide availability of chemical agents and
to U.S national security. dangerous pathogens, access to dual-use life sci-
ence research, and individuals and networks that
Strategic Objective 1.1: Counter the make use of geographic smuggling pathways and
illicit business relationships to profit from WMD
Proliferation of Weapons of Mass proliferation complicate this task. The United
Destruction (WMD) and their States must stop this spread of WMD and counter
Delivery Systems these threats to U.S. and international security.

Strategic Objective Overview Strategies for Achieving the Objective

Proliferant states and terrorist groups are acquir- The Department will pursue diplomatic solutions
ing or seeking to acquire increasingly dangerous to proliferation challenges, and rally international
weapons to threaten American interests or the U.S. support for sanctions against proliferant nations.
homeland directly. North Korea recently devel- The threat posed by North Korea’s unlawful nucle-
oped an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) ar and ballistic missile programs requires imme-
with the stated objective of striking the United diate international attention and the Department
States. Its unlawful nuclear and ballistic missile continues to urge all countries to cut diplomatic,
programs pose an urgent threat to international financial, economic, and military ties with North
security. Multiple countries possess clandestine Korea. We will continue to lead efforts to impose
chemical or biological programs in violation of and enforce sanctions – whether nationally, in
international conventions or commitments, and conjunction with like-minded states, or through
the Syrian regime and ISIS have deployed chemi- the UN Security Council – on principal sectors of
cal weapons. ISIS and other terrorist groups seek the North Korean economy, or on entities and in-
to use nuclear, radiological, chemical, and bio- dividuals supporting North Korea’s proliferation
logical materials in terrorist attacks, including on programs.
the homeland. Iran is aggressively pursuing the
development and testing of sophisticated ballistic The Department will continue efforts to strength-
missiles that may be capable of delivering nuclear en and improve international weapons conven-
weapons. Iran’s proliferation of advanced missiles tions, nonproliferation treaties, and multilateral
and missile technologies to its proxies and part- export control regimes, such as the Chemical
ners fuels local civil wars, destabilizes the region, Weapons Convention, the Nuclear Nonprolifer-
and poses imminent threats to international ship- ation Treaty, and the Biological Weapons Con-
ping and our closest allies in the Middle East. A vention. In addition, we will continue to support
number of other countries of proliferation con- the New START Treaty, which provides trans-
cern are also pursuing ballistic missile capabili- parency and predictability regarding the world’s
ties, relying on acquisition of equipment, com- two largest nuclear arsenals in the United States
ponents, and expertise from foreign suppliers, and the Russian Federation. We will also work
as well as developing indigenous capabilities. In to strengthen means for interdicting shipments of
fact, we recommit to ensuring Iran never acquires proliferation concern, and other states’ capacities
to prevent proliferant transfers.

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GOAL 1: PROTECT AMERICA’S SECURITY AT HOME AND ABROAD

The Department will continue to assess states’ provides instructions on the production of chem-
compliance with obligations and commitments, ical and biological weapons. The Department
including the publication of a congressionally keeps abreast of technological change; engages
mandated Compliance Report detailing noncom- with partner countries to update the control lists
pliant activity annually. We will continue to lead of the multilateral export control regimes; and is
multilateral efforts that urge noncompliant states working to create new frameworks and norms to
to return to compliance with their obligations assess the benefits and risks of dual-use research
and to understand the challenges associated with in the life sciences.
future nuclear disarmament verification, in par-
ticular, through the International Partnership for Performance Goal 1.1.1
Nuclear Disarmament Verification. We will work
with the Congress and our European allies to fix By 2022, strengthen U.S. national security by
the flaws in the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Ac- countering WMD and ballistic missile prolif-
tion and continue to hold Iran strictly account- eration, strengthening relevant multilateral
able to its agreed-upon commitments. arrangements, and impeding illicit trafficking
of WMD, advanced conventional weapons,
Cross-Agency Collaboration and related technologies.

The Department of State’s own nonproliferation


security assistance programs work to reinforce Performance Goal 1.1.2
diplomatic engagement to counter WMD prolif-
eration. The Department and USAID also work By 2022, strengthen U.S. national security by
with the Department of Defense’s Office of Co- countering WMD and ballistic missile prolif-
operative Threat Reduction, the Department of eration, strengthening relevant multilateral
Energy (DOE), especially the National Nuclear arrangements, and impeding illicit trafficking
Security Administration (NNSA) and the Nation- of WMD, advanced conventional weapons,
al Laboratories, the Department of Homeland and related technologies.
Security Container Security Initiative and other
programs, the Department of Justice (DOJ), the
Department of Treasury (DOT), and the Depart- Strategic Objective 1.2: Defeat ISIS,
ment of Commerce (DOC).
al-Qa’ida and other transnational
Risk terrorist organizations, and counter
state-sponsored, regional, and local
The United States relies on many internation- terrorist groups that threaten U.S.
al and multilateral organizations to help achieve
our nonproliferation objectives. Because many of national security interests
these organizations work by consensus, one state
can refuse or delay prompt action or achievement Strategic Objective Overview
of our immediate and longer-term nonprolifera-
tion objectives. In his speech to the Arab Islamic American Sum-
mit in May 2017, the President outlined a shared
New technologies are being developed and prac- goal with our international partners to conquer
tical applications for them are being devised at an extremism and vanquish the forces of terrorism
astonishing pace. Lines are being blurred between and the ideology that drives it.2 In support of this
chemical and biological agents; new organisms effort, the United States and our partners have
are being developed; there is worldwide access accelerated the fight against ISIS, significantly
to dual-use life science research; and the internet degraded its safe havens in Iraq and Syria, and

2 The President of the United States’ remarks: https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/president-trumps-speech-ar-


ab-islamic-american-summit/
25
GOAL 1: PROTECT AMERICA’S SECURITY AT HOME AND ABROAD

challenged its ability to operate around the world. mote international norms and good practices,
However, ISIS continues adapting its tactics to- and sustain trans-regional cooperation to prevent
ward an insurgent and clandestine presence. ISIS and counter terrorism.
continues to inspire and mobilize supporters and
sympathizers through messaging, propaganda, We will encourage regional organizations, na-
and recruitment efforts. Al-Qa’ida (AQ) and its tional and local governments, civil society, faith-
global network of affiliates remain determined to based groups, and the private sector to count-
threaten U.S. interests. Regional and local ter- er these radical ideologies, as well as to prevent
rorist groups also threaten U.S. citizens and our and mitigate conditions conducive to instability,
partners. Iran, the world’s leading state sponsor radicalization, and terrorist recruitment. We
of terrorism, provides training, equipment, and will strengthen democratic, transparent, rep-
financing for terrorist groups such as Hizballah resentative, and citizen-responsive governance
and Hamas. The country is developing new proxy and include the voices of women and marginal-
militia forces, comprised of over 100,000 non-Ira- ized communities, to increase the trust between
nian fighters, to extend its influence, co-opt local government authorities and local populations.
security forces, and conduct lethal operations on Where we have defeated terrorists in the field and
Iran’s behalf across the Middle East. ended their control of specific communities, we
will support stabilization of liberated areas so that
The Department of State and USAID’s overarch- the terrorists cannot return. Syria is a special case
ing objective is to degrade global terrorism threats in that no legitimate host-nation partner exists to
so local governments and security forces can con- provide effective security, governance, and eco-
tain them and restore stability. We will work to nomic activity in areas freed from ISIS. The way
consolidate military gains against ISIS, AQ, and forward in Syria depends upon implementation
other terrorist organizations and stabilize liber- of UNCSR 2254, including a political transition
ated areas by supporting local partners that can with international support. Interim arrangements
reestablish the rule of law, manage conflict, and that are truly representative and do not threaten
restore basic services. We believe that diplomatic neighboring states will speed the stabilization of
engagement and targeted development assistance liberated areas of Syria and set the conditions for
to stabilize affected areas will help prevent new constitutional reform and elections.
recruitment, reduce levels of violence, promote
legitimate governance structures that strengthen The Department and USAID will prioritize their
inclusion, and reduce policies that marginalize engagement and assistance to stabilize areas liber-
communities. As outlined by Secretary Tillerson ated from violent extremist organizations, partic-
in his remarks at the Hoover Institute in January ularly ISIS. We will use innovative approaches to
2018, we must deny ISIS and other terrorist orga- encourage host government partners and civil so-
nizations the opportunity to organize, raise funds, ciety organizations to undertake critical reforms
travel across borders, use communications tech- to establish legitimate governance, restore the rule
nology to radicalize and recruit fighters, and to of law, and address local grievances, particularly
train, plan, and execute attacks.3 among women, religious and ethnic minorities,
and other marginalized communities.
Strategies for Achieving this Objective
Cross-Agency Collaboration
The Department and USAID will play a key role
in implementing the President’s plan to defeat The Department works with other federal agen-
ISIS, through leadership of the Global Coali- cies and our partner countries’ defense, law
tion to Defeat ISIS. We will work multilaterally enforcement, and justice sectors to build and
through institutions such as the United Nations, strengthen their institutional counterterrorism
G7, and Global Counterterrorism Forum to pro- and other related capabilities, while reinforcing

3 Secretary Tillerson’s remarks: https://www.state.gov/secretary/remarks/2018/01/277493.htm

26
GOAL 1: PROTECT AMERICA’S SECURITY AT HOME AND ABROAD

critical stabilization goals that make such efforts Performance Goal 1.2.2
sustainable. We work closely with the Depart-
ment of Defense to ensure coordinated security By 2022, reduce identified drivers of violent
cooperation assistance. extremism in countries, regions and locales
most vulnerable to radicalization to terror-
USAID designs and delivers programs targeting ism while also strengthening partner gov-
specific regional and local vulnerabilities, with a ernment and civil society capacity to prevent,
focus on improving governance and the ability of counter, or respond to terrorism and violent
partners to assume responsibility for their own extremism.
prevention efforts. These programs respond to
on-the-ground conditions using an array of inter-
ventions. Performance Goal 1.2.3

Risk By 2022, strengthen partner government and


civil society capacity to utilize data-driven
Enemies of the United States will continue to approaches to counter messaging.
modify and adapt their techniques, requiring the
Department and USAID to increase diplomatic
and development action, adjust strategies and sta- Strategic Objective 1.3: Counter
bilization initiatives, approaches, and programs
quickly to counter constantly changing threats.
instability, transnational crime, and
This requires a flexible approach and strong col- violence that threaten U.S. interests
laboration, both within the U.S. Government and by strengthening citizen-responsive
with our partners, to ensure we keep pace with governance, security, democracy,
threats and protect our homelands. We must re-
main vigilant regarding the threat of terrorism in human rights, and the rule of law
ungoverned spaces, especially in conflict zones,
which remain ripe breeding grounds for ISIS and Strategic Objective Overview
other terrorist organizations.
Violence and political instability affect nearly half
Performance Goal 1.2.1 the world’s population4 and impose a staggering
toll on human development, with an estimated
cost of more than $13 trillion per year.5 Transna-
By 2022, contribute to the defeat of ISIS core,
tional crime, with global revenues of approximate-
its regional branches and nodes, and its glob-
ly $2 trillion annually,6 fuels corruption, finances
al network through mobilization of the Glob-
insurgencies, and distorts markets. Transnational
al Coalition, diplomacy, action, humanitarian
criminal organizations (TCOs) traffic in persons
and stabilization assistance, and international
and wildlife, and contribute to the domestic opi-
coordination and cooperation.
oid crisis by bringing heroin and synthetic opi-
oids across U.S. borders, harming American com-
munities through the drug trade and attendant
violence. Environmental threats such as water
scarcity and biodiversity loss can further fuel ten-
sions over much-needed resources.

