You are on page 1of 46

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989.

Chapter 9 

AZIM UD­DIN I:  THE APOGEE OF THE MUSLIM WARS  The frequent raids of these Moro pirates, both Mindanaos and   Joloans,   were   one   of   the   greatest   hardships   which   these   Filipinas   Islands   suffered   through   many   continuous   years;   they   were   the   scourge   of   the   natives   of   Pintados   and   Camarines,   Tayabas.   and   Mindoro   as   being   nearest   to   the   danger   and   most   weak   for   defense.   These   people   paid   with   their   beloved   liberty   for   our   neglect   to   defend   them   –   not   always deserving of blame, on account of the mutations of the   times. ­ Casimiro Diaz (1690s)  The British occupation (1762­1764) was traumatic but, except  for the  resulting convulsions in Pangasinan and the Ilocos, was not much more  than   a   painful   bruise   to   the   Spaniards'   ego.   It   was   the   battering   of  Filipinas from the Muslim wars beginning with the 1750s until the very  end   of   the   eighteenth   century   that   posed   continuing   problems   and  hardships to the regime. In 1799 Manila virtually gave up the fight and  passed on  the responsibility for defense against  the raiders  to the local  officials and friars.  No man in all the islands during the period 1740s­1760s had half as  colorful a life or a nature as adventurous as the Sultan of Sulu, Alimudin  (regnal name, Azim ud­Din). His incredible saga – including his stay in  Manila from 1749 to 1764, in an episode that has not yet been adequately  explained – rightfully takes up the first half of our story in this Chapter.  The Spanish King Felipe V wrote Alimudin in 1744. The letter traveled  from Buen Retiro, crossed two oceans, and reached Manila in July 1746. A  special deputation brought it to Jolo in September of the next year. Felipe's  salutation was effusive: “To You, most admired and praised among the  Kings and Princes of  Asia, Mahamat Amirudin, King of Jolo, for whom We 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
1

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. wish all good and honor: health and abundant best wishes!”1  A treaty of peace, friendship, and understanding had been concluded by  the   Sultan   and   the   governor­general   of   Filipinas   in   1737.   Felipe   V  confirmed   it   on   9   June   1742,   and   the   1744   letter   informed   Alimudin  accordingly. A similar letter was addressed at the same time to Muhamad  Amirudin   (or   Amir   ud­Din   Hamsa,   based   in   Tamontaca),   the   Sultan   of  Maguindanao   –   Madrid   had   garbled   the   names.   The   sultans   replied   in  good time, with formality and professions of good will.  These letters, agreements, and treaties did not ensure peace. Despite  their problems in Filipinas, the Spaniards could not help pushing into the  Islamic south of the archipelago. On the other hand, the Muslim Filipinos  lived the way of life of the sea warrior that their habitat had made them  into. Sea warriors prowl the seas, as forest people must hunt the jungle  and desert tribes roam the sands. The Muslim Filipinos had no armies,  but they had something more potent, for every man was a fighting man, at  his best when swooping down on the richest treasure of the sea – a weak  coastal settlement, with captives for the taking. This was the life of the  region of which they were part, moderated only by trade for profit, with its  rich commerce in captured slaves.  The Spanish regime claimed to seek only a religious conquest, but often  times   this   was   hand   in   glove   with   military   pressure,   weakened   by   the  sedulous addiction of many of its alcaldes and military commanders to the  profits of private trade. Here the Christian pressure was a challenge to the  Muslim sultanates, each side sustained by a powerful faith. The southern  Filipinos did not actually seek to convert Christians to Islam; on occasion  they allowed Jesuit missionaries to preach in their land. But they could not  be denied the prize and the booty of their sea raids.  It was the closing down of the southern forts in 1663, principally the  presidio in Zamboanga, that had made a relative peace possible. Occupied  with other threats, the Spaniards left the Muslims alone. This gave the  Sulu and Magindanao sultanates time to develop as institutions. By the  1730s the sultanates would be so established that the Spaniards, as well as 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
2

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. the Dutch and the British, would deal with the sultans as sovereign rulers.  But   the   militant   Jesuits   could   not   abide   the   closing   of   the   doors   to  Islamic  Mindanao and   Sulu  that  the abandonment  of  the forts  implied.  They   labored   and   lobbied   in   Manila   as   well   as   in   Madrid   for   the  reestablishment of the fort in Zamboanga. There was danger in this, and  experience would guarantee tragedy. But they were Jesuits. They obtained  royal decrees in 1666 and 1672 ordering the reestablishment of the forts.  The regime in Manila, anticipating the consequences and all too conscious  of its scant resources, refused to implement them. The Jesuits persisted  and   obtained   another   decree,   that   of   1712.   The   Manila   regime   finally  implemented   this   in   1718.   The   Jesuits'   rivals   in   missionary   work   in  Mindanao, the Recollects, would not be left behind; they also prevailed on  the   regime   to   set   up   a   presidio   in   Labo,   southern   Palawan.   These  measures,   after   a   half­century   of   relative   peace,   were   regarded   by   the  Muslims as a challenge. The sultanates were now stronger than before,  and the Spanish actions fatefully opened up a new era of Christian­Muslim  wars that were to last throughout the remainder of the eighteenth century.  In the north, the colonial regime would survive the British invasion and  Palaris   and   Silang   revolts.   The   Batanes   islands   would   be   effectively  brought in as part of Filipinas in this era. But the regime will continue to  have only a tenuous hold on the Visayas. It had alcaldes and friars there,  although   La   Perouse   would   say   in   the   1780s   that   the   Spaniards   were  sovereign in the Visayas just like the King of England  was the King of  France. This was because the regime could not protect its subjects. The  Muslims continued not to take territory, but they escalated their raids for  prize. It was as if they wished the Spaniards to build more churches and  organize more pueblos, so that they would seize the altar pieces and other  church ornaments and take the people into captivity.2

The Saga of Alimudin
Alimudin   was   not   the   warrior   statesman   that   Sultan   Kudarat   had  been, but his was the most cited native name in all the Spanish sources.  His career is relatively well­documented. It was rich with high adventure, 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
3

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. risk and daring, moments of glory, and years of imprisonment and exile.  He was learned in his faith. He might have appeared to have betrayed it,  but his people accepted him even afterward, and he died a Muslim sultan.  His public life gave color to the history of the Filipinos. Notwithstanding  all this, the man and his motivations remain an unresolved enigma.  The forts in Labo and Zamboanga could not contain the Muslims, but  were sufficient to agitate them. Labo had to be closed down in 1720. This  was followed by a wave of Muslim raids that reached up to near Manila. In  December Zamboanga itself was under attack by a force under Datu Balasi  of Butig. This attack was repulsed. The next month the sultans of Jolo and  Maguindanao combined forces and besieged the fort, but had to retire after  two   months.   A   retaliatory   expedition   against   the   Maguindanaos   was  ordered by the governor­general in July 1721. It also accomplished nothing;  on the other hand, the Maguindanaos attacked the Cuyos, Agutaya, and  Mindoro. In early 1723 a well armed fleet left Manila and joined up with  more   vessels   from   Leyte   and   Cebu.   They   came   upon   forty   caracoas   of  M}islims in Negros. But the Spanish craft were too slow to catch up with  the   Muslims,   and   after   a   few   mishaps   the   remaining   boats   retired   to  Manila.  Trade concerns led to a truce of sorts in 1725­1726 when the Sultan of  Sulu   commissioned   a   Chinese   ship   captain   in   Jolo   to   negotiate   an  agreement in Manila. A treaty was signed here in December 1726. Under  its terms traders of each party were free to do business in the territory of  the   other   under   a   system   of   licenses   signed   by   the   Sultan   and   by   the  governor­general of Filipinas, or by the governor of the fort of Zamboanga  in lieu of the latter. There were provisions for captives and enemies. The  Sultan is said to have undertaken to restore Basilan to Spain. This sultan  was Badar ud­Din I, father of Alimudin; he was called Bigotillos by the  Spaniards.   It   was   this   treaty   that   the   regime   in   Manila   successfully  confirmed with Alimudin in 1737.  Shortly after the agreement was signed, however, the Muslims captured  a boat of the Spanish alcalde of Cebu, doubtless engaged in his trading  business, and slew the entire crew. The pueblos of Manaol in Mindoro and 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
4