4 OECD States of Fragility Report, 2016: http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/docserver/download/4316101e.pdf?expires=151508571


4&id=id&accname=guest&checksum=EDBA05A422FB7C733750B6F0545E57B3
5 Institute for Economics and Peace, The Economic Cost of Violence Containment, http://economicsandpeace.org/wp-content/
uploads/2015/06/The-Economic-Cost-of-Violence-Containment.pdf.
6 Global Financial Integrity, “Transnational Crime and the Developing World,” March 2017, http://www.gfintegrity.org/wp-con-
tent/uploads/2017/03/Transnational_Crime-final.pdf

27
GOAL 1: PROTECT AMERICA’S SECURITY AT HOME AND ABROAD

Crime and insecurity are often a consequence of advance international standards on drug control
weak democratic norms and institutions. TCOs and hold partners accountable to burden sharing.
and other illicit actors can exploit areas of weak
governance to establish a safe haven to grow Development plays a critical role in counteracting
their enterprise. In areas of civic mobilization, the drivers of instability. The Department and US-
some governments crack down rather than open AID will address the underlying causes of crime
up – ultimately undermining their own security by supporting critical institutional capacity build-
as they lose public legitimacy and squander the ing, civil society strengthening, and reform efforts
public trust needed to combat crime. Globally, needed to promote good governance, strengthen
developing countries with ineffective government the rule of law, and introduce strategies to pre-
institutions, rampant corruption, and weak rule vent, mitigate, and stabilize violence. In the West-
of law have a 30 to 45 percent higher risk of civil ern Hemisphere, we will support economic and
war and a heightened risk of criminal violence.7 social opportunities for those at risk of becoming
perpetrators or victims of violence as well as help
As Secretary Tillerson stated in his remarks at improve citizen security. We will emphasize to
Florida International University in June 2017, foreign counterparts how citizen-responsive gov-
“Our international partners in this effort must ernance and protection of rights is critical to their
work to reject intimidation, strengthen human own security and prosperity. This includes work-
rights, and increase the fight against criminal or- ing to strengthen the institutional framework for
ganizations within their own borders.”8 The De- the promotion of human rights, the human rights
partment and USAID will seize the opportunity to defenders’ protection systems, and communica-
work with our international partners in this effort tions and collaboration between governments
to counter instability, transnational crime, and vi- and civil society. We will use foreign assistance,
olence through a range of programs, authorities, visa sanctions, and multilateral and bilateral en-
and diplomatic engagements. The United States gagement to promote government accountability
has an array of varied interests across fragile and and support partners in implementing reforms.
conflict-affected states, and the Department and Recognizing the influential role women can play
USAID will selectively focus on those places pos- in conflict prevention, peacebuilding, and stabili-
ing the greatest threats and risks for U.S. interests. zation, the Department and USAID are commit-
ted to full implementation of the Women, Peace,
Strategies for Achieving the Objective and Security (WPS) Act of 2017 (P.L. 115-68),
which aims to institutionalize both protection of
Law enforcement capacity building programs are women in conflict situations and the engagement
the bedrock on which we strengthen partner- of women in decision making processes.
ships to counter TCOs. We seek to expand these
programs and build the capacity of trustworthy The Department and USAID will make early in-
foreign partners through rule of law and anticor- vestments in preventing conflict, atrocities, and
ruption assistance in order to facilitate law en- violent extremism before they spread. During
forcement development and cooperation. In the conflict, we will promote civilian protection and
Western Hemisphere, we seek to use these pro- increase support to peace processes. We will
grams to target TCO leadership and their support enhance partner countries’ self-sufficient peace
networks, shut down illicit pathways to the United operations, training, and deployment capabili-
States, and enhance shared security. Globally, we ties, and build the capacities of international and
will work with partners to cut financial lifelines regional organizations to conduct peacekeeping
for global terror and organized crime organiza- missions. Following armed conflict, civilian agen-
tions, including those involved with human and cies will lead in consolidating gains and promot-
wildlife trafficking. We will coordinate through ing stabilization efforts, including supporting lo-
regional and international bodies to develop and cal efforts to manage conflict peaceably, restoring

7 World Bank, World Development Report, 2011: http://web.worldbank.org/archive/website01306/web/early-findings.html.


8 Secretary Tillerson’s remarks: https://www.state.gov/secretary/remarks/2017/06/271960.htm
28
GOAL 1: PROTECT AMERICA’S SECURITY AT HOME AND ABROAD

public safety, holding perpetrators of atrocities Performance Goal 1.3.3


accountable, and enabling disarmament, demobi-
lization and reintegration of ex-combatants. The By 2022, work with partner country govern-
Department and USAID will provide short-term ments to strengthen criminal justice systems
assistance to facilitate political transitions, along and support prevention efforts in local com-
with assistance to address the governance chal- munities in order to build capacity to address
lenges that are often the root cause of conflict. In transnational organized crime.
tandem, host governments must increase burden
sharing with international partners and develop
the capability to coordinate their own security
strategies.
Strategic Objective 1.4: Increase
capacity and strengthen resilience of
Cross-Agency Collaboration our partners and allies to deter
aggression, coercion, and malign
The Department and USAID engage bilaterally
and through multilateral mechanisms with hun- influence by state and non-state
dreds of external partners and stakeholders with actors
an interest in reducing global violence and in-
stability. We coordinate programs and strategies Strategic Objective Overview
with relevant branches of the U.S. Government,
including collaboration with the Department of The ascent of authoritarianism, the re-emer-
Defense, the Department of Justice, and the De- gence of great power competition, and the rise
partment of Homeland Security. We cultivate of hostile non-state actors have altered the stra-
close relationships with UN organizations and tegic landscape and increased the vulnerability of
non-governmental organizations active in this well-established democratic nations and emerg-
arena as well. ing democracies. China and Russia directly chal-
lenge an international order based on democratic
Risk norms, respect for human rights, and peace. Iran
and North Korea seek to increase their regional
There are inherent risks in working with countries influence through coercion and aggression, using
prone to instability, violence, and crime. Security their nuclear programs and support for malign
risks in these environments can limit our agencies’ non-state actors. State-supported and indepen-
footprint. Politically, fragile states rarely travel a dent cybercriminals attack the interests of the
predictable path, which can affect our ability to United States and its allies through theft, extor-
introduce enduring partnerships and programs. tion, and malicious efforts aimed at crippling in-
frastructure.
Performance Goal 1.3.1
Russia conducts covert and overt campaigns to
By 2022, improve the capacity of vulnerable undermine core Western institutions, such as the
countries to mitigate sources of fragility, in- North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and
stability, and conflict. the European Union (EU), and weakens faith in
the democratic and free-market system. Russia’s
predatory behavior extends to the political, secu-
Performance Goal 1.3.2 rity, informational, energy, and economic spheres.
Recent subversive Russian actions threaten the
By 2022, contribute to strengthened demo- energy markets in Europe and cause interference
cratic governance through targeted assistance in domestic political affairs. The United States re-
to improve citizen engagement, strengthen mains committed to deterrence and the principle
civil society, increase transparency, and pro-
tect human rights.

29
GOAL 1: PROTECT AMERICA’S SECURITY AT HOME AND ABROAD

of common defense as enshrined in Article 5 of sharing responsibilities and burdens. Nations of


the Charter of the NATO, and continues to invest the world must take a greater role in promoting
in transatlantic security. secure and prosperous societies across their re-
gions, thereby protecting the world against these
China seeks to increase its influence in the In- common threats.
do-Pacific region. China’s actions, including the
militarization of disputed territory in the South Strategies for Achieving the Objective
China Sea, transgression of norms in cyberspace,
continued support for North Korea, disregard for The United States will maintain our leadership
human rights, and unfair trade and investment and strong, forward diplomatic presence built on
practices threaten to undermine the internation- enduring security partnerships to collectively de-
al rules-based order that has underpinned peace ter aggression, reduce threats, and assist our allies
and prosperity in the Indo-Pacific region and be- in sustaining favorable regional strategic balanc-
yond. es. We will expand our network of alliances and
partnerships and increase our ability to influence
Iran remains the world’s leading state sponsor malign actors’ policy choices and encourage their
of terrorism and provider of military training, adherence to a rules-based international order.
equipment, and funding to Hizballah, Hamas,
and other terrorist networks. Iran seeks to in- To advance our interests in the most dynamic re-
crease its regional influence through destabilizing gion of the world, we will support a free and open
activities across the Middle East. Tehran props up Indo-Pacific, working with allies and partners to
the murderous regime of Bashar al Assad in Syria, promote economic prosperity, security, and dem-
spreads sophisticated missiles and other advanced ocratic governance. We will deepen our unique
weapons to its partners and proxies, trains and strategic partnership with India, a fellow democ-
arms large local militant groups to fight its wars racy and pillar of rules-based international behav-
across the Middle East, and openly calls for the ior. To balance Chinese influence, we will rein-
destruction of some of our closest allies. force existing regional alliances, including those
with Japan, Australia, and the Republic of Korea,
Cybersecurity and outer space are critical eco- and strengthen other security partnerships, in-
nomic, security, and foreign policy concerns. cluding with India. We will engage with China
Cyberattacks are relatively low cost and can be to address our differences on North Korea and in
launched from anywhere, allowing adversaries to other areas, including trade and territorial dis-
target systematically critical infrastructure, finan- putes. To counter Russian aggression and coer-
cial systems, and military installations worldwide. cion, the Department will lead allies in enhancing
These cyberattacks can also be directed against NATO’s deterrence and defense posture, promote
civilian and business interests. Malicious state deeper NATO partnerships with like-minded na-
and non-state actors will continue to employ new tions, and build bridges between NATO and the
strategies and tactics to pursue criminal or dis- EU to confront the full range of hybrid threats.
ruptive ends in cyberspace, and our cybersecurity
policy must evolve at the cutting edge of technol- To mitigate efforts to undermine civil society
ogy to stay ahead of these changes. Outer space is and democratic norms, the Department and US-
increasingly challenging as it becomes congested AID will assist governments, non-governmental
with space debris and contested through potential organizations (NGOs), and faith-based organi-
adversaries’ development of counter space capa- zations that face coercion and malign influence.
bilities. The United States will continue to champion
long-standing, foundational values of freedom
The ability to address these challenges requires and liberty. We will work with our partners to
a collaborative effort, where cooperation means eliminate corruption and support the rule of law,

30
GOAL 1: PROTECT AMERICA’S SECURITY AT HOME AND ABROAD

strengthen civil society and democratic institu- Cross-Agency Collaboration


tions, enhance energy security, support financial
and trade reforms, support economic diversifica- The Department of State provides foreign policy
tion, and foster independent, professional media. advice to Department of Defense programs, poli-
cies, and planning. The Department and USAID
The Department will pursue a range of security use Development Assistance and Economic Sup-
sector assistance activities to strengthen our al- port Funds to support critical institutional capac-
liances and partnerships, assist them in their ef- ity building and reform efforts. The Department
forts against malign influence and aggression, and uses Public Diplomacy funds to engage publics
maintain favorable regional balances of power. vulnerable to malign influence campaigns and
We will ensure that foreign policy goals funda- counter disinformation.
mentally guide security sector decision-making,
and through grant assistance and arms sales, we Risk
will judiciously equip partners and allies with ca-
pabilities that support strategic priorities. We will This strategy requires that partners and allies have
forge lasting security relationships by improving the political will and technical capacity to contin-
interoperability between the United States and ue to stand against aggression and malign influ-
coalition partners; securing access and legal pro- ence. However, some of these partners and allies
tections to facilitate deployment of U.S. forces; may be beholden to the political influence of ad-
and supporting professional military education versaries and potential competitors.
and training of partner nations. The Department
will continue missile defense cooperation to de- We will continue to be challenged with balanc-
ploy missile defense capabilities to defend the U.S. ing foreign policy and national security concerns
homeland, U.S. deployed forces, allies, and part- while building partner capacity and interoperabil-
ners. ity through responsibly managed arms transfers.

In conjunction with allies, partners, and in multi- Performance Goal 1.4.1


lateral fora, we will devise, implement, and mon-
itor economic and energy sector sanctions. The By 2022, significantly increase international
Department will seek to increase cooperation cooperation to secure an open, interoperable,
with allies and partners to counter Iranian threats reliable, and stable cyberspace and strength-
and destabilizing behavior; through sanctions, we en the capacity of the United States and part-
will constrain Iran’s ballistic missile program and ner nations to detect, deter, rapidly mitigate,
degrade its support for terrorism and militancy. and respond to international cyber threats
and incidents.
The Department will build a coalition of like-
minded governments to identify and hold regimes
accountable that engage in or permit malicious Strategic Objective 1.5: Strengthen
cyber activities to occur on their territory, con-
trary to the United States supported framework of
U.S. border security and protect U.S.
responsible state behavior in cyberspace, and to citizens abroad
address threats from non-state actors. We will use
a similar approach when addressing challenges in Strategic Objective Overview
outer space.
National security starts overseas and our aim is
to create conditions that help secure U.S. borders
and protect U.S. citizens abroad while facilitating
legitimate international travel that builds the U.S.

31
GOAL 1: PROTECT AMERICA’S SECURITY AT HOME AND ABROAD

economy, strengthens formal and informal inter- stricts the environment in which potential threat
national partnerships, and protects U.S. interests actors can operate.
abroad. Information gathered in pursuit of ter-
rorist threats results in the discovery of known Strategies for Achieving the Objective
and suspected terrorist identities that populate
U.S. government watch lists used to vet and screen The Department of State will continue to en-
prospective travelers to the United States. The hance the refugee security screening and vetting
Department enables its partners to disrupt TCOs processes. We will work with other agencies to
involved in human smuggling as far from our establish a uniform baseline for screening and
borders as possible, and deters and prevents ille- vetting standards and procedures across the travel
gal immigration into the United States. Strength- and immigration spectrum. The visa application
ening civil societies and deterring aggression forms, as well as the adjudication and clearance
overseas creates a more secure environment for processes, will conform to common standards for
U.S. citizens traveling and residing abroad. Data applications, official U.S. Government interac-
legally gathered across all mission spaces inform tions and interviews, and systems checks as man-
the content of consular messages to U.S. citizens dated. We will support our partners in their ef-
as well as other audiences. Finally, cyberspace forts to support refugees and migrants near their
allows state and non-state actors to avoid phys- home regions through a variety of programmatic
ical borders and threaten critical infrastructure, and bilateral diplomatic tools.
which represent some of the most pressing risks
to national security, economic security, and pub- The Department will continue to work with our
lic safety. international partners to exchange information
on known and suspected terrorists and other
At home and abroad, the Department helps pro- threats to U.S. citizens at home and abroad. We
tect U.S. national borders through sharing of will ensure that interagency and international
information within and between foreign gov- arrangements are maintained and updated, pro-
ernments by improving passport security and viding the highest-possible degree of information
implementing effective visa adjudication pro- sharing of terrorist and criminal identities.
cesses that deny access to individuals who pose
risks to U.S. national security. The Department’s The Department will strengthen our partners’
diplomatic engagement on counterterrorism and abilities to provide security for Americans in their
homeland security increases two-way informa- country by promoting increased cooperation with
tion sharing on known and suspected terrorists, U.S. homeland security policies and initiatives.
risk-based border management, and threat-based We will further refine safety and security infor-
security and border screening at all land, air, and mation provided to U.S. citizens, which will help
sea borders to protect partner nations and U.S. them to make more informed decisions about
citizens in those locations and to deter terrorist their travel and activities. The Department pro-
travel, including to the United States. In order motes information sharing and the widespread
to achieve this objective, the Department main- adoption of cybersecurity best practices to ensure
tains information sharing programs with partner all countries can implement the due diligence to
nations and security programs to build capacity reduce the risk of significant incidents from oc-
of foreign government law enforcement partners curring.
and enhance information sharing among foreign
partners. The Department will work with interagency part-
ners and the transportation industry to enhance
The Department works with international part- global transportation security. We will inform
ners to increase their capacity to manage migra- foreign partners of non-imminent persistent
tory flows, recognizing that strong rule of law re- threats to spur international border and transpor-

32
GOAL 1: PROTECT AMERICA’S SECURITY AT HOME AND ABROAD

tation security efforts, including implementation Performance Goal 1.5.2


of international standards and recommended
practices. We will continue to urge countries to Through 2022, ensure timely dissemination
employ threat-based border security and en- of safety, security, and crisis information that
hanced traveler screening; to improve identity allows U.S. citizens to make informed deci-
verification and traveler documentation; and to sions for their safety while traveling or resid-
use, collect, and analyze Advanced Passenger In- ing abroad.
formation and Passenger Name Record data in
traveler screening to prevent terrorist travel.
Performance Goal 1.5.3
Cross-Agency Collaboration
Through 2022, continue to ensure vigilant,
The Department works closely with other U.S. accurate, and timely passport services to U.S.
government agencies, Congress, service organi- citizens.
zations, advocacy groups, the travel industry, and
state and local governments to advance the full
range of consular and other activities in support Performance Goal 1.5.4
of border protection. The following list highlights
key external partners: By September 30, 2019, we will update the
DS-160 and DS-260 nonimmigrant and im-
• U.S. government agencies including DHS, migrant visa application forms and add the
Justice, DOD, and the Intelligence newly-collected fields to our data sharing
Community feeds for interagency partners. (APG)
• Terrorist Screening Center
• American Chambers of Commerce
• Federal, state, and local governments
• Travel and Tourism Community
• Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Risk

There may be a lack of adequate resources and


cooperation to implement interagency initiatives.

Foreign partners may be unwilling to share in-


formation because of differences in legal systems,
regulations on protection of national security in-
formation, and privacy concerns.

Performance Goal 1.5.1

By 2022, increase information sharing with


partner nations and improve partner nation
connectivity to international criminal and
terrorist databases in order to better identi-
fy individuals with derogatory information
seeking to enter the United States.

33
GOAL 2:
RENEW AMERICA’S COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE FOR
SUSTAINED ECONOMIC GROWTH AND JOB CREATION
Strategic Goal Overview currency manipulation to support a strong
U.S. manufacturing base and well-paying
American national security requires sus- jobs, especially in cutting-edge industries.
tained economic prosperity. In an inter- Our engagement will advance more open
connected world, the Department of State markets and sensible regulatory systems
and USAID must position the United States abroad that provide confidence without sti-
more advantageously to ensure the condi- fling innovation. We will vigorously defend
tions for economic dynamism at home. As U. S. intellectual property rights, uphold
new challenges and opportunities emerge America’s position as the top destination
in a changing international landscape, for international investment, and develop
our economic engagement with the world new avenues for coordinating with coun-
must be comprehensive, forward-looking, tries and institutions to foster innovation
and flexible. The United States can ad- and ensure that regulations on emerging
vance its economic and security goals only industries do not create new barriers in ar-
through robust diplomacy, assertive trade eas of American strength. To further ad-
and commercial policies, and broad-based vance American leadership in international
engagement with governments and societ- energy governance, the Department and
ies. Growth and economic security among USAID must leverage developments in the
U.S. allies and partners also build markets U.S. energy sector to pursue universal ac-
for U.S. goods and services and strengthens cess to affordable and reliable energy and
the ability to confront global challenges to- promote sustainable global energy markets.
gether. We must counter models promoted
by other nations by offering a clear choice: Our economic diplomacy and develop-
The American approach is to help our part- ment assistance are key tools in projecting
ners prosper. Our economic diplomacy this leadership to enhance security and
and development assistance are key tools in prosperity at home. Development, trans-
projecting this leadership to enhance secu- parency, and good governance in unstable
rity and prosperity at home. regions are essential to fight poverty, iso-
late extremists, and improve humanitarian
American technology is pre-eminent, our conditions. The Department and USAID
workers are the most productive in the will promote healthy, educated, and pro-
world, and U.S. exporters thrive in glob- ductive populations in developing coun-
al markets when given a truly fair playing tries to drive inclusive economic growth
field in which to compete. In close part- that opens markets for U.S. investments
nership with the full range of U.S. Govern- and counters violent extremism. Investing
ment agencies, the Department will fight in women’s economic empowerment has
aggressively for fairer trade policies across transformational effects for families and
the world and a global economy free from communities, and will be a key component

35
GOAL 2: RENEW AMERICA’S COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE FOR SUSTAINED ECONOMIC GROWTH AND JOB CREATION

of our approach. Confronting internation- fair, and reciprocal trade and set transpar-
al environmental challenges requires robust ent standards to create enabling environ-
American diplomacy and a more compre- ments for investment, innovation, and co-
hensive deployment of U.S. environmental operation in science and technology and
goods and services throughout the world. health. American prosperity also requires
We will stand against corruption abroad, internationally agreed norms for access and
which undermines security, enables TCOs operations in areas beyond national juris-
and disadvantages U.S. companies. diction, including on the high seas and out-
er space.
Strategic Objective 2.1: Promote
American prosperity by advancing Promoting entrepreneurship creates jobs
bilateral relationships and leveraging and openings for U.S. businesses world-
wide, strengthening global political stabili-
international institutions and
ty and economic prosperity. In partnership
agreements to open markets, with the Department of Commerce, the
secure commercial opportunities, Department will expand its advocacy for
and foster investment and U.S. commercial and defense products and
innovation to contribute to U.S. job services abroad, as well as promote foreign
creation direct investment to the United States.

Strategic Objective Overview The Department also collaborates with the


Department of Commerce to advocate for
A robust and secure U.S. economy that cre- U.S. companies bidding on foreign govern-
ates new American jobs depends on strong ment tenders, to alert U.S. companies to
economic growth and promoting free, fair, new market opportunities, and to encour-
and reciprocal trade relationships with age investment in the United States. The
countries around the world. American Department leads negotiations on civil air
prosperity will also advance when we main- transport agreements and telecommuni-
tain and deepen relationships, encourage cations agreements, co-leads negotiations
strong demand for U.S. exports in emerging on investment treaties, produces annual
and developing countries, and expand U.S. country Investment Climate Statements,
trade and investment opportunities in the and participates in the Committee on For-
global marketplace. eign Investment in the United States. Both
the Department and USAID participate in
We will also strengthen property rights and interagency teams led by the United States
contract enforcement, competition policies, Trade Representative (USTR) to develop
sound commercial law, and the protection and vet U.S. trade policy positions including
and enforcement of intellectual property revising and negotiating new trade agree-
rights around the world. ments. The Department of State, with other
agencies, actively negotiates and promotes
International institutions must do more to the regulatory and policy environment that
promote economic rules that enhance free, sustains and strengthens a dynamic and
open digital economy.

36
GOAL 2: RENEW AMERICA’S COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE FOR SUSTAINED ECONOMIC GROWTH AND JOB CREATION

Many of USAID’s assistance programs fo- to high standards. The Department will
cus on supporting the creation of business modernize defense trade policies and reg-
friendly regulatory regimes around the ulations to support national security and
world. The Department’s work on inter- foreign policy goals, increase resilience,
national environmental, oceans, science, and enhance the competitiveness of key
health, and outer space supports hundreds U.S. manufacturing and technology sectors.
of billions of dollars of economic activity in We will promote education exports, such as
those sectors through efforts to negotiate study in the United States, through student
rights and promote internationally agreed advising centers and other programs, and
norms. Our engagement through interna- support American scientists, engineers,
tional institutions and fora promotes agree- and innovators in international settings.
ment on technical standards and policies
that drive the information technology and The Department’s officials will work bilater-
communications sectors. Our work with ally and through international institutions
U.S. and foreign educational, non-profit, to ensure that foreign governments do not
and private sectors promotes U.S. educa- employ practices such as weak labor, en-
tional exports, and science fellows and sci- vironment, or intellectual property rights
ence envoy programs enhance our science systems, data localization requirements,
and technology outreach. or state subsidies to compete unfairly. We
will also work to establish clear, transpar-
Strategies for Achieving the Objective ent markets outside of formal negotiations,
expanding fair access for U.S. products,
The Department will advocate on behalf services, and technology. Department of
of American workers by seeking to lower State and USAID programs will support
foreign trade and investment barriers and market-based economic reform efforts and
to attract new job-producing investment target improved commercial law and trade
and legitimate foreign visitors and students regimes, benefiting U.S. exporters by re-
to the United States. Through diplomatic ducing barriers at foreign borders. We will
engagement bilaterally and in internation- work to empower women economically, as
al fora, the Department and our embassies a driver of development and trade. We will
will continue to work to break down bar- leverage public-private partnerships and
riers to U.S. exports and target unfair pol- targeted foreign assistance to work with
icies that adversely affect U.S. businesses. foreign partners to address barriers to trade
Our expanded outreach to U.S. exporters, and investment and economic growth.
including by identifying market opportuni-
ties and challenges and publicizing foreign Cross Agency Collaboration
procurement tenders, will remain critical
to efforts to boost U.S. exports. We will Interagency partners include the Depart-
target assistance efforts to create a level ments of the Treasury (DOT), Commerce
playing field for doing business, including (DOC), Transportation (DOT), Homeland
rules supporting fair and reciprocal trade, Security (DHS), Justice (DOJ), the Unit-
business friendly regulation, and adherence ed States Trade Representative (USTR),