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. Cateel in Caraga were raided.  A raiding fleet under the command of the Sultan's brother sailed from  Tawi­Tawi   and   hit   the   coastal   pueblos   of   Palawan   and   the   island   of  Dumaran in 1730. From here the raiders lay siege to the principal Spanish  stronghold   on   Palawan,   the   Presidio   de   Santa   Isabel   in   the   pueblo   of  Taytay. The siege lasted for twenty days. A council of war was held by the  Spaniards and boats were built for a punitive expedition against Jolo. In  February 1731 a fleet of four newly built galleys manned by 140 Spanish  soldiers and thirty cannoneers, plus some eighty marines and crew with  376 convicts as rowers, left Manila. It was joined in Zamboanga by two  frigates, four champans, a tartan, a tender, and ten caracoas of Visayans  and Lutaos. A hard fought battle took place in Jolo, which the Spaniards  won.  This same year Maulana Diafar (regnal name, Muhammad Jafar Sadiq  Manamir), Sultan of Tamontaca, went to the Spaniards  asking for help  against   his   nephew   Malinug,   who   had   proclaimed   himself   Sultan   of  Slangan. Another Spanish force sailed to Mindanao, where it was joined by  the Tamontaca forces. The entrance to the river was guarded by a fort built  by a Dutch engineer. Malinug lost; the allies proceeded up river to attack  the   rebels,   and   won   again.   It   was   a   major   victory.   However,   in   1733  Malinug and his father attacked Tamontaca itself and killed the Sultan.  The internal struggle for supremacy in Maguindanao continued. Pakir  Maulana Kamsa, son of the slain sultan, asked for Spanish aid against his  cousin Malinug. He undertook to join his forces under Spanish command.  If the expedition succeeded, he would allow missionaries to work in his  territory, place himself in submission to Spain, and pay tribute.  Accordingly, in February 1734 a Spanish force set sail from Zamboanga,  reenforced   by   the   fleet   called   in   from   Manila.   At   the   famous   Punta   de  Flechas   the   armada   divided   into   two.   The   first   sailed   along   the   coast  toward Tuboc, near the old Spanish fort in Sabanilla. The other cut across  the open sea. The first anchored off Tuboc, awaited by a strong Tawi­Tawi  force allied to Malinug. The attackers disembarked at dawn. Hard fighting 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
5

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. followed,   and   the   attackers   withdrew   to   their   boats,   a   Spanish   writer  blaming the Filipino auxiliaries for the retreat. By nightfall the other half  of the armada joined the first, and plans were made for another assault.  Three   days   later,   using   lightened   craft,   the   expedition   pushed   up   river  towards Malinug. It landed without incident under covering fire from the  guns of the fleet. The attack force had 600 Filipinos in the vanguard, 700  more natives in the rear, and 300 Spaniards tucked safely in the middle.  They were repulsed again. This time the same Spanish writer says that  this was due to the superior numbers of the defenders. The commander of the expedition decided to make up for his reverses by  pushing   south.   The   Spaniards   gained   the   river   and   succeeded   in  overrunning Lubungan and Cabuntalan along the way. The fort of Malinug  was next. It was bombarded for three hours; the fight was hard but the  defenders   held   their   ground,   and   so   the   Spaniards   again   withdrew,  carrying their wounded back to their boats.  The rest of the year the Muslims attacked Linacapan and lay siege once  more  to Taytay. The Sultan of Sulu tried to take Zamboanga itself, but  failed.  Meantime the Spanish governor­general held a council of war to devise  anti­Muslim measures, and the following decisions were adopted: coastal  pueblos were to build watch towers and forts; the alcaldes were to transfer  the people of small pueblos to form larger ones, a pueblo to have not less  than 500 tributes; boats for coastal defense were to be built: privateers,  Filipinos included, were authorized to arm their vessels for war against  the raiders and to keep any Muslim captives as slaves.  This year 1735 Badar ud­Din I succeeded in getting his son Alimudin  proclaimed   as   Sultan   in   Tawi­Tawi.   According   to   Majul,   Alumudin's  mother   was   from   Celebes.   He   was   known   as   Data   Lagasan   before  becoming Sultan. He took the regal name Azim ud­Din. A Recollect history  says that his father prepared him well; he had him attend a madrasah or  Islamic   school   in   Batavia,   to   learn   the   Koran   and   Arabic.   His   Islamic  education was adequate to qualify him to be called a pandita, learned in 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
6

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. Islam. From Tawi­Tawi he moved to Jolo in 1736 upon the invitation of  some Jolo datus. 3  The political risk and danger that were constantly to characterize the  new sultan's career and actions materialized early. His father had been  challenged   and  eventually forced   into  retirement  by  Datu  Sabdula,  who  became   Sultan   Nasar   ud­Din.   Alimudin's   own   accession   was   therefore  contested.   Nasar   ud­Din's   supporters   were   to   include   Datu   Salicaya,   a  powerful Jolo datu;   Malinug, who became Sultan of Maguindanao; and  Bantilan, Alimudin's younger brother.  His chosen line was delicate. He entered into the 1737 treaty with the  Spaniards. This agreement included provisions obligating him to allow the  Jesuits to preach in the sultanate, to allow the conversion of those of his  subjects who were willing to be converted, and to assign a site in Jolo for a  Jesuit church and residence. It could have been due to these provisions  that the Spanish king, in his 1744 letter, expressed the hope that Alimudin  and his principal datus would embrace Christianity. Alimudin's reply was  that he would allow even his son the Prince Israel to be converted, if the  latter so wished. Subsequent to the 1737 treaty he had twice asked the  Spanish   governor   in   Zamboanga   for   material   support   against   the   anti­ Alimudin faction (1742). In 1747 he and the Spaniards jointly warred on  the Tiruns of east Borneo.  The Tiruns were for some time now subjects or tributaries of the Sultan  of Sulu, but the latter's control over them was shaky. They would conduct  raids   on   the   Christian   pueblos   independently   of   the   Sultan's   authority.  The alliance between Alimudin and the Spaniards against the Tiruns was  therefore of mutual benefit.  Whatever Alimudin's reasons; these political moves and decisions were  all   overt   and   perilous   acts   that   would   strengthen   the   Spaniards,   while  entangling him in a web of commitments to the Muslims' enemy. Equally  risky were his undertakings relative to religion, which were aggravated by  his   open   consorting   with   the   Jesuit   unbelievers.   These   open   acts   of  Alimudin can be too easily interpreted as obvious reactions to the dynastic 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
7

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. struggle against him. He had political trouble; therefore his turning to the  Spaniards for support was natural. This was no different from the course  taken   earlier   by   the   Tamontaca   sultan   Maulana   Diafar.   According   to  Saleeby,   these   actuations   of   Alimudin's   “caused   great   dissatisfaction  among   the   people,   and   an   opposition   party   was   formed   under   the  leadership of Prince Bantilan for the purpose of expelling the missionaries  and deposing Alimud Din.... Civil war was imminent.” A broader appreciation of the political situation is provided by Majul,  who   says   that   some   of   Alimudin's   moves   were   directed   towards   the  broadening of the powers of the sultanate and towards the centralization of  authority   in   the   Sultan.   These   tendencies   unavoidably   perturbed   the  datus,   whose   traditional   status   and   authority   were   threatened.   They  would   be   expected   to   side  with  an   opposition  party,  which   was  to  form  around Bantilan, and to seek the support of the leaders of Maguindanao.  This seems  to be a  more  correct  reading of  Saleeby's  “dissatisfaction  among the people,” since it was the datus who were the people concerned.  To this appreciation of Alimudin's position has to be added the fact that  Alimudin   had   a   relatively   uncommon   background,   accompanied   by   a  complex personality. He had spent part of his youth abroad; he had years  of schooling in a madrasah in a leading Islamic land; and he had command  of superior doctrinal knowledge of Islam relative to the datus. Although  these facts will not adequately explain his moves, to ignore them would  make   his   decisions   and   actions   appear   to   be   those   of   a   reckless   and  capricious man, which he was not.  The complexity is reflected in Alimudin's other actions. He repeatedly  hedged   on   the   building   site   which   he   had   conceded   to   the   Jesuits.   He  finally   sold   them   a   lot,   but   then   he   had   them   move   into   the   sultan's  compound. None of this pleased the Jesuits or reassured the datus. On the  Spanish king's invitation to embrace Christianity, he replied with eloquent  ambiguity: “If in time God should incline me to do so, with the light that  He   may   give   to   me   I   shall   endeavor   to   follow   that   inclination.”   His  cooperation with the Spaniards against the Tiruns was, to put it mildly,  insincere: he gave the Tiruns advance information of his own allies' moves 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
8