37
GOAL 2: RENEW AMERICA’S COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE FOR SUSTAINED ECONOMIC GROWTH AND JOB CREATION

Overseas Private Investment Corporation Performance Goal 2.1.1


(OPIC), Trade and Development Agency
(USTDA), Millennium Challenge Corpo- By 2022, using 2017 baseline data, sup-
ration (MCC), Federal Communications port increased exports of U.S. goods
Commission (FCC), Federal Aviation Ad- and services by increasing by 50 per-
ministration (FAA), Federal Maritime cent appropriate commercial advocacy
Commission, Maritime Administration, for U.S. businesses.
Customs and Border Protection (CBP), the
Department of Agriculture (DOA), Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Performance Goal 2.1.2
the National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration (NOAA). Other partners By 2022, support increases in exports of
include American Chambers of Commerce U.S. digital products and services by ad-
overseas and the U.S. Chamber, foreign de- vocating for regulatory environments
velopment assistance agencies, and multi- that enable cross-border data flows and
lateral development finance institutions. digital trade, contributing to informa-
tion and communications technology
Risk (ICT) services growing to more than
$70 billion.
Financial crisis and recession can trigger
protectionist responses that make it more
difficult to open foreign markets. A strong Performance Goal 2.1.3
dollar can lead to fewer foreign visitors and
students, and affect the competitiveness of By 2022, increase the number of part-
U.S. exports. ners engaged with the U.S. to promote
and expand cooperation in science,
Technological diffusion and the spread of technology and innovation to boost
economic activity to emerging markets, American prosperity.
while positive overall, could reduce the
ability of the United States to shape inter-
national institutions and economic devel-
opments outside our borders. Disruptive
technologies could continue to present
challenges as well as opportunities to tradi-
tional commerce.

State capitalism prevalent in some coun-


tries can distort markets and impede U.S.
business opportunities, while corruption
subverts open markets and impedes the
ability of American companies to compete.

38
GOAL 2: RENEW AMERICA’S COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE FOR SUSTAINED ECONOMIC GROWTH AND JOB CREATION

Strategic Objective 2.2: Promote programs that connect people, especially


healthy, educated and productive women and minorities, to the global econo-
populations in partner countries to my; build resilience to economic and social
stresses in conflict-prone societies; educate
drive inclusive and sustainable de-
and empower citizens; and save children
velopment, open new markets and from disease and preventable death.
support U.S. prosperity and security
objectives Host country governments, local civil so-
ciety partners, faith-based organizations,
Strategic Objective Overview bilateral donors, multilateral organizations,
the private sector, and international orga-
Political instability, unchecked crime, and nizations are committed to achieving re-
the lack of essential services and econom- sults through partnerships, collaboration,
ic opportunities in other countries have and coordination that are more effective.
the potential to create global health crises, Strong collaboration will optimize resource
drive mass migration to the United States, allocation and reduce fragmentation. Clear
and inflame violent extremism around the host country ownership and priorities, in-
globe. The Department of State and USAID cluding national or sub-national education
investments in global economic growth and plans, enable targeted investments from
development safeguard U.S. economic and development partners. A collaborative
strategic interests, and are visible expres- development approach is critical, especial-
sions of U.S. values. Department of State ly in cases of acute or protracted crises,
and USAID programs help economies to widespread displacement, and chronic in-
grow, and countries to open their markets, stability. The Department and USAID will
become potential consumers of U.S. goods rapidly respond to crises as they arise and
and services, and contribute to regional sta- coordinate with the ongoing development
bility. U.S. security and prosperity are bol- efforts of other donors.
stered when other countries achieve eco-
nomic and political stability, resilience, and Strategies for Achieving the Objective
self-reliance through investments in areas
such as food and water security, energy se- The Department of State and USAID will
curity, good governance, health, education, support foreign governments, international
and economic growth. organizations, and private sector partners
to increase access to quality education as
Economic growth, particularly in develop- a smart development strategy in order to
ing and transitional economies, serves to improve economic conditions around the
strengthen and expand our base of partners, world. To reinforce the educational foun-
bolster economic opportunities, and build dation of growing societies in our partner
future markets for U.S. exports in the fastest countries, we will fund programs to ensure
growing regions of the world. Likewise, the crisis-affected children and youth are ac-
United States is made stronger and more cessing quality education that is safe, rel-
secure through Department and USAID evant, and promotes social cohesion. We

39
GOAL 2: RENEW AMERICA’S COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE FOR SUSTAINED ECONOMIC GROWTH AND JOB CREATION

will also fund programs to ensure children strengthen resilience among people and
are reading and gaining basic skills that are systems, and improve nutrition, especially
foundational to future learning and success; among women and children, to enhance
young people are learning the skills they human potential, health, and productivity.
need to lead productive lives, gain employ- We will strive to alleviate the burden of gen-
ment, and positively contribute to society; der-based violence, which affects women’s
and higher education institutions are sup- ability to thrive and succeed.
porting development progress across sec-
tors. We will remain champions of girls’ ed- The Department and USAID will encour-
ucation and target the underlying causes of age improvements to corporate gover-
gender gaps in education attainment. Clos- nance, sharing new technology, supporting
ing the gender gap in secondary education capital formation and strong, abuse-resis-
has a direct and robust association with tant financial systems to bolster the busi-
economic development, as a 1 percent in- ness capacity of small business and high
crease in female secondary education raises growth-potential entrepreneurs to help
the average GDP by 0.3 percent, and raises grow and integrate domestic and interna-
annual GDP growth rates by 0.2 percent. tional markets. By strengthening property
rights and land/resource tenure, U.S. en-
The Department and USAID will foster gagement will support women’s economic
inclusive economic growth in which all empowerment, youth employment, conflict
members of society share in the benefits prevention, and other development ob-
of growth, reducing poverty, building re- jectives. We will promote the use of U.S.
silience and expanding opportunity, and pollution control technologies, combat en-
by reducing political turmoil and conflict. vironmental crimes and marine debris, and
We will help developing and transition- support innovative approaches to climate
al countries improve their policies, laws, resilience. In furtherance of the U.S. Global
regulations, entrepreneurial skills and pro- Water Strategy’s goal of a more water secure
fessional networks to boost private sector world, the Department and USAID will
productivity, ensure equal opportunities also work to increase the availability and
for women and marginalized groups, and sustainable management of safe water and
spur diversified and sustainable economic sanitation.
growth.
We will foster transparency in environ-
We will support capacity building of pri- mental governance in partner countries,
vate-sector entities that can link the poor support the modernization of power grids,
to markets, including international ones, improve energy security, help partner
through effective and economically sustain- countries make investments in their own
able systems and relationships. Through development agenda, and improve their ca-
implementing the U.S. Global Food Secu- pability to track and report financial flows.
rity Strategy, we will continue our global We will foster the ability of countries and
leadership to advance inclusive and sus- communities to take on the responsibility
tainable agricultural-led economic growth, for building resilience and managing risks

40
GOAL 2: RENEW AMERICA’S COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE FOR SUSTAINED ECONOMIC GROWTH AND JOB CREATION

from shocks and stresses by helping coun- Performance Goal 2.2.1


tries more effectively harness their domes-
tic resources as well as private sector capital. By September 30, 2019, Feed the Future
will exhibit an average reduction in the
Cross Agency Collaboration prevalence of poverty and stunting of
20 percent, across target regions in Feed
In addition to engaging bilaterally and the Future’s focus countries, since the
through multilateral fora, partner agencies beginning of the initiative in FY 2010.
include the Departments of Commerce (APG)
(DOC), Treasury (DOT), Health and Hu-
man Services (HHS), Energy (DOE), Inte-
rior (DOI), the Centers for Disease Con- Performance Goal 2.2.2
trol (CDC), the Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA), the Trade and Development By 2022, achieve parity in participation
Agency, and the Peace Corps. between women and men in programs
that are designed to increase access to
Risk economic resources.

The ability of the Department of State and


USAID to advance economic development Performance Goal 2.2.3
and growth in partner countries, and there-
by advance American economic objectives, By 2022, increase the number of peo-
is affected by external risk factors, including ple reached by U.S. government-funded
the degree of partner country leadership interventions providing gender-based
and political will to enact major reforms; violence (GBV) services (with 2016 as
lack of domestic resources and investments; the baseline).
corruption and mismanagement; and in-
creased incidence of conflict, crisis and nat-
ural disaster. Performance Goal 2.2.4

Global economic security and development By 2022, the percentage of children


also face risks from the disruption caused and young people at the end of prima-
by natural disasters. Economic losses from ry school achieving at least a minimum
hazards such as storms, earthquakes, and proficiency level in reading and math
pandemics are both drivers and symptoms will increase in at least 10 countries.
of state fragility. Investments in improving
governance, including building social trust,
increasing accountability of policymaking, Performance Goal 2.2.5
and improving capacity of administrations
to deliver quality services to citizens of both By 2022, increase sales and employment
sexes and all demographic groups, have of 25,000 firms through technical assis-
been shown by experience to improve resil- tance to improve business performance.
ience in the face of major disruptions.

41
GOAL 2: RENEW AMERICA’S COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE FOR SUSTAINED ECONOMIC GROWTH AND JOB CREATION

Performance Goal 2.2.6 security. We also work to deny terrorists


and rogue nations access to funds derived
By 2022, partner institutions and in- from energy production. These are threats
dividuals adopt sustainable environ- not only to the economic and national se-
mental practices, resulting in improved curity of American allies and partners, but
health and economic outcomes. also of the United States itself.

Transparency shines a light on corruption


and makes foreign publics more invested
Strategic Objective 2.3: Advance U.S. in their governments, while also protect-
economic security by ensuring ener- ing American citizens and companies op-
gy security, combating corruption, erating abroad. The United States has long
played an international leadership role pro-
and promoting market-oriented eco-
moting the adoption of international best
nomic and governance reforms practices in order to perpetuate the rules-
based economic system upon which our
Strategic Objective Overview
prosperity is predicated, and to help ensure
a free and fair arena where U.S. companies
America’s prosperity, which underwrites
can compete.
our national security, depends on main-
taining a fair, open, and stable internation-
Strategies for Achieving the Objective
al economy that guarantees reliable access
to affordable energy for the United States
To advance the President’s National Secu-
and our allies, and well-governed trading
rity Strategy and the America First Ener-
partners. As the United States is an in-
gy Plan, the Department promotes energy
creasingly dominant energy producer, the
security for the United States, our partners
Department of State and USAID have the
and allies by promoting diverse global en-
opportunity to forge a market-based inter-
ergy supplies from all energy sources. The
national energy policy that strengthens the
Department of State works to defeat ISIS
energy security of the U.S. and our allies.
and other transnational terrorist organiza-
Maintaining market access for U.S. energy
tions by preventing the groups’ ability to
products, technologies and services, and
exploit energy resources they control. The
ensuring sustainable, transparent, and pre-
Department works to open markets and re-
dictable international energy markets for
move barriers to energy trade and develop-
our partners and ourselves is crucial to our
ment while promoting U.S. energy exports
security. However, lack of access to energy
globally, including U.S. liquefied natural gas
creates conditions for political instability,
(LNG). The Department and USAID coor-
migration, and the proliferation of extrem-
dinate with governments and companies to
ist organizations. Non-competitive behav-
pursue energy diversification and increased
ior, such as monopolies, sole suppliers, and
access to affordable and reliable energy
cartels that use energy as a political and
(particularly to electric power) and to de-
economic weapon threaten global energy
velop efficient and sustainable energy pol-