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. so that they (the Tiruns) could withdraw and hide their Christian captives  in the interior villages; in this way he reestablished his sovereignty over  his wily subjects. He even charged the Spaniards 6,000 pesos and military  supplies for his costs in the Tirun campaigns. Finally, the Jesuits in Jolo  expressed   suspicions   about   his   sincerity,   both   in   dealing   with   the  Spaniards   and   in   fulfilling   his   treaty   commitments.   This   attitude   was  shared by the ranking Spanish official in southern Filipinas, the governor  of Zamboanga.  After   the   Tirun   campaigns   the   situation   in   Jolo   would   have   to   be  assessed   as   full   of   uncertainty   for   Alimudin.   He   had   joined   with   the  Spaniards against his own subjects; he had asked for and received Spanish  money; he was supported by the enemy. Moreover, he had given the Jesuits  permission to be in the sultanate. He and they would be seen together ­  reportedly discussing doctrinal questions. These last were not reassuring  to the influential group of Sulu religious leaders.  And then Alimudin escalated the uncertainty of his position by a bold  and unprecedented move: he announced his decision to visit the governor­ general in Manila. This man was the Dominican bishop of Nueva Segovia.  It was necessary to name a leader or "regent" to look after affairs in  Jolo during Alimudin's absence. The Spanish historian Montero y Vidal  says that Alimudin had consulted with the Jesuits on this matter and that  he had decided to name the Datu Salicaya. This would support Montero y  Vidal's   statement   that   Alimudin's   younger   brother   Bantilan,   who   had  aspirations to the throne, was angered or alienated by the decision. This  view in turn supports the Spanish theory, shared by Saleeby, of Bantilan's  complicity in the alleged assassination attempt on Alimudin. The view is  plausible because Salicaya was now in Alimudin's camp; he had been the  Sultan's envoy to Manila to carry the reply to the Spanish king's letter,  and   his   daughter   was   engaged   to   be   married   to   Israel,   Alimudin's  presumptive heir. What makes the Montero y Vidal view inconclusive is  that Datu Salicaya was not around during the hours when Alimudin was  to have left Jolo for Zamboanga. Had he in fact been named the proxy of  Alimudin, the two of them would certainly have been together during this 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
9

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. time.  Instead, at one o'clock in the morning of 2 September 1748, Alimudin  received   a   wound   in   the   leg   as   he   was   going   down   the   stairs   of   a  concubine's   house,   presumably   after   bidding   goodbye   before   leaving   for  Zamboanga later that day. Panic spread. The word was that the Sultan  had been murdered. Salicaya arrived much later. The injury turned out to  be slight. It was Bantilan and the members of the Sultan's council, the  Ruma Bichara, who saw him off in the evening, departure honors complete  with the prescribed salvo from the cotta's cannon. Majul says that Bantilan  had been mentioned by Alimudin as the Sulu governor in his absence.  In a third hypothesis, De la Costa states that three datus – Salicaya,  Mamancha, and Bantilan – had been named  by Alimudin to serve in a  regency   during   his   absence.   The   question   of   whether   the   wounding   of  Alimudin   was   a   frustrated   assassination   attempt,   or   merely   a   show  arranged to confuse the Spaniards, may never be answered. Majul cites  testimony that it was Bantilan who had arranged for the wounding of the  Sultan. In the end, Bantilan was proclaimed Sultan after Alimudin had  left.4 Alimudin   arrived   in   Cavite   with   a   retinue   of   seventy   on   the   2nd  January 1749. The governor­general provided boats to carry the party to  the Pasig. From here Alimudin was conducted to comfortable lodgings in  Binondo, with a company of the Real Tercio, an elite army regiment, as his  official guard. On the 17th a carriage drawn by six horses, with the captain  of   the   palace   guard   and   six   mounted   halberdiers   as   escort,   fetched   the  Sultan   for   the   formal   reception   tendered   in   his   honor   by   the   governor­ general.   The   route   was   festive;   musicians   played   at   fixed   intervals;   the  procession   passed   through   streets   adorned   by   painted   arches   with  fluttering ribands and flags; the windows of the houses were gay with silk  curtains and bunting. On each side of the street were lined, first the native  militia,   then   the   Pampango   troops   and,   from   the   main   gate   of   the   city  walls,   the   royal   infantry   regiment.   There   were   volleys   of   musketry   and  salvos of artillery. 

CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 

10

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. At the palace, in the hall of the Audiencia, Alimudin was received by his  host   and   embraced   and   eulogized   by   the   church   prelates   and   religious  superiors. The hall was rich with damask tapestry and Persian rugs. A  rich banquet followed. The regime visibly went out of its way to impress  the royal visitor. A friar history observes that “this gala reception gave to  the Sultan an idea of the grandeur of the Spanish monarchy and of its  great power in these remote parts of the world.” In   the   days   after   the   reception   the   Sultan   was   visited   by   all   the  notables of Spanish Manila. Then came time for sightseeing in the larger  city. He was visibly impressed by the art of printing, and he had a small  press   brought   to   his   Binondo   quarters.   The   Sangley   shops   with   their  seemingly   infinite   variety   of   wares,   evidencing   all   kinds   of   crafts   and  skills, fascinated him. He attended the festivities arranged for him by the  mestizos. He watched their comedias.  All the time, for a whole year, the governor­general treated him well,  hosted   him   at   table,   and   together   they   would   witness   the   public  ceremonies of the  Spanish  community  from  the balconies  of the palacio  real. The only imposition upon the Sultan was that his host never ceased to  suggest that he embrace the true faith, recover his throne, and defeat his  enemies as a Christian king.  Finally, in December, Alimudin told the governor­general of his desire  to become a Christian. Two Jesuits were assigned to instruct him in the  new doctrine. He started wearing Spanish dress; he said that he was no  longer going to live with the three concubines he had in his suite; and he  wore a rosary around his neck. In March 1750 his Jesuit tutors certified to  his   adequate   knowledge   of   the   Christian   doctrine   but   that,   in   their  opinion, he did not yet show the proper disposition for baptism.  But the archbishop of Manila had misgivings over Alimudin's sincerity.  The   latter   had   to   write   two   more   times   without   getting   the   prelate's  approval   for   his   baptism.   But   the   governor­general   was   his   patron   and  committed to his royal convert. He convoked a fifteen­man group of doctors  of   canon   law.   After   deliberations   this   council   pronounced,   with   only 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
11

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. Alimudin's two Jesuit tutors dissenting, his fitness for baptism. In order to  avoid   a   conflict   of  jurisdiction  with  the  archbishop,  the  bishop­governor  decided   to   have   Alimudin   baptized   in   his   own   diocese,   in  the  pueblo  of  Paniqui, the nearest town of the bishopric of Nueva Segovia.  On 20 April the Sultan, richly garbed in Spanish attire, left Manila for  Paniqui. He was accompanied by his personal retinue and guard as well as  by   several   Spanish   officials   and   clergy.   The   party   was   escorted   by   a  detachment of the royal infantry. They began the trip by sea and made the  rest of it by land. They were entertained and feted in all of the pueblos en  route. He was baptized in Paniqui on the 28th, a Spanish general standing  proxy for the bishop­governor as sponsor. He took the name Fernando I.  Two of his datus and five men of his guard are reported to have been also  baptized.  It was holiday time, for the month of May was a month of fiestas and  pilgrimages in Filipinas, then as now. The return of the Christian sultan  in Manila was the start of fifteen days of celebrations. He was saluted by  the cannon of the walls. The party entered the walls through the gate of  the   Dominicans,   and   the   reception   group   of   military   and   clergy  accompanied him to the chapel of Nuestra Senora del Rosario, where a Te   Deum was sung. The governor­general's carriage again brought him to the  palace, where he was received with gracious felicitations. Then followed  fiestas featured by evenings of lights, masquerades, comedias, fireworks,  balls, and bullfights ­ although the local bulls were tame. The celebrations  culminated in a solemn high mass. 5  It   was   at   this   juncture   that   the   bishop­governor   wished   to   have  Alimudin restored to his throne, now occupied by Bantilan. But the regime  was strapped for funds; no situado had been sent from Nueva Espana for  six years. The soldiery was also low, since no recruitments had been made  for three years. Alimudin now asked that his son and heir, Muhammad  Israel,   and   his   daughter   Fatima,   be   brought   from   Jolo   to   Manila   for  instruction in Christianity.  Meantime, Bantilan strengthened his forces, and the Joloanos raided 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
12

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. the   Visayas.   The   regime's   influence   in   Maguindanao   deteriorated.   The  Visayas were weakly defended. A new governor­general decided to restore  Alimudin in Jolo, in the hope that this would check and arrest the Muslim  attacks.   The   Jesuits   and   the   Zamboanga   governor   opposed   this   plan,  arguing that Alimudin's going to Manila had been a charade all along, a  plot between him and Bantilan to learn everything about the Spaniards'  defenses.  In   Manila   the   governor­general   insisted   on   restoration,   and   another  turning point in the saga would soon be reached. A small squadron sailed  from   Manila   on   17   May   1751.   The  capitana  or   flagship   arrived   in  Zamboanga at the end of the month. Alimudin was on board the frigate  San Fernando, the almiranta or second ship.  The almiranta had rudder trouble. We may surmise that this had been  arranged by the Spaniards. This is suggested by the nature of the orders  carried   by   the   squadron   commander.   He   was   directed   by   the   governor­ general to “make port at Zamboanga, and from there try to subdue the  rebel   vassals,   blockade   the   island   of   Sulu   by   sea,   cut   it   off   from   all  communication   with   its   neighbors,   prevent   food   from   being   introduced,  prevent and punish all depredations, acts of piracy, ... and see that the  captives   are   returned   and   that   due   observance   is   given   the   treaties   of  peace and other agreements....”  Jolo was blockaded and heavily bombarded by the flagship and the rest  of the squadron pursuant to the fleet orders. These hostile actions were  obviously incompatible with Alimudin's presence in the main body of the  expedition,   since   they   would   set   his   people   against   him.   This   was   why  Alimudin   was   assigned   to   the   almiranta.   Meanwhile,   his   loyalty   to   the  Spaniards could be gauged based on his reaction to the hostilities when  apprised of them.  The mishaps and delays that befell Alimudin's trip support the above  interpretation. The San Fernando drifted off course and put in at Calapan  in Mindoro. Two  faluas  or tenders were with the frigate, following, and  Alimudin transferred to one of them. This too was disabled and forced to 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
13

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. stop   in   Naujan.   A   champan   sent   from   Manila   took   him   to   Iloilo,   from  where still another champan brought him to Dapitan, whence a caracoa  took him to Zamboanga.  The main body of the squadron, with every good reason not to wait for  Alimudin, left Zamboanga for Jolo at the earliest opportunity. This was to  deny   the   Joloanos   time   to   prepare   for   hostilities,   in   the   light   of   the  provocative   actions   that   the   fleet's   orders   entailed.   The   Spaniards  anchored on the roadstead off Jolo in the last week of June. Then they  captured  two Chinese junks. This act of war angered the Joloanos, and  there was an exchange of artillery fire. The Spaniards landed a group, but  the men were driven back to their boats.  Jolo   was   unprepared   for   the   bombardment,   and   so   a   brother   of  Alimudin, the Datu Asin, negotiated peace with the squadron. Now it was  learned   that   the   Spaniards   were   restoring   Alimudin;   the   squadron  demanded that the Joloanos accept him, and that all Christian captives be  returned. Datu Asin obtained the Joloanos' word that they would accept  their old Sultan; however, he explained to the Spaniards that the return of  the   captives   would   require   sometime,   because   their   owners   would   first  have to be located. In the event, Datu Asin agreed to go to Zamboanga to  receive Alimudin and escort him to Jolo. He was also required to bring as  many Christian captives as possible, for release.  The great adventure would soon be over. The Christian sultan was  going home. He was awaited by his subjects. For two years he had been  feted by the Spaniards. He had learned not only Spanish ways, had not  only become Christian; he had surely also learned much about the  Spaniards' military capability and defenses. If he had deceived the  Spaniards, if it all had been a deception, with Bantilan or by himself alone,  it would be an unheard of, an incredible and extraordinary coup! The rest  of his retinue arrived in Zamboanga; his subjects from Basilan were also  there, preparing to receive him; on 30 July Datu Asin with his own group  from Jolo arrived. The Spanish fort of Zamboanga was swarming with  Muslims. 

CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 

14

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. The San Fernando, now repaired, arrived in Zamboanga on the 25th. It  carried two letters from Alimudin for Amirudin, Sultan of Maguindanao.  Alimudin had been required by the governor­general to inform Amirudin of  his   restoration   and   of   the   support   he   owed   to   the   Spaniards;   Alimudin  must   likewise   ask   Amirudin   to   allow   missionaries   to   preach   in   his  territory,   support   the   Spaniards   against   rebellious   Sulus,   and   return  Christian captives.  But the message in the first letter, which was in the native dialect; was  entirely different from that which he was asked to write. The gist of it was  that the governor­general had “ordered me to write to you in our style and  language; therefore, do not understand that I am writing to you on my own  behalf, but because I am ordered to do so....” In other words, he asked  Amirudin not to take offense and be surprised at the style and message of  the other letter, which did not observe the proper address between sultans,  since he wrote it under duress. The second letter he had dictated in  Spanish, its text pursuant to the governor­general's instructions, as if it  were a Spanish translation of the first.  The two letters were delivered to the governor of Zamboanga who, it  will be remembered, deeply distrusted Alimudin. He had the first letter  translated from the native text into Spanish. Given his suspicions, he  decided that it was conclusive evidence of Alimudin's duplicity and  treason. All the acts and events in the past that could suggest Alimudin's  insincerity or conspiracy between him and his datus were now recalled as  confirmation of the governor's suspicions. The extraordinarily large  number of Muslims who were converging in Zamboanga ­ although many of  them were women – was taken to be part of a plot to seize the fort.  The Zamboanga governor acted. Alimudin was imprisoned midnight of  3 August 1751. With him were Muhammad Israel and three other sons,  four   daughters   including   Fatima,  his   brother  Datu  Asin,   his   sister,  five  brothers­in­law the chief Cadi of Sulu, five panditas, thirty­two concubines  and servants, and others, for a total of 216. The prisoners were ordered  taken   to   Manila.   Alimudin   was   kept   in   the   maximum   security   Fort  Santiago, and the others in the prison of San Felipe in Cavite. 6 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
15