42
GOAL 2: RENEW AMERICA’S COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE FOR SUSTAINED ECONOMIC GROWTH AND JOB CREATION

icies abroad through technical assistance courage transparency, promote fiscal re-
and public-private partnerships. We work sponsibility, and protect investor and in-
through the global Extractive Industries tellectual property rights. Two important
Transparency Initiative (EITI) to promote vehicles for convening partners are the G7
transparency abroad, improve energy re- and G20 summits, which bring together
source governance, and reduce corruption. member countries to enhance government
transparency and accountability. The De-
The Department and USAID work with partment leads U.S. participation in bilat-
partner countries to promote a culture of eral and multilateral energy task forces that
integrity to prevent corruption before it recommend solutions to energy problems
starts and to strengthen detection and en- affecting our partners around the world.
forcement efforts. This includes encourag- The agencies work through bilateral and
ing countries to meet multilateral standards multilateral engagement, and regional ini-
and political commitments. We work with tiatives such as Power Africa and Connect-
partners to develop and implement inter- ing the Americas 2022 to expand electrical
national standards to combat the bribery of interconnections.
foreign officials, based on the Organization
for Economic Cooperation and Develop- Department and USAID programs sup-
ment (OECD) Anti-Bribery Convention. port partner countries through assistance
The Department and USAID focus on re- to improve economic governance in public
covering the ill-gotten lucre of corruption finances legal frameworks, which are re-
by working bilaterally and multilaterally to quired to attract investment to such coun-
strengthen the capacity of foreign govern- tries. In the interagency, USAID plays a
ments to investigate and prosecute public central role in advancing domestic resource
and private sector corruption. We provide mobilization in partner countries and in
a comprehensive range of assistance to help implementing programs that foster more
countries in developing and sustaining an open, transparent, and robust public finance
array of governmental reforms that con- systems and business-enabling environ-
tribute to fighting corruption. The Depart- ments around the globe. To promote fiscal
ment manages the Global Anti-Corruption transparency, the Department of State/US-
Consortium in partnership with USAID AID Fiscal Transparency Innovation Fund
and partner governments. The Depart- (FTIF) builds the technical capacity of gov-
ment’s comprehensive anti-corruption pro- ernments to make their budgets and spend-
grams build the capacity of foreign law en- ing transparent and the capacity of civil so-
forcement to combat corruption, including ciety to press for information on, analyze,
kleptocracy, and strengthen international and monitor government finances.
standards and political will to implement
needed reforms. The Department also uses targeted ener-
gy sanctions and other actions to deprive
The Department and USAID promote a rogue nations and terrorists access to capi-
wide array of policy and legislative reforms tal derived from the sale of natural resourc-
to remove barriers to doing business, en- es (e.g., DPRK). The Department also uses

43
GOAL 2: RENEW AMERICA’S COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE FOR SUSTAINED ECONOMIC GROWTH AND JOB CREATION

energy sanctions as a tool when necessary supply or availability of energy commodi-


to discourage other nations from engag- ties on the global market could put unten-
ing in behavior outside of existing treaties, able stress on the institutional frameworks
agreements, and international norms. that have prevented a major global energy
crisis for the past quarter-century.
Cross Agency Collaboration
The continuing allure of closed econom-
The Department and USAID work with ic systems as alternative models remains a
partner governments on regulatory re- risk to good governance and global pros-
form and multilateral institutions to push perity. If leading developing countries pull
for sound macroeconomic fundamentals. back on anti-corruption and market reform
In addition to engaging bilaterally and efforts, other governments may be tempted
through multilateral fora, partner agencies to de-prioritize these critical initiatives.
include the U.S. Departments of Commerce
(DOC), Energy (DOE), Interior (DOI), Performance Goal 2.3.1
Treasury (DOT), Justice (DOJ), the Securi-
ties and Exchange Commission (SEC), the By 2022, promote an increase in U.S.
Overseas Private Investment Corporation energy exports and achieve for the
(OPIC), the Trade and Development Agen- United States, its allies, and partners
cy, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commis- increased energy security and access to
sion (FERC), and the Export-Import Bank diversified, affordable, and reliable en-
of the United States. ergy sources.

Risk
Performance Goal 2.3.2
The combination of political instability in
major energy producers and disruption of Through 2022, prevent and combat
global trade at a major chokepoint such as corruption and its role in related crim-
the Strait of Hormuz threaten global energy inal activity by strengthening other
security. Dependence on a single or major countries’ commitment and capacity to
supplier for energy imports leaves coun- address it through increased anti-cor-
tries vulnerable to external pressure from ruption training and anti-corruption
countries that use energy as a geopolitical measures.
weapon. Competition for energy can lead
to conflicts, and terrorists and rogue re-
gimes could seek to exploit energy resourc- Performance Goal 2.3.3
es to fund violence and destabilizing activ-
ities. U.S. companies and citizens involved By 2022, through assistance to central
in energy projects abroad can face security governments or non-governmental or-
threats and corruption. Pressure from re- ganizations, improve fiscal transpar-
lentless demand increases in Asia com- ency in at least five countries assessed
bined with a prolonged disruption in either as not meeting the minimum require-
ments under the fiscal transparency re-
view process.
44
GOAL 3:
PROMOTE AMERICAN LEADERSHIP THROUGH
BALANCED ENGAGEMENT
Strategic Goal Overview promotes mutual security and economic
interests in cooperation with like-minded
America First does not mean America countries. The United States moreover con-
alone. The United States is a beacon of lib- tinues to play a leading role in international
erty, freedom, and opportunity. Since the and multilateral organizations, presenting
conclusion of the Second World War, the opportunities to build consensus around
United States has led the development of a American values, advancing American na-
rules-based international order that allows tional security, economic, and development
nations to compete peacefully and cooper- goals; and rallying collective action with
ate more effectively with one another. We American leadership. However, no one na-
worked together with allies and partners to tion should have to bear a disproportionate
build the institutions and structures to de- share of the burden of responsibility to pro-
fend the sovereignty, self-governance, secu- tect against common threats.
rity, and prosperity of all nations and peo-
ples. Yet past successes alone cannot ensure The United States will continue to be the
this system will continue indefinitely with- global leader in preventing the spread of
out being renewed, rejuvenated, and made disease, promoting protections for human
to be truly reciprocal. As the President dignity and rights, and facilitating human-
stated in his remarks at the 72nd session of itarian efforts around the world -- project-
the United Nations General Assembly, “We ing American values as we stand shoulder
are guided by outcomes, not ideology. We to shoulder with people in their hour of
have a policy of principled realism, rooted need. It is who we are as Americans.
in shared goals, interests, and values.”9 The
ability to ensure peace, security, and pros- The Department and USAID will continue
perity requires a more principled and bal- to pay our fair share but will not commit
anced approach to our engagement with to invest without returns. The Department
our allies and partners: balanced between of State and USAID must encourage, pre-
opportunity and responsibility; between pare, and support our allies and partners to
shared goals, interests, and values; and be- meet their obligations. We are committed
tween assistance and enforcement. to maximizing the impact of American tax-
payer dollars and ensuring that the foreign
U.S. foreign policy must first serve Amer- assistance the agencies invest in lead to sus-
icans and our national interests, with the tainable results.
United States as a leader and integrated
member of the global community. Through
alliances and partnerships, the United States

9 The President of the United States’ remarks at the 72nd session of the United Nations General Assembly: https://www.white-
house.gov/briefings-statements/remarks-president-trump-72nd-session-united-nations-general-assembly/
47
GOAL 3: PROMOTE AMERICAN LEADERSHIP THROUGH BALANCED ENGAGEMENT

Strategic Objective 3.1: Transition Strong interagency field missions will de-
nations from assistance recipients to velop country specific strategies that focus
enduring diplomatic, economic, and available resources to efficiently overcome
challenges and capitalize on opportunities
security partners
in each country. This targeted strategy will
enable realistic planning and monitoring of
Strategic Objective Overview
each country’s progress towards self-suffi-
ciency.
U.S. foreign assistance aims to foster in-
clusive economic growth, reduce poverty,
In line with American values, Department
strengthen democratic governance, and
and USAID programs enhance good gov-
enhance peace and security, while helping
ernance and security, support the rule of
countries progress beyond needing assis-
the law, promote foreign direct investment,
tance. The Department of State and USAID
combat corruption, and protect private
will ensure partner countries demonstrate
and intellectual property rights. These
their tangible commitment to achieving
programs must also improve a country’s
these objectives while maximizing the im-
ability and willingness to mobilize domes-
pact of American taxpayer dollars. U.S. as-
tic resources as a key element of achieving
sistance will not be provided in perpetuity.
shared prosperity and greater partnership
The Department and USAID will measure
in global development, diplomacy, and se-
the impact of our assistance by how it helps
curity. We will coordinate media outreach
countries move from assistance recipients
and public communications to explain our
to enduring diplomatic, economic, and se-
assistance while creating public support for
curity partners.
future partnerships.
Strategies for Achieving the Objective
Cross Agency Collaboration
The Department and USAID will prioritize
The Department and USAID work closely
programs that assist countries in improving
with the Departments of Defense, Treasury,
their policies to stimulate economic growth,
Agriculture, Energy, Environmental Pro-
strengthen their democratic institutions,
tection, Justice, Commerce, and Health and
foster co-investments, share the burden of
Human Services. The Millennium Chal-
addressing common challenges, and mobi-
lenge Corporation provides assistance to
lize domestic resources for self-sufficiency.
partner countries to meet threshold indi-
We will promote an efficient, effective, and
cators on democracy, anti-corruption, and
supportive legal and regulatory environ-
rule of law. Regional associations such as
ment that attracts investment in partner
the Association of Southeast Asian Nations
nations through close partnerships with
(ASEAN), the European Union (EU), Eco-
the U.S. interagency and multilateral in-
nomic Community of West African States
stitutions while supporting each country’s
(ECOWAS), the Organization of American
self-determined development path.
States (OAS), the Organization of Econom-
ic Cooperation and Development (OECD),

48
GOAL 3: PROMOTE AMERICAN LEADERSHIP THROUGH BALANCED ENGAGEMENT

and others are key stakeholders advocating and rally collective action with American
for common standards and global partner- leadership. Multilateral organizations set
ships. UN agencies and bilateral donors norms that support political stability, per-
provide project expertise and funding com- sonal liberty, economic prosperity, public
plementing U.S. assistance. health, social development, and that ad-
dress forced displacement and internation-
Risk al migration. By working through these
fora, the United States can more effectively
Risks include negative changes in the eco- make our citizens safe, our businesses pros-
nomic and political context; malign influ- perous, and our future promising. Active
ence from state and non-state actors; large engagement in multilateral fora allows the
scale population movements resulting United States to exercise its leadership to
from conflict and instability in neighbor- shape the rules and norms of the interna-
ing countries that strain public services, tional order and to prevent malign actors
infrastructure, and integration services in from advancing ideas and policies that are
receiving countries; corruption; and the contrary to our interests.
risk of natural disasters (floods, droughts,
tsunamis, earthquakes, and other extreme The United States makes assessed contri-
weather events). butions to 44 international organizations,
including the UN and NATO. U.S. con-
Performance Goal 3.1.1 tributions include support to international
peacekeeping activities, the Internation-
By 2022, all USAID Country Develop- al Organization for Migration (IOM), the
ment Cooperation Strategies (CDCSs) World Health Organization (WHO), and
will address ways to strengthen partner the United Nations High Commissioner for
country capacity to further its self-reli- Refugees (UNHCR). In all of these cases,
ance. the U.S. government strives to ensure eq-
uitable burden sharing among donors and
to leverage a broader international donor
base. American representatives serving on
Strategic Objective 3.2: Engage governing boards of international organiza-
international fora to further tions contribute significantly to the policies
American values and foreign policy and standards set by these bodies.
goals while seeking more equitable
Strategies for Achieving the Objective
burden sharing
While ensuring the integrity of our sover-
Strategic Objective Overview
eignty and respecting the sovereignty of our
partners, the Department of State and US-
International organizations present oppor-
AID will lead by example and leverage the
tunities to build consensus around Amer-
potential of the multilateral system to help
ican values; advance American national
defuse crises; mitigate destabilizing eco-
security, economic, and development goals;

49
GOAL 3: PROMOTE AMERICAN LEADERSHIP THROUGH BALANCED ENGAGEMENT

nomic events; deter aggression and extreme Cross Agency Collaboration


ideologies; promote fair and reciprocal
trade; enhance economic competitiveness; Cooperation across the U.S. Government is
open markets; and cooperate on migration essential to achieving more equitable bur-
issues. It is the primary responsibility of den sharing. This cooperation is also nec-
sovereign states to help ensure that migra- essary to align positions on organizational
tion is safe, orderly, and legal. reform, contributions to and maintenance
of high fiduciary, social and environmen-
The Department and USAID will support tal standards in multilateral development
and initiate reforms to make international banks. In addition, filling senior positions
bodies more efficient, effective, and equita- in international organizations with Ameri-
ble in mobilizing all member states to pre- cans is a priority to enable advancement of
serve the global commons. U.S. values and interests.