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. The regime now undertook a "war by fire and sword" against the  Joloanos, Tiruns, and Camucones. A corso was launched, calling on private  persons with their own craft to campaign against the Muslims under  letters of marque; the privateers were authorized to seize all vessels,  goods, weapons, and persons of the enemy. Captives were to be made  slaves. 7 In  May   1752   a   large  force   with  1,900   land   troops   attacked   Jolo,   but  without   success;   it   turned   on   Parang,   where   it   lost   seventy   dead   and  eighty­five wounded; still later, it lost a detachment against Tawi­Tawi.  Bantilan   retaliated.   This   period   began   an   era   of   reverses   for   the  Spaniards, exposing their inability to defend their subjects. The Spanish  commander   of   the   fort   of   Iligan   asked   Manila   to   have   it   strengthened;  while   the   councils   of   war   were   discussing   the   appeal,   a   force   of   2,000  Muslims lay siege to the fort. In Leyte the pueblos of Sogod and Maasin,  Cabalian, Hinundayan, Liloan, and “a hundred other places,” were burned  and sacked.  The bureaucracy in Manila was of no help. As the experts and ranking  officials debated and argued, the reports and appeals for succor from the  stricken provinces “make the long peregrination of discussions, reports,  and opinions until they are joined to the expediente (all the papers, the file,  on a subject), such that, by the time the relieving force leaves Manila, the  Muslims have returned to their lairs, with rich booty, and preparing for a  new raid. At times, while the raiders were ravaging an island, the  commanders of the squadrons sent to punish them were calmly conducting  their trading affairs nearby.” In 1753 the province of Caraga suffered incalculable losses. In July  Surigao lost "a multitude' of people. A Recollect friar fled to the hills and  was captured in Lanao; his companion friar died of exhaustion and  exposure. In Siargao the pueblos of Caolo, Sapao, and Cabonto were  sacked; the curate was killed. Higaquet, Pahuntungan, and the pueblo of  Surigao were depopulated.  The Muslims entered the river of Butuan and burned the church and 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
16

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. houses. They also burned the pueblos of Tubay, Mainit, Hibon, Habongan,  Talacoban,   and   Gingoog.   The   islands   of   Tablas,   Banton,   Simara,   and  Sibuyan lost many people. In Ticao the curate was seized and brought to  Masbate.   The   Muslims   demanded   a   ransom   of   500   pesos   but   took   the  money, the friar, and captives. Calapan was burned down and the curate  there was brought to Jolo. Dongon was attacked. In Calavite the curate  was killed. The Batangas coast was harassed.  A Spanish galley was reconnoitering the Maguindanao coast in October;  one   midnight   it   found   itself   surrounded   by   thirty­three   boats.   The  strangers were Illanons (Maranaos). To the Spanish crew the craft. were  ominously   familiar,   especially   the   capitana   the   Santa   Rita   and   the  almiranta the San Ignacio ­ but this was because the two were Spanish  ships   that   the   Muslims   had   lately   captured   in   Palawan.   The   Spanish  commander  saw  no  escape,  and   he  heroically  had  his   powder  magazine  blown up.  In November a Spanish squadron of two galleys, a sloop, a champan for  stores, and a tender sailed from Cavite to take soundings of some rivers.  After   a   stopover   in   Calapan   it   was   caught   in   a   storm.   One   of   the   two  galleys   foundered   and   twenty­one   men   were   lost.   The   sloop   was   also  wrecked. The capitana made its way to Batangas, its main mast broken;  the champan was in similar distress. After making repairs they headed  back for Calapan and were set upon by a Muslim raiding party passing by,  which took 409 captives.  In February of this year of intense Muslim raids Alimudin, in prison in  Manila, made a proposal towards peace and his release. He had letters to  Bantilan and to the datus in Jolo regarding peace with the regime, and he  undertook   to   have   fifty   Christians   held   captive   in   Sulu   released   to   the  Spaniards   within   a   period   of   three   months.   These   were   not   unusual  proposals,   although   the   fact   of   Alimudin's   utter   confidence   that   his  undertakings  would  be honored  in  Jolo  must  be noted.  What   was  more  remarkable, because unconventional, was Alimudin's proposed mission to  deliver his letters to Jolo. His messages and the negotiations with Bantilan  were to be conducted by his sister Pangyan Bangkilang and his daughter 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
17

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. Fatima. The regime cleared this proposal. Her aunt having taken sick, it  was Fatima who was eventually charged with the mission. And so a young  Muslim girl became the first Filipino woman to execute a delicate mission  of   state   diplomacy.   She   embarked   on   the   uncertain   journey   with   the  sparest retinue of just three servants, and arrived in Jolo on the 12th May.  Fatima carried out her mission successfully. Thirty­two captives were  delivered to Zamboanga a few days after her arrival, and the remaining  eighteen on 23 July. It should be realized that the release of captives was  by no means easy. As the Muslim sultans would explain to the Spaniards  several times, the return of captives, especially if this involved persons who  had been captured years earlier, entailed tracing their captors or owners  (who might have sold them to others), and then convincing these to give  them up or release them for ransom. In some cases the captives would have  been sold in Borneo or in the other slave markets in the region.  The influence and   effort  exerted   by Bantilan  (Muizz  ud­Din)  on  this  matter indicate his regard for his niece, his concern for his brother, and his  readiness to deal diplomatically with the Spaniards. Bantilan's writing a  return letter to the governor­general for his brother's release – which if  favorably acted upon would create problems for himself – also evidences  the strong family bonds among the Muslims, no matter how seriously they  waged family rivalries for dynastic succession. This was no different from  dynastic rivalries in royal families elsewhere.  Fatima   returned   to   Zamboanga   in   October   and,   in   the   company   of  Muhammad Ismail, Bantilan's ambassador, arrived in Cavite in December.  Bantilan's letters asked for the release and return of Alimudin so that he  would be restored as Sultan, as well as for a lasting peace. Muhammad  Ismail was formally received in Manila. This paved the way towards the  next step in the negotiations on Alimudin's status.  On   28   February   1754   Alimudin   as   Sultan   and   nine   other   Muslim  notables in Manila  signed  the terms of a  peace  proposal  that had  been  discussed   previously   with   the   Spanish   governor­general.   The   document  noted the war between “the two nations, Spanish and Joloan;” and that 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
18

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. “Bantilan, governor of the kingdom,” had sent an envoy with full powers to  treat for a firm and perpetual peace in the name of the Joloan nation.  The Muslim undertakings were as follows: the return within one year of  all subjects of the Spanish regime held captive in the kingdom of Jolo and  by the Tiruns; return of all religious ornaments and other items captured  from   the   churches;   punishment   by   the   Sulu   authorities   of   any   datu   or  subject, including the Tiruns, who caused any harm to any subject of the  regime; treatment by the Sulus of any neighboring kingdom at war with  the   regime   as   an   enemy;   and   Alimudin's   pledge   of   his   life   for   faithful  compliance with the foregoing undertakings.  Furthermore,  the  Datu   Yuhan  Pahalawan,  Alimudin's   brother­in­law,  was named to serve as his envoy to Jolo; he would go with Muhammad  Ismail to obtain the compliance of the Jolo authorities. The signatories,  aside   from   Alimudin,   were:   Datto   Yasugo;   Maharayalaila;   Mohamad  Ismael; Sarabudin; Yuhan Pahalawan; Mustafa; Elan; Aman; and Israel.  The   undertakings   would   need   to   be   confirmed   or   adhered   to   by  Bantilan in Jolo. The Spanish governor­general had a letter for Bantilan,  dated 3 March 1754, to the effect that if the undertakings were complied  with within one year, Alimudin would be released.8 One of the two Spanish squadrons  patrolling Visayan and Mindanao  waters anchored on the roads off Jolo towards the end of June. Its mission  was to ascertain what Bantilan had done, if any, towards discharge of the  undertakings assumed in Manila. The commander was invited by Bantilan  to visit on shore; he was treated well and was given sixty­eight captives,  two captured vessels, and some ransom money. The commander wrote a  letter to the governor­general from Jolo, and again later from Zamboanga,  on the auspicious situation in Jolo, with a special report of his assessment  of Alimudin. In his view, Alimudin had never been a traitor to Spain, but  that, in view of the unfavorable effect on his people of his concessions to  the   Spaniards   and   of   his   conversion,   he   had   written   to   the   Jolo   datus  promising   to   be   subject   to   the   old   laws   of   the   sultanate   upon   his  restoration. In Jolo they were awaiting his return, at which they would 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
19

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. recognize him as their legitimate sovereign. As for Bantilan, his position  relative   to   Alimudin   had   become   weaker,   and   he   wished   only   to   bring  about the freedom of the princesses imprisoned in Manila.  The   year   1754   “was   fatal   for   the   provinces   of   Filipinas,   due   to   the  vandalistic raids of the Muslims.” In March the pueblos of southern Leyte  – Cabalian, Hinundayan, Liloan, Sogod, Maasin, and  others  were  again  ravaged; the residents of the pueblo of Biliran were captured en masse.  In   May   a   Muslim   fleet   of   seventy­four   boats   attacked   Bongabong   in  Mindoro   and   took   100   captives,   plus   more   than   fifty   in   Manaol   and  Bulalacao. Sixty­eight caracoas raided Calibo and Asin. Cabalot in Tablas  Island suffered a similar attack; Cauit lost ninety­five people. Fifty­seven  Muslim   boats   raided   Mainit   in   Banton   Island;   the   corsairs   burned   the  town,   captured   four   small   cannon,   and   took   sixty­seven   captives.  Seventeen   boats   raided   Pandas   on   the   northeast   coast   of   Panay,   then  joined thirty others to attack Tibiao down the coast, although failing to  take the latter. In Odiongan, Romblon 101 people were captured.  In   June   a   hundred   captives   were   taken   by   a   raiding   group   of   900  Maranaos in the pueblos of Baco and Casang in Albay; Santa Cruz was  burned.   In   the   Caiamianes   130   persons   were   captured.   Busuanga,   the  main island in the Calamianes group, was to be raided no less than ten  times   in   the   three   months   from   June   to   August.   The   alcalde   lost   his  trading   champan   in  Linacapan.   This   same  month  the  following   pueblos  and islands were raided: Cuyo, Canipo, Agutaya, Culion, Lubang, Balayan,  and   Caysasay.   Palompon   in   Leyte   was   attacked   by   1,000   Maranaos;  Hilongos was raided by 2,000.  In July it was the turn of the following pueblos and islands: Bantayan,  Potat, and Balambang in Cebu; Dumaguete, Siquijor, Tucupan, Ilog;  Cabilga, Palanasan, Panamao (Leyte); Tanauan (Tayabas); Catbalogan,  Butuan, Siargao, and Bislig. Lubungan in northern Zamboanga was  especially unfortunate, attacked by Maranaos, Maguindanaos, Joloanos,  and Lutaos.  The   fort   and   pueblo   of   Tandag,   the   chief   Spanish   outpost   in 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
20

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. northeastern Mindanao, were betrayed by the loser in the contest for the  vacant  alcaldeship of the  province. The man invited the Maguindanaos.  The Sultan obliged by ordering the Datu Dumango to the attack. The fort  was garrisoned by a company of Spaniards and another of Pampangos; it  had   sixteen   cannon   of   various   caliber.   The   garrison   withstood   the   two­ month siege bravely, but was decimated by hunger. On an overcast and  rainy morning, the attackers took the main fort and turned the cannon  around to the barracks and magazines, where the doomed defenders had  taken   shelter.   The   garrison   was   slain   to   the   last   man,   the   Spanish  commander taking his wife's life first. The raiders took all the cannons  they could carry.  The two Spanish squadrons patrolling central and southern Filipinas  were kept busy. These raids of 1754 should be viewed as the Muslims' way  of   keeping   pressure   on   the   regime.   It   was   touch   and   go.   There   was  sentiment   in   Manila   in   favor   of   killing   Alimudin.   The   opinion   that  prevailed   was   that   killing   the   Sultan   would   provoke   a   slaughter   of   the  estimated   10,000   Christians   held   captive,   in   addition   to   the   wave   of  retaliatory   raids   that   would   surely   follow.   In   the   meantime,   a   new  governor­general assumed office in Manila, and the good reports from Jolo  and Zamboanga written by the squadron commander in July disposed him  well towards Alimudin.  At   this   juncture   Alimudin   formally   asked   the   governor­general   to  intercede with the archbishop to allow him to hear mass and receive the  sacraments. Eventually, after a personal visit to the Sultan, the prelate  declared Alimudin to be a loyal son of the Church. He confessed and took  communion   on   16   March   1755.   He   was   later   also   allowed   to   marry   his  concubine, Rita Calderon, after the death of his wife. The marriage was  solemnized at the palacio del gobernador on 27 April.  Among the preliminaries leading to the accord of February 1754 was a  plan to release all the Muslims detained in Manila and bring them to Jolo,  save only Alimudin and Muhammad Israel, who would remain as hostages.  Israel   was   to study  at   the  Colegio  de  San  Felipe  in  Manila.  A  Spanish  council of war decided to give effect to this. 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
21

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. The ceremonies in Jolo marking the return of the exiles give us an idea  of the court practice in the sultanate at the time. A small squadron of four  champans   under   the   command   of   the   newly   appointed   governor   of  Zamboanga   (the   anti­Alimudin   governor   had   died)   anchored   at   the  roadstead of Jolo on the 4th October. A reception party of notables led by  Datu Yuhan Pahalawan boarded and paid respects to the governor; next he  met   his   wife   Pangyan   Bangkilang,   Alimudin's   sister;   finally,   he   paid  courtesies to the Sultan's daughters. Below, native music was played in the  gaily dressed native boats bobbing around the visiting Spanish ships. The  next day the squadron and the cotta exchanged artillery salutes.  The   governor   and   his   Muslim   passengers   disembarked   with   great  ceremony. They were awaited on shore by a large throng led by the datus  and other notables, who conducted the party to the Sultan's house. The  route was lined by fighting men. The Raja Mura (heir apparent, sometimes  Raja   Muda)   and   Raja   Laut   (fleet   commander)   received   them   at   the  entrance   and   conducted   them   to   the   reception   room,   where   Sultan  Bantilan awaited in ceremonial dress under a richly adorned canopy. The  Sultan   embraced   the   governor   and   had   him   sit   at   his   right.   The   other  Spaniards and datus took their seats. After being informed of the health of  Alimudin and of the governor­general, Bantilan formally bade welcome to  the governor and assured him in a gracious speech that his assignment to  Zamboanga   was   a   wise   and   auspicious   appointment   that   would   ensure  peace between Spaniards and Joloanos.  After   the   ceremonies   the   governor   retired   to   his   quarters.   In   the  evening he was visited by the Sultan and later by Alimudin's daughters  the princesses Fatima, Carima, and Famila. He was especially honored by  a call by the Sultan's wife and her ladies. The datus also called on him in  their turn, without their arms, which denoted esteem and trust. Finally,  the orangkaya (“men of means” – thus, notables, but not of the nobility)  paid  their respects. The protocol  was punctilious. During the governor's  stay   Jolo   was   gay   with   celebrations.   After   a   round   of   meetings   a  proclamation of  peace  was  issued.  But  the governor  had  to  leave on  24  October upon receipt of reports that Zamboanga was to be attacked by the  Maranaos and Maguindanaos. 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
22

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. These Maguindanao and Maranao moves show that the pattern in the  wars   between   the   Muslim   Filipinos   and   the   Spaniards   was   seldom  predictable. Peace with one group, if it came, and war with the rest was  the norm. Simultaneous peace treaties with Jolo and Maguindanao were  rare and were clearly entered into by the Muslims for tactical reasons. The  1737 agreement, it must be recalled, was in support of the strategy of the  Tamontaca leader to gain a breathing spell vis­a­vis the Spanish enemy,  and at the same time to employ the latter's aid against his dynastic rival  Malinug. After he had gained ascendancy over all Maguindanao the Sultan  regained independence of action and thereafter acted as opportunity and  advantage indicated. Even when the two sultans were formally at peace  with the regime their datus would raid the provinces of Filipinas and the  sultans would explain to the Spaniards that they could not control these  datus.   This   was   very   often   true   in   the   case   of   the   Samals   of   the  Balanguingui island group and of the Tiruns of east Borneo, both subjects  of the Sultan of Sulu.  During   this   era   the   Maranaos   emerged   as   a   raiding   power.   Their  resistance   against   the   Spaniards   in   the   late   1630s,   thanks   to   the  inspiration of the great Sultan Kudarat, was crucial to the Islamization of  the Lake Lanao region. Their raids added to the Spaniards' problems. In  truth, the regime at this time simply did not have the manpower and other  resources to prevail over the Muslim Filipinos. Sometimes its efforts were  weakened by contests between rival missionary groups (the Recollects and  Jesuits   in   Mindanao),   at   other   times   by   its   alcaldes   and   military  commanders engaging in trading activities to the neglect of the war. One   of   the   regime's   approaches   to   strengthening   the   Zamboanga  garrison was the resettlement near the fort of families from the Visayas.  An instance of this was the resettlement of one hundred Boholano families  during  the  late 1730s.  The Jesuits  were in the forefront   of this  project,  since   they   had   the   most   interest   in   a   strong   outpost   to   support   their  missionary   thrust   in   Sulu.   They   had   proposed   the   move   back   in   the  previous decade, pointing out the following beneficial results:  1. there would be savings to the royal treasury, since the 100 families 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
23