We must hold others accountable for shar- Risk


ing the financial burden while support-
ing collective action. Many recipients of As other nations increase their relative fi-
U.S. assistance play critical roles as part- nancial contributions and participation in
ners in countering transnational terrorist multilateral fora, it could decrease U.S. in-
and criminal groups and as contributors fluence in achieving key policy objectives
to peace operations. We will engage with in specific cases as well as blunt broader or-
new donors willing to contribute expertise ganizational reform, leaving the door open
and funds such that our mutual efforts and to adversaries exerting greater influence in
shared costs align with the Department and shaping the international order. This would
USAID’s respective comparative advantag- limit the agencies’ ability to advance the
es. U.S. foreign policy agenda and could result
in setbacks on key policies that promote
The Department will employ a wide range and protect American interests.
of public diplomacy tools to underscore
U.S. leadership on the global stage, and Performance Goal 3.2.1
particularly as host of international orga-
nizations. Highlighting U.S. leadership will By 2022, U.S. contributions as a per-
provide opportunities to demonstrate the centage of total funding support for
utility of these organizations in promot- international organizations are reduced
ing American interests. The Department below 2017 levels.
and USAID will seek to increase the num-
ber and percentage of Americans serving
in international organizations at all levels,
including the United Nations and its tech-
nical and specialized agencies, and in the
governance of international economic fora.

50
GOAL 3: PROMOTE AMERICAN LEADERSHIP THROUGH BALANCED ENGAGEMENT

Strategic Objective 3.3: Increase grams, and youth leadership networks like
partnerships with the private sector the Young African Leaders Initiative. The
and civil-society organizations to Department of State and USAID will fa-
cilitate access for and collaborate with U.S.
mobilize support and resources and
companies and foundations that invest in
shape foreign public opinion workforce skills development for foreign
populations, expand digital literacy and
Strategic Objective Overview
access, and foster entrepreneurship ecosys-
tems that support U.S. interests.
The United States cannot accomplish ef-
fective diplomacy and development alone.
Strategies for Achieving the Objective
Strategic partnerships across the public,
private, faith-based, and nonprofit sectors
The Department and USAID will engage
help the United States connect with com-
civil society and NGOs, along with the pri-
munities and civil society to create shared
vate sector, to maximize our ability to affect
value, purpose, and vision, and are criti-
positive change, including protecting eth-
cal to achieving our national security ob-
nic and religious minorities and other mar-
jectives. Because decision-making is dis-
ginalized populations; promoting religious
persed among state and non-state actors,
and ethnic tolerance; and providing emer-
cultivating relationships is vital.
gency assistance to human rights defenders
and survivors of abuse.
USAID’s Global Development Alliance
(GDA) builds partnerships with local and
The Department and USAID will devel-
international companies and a range of oth-
op training focused on non-government
er partners based on principles of shared
entities. Developing sustainable and effec-
interest and value focused on market-based
tive partnerships outside the public sector
solutions. Working with financial institu-
requires unique skills and tools distinct
tions, companies, and other financial pro-
from those used in government-to-govern-
viders, USAID facilitates greater private
ment diplomacy. Successful communica-
investment to support development objec-
tion with civil society and foreign publics
tives in energy, agriculture, and health. US-
requires mutual understanding and trust.
AID works with partners to tackle barriers
We must develop and train our workforce
to investment and to provide technical ex-
to effectively deploy people-to-people and
pertise and tools.
communication programs to generate the
strong support and robust local participa-
Digital engagement, visitor and exchange
tion necessary to solidify partnerships that
programs, and local community efforts led
produce maximum impact.
by U.S. program alumni help build partner-
ships that positively influence foreign pub-
Cross Agency Collaboration
lics in pursuit of U.S interests. More than
650 public engagement facilities (“Amer-
Our strategic partnerships represent a di-
ican Spaces”) worldwide enable English
verse network of organizations, including
language learning, people-to-people pro-

51
GOAL 3: PROMOTE AMERICAN LEADERSHIP THROUGH BALANCED ENGAGEMENT

for-profit businesses, civil society, academ- Strategic Objective 3.4: Project


ic institutions, philanthropic foundations, American values and leadership by
and diaspora groups. Partners include state preventing the spread of disease and
and local law enforcement agencies; Amer-
providing humanitarian relief
ican and foreign universities; media orga-
nizations and journalist advocacy groups;
Strategic Objective Overview
cultural; sports; and youth organizations;
religious leaders and religious communi-
Health crises, disease, conflicts, water scar-
ties; faith-based organizations; and schools.
city, land degradation, and natural disas-
ters displace tens of millions of people each
Risk
year, and can destabilize societies and polit-
ical systems. We will stand with the world’s
Shrinking democratic spaces make pro-
people when disaster strikes or crisis emerg-
grams more costly, dangerous, restrictive,
es, because that is who we are as Americans.
or illegal. The Department and USAID
As the world’s leaders in humanitarian as-
use rigorous program reviews to maintain
sistance, food security and health, the De-
transparency while protecting the security
partment and USAID demonstrate the best
of our partners. Lastly, significant drops
of American leadership and compassion
in a population’s trust of the United States
around the world. Strengthening the resil-
may constrain willingness to work with the
ience of assistance recipients enables U.S.
Department and USAID as partners.
humanitarian assistance to lay the ground-
work for long-term political, economic,
Performance Goal 3.3.1
and social advancements, which will con-
By 2022, increase partnerships with the solidate and protect American investments,
private and public sectors in order to produce new opportunities, and project
promote shared goals, leverage resourc- American values and leadership.
es, and utilize expertise for more sus-
tainable results. The U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for
AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), active in more than
60 countries, catalyzes a global response
to control the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Inno-
Performance Goal 3.3.2
vative programs in nutrition and women’s
health support USAID’s efforts in prevent-
By 2022, increase approval of United
ing maternal and child deaths. In addition,
States government policies among in-
the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA)
fluential foreign publics.
serves as a multilateral and multi-sectoral
approach to strengthen capacities to pre-
vent, detect, and respond to infectious
threats and public health emergencies of in-
ternational concern, and to enable nation-
al governments to fulfill their obligations
under the International Health Regulations
(IHR).

52
GOAL 3: PROMOTE AMERICAN LEADERSHIP THROUGH BALANCED ENGAGEMENT

Strategies for Achieving the Objective effective, equitable, locally adapted, and ev-
idence-based interventions to reach poor,
The Department and USAID will take the marginalized, and vulnerable people to pre-
lead on humanitarian assistance globally vent and treat infectious diseases.
through policies, multi-sectoral programs,
and funding in order to provide protection Cross Agency Collaboration
and ease suffering. We will work through
multilateral systems to build global partner- In order to achieve this objective, we will
ships and ensure compliance with interna- collaborate with the our interagency part-
tional norms and standards. Additionally, ners including the Departments of Trea-
we will promote best practices in human- sury, Defense, Commerce, Agriculture,
itarian response, ensuring that humanitar- Health and Human Services, Labor, Peace
ian principles are supporting broader U.S. Corps, and the Millennium Challenge
foreign policy goals. Collaboration with Corporation. Other partners include the
donors and host countries will help identify American Chambers of Commerce, foreign
solutions to displacement, protect people at development assistance agencies, multilat-
risk, promote disaster risk reduction, and eral development finance institutions, and
foster resilience. The Department and US- NGOs.
AID will give particular attention to miti-
gating gender-based violence in emergency Risk
contexts.
The risks to this objective include insuffi-
Through efforts in family planning, malar- cient transparency and accountability in
ia, HIV/AIDS, and nutrition, the agencies’ partner countries and implementing part-
health programs will work to strengthen ners, strains that could lead to instability in
child and maternal health, a cornerstone refugee-hosting nations, and nations that
of public health, to reduce deaths, preempt seek to subvert U.S. leadership or otherwise
pandemics and the spread of diseases, and seek to promote their own interests. Oth-
foster prosperity and stability. These pro- er risks to our efforts include reluctance of
grams will concentrate on countries with partner governments to comply with IHR
the highest need, demonstrable commit- and contribute their fair share, economic
ment, and potential to leverage resources downturns, natural disasters, and conflict.
from the public and private sectors.
Performance Goal 3.4.1
The Department and USAID will provide
global leadership, support country-led ef- By September 30, 2019, U.S. global
forts, and innovate to implement cost-effec- leadership and assistance to prevent
tive and sustainable interventions at scale child and maternal deaths will annu-
to prevent the spread of the HIV/ AIDS ally reduce under-five mortality in 25
epidemic and mitigate its effects. Work- maternal and child health U.S. Govern-
ing with health ministries, partners, and ment-priority countries by an average
communities, our programs will scale up of 2 deaths per 1000 live births per year
as compared to 2017. (APG)

53
GOAL 3: PROMOTE AMERICAN LEADERSHIP THROUGH BALANCED ENGAGEMENT

Performance Goal 3.4.2 Performance Goal 3.4.5

By September 30, 2019, new infections Through 2022, timely contributions to


are fewer than deaths from all causes in emergency appeals ensure humanitari-
HIV-positive patients in up to 13 high- an international organizations respond
HIV burden countries through leader- rapidly to the urgent needs of refugees
ship by State and implementation by and other populations of concern by
USAID; the U.S. Department of Health maintaining the percentage of UNHCR
and Human Services and its Agencies, Supplementary Appeals and ICRC Bud-
including the Centers for Disease Con- get Extension Appeals the U.S. commits
trol and Prevention, the Health Re- funding to within three months.
sources and Services Administration,
and the National Institutes of Health;
the Departments of Defense, Labor, and Performance Goal 3.4.6
Treasury; and the Peace Corps. (APG)
By 2022, the United States will increase
the timeliness and effectiveness of re-
Performance Goal 3.4.3 sponses to U.S. government-declared
international disasters, responding to
By 2022, State increases its systemat- 95 percent of disaster declarations with-
ic response to gender-based violence in 72 hours and reporting on results.
in new and evolving emergencies by
maintaining or increasing the percent-
age of NGO or other international orga- Performance Goal 3.4.7
nization projects that include dedicated
activities to prevent and/or respond to By 2019, the United States will identify
gender-based violence. and pursue key changes by major im-
plementing partners the U.S. believes
are required to improve accountability
Performance Goal 3.4.4 and effectiveness, and create operation-
al and managerial costs savings in hu-
By 2022, USAID increases its system- manitarian responses as outlined in the
atic response to gender-based violence Grand Bargain.
in emergencies by increasing the per-
centage of proposals it receives from
non-governmental organizations that
include protection mainstreaming to 95
percent.