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. would guarantee 100 soldiers for the garrison at all times;  2. the organization of the new Boholano pueblo at La Caldera would  force the Muslims in that area to leave, and at the same time provide the  regime with fishermen and boat crews;  3. the   men   would   be   available   as   escorts   for   the   friars,   without  assigning soldiers from the presidio for this purpose;  4. the Boholanos would supply provisions to the fort by raising crops,  fruit, fowl, and by fishing;  5. the Boholanos would be more trustworthy as reenforcements for the  presidio   than   the   Lutaos   (who   were   then   the   main   force   of   native  auxiliaries); and their boats would augment the fleet of Zamboanga; and  6. the Boholanos would furnish good examples of Christianity to the  other people in the area; they have proved their loyalty and valor for the  last three years, and have been the only people who had inflicted defeats  on the Muslims, although with inferior arms.  The Manila authorities approved this project in 1723. However, it had  not been implemented by 1726. The Jesuits informed the government that  they had obtained a bequest from Mexico to cover costs of food and salaries  of the officials and soldiers of the planned pueblo for two years, and also to  construct   vessels   with   drums   and   bells.   In   1726   the   Jesuits   asked   for  implementation under the following conditions:  1. that the Boholanos be extended perpetual exemption for tribute and  personal services;  2.  that   the  new  pueblo  officials   and   military  officers   be  issued   their  titles of office free and without collection of the fees for appointments;  3. that each family be given an axe and a spade; and  4. that the new puelblo be assigned arms and ammunition.  The matter having gone to Spain, it was there decided that the settlers 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
24

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. be exempted from the tribute and polos for four years only. The regime in  Manila informed Spain in 1737 that it had decided to carry out the project. In   1757   a   large   group   of   328   men,   46   women,   and   24   children   was  brought   to   settle   near   the   presidio,   although   one   of   the   six   champans  carrying them was wrecked along the way, with twenty­one drowned; the  rest of the people in this boat were harassed by Joloanos, and the survivors  eventually made it to Zamboanga.9 During this period a government decree ordered the coastal pueblos in  Batangas, Romblon, Masbate, Ticao, Panay, Cebu, Leyte, Negros, Tayabas,  Camarines,   Calamianes,   Marinduque,   Camiguin,   and   other   islands   to  construct  local forts. The projects  were to be under  the direction  of  the  friars and curates.  There is a  friar account  (ca.  1800) about  the  Batangas  forts.  During  Bantilan's reign the Muslims raided Balayan, the Muslim village of pre­ Spanish times; they stayed there two months and burned it before leaving.  The  account  says that  in those days the raiders  would  have 100 to 200  boats carrying about a hundred men each, but that after the forts were  built the raiders came in smaller fleets.  The friar account is descriptive. The forts are called cottas. They are  built   by   the   townspeople   under   the   curate's   leadership.   The   central  government   contributes   nothing.  The  friar   persuades   the  people  to  give  their   labor,  provide   lime  and   stone,  and   donate   money.  The   cottas   take  time to complete. The people are naturally lazy and the friar has to use  threats, at times gentle persuasion. The forts are annexed to the convento;  the friar's rooms give on to the cotta so that he can check on the sentry and  wake him up if he sleeps. The sentry rings a bell from time to time; if he  fails to do so at the correct time the friar punishes him. This system is said  to   be   the   least   burdensome   to   the   townspeople   –   only   a   few   are  inconvenienced because during the day the servants in the convento take  the watch.  However,   when   the   alcalde   mayor   sees   that   the   cotta   has   been  completed, “he develops a desire to be in command, and to substitute a 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
25

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. tyranny for the paternal leadership that was instituted by the friar.” The  alcalde thinks that the royal authority withers away when the cottas are  under the curates. So he gets the regime to order the latter to turn them  over to him. He decides that each cotta must have a castellan or warden  and that men must be assigned to serve by repartimiento. The castellan  has to be a native; he decides who shall serve under the repartimiento. But  he makes the men work his fields, leaving the cotta unattended. He exacts  payment from those who wish to be exempt from the service; since the rate  is three or four reals per week the post of castellan is profitable and much  sought after. This castellan and the alcalde are usually in collusion. The  curates   cannot   do   anything;   “a   priest   once   refused  the  sacraments   to   a  castellan who deserved to be called robber, [but] he bribed the alcalde and  the priest cannot bring about any improvement.”  A Recollect history illustrates the loss of population and tributes during  this period: in Romblon in 1756 the tributes were reduced from 1,370 to  995;   in   Calibo,   Capiz   from   1,164­1/2   to   549;   and   in   Banga,   Capiz   from  1,020 to 754. These losses in the three pueblos would be equivalent to some  5,650 people lost.10 Sulu participation in the wars until towards the mid­1760s abated. This  can be explained only in relation to the Alimudin problem. The Jolo datus  had   formally   undertaken   to   support   the   release   and   restoration   of   the  sultan,   and   adventurism   now   would   jeopardize   his   health   and   life   in  Manila. In Manila the faction that had called for his death had lost out,  but there was no need to aggravate the situation. In Jolo Bantilan was  estopped from rashness because of the presence of Alimudin's wife, son,  and daughters, whom he had royally welcomed in 1755. Sultan Bantilan in  fact would send embassies to Manila; they would be received cordially until  the   Spaniards   suspected   that   these   were   being   sent   chiefly   to   gather  military intelligence, and stopped them.  However, Bantilan was able to send an envoy to Manila in late 1761 or  early 1762, and Alimudin wrote a petition to the archbishop, who was then  serving as governor­general, to review his case. According to this governor­ general, arrangements were made for Alimudin and Israel to be returned 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
26

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. to Jolo in November 1762. The two had signed an agreement under which  the Spaniards were allowed to establish a settlement in Jolo, to build a fort  there, and another in Basilan. Meanwhile, the principal cotta of Jolo would  be turned over to the Spaniards. Finally, no other nation would be allowed  to establish settlements in Sulu without the consent of the Spaniards –  this last was a counter to Bantilan's earlier cession of Balambangan to the  British.  It will be recalled that Sultan Bantilan and the Britisher Dalrymple  had   entered   into   a   treaty   of   commerce   and   friendship   in   Jolo   on   28  January 1761. Dalrymple had proceeded to Manila and was able to confer  with Alimudin, obtaining the latter's counter­signature on this agreement  in November of the same year.  The outbreak of war between Spain and Britain enhanced Alimudin's  importance. It was necessary for the Spaniards to have his cooperation in  order to forestall further spread of British influence in Borneo and Sulu; it  was   just   as   important   for   the   British   to   have   his   confirmation   of   the  Balambangan cession.  Anda y Salazar had sought to prevent the British from getting hold of  Alimudin during the war of 1762­1764 by arranging to have him brought to  his camp in Pampanga. However, an accident befell him along the way and  he was detained in Pasig. This happened at precisely the time when the  British   were   moving   into   the   Laguna   de   Bai   area   procuring   provisions  after their capture of Manila. They captured the pueblo of Pasig, Alimudin  fell into their hands; and they brought their prize hostage to Manila.  The British treated him well and he confirmed the 1761 treaty all over  again.   From   this   moment   on   Alimudin   was   kept   isolated   from   the  Spaniards, and a British naval escort eventually brought him to Jolo in  May 1764. He had been away for a long sixteen years. Bantilan had died  and was succeeded by his son. This nephew stepped aside for the returning  Alimudin,   who   was   formally   reinstalled   as   Sultan   in   June   1764.   He  resumed   Islamic   ways.   His   seeming   apostasy   appeared   to   have   been  forgotten.   In   1774   he   abdicated   and   was   succeeded   by   Israel   (Sultan 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
27

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. Muhammad Israil).  It   is   easy   to   misappreciate   the   saga   of   Alimudin   by   focusing   on   the  colorful adventures of his years in Manila, the pageantry of his better days  with the Spaniards, the drama of his apparent renunciation of Islam and  conversion to Christianity. These are all memorable aspects in any man's  life, and in Alimudin's case they were natural reflections of his personality.  Almost every move he made when he was in Manila was unprecedented  because he was an extraordinary man. He was a cosmopolitan Filipino in  his   time,   perhaps   the  first   Filipino   of  stature  to  have  had   some  formal  education in a foreign country. But his schooling in a Batavia madrasah  could not have sufficed to enable him later to hold his own, as he did, in his  discussions of doctrinal issues with European Jesuits. This ability must be  ascribed to his native intelligence, enhanced by continued self­education  during   his   adult   years.   His   decisions   therefore   transcended   the  commonplace, and some were perilously risky because of the imagination  that fired his intellect. It is this phase of Alimudin's life that is enormously  fascinating, although an authoritative interpretation is still unavailable.  But a fact about Alimudin that is invariably overlooked, because it is  just so easy to miss, is that he was an active sultan for a very long time,  even leaving out the sixteen years of his exile and imprisonment. His years  on the throne spanned a period of twenty­three years, covering 1735­1748  and   1764­1774.   Even   if   it   is   said   that   many   decisions   in   the   sultanate  during the last two or three years of his second reign were made by his son  Israel, the period of his active rule still exceeded that of most sovereigns.  By   the   evidence   of   the   continued   stability   and   importance   of   Sulu  throughout his active reign, he carried out his duties and preserved the  sultanate effectively. His achievements were not those of a warrior sultan.  His   contributions   were   of   a   nature   more   appropriate   to   his   education.  Saleeby summarizes his constructive achievements: “He revised the Sulu  code of laws and system of justice. He caused to be translated into Sulu  parts   of   the   Quran   and   several   Arabic   texts   on   law   and   religion.   He  strongly   urged   the   people   to   observe   faithfully   their   religion   and   the  ordained   five   daily   prayers.   He   even   went   so   far   as   to   prescribe 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
28

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. punishment for failure to observe this rule. He wanted all pandita to learn  Arabic   and   prepared   Arabic­Sulu   vocabularies   as   a   preliminary   step   to  making   the   Arabic  the   official   language   of  the   state.   He  coined   money,  organized a small army, and tried to establish a navy.” In his later years as  Sultan he was, still according to Saleeby, “addressed as Amirul Muminin  (the Prince of the Faithful).” Modern Taosugs (the people of Sulu) continue  this address.  Perhaps  his  distinction  lies,  as  Majul  sees   it,  in that   he deliberately  sought to centralize the authority and powers of the sultan at some cost to  the wonted independence of the datus. Alimudin's times were a period of  further   development   of   the   sultanate.   The   latter   not   only   survived   the  difficult   problem   of   a   sultan­in­exile,   but   also   held   Sulu   and   its   people  intact   against   both   Spain   and   Britain.   Alimudin   was   the   nineteenth  Sultan of Sulu since around 1450.  The cession of Balambangan Island to the British East India Company  in 1762 should be viewed strategically. The island was fully 500 kilometers  away from Jolo in a straight line across the Sulu Sea, just off the  northwest tip of Borneo. There were no Joloano installations there, but if  the British were to establish a factory and emporium it would mean  trading opportunities and jobs for the Sultan's people. It was still far away  enough for the British presence to become uncomfortable for Jolo itself –  unlike the fort of Zamboanga. Above all, the cession would commit the  British to an alliance that would, at the very least, serve as a foil to  Spanish pressure. The cession of Balambangan was like the cession to  Spain by the Sultan of Borneo of the island of wan: it was of peripheral  importance, and the island was not under the active control of the ceding  party.11 The Crest and the Ebb Tide  Let us return to the Muslim wars. The British invasion sparked a fresh  wave of intense raids. Montero y Vidal's history says of this period: “The  mere  report  of the proximity of the Muslims; the rumor of a raid, very  often imaginary; the sight of a boat thought to be a raiding craft; all filled 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
29

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. the   unfortunate   natives   with   terror   and   panic.”   Furthermore:   “The  detailed account of the depredations and violence wrought by the Muslims  in   only   one   decade,   apart   from   the   British   invasion,   would   fill   entire  volumes.” The Joloanos, Maguindanaos, Maranaos, and Tiruns seemed to be in a  grand alliance. In mid­1767 some 2,000 raiders in seventy boats raided the  fort of Cateel on the eastern Mindanao coast. The Spanish garrison fled.  The Muslims then turned north against the fort of Tandag, but here the  defenders were prepared, and the attackers were repulsed.  In 1770 a raiding fleet swept like a broom through the Visayas and  sailed north to within cannon range of Manila. The raiders practically  bottled up the bay, capturing firewood gatherers in the marshy shorelands.  They seized two Chinese champans loaded with merchandise just off  Mariveles. From here they retired to Mamburao in Mindoro and set up  camp. This was a notorious Muslim base. Macassars and other Muslim  traders would call at Mamburao for secondary trade in the course of their  main business with Manila, as well as to buy the Christian captives. A  friar history has these words about the Muslim bases in Mindoro: 
From   the   pueblo   of   Ililim   to   the   point   of   Calavite   is   thirty   leguas.  There are no pueblos between them, because all have been destroyed  by the Muslims, who have established themselves on the island. They  can no longer raid as before, and so they have to look for places to stay  until it is time to go back to Jolo to sell their captives. During the  easterlies and northerlies, they stay on the coast in Mamburao, and  during   the  vendavals  [strong   winds   from   the   sea]   on   the   opposite  coast, in Balete. From these bases they conduct their depredations and  plundering raids, and take captives when they can. Then they demand  ransom, but only for rich natives and friars. The ransom money has  gone up, because the captives' relatives readily pay what the Muslims  demand. A friar's ransom is at least 1,000 pesos; for a native it is at  least 300 pesos, in silver or in kind, such as rice. The less important  captives   are   brought   to   these   camps,   where   the   Muslims,   who   are  addicted to gambling, especially playing cards, play for them. 

An expedition against Mamburao, however, drove the Muslims from the 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
30

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. base. As a result, the latter subjected the Visayas in 1771 to devastating  punishment.   A   Spanish   historian   writes   that   Luzon   suffered   a   terrible  earthquake as well as an almost total loss of the harvest this year, but that  this was not comparable to the losses in the Visayas.  The raiders began with the province of Caraga and destroyed or burned  all the pueblos. Iponan, Alilitum, Compot, Salay, and Sipaca of Misamis  were sacked and burned. Camiguin Island lost “an infinitude” of people.  The provinces and islands of Samar, Sorsogon, Leyte, Cebu, Panay, Iloilo,  Negros, Tablas, Masbate, Mindoro, Calamianes, Sibuyan, Burias, Bataan,  and Maestre de Campo were all hard hit. The raiders set up a holding  stockade for captives on the islet of Inampulugan off Guimaras Island near  Iloilo. As the captives numbered 400 to 500 they were shipped to Jolo. The  raiders entered Manila Bay and some of the men would land for a stroll in  the plaza of the palace at night. Paranaque and Tambobong lost people,  and in the Manila suburb of Malate twenty persons going home from a  funeral in Pasay were captured. The regime could ill afford these losses.  The colonial authorities decided to allocate the proceeds of the cargo of the  galleon San Carlos, then loading for Acapulco, for financing anti­Muslim  measures and facilities.  But Manila was only halfway as far north as the raids reached. On 7  June   1771   a   raiding   group   appeared   in   Aparri   on   the   northern   Luzon  coast. A Dominican history tells a nice if manifestly embellished story of  this   episode:   The   raiding   fleet   presented   a   sinister   sight.   After   some  parleys the corsair leader asked to meet