54
GOAL 4:
ENSURE EFFECTIVENESS AND ACCOUNTABILITY
TO THE AMERICAN TAXPAYER
Strategic Goal Overview al efficiencies, we will use a range of service
delivery models, including outsourcing,
The Federal Government can and should shared services, local delivery, and globally
operate more effectively, efficiently, and se- managed centers of excellence. We will re-
curely. As such, the Administration will set alize greater returns on investment by using
goals in areas that are critical to improving public-private partnerships and more adap-
the Federal Government’s effectiveness, ef- tive and flexible procurement mechanisms
ficiency, cybersecurity, and accountabili- to complement more traditional models
ty. This includes taking an evidence-based for implementing foreign assistance. The
approach to improving programs and ser- Department and USAID will maintain an
vices; reducing the burden of compliance agile workforce structure that ensures the
activities; delivering high performing pro- agencies have the right people at the right
gram results and services to citizens and time with the right expertise domestically
businesses through effective and efficient and abroad. Flexible physical workplac-
mission support services; and holding es, state-of-the-art technology and use of
agencies accountable for improving perfor- cloud technologies will enable secure ac-
mance. cess to information technology anytime,
anywhere. Integrated data platforms will
In support of these aims, this goal guides improve knowledge sharing, collaboration
the management of our people, programs, and data-driven decision making by lead-
information, and capital assets. It requires ers and staff. To maintain safe and secure
pursuing efficiencies at all levels, streamlin- operations, we will continue to assess fa-
ing the Department of State and USAID’s cilities and numbers of people at all over-
organizations without undermining their seas missions, adjusting where needed, and
effectiveness; using data-driven analysis for conduct annual reviews of high threat, high
decisions; making risk-based investments risk posts.
in safety and security; diversifying and re-
orienting the foreign assistance portfolio The Department and USAID consistently
toward innovation and sustainability; and seek to maximize taxpayers’ return on in-
developing a more flexible, highly skilled vestment and improve operational efficien-
workforce. cy; one important means is by addressing
the management objectives cited in the
The Department and USAID will optimize JSP. Strategies contained in this goal’s man-
operations and resource allocations to ex- agement objectives address several of the
ecute our diplomatic and development ob- management and performance challenges
jectives in a secure, strategic, well-coordi- identified by the Department and USAID
nated manner. To better serve the mission Offices of Inspector General (OIG) in the
and employees, as well as achieve operation- Department11 and USAID’s12 recent Agen-
11 Department of State’s Agency Financial Report: https://www.state.gov/documents/organization/274977.pdf
12 USAID’s Agency Financial Report: https://www.usaid.gov/sites/default/files/documents/1868/USAIDFY2017AFR.pdf
57
GOAL 4: ENSURE EFFECTIVENESS AND ACCOUNTABILITY TO THE AMERICAN TAXPAYER

cy Financial Reports and by the U.S. Gov- existence, by supporting countries in lead-
ernment Accountability Office (GAO). The ing their own development journey.
Department and USAID will track progress
towards successful completion of strategic The Department and USAID will invest in
objective performance goals across this cutting-edge approaches to find new and
goal in the Annual Performance Plan and better ways to address the problems we are
Annual Performance Report. trying to solve. We will collaborate with the
private sector and other non-traditional ac-
Strategic Objective 4.1: Strengthen tors that can bring new resources and ideas,
the effectiveness and sustainability leverage new technologies or innovations
of our diplomacy and development that can accelerate our efforts, and strength-
en the capacity of local partners to ensure
investments
the long-term sustainability and success of
Department and USAID programming.
Strategic Objective Overview
Strategies for Achieving the Objective
To be good stewards of American taxpay-
er dollars, achieve lasting results, and ad-
The Department of State’s Managing for
vance U.S. foreign policy objectives, the
Results Framework (MfR) and the USAID
Department and USAID will ensure sound
Program Cycle are foundational to making
strategic planning and program manage-
diplomatic engagement activities and de-
ment are in place and invest our resourc-
velopment investments effective, efficient,
es based on evidence. Our agencies work
and sustainable. These frameworks for
in countries with rapidly evolving political
strategic planning, budgeting, and program
and economic contexts and complex chal-
management set the stage for strategic
lenges. By adopting more innovative and
alignment of resources and evidence-based
flexible approaches to program design, and
diplomacy and development.
continuously learning throughout program
implementation, we will be able to respond
The Department and USAID conduct joint
nimbly and adapt to lessons learned.
strategic planning for regional bureaus,
which in turn informs country level stra-
Disciplined planning and design processes
tegic planning. Each Department of State
help ensure the Department and USAID
functional bureau develops a strategic plan
understand the local country context, as-
for coordination across regions and coun-
sess what we need to do, and set meaning-
tries. All embassies have an Integrated
ful performance milestones and targets to
Country Strategy (ICS) in place, and as of
achieve diplomatic and development objec-
2017, USAID operating units completed 63
tives. Robust monitoring and evaluation
Country Development Cooperation Strate-
processes enable our agencies to learn what
gies (CDCS), representing the majority of
is working and how best to adapt programs
USAID missions.13 The sustainability of our
to achieve results. Ultimately, the purpose
investments depends on results produced
of foreign assistance is to end its need for
and valued by partner countries. There-

13 Country Development Cooperation Strategies https://www.usaid.gov/results-and-data/planning/country-strategies-cdcs

58
GOAL 4: ENSURE EFFECTIVENESS AND ACCOUNTABILITY TO THE AMERICAN TAXPAYER

fore, we will give precedence to local priori- processes, deploy the State Assistance Man-
ties and local implementers in regional and agement System (SAMS) across the De-
country strategic planning that align with partment, and create innovative approaches
American interests. to improve core operations, increase stake-
holder engagement, and enhance the ca-
The Department and USAID will evaluate pabilities of our workforce. Existing grant
programs to learn what is working well and management systems will be improved to
where there is a need to adapt to maximize include performance management capa-
effectiveness. All foreign assistance evalu- bilities, streamlined communication, over-
ation reports will continue to be publicly sight, and coordination with grant recipi-
available on USAID14 and Department15 ents.
websites. Ancillary to these efforts is the
creation of USAID’s Development Informa- Cross Agency Collaboration
tion System (DIS), a unified portfolio man-
agement system designed to better manage The Department and USAID collaborate
USAID’s data, facilitate evidence-based with government institutions, private sec-
decision-making, and enable USAID to tor partners, national and international aid
improve reporting on the results of its ac- transparency and oversight groups, and civ-
tivities. il society organizations in partner countries
to gain valuable external perspectives and
The Department and USAID will develop new ideas about how we conduct our work.
training and provide guidance to enable We meet with Congressional stakeholders
bureaus and overseas missions to define to discuss proposed budgets and approach-
more clearly their programmatic goals, es to delivering on our missions as well as
describe how our investments will help on the status of pending legislation and our
achieve them, and conduct robust moni- implementation of new laws affecting effec-
toring and evaluation to determine the re- tiveness and efficiency.
sults and strengthen accountability. This
guidance will be available online and will Risk
communicate to the public the processes in
place to ensure good management of tax- While risk is inherent to the Department
payer resources.16 and USAID’s work, planning, managing,
and monitoring projects in non-permissive
We will increase the efficiency and effec- environments poses specific challenges.
tiveness of procuring services through con- These include finding qualified contrac-
tracts and support partners with grants and tors and grantees willing to work in these
cooperative agreements, and increase our environments, vetting partners, providing
use of innovative and flexible instruments security for and periodically evacuating
that allow for co-creation and payment for overseas agency personnel, and gaining ac-
performance. The Department and USAID cess to local partners and project locales for
will streamline acquisition and assistance appropriate project design and monitoring.

14 Development Experience Clearinghouse: https://dec.usaid.gov/dec/home/Default.aspx


15 Foreign Assistance Evaluations: https://dec.usaid.gov/dec/home/Default.aspx
16 State: https://www.state.gov/f/tools/ and USAID: https://usaidlearninglab.org/mel-toolkits

59
GOAL 4: ENSURE EFFECTIVENESS AND ACCOUNTABILITY TO THE AMERICAN TAXPAYER

Greater engagement of local implementers Performance Goal 4.1.4


can also pose risk. USAID will continue
to use a Non-U.S. Organization Pre-Award By September 30, 2019, meet or exceed
Survey to determine the risks involved in Federal targets for Best-In-Class (BIC)
the selection of local implementing part- contract awards. (APG)
ners and develop special award conditions
to mitigate identified risks. Building local
capacity can, however, take time, be more
resource intensive up front, and may slow Strategic Objective 4.2: Provide
the rate of achieving specific development modern and secure infrastructure
objectives. As a result, development impact and operational capabilities to
may take additional time as local partner
support effective diplomacy and
capacity is strengthened in the short term.
development
Performance Goal 4.1.1
Strategic Objective Overview
By 2022, increase the use of evidence to
inform budget, program planning and The Department of State and USAID coor-
design, and management decisions. dinate closely to achieve U.S. foreign policy
objectives. Mission execution is support-
ed by multiple operational platforms with
minimal leveraging of shared services.
Performance Goal 4.1.2
Harmonizing mission support functions
for both agencies will leverage economies
By 2022, increase engagement with lo-
of scale, improve process visibility, enhance
cal partners to strengthen their ability
technology integration, and improve the
to implement their own development
quality and the speed with which the agen-
agenda.
cies deliver support services.

The Administration’s support for bench-


Performance Goal 4.1.3
marking results, as well as staff perceptions
By September 30, 2019, USAID will shared during the Secretary’s listening tour,
have increased the use of collaborative emphasized the need for the Department
partnering methods and co-creation and USAID to improve the efficiency and
within new awards, measured by dol- effectiveness of management support func-
lars and percentage of procurement ac- tions, including the global logistics and
tions (to be determined after baselines supply chain. This includes improving
established in FY2018). (APG) staff ’s customer satisfaction with mission
support services while also reducing costs.
This will entail more consistent evaluation
of support services results to ensure the De-

60
GOAL 4: ENSURE EFFECTIVENESS AND ACCOUNTABILITY TO THE AMERICAN TAXPAYER

partment’s global supply chain meets or ex- achieving this objective. Enhancement of
ceeds established service standards. the Department’s Integrated Logistics Man-
agement System has been ongoing since
Our geographically dispersed staff requires 2015, and will continue into the foreseeable
technological tools to work and collaborate future. In addition, the Department and
from anywhere at any time using any mo- USAID’s respective efforts to implement
bile or fixed device. For staff to work more action plans to comply with the Federal In-
efficiently, data and information technology formation Technology Acquisition Reform
(IT) security policies and procedures must Act (FITARA), Federal Information Securi-
be aligned to support the conduct of diplo- ty Management Act (FISMA), and Federal
macy and development assistance. The De- IT modernization efforts will also substan-
partment and USAID’s IT risk management tively contribute to a modern and secure
approaches should also be clear and flexible technology infrastructure.
enough to allow for the expeditious testing
and piloting of emergent tools. Connect- Strategies for Achieving the Objective
ing the agencies’ infrastructure and services
will reduce the complexity and long-term The Department and USAID will promote
costs of the agencies’ IT systems. We will and share services where appropriate to de-
pursue a collaborative approach to improv- liver cost effective and customer focused
ing IT and data governance processes to services and products. Informed by anal-
adopt interoperable processes, standards, ysis grounded in data, the agencies will
and tools. consolidate where appropriate and improve
logistics. Improving the quality of data will
Both agencies are committed to accom- be a priority. We will increase data quality
plishing IT goals in order to better support assurance measures, such as enforcing en-
overarching diplomacy and development terprise data standards, conducting period-
strategies. For the Department, this com- ic data quality audits to assess data validity,
mitment is outlined in the IT Strategic Plan and mitigating root causes of systemic er-
objective “Modernizing IT Infrastructure,” rors.
which states that the Department will “de-
ploy a modernized IT infrastructure that The Department and USAID will priori-
enables seamless access to information re- tize cloud-based tools for collaboration and
sources.” In turn, in USAID’s IT Strategic web-based systems that improve the acces-
Plan, its Goal 2 ”Secure Operations Excel- sibility of timely, relevant data to staff and
lence” states that “IT operations and infor- decision makers. Wireless access to data
mation security is improved, and the infra- will enhance productivity within agency
structure supporting all of our IT services offices. To facilitate centralized control
is reliable, efficient, and meets their service of IT resources, the Department will im-
level agreements.” prove the governance processes to ensure
its Chief Information Office (CIO) is posi-
The Department of State’s Impact Initiative tioned to meet legislative requirements for
and USAID’s ReDesign will contribute to control over Department-wide IT spending

61
GOAL 4: ENSURE EFFECTIVENESS AND ACCOUNTABILITY TO THE AMERICAN TAXPAYER

and systems -- an effort that has already can public and businesses that rely on accu-
occurred at USAID. Tiered trust security rate Department and USAID data.
will allow access to data based on the level
of trust established by user identification, Risk
device, and location. The Department and
USAID will modernize legacy systems and Modernizing legacy systems and training
software, which will include efforts to re- staff on these systems present risks to the
duce the number of disjointed data ware- agencies. Additionally, this will likely have
houses. Employing business intelligence higher costs up front, but the initial invest-
tools will allow the aggregation, analysis, ment will lead to long-term payoffs and cost
research, and evidence-based assessment of savings. There may be a risk in spending
U.S. foreign policy and development work money to maintain old services rather than
for data scientists. investing in newer cost saving technology.

The Department will continue to expand Performance Goal 4.2.1


and improve its global supply chain plat-
form, the Integrated Logistics Management By 2022, provide USAID staff access to
System (ILMS). We will train more staff at integrated and accurate foreign assis-
posts to use ILMS to reduce their use of re- tance portfolio data to better assess per-
sources, monitor for fraud, and streamline formance and inform decision-making.
logistics and procurement processes. The
Department may develop new ILMS mod-
ules to expand posts’ capabilities further, for Performance Goal 4.2.2
example by producing new types of reports
that analyze different data. Other agencies By 2022, establish a plan to expand and
have shown interest in using this logistics leverage analytics capabilities of the
platform. We will encourage them to par- Department’s integrated global logistics
ticipate in this shared service, which would systems to drive data-informed deci-
reduce costs to each agency. However, the sions, efficiencies, and/or improved ac-
inability to conduct pilot tests, site visits, countability in the supply chain.
and training could potentially hinder the
Department’s ability to expand the ILMS
platform and gain the efficiencies that come Performance Goal 4.2.3
from it.
By 2022, improve or maintain the agen-
Cross Agency Collaboration cies’ Megabyte Act grades to A to real-
ize cost savings and efficiencies.
The Office of Management and Budget
(OMB), House Oversight and Government
Reform (HOGR) Committee, Foreign af-
fairs agencies that operate under Chief of
Mission authority overseas, and the Ameri-

62
GOAL 4: ENSURE EFFECTIVENESS AND ACCOUNTABILITY TO THE AMERICAN TAXPAYER

Performance Goal 4.2.4 USAID will each create nimble and data-in-
formed decision making processes that lead
By September 30, 2019, the Depart- to greater employee engagement with HR
ment will improve its IT service de- services. We will bolster programs to hire,
livery by reducing the average time develop, assess, and align technical, man-
associated with providing new IT ca- agerial, and leadership talent (especially at
pabilities by 20 percent (baseline to be the senior ranks) specific to each agency.
determined in FY 2018), managing 100 By focusing on the issues identified above,
percent of workforce digital identities the Department and USAID will maximize
through a central Enterprise Identity the impact of our foreign policy objectives
Management solution, from a baseline while further diversifying and empowering
of zero, and increasing workforce access an agile workforce.
to cloud-based email and business data
from any device from 10 percent to 100 Strategies for Achieving the Objective
percent. (APG)
The Department and USAID seek to im-
prove flexibility, cost effectiveness, and stra-
tegic human capital support at each agency.
Strategic Objective 4.3: Enhance As such, the Department’s Impact Initiative
workforce performance, leadership, and USAID’s ReDesign as well as the Hu-
engagement, and accountability to man Resources Transformation Initiatives
will be important in achieving this objec-
execute our mission efficiently and
tive. We will establish consistent, measur-
effectively able standards for HR processes and proce-
dures, performance goals, and continuous
Strategic Objective Overview
improvement initiatives where needed. We
will review and enhance service level agree-
The Secretary’s Listening Report found
ments that better enable customers to focus
that at both the Department of State and
on the core business/mission. In addition,
USAID, people are inspired by being of
we will expand or create specialized work
service and making a difference, and are
teams and processes for complex inquiries.
passionate about the mission to serve hu-
manity. In both cases, people are inspired
The Department and USAID will review
by those with whom they work. The Report
HR functions and staff within each agency
also identified human resource (HR) issues
and recommend internal consolidation and
that the Department and USAID could
outsourcing where appropriate to enhance
each improve. Some of the findings for our
flexible service delivery and provide glob-
agencies included distributed delivery of
al service and support to multiple bureaus
burdensome, duplicative transactions; re-
more uniformly. Centralizing, consolidat-
dundant HR systems; and minimal quality
ing, and automating transactions will allow
assurance mechanisms to ensure accuracy
HR staff at both agencies to provide more
and validity of data. The Department and
strategic human capital support. USAID

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GOAL 4: ENSURE EFFECTIVENESS AND ACCOUNTABILITY TO THE AMERICAN TAXPAYER

will continue to advance implementation Cross Agency Collaboration


of its HR Transformation Objectives to
strengthen HR operations. The Office of Management and Budget
(OMB) and Office of Personnel Manage-
The Department and USAID will develop ment (OPM) guidance is instrumental in
an integrated approach to talent manage- achieving this objective. The Department
ment that maximizes transparency and and USAID meet with Congressional stake-
employee engagement, motivation, and ac- holders to discuss proposed budgets and
countability. We will close the gap between approaches to delivering on our missions as
current and desired workforce capabilities well as on the status of pending legislation
by adopting effective workforce planning and our implementation of new laws affect-
tools and hiring programs with best practice ing effectiveness and efficiency.
metrics and targets. We will develop talent
management platforms tailored to each in- Risk
dividual agency to better align personnel
with positions and streamline workforce Consolidating HR functions within each
strategic planning. USAID will complete individual organization while ensuring
implementation of its HR Transformation they are compliant with legislative require-
Objectives related to workforce planning ments will be expensive and time consum-
and deployment of staff. The Department ing. The Department of State and USAID
will complete and implement its TalentMap must demonstrate that centralization will
system and create full service websites for increase efficiency and ultimately save
managers. money.

The Department and USAID will empha- Centralization will challenge traditional
size professional development and empow- HR structures and practices of the Depart-
er leadership at all levels. Our approach ment, particularly within regional bureaus.
will promote diversity and inclusion and The Department and USAID must also en-
will help increase employee wellness. We sure staffing levels align with the Depart-
will enhance performance management ment’s Impact Initiative and USAID’s Re-
tools that enable frequent and substantive Design organizational structure and clearly
discussions, including multisource feed- communicate expectations for staff. As we
back, tied to performance expectations. implement new workforce planning tools
Increasing leadership and diversity classes and databases, there must be standard op-
will contribute to these outcomes. To en- erating procedures that preserve the data
sure greater employee and management quality of employee records. Finally, efforts
accountability, we will better align perfor- to improve talent management within a
mance objectives to measurable criteria, merit-based system require sustained lead-
and we will enforce mandatory training re- ership within the Department and support
quirements. The Department and USAID from Congress and unions.
will identify promising leaders and invest in
their growth.

64
GOAL 4: ENSURE EFFECTIVENESS AND ACCOUNTABILITY TO THE AMERICAN TAXPAYER

Performance Goal 4.3.1 ing environments by providing safe, se-


cure, functional, and sustainable facilities.
By 2022, the Department of State will Department and USAID facilities must
reduce the costs of HR service delivery comply with stringent security, protective,
by 14 percent. health, safety, environmental, and building
code requirements, while ensuring a level
of openness and accessibility that enables
Performance Goal 4.3.2 diplomatic priorities.

By 2022, the Department of State and Diplomatic Security’s International Pro-


USAID will achieve a 5.08 overall sat- gram (DS/IP) and High Threat Program
isfaction score in the Human Capital (DS/HTP) Directorates will help to achieve
function of GSA’s Customer Satisfac- this objective through risk-based analysis
tion Survey. and recommendations. The USAID Space
Matters Program and the Department of
Performance Goal 4.3.3 State’s Impact Initiative and USAID’s Re-
Design will also contribute to this objective.
By 2022, the Department of State will
increase its FEVS calculated Employee Strategies for Achieving the Objective
Engagement Index to 72 percent.
The Department and USAID must proac-
tively assess risks and strengthen the ability
to respond. Achieving this requires strate-
Strategic Objective 4.4: Strengthen gies in priority areas, which includes fulfill-
ing the Department’s key responsibilities of
security and safety of workforce and
developing and ensuring compliance with
physical assets security standards, being a leader in protec-
tive security operations, and ensuring oper-
Strategic Objective Overview ationally safe facilities that adhere to occu-
pational health and safety standards. This
Crime, terrorist attacks, civil disorder, will require yearly review of all high threat,
health, and natural disasters threaten U.S. high risk posts by senior Department lead-
government personnel, their family mem- ership using the Post Security Program Re-
bers, and U.S. government facilities around view (PSPRs) process and Program Man-
the world. The Department of State and agement Review (PMRs) process to ensure
USAID aim to ensure its people and as- adherence to Overseas Security Policy
sets are safe by strengthening security pro- Board (OSPB) policy and compliance with
grams, protective operations, and physical procedures. Each year, the Department will
building infrastructure. review and validate our continued, or new,
presence at all high threat, high risk posts
The Department and USAID will secure using the Senior Committee on Overseas
U.S. foreign affairs activity in all operat- Risk Evaluation (SCORE) process.

65
GOAL 4: ENSURE EFFECTIVENESS AND ACCOUNTABILITY TO THE AMERICAN TAXPAYER

The Department and USAID will establish tional effectiveness overseas, especially in
and institutionalize an “Expeditionary Plat- non-permissive environments.
form Working Group” in instances when
foreign policy goals dictate a diplomatic or Cross Agency Collaboration
development presence in new or non-tradi-
tional operating environments. This Work- We will collaborate with the Department
ing Group would incorporate subject mat- of Defense (DoD), United States Marine
ter experts from appropriate Department Corps (USMC), Intelligence Community,
of State bureaus. Relevant representation Overseas Security Policy Board (OSPB)
from USAID and the Department of De- members, private sector (architecture and
fense should also be included to reflect an engineering firms, construction firms, etc.),
approach that encompasses defense, diplo- Office of Management and Budget (OMB),
macy, and development. General Services Administration (GSA),
and Congress to achieve this objective.
Staff plays a vital role in strengthening the
security posture for both the Department Risk
and USAID. We will promote efforts to im-
prove staff proficiency in mitigating orga- The Department and USAID have in-
nizational and individual staff security. We creased diplomatic presence in dangerous
will emphasize a risk profile that balances places to accomplish U.S. foreign policy
risk and operational effectiveness and pre- and development objectives. In those envi-
pare people to operate wherever our work ronments, it is harder to protect our people
takes us, including in increasingly complex, and to build and operate safe facilities.
unstable, and risky environments. The
Department and USAID will centralize Political behavior that destabilizes existing
lessons learned with respect to both risk governance structures or distribution of
management and security concerns, thus power complicates our ability to negotiate
making it easy to search and data mine se- with government officials and obtain the
curity-related information to improve the support needed for our security programs
institutionalization of corrective actions and construction of facilities. Events in
and create a true learning organization. countries where we maintain presence, such
We will also develop a mission analysis and as war, terrorism, and civil disturbance,
policy planning process that is consistent, have impacts that could range from tempo-
credible, and actionable, and that balances rarily disrupting operations to threatening
risk and resources. the physical safety of our employees, espe-
cially local employed staff.
Finally, the Department and USAID will
codify our cooperation with other agencies Certain countries and property owners
(for example, Department of Defense, al- are unable or unwilling to provide full site
lied forces, United Nations, NGOs, etc.) by transparency, which stifles fair pricing and
establishing standing authorities, protocols, access to preferential locations that provide
and global mechanisms to improve opera- a safer and more secure environment for

66
GOAL 4: ENSURE EFFECTIVENESS AND ACCOUNTABILITY TO THE AMERICAN TAXPAYER

our operations and staff. Such constraints


are exacerbated by our need to assess and
operate under a variety of complicated lo-
cal construction conditions, environments,
laws, and regulations.

Performance Goal 4.4.1

By 2022, ensure that Diplomatic Mis-


sions reviewed through the Post Secu-
rity Program Review (PSPRs) process
receive a 95-100 percent rating.

Performance Goal 4.4.2

By 2022, Department of State will move


overseas U.S. government employees
and local staff into secure, safe, and
functional facilities at a rate of 3,000
staff per year.

Performance Goal 4.4.3

By 2022, domestically, USAID will im-


prove safety and efficiency by consol-
idating scattered smaller spaces into
more efficient larger locations.

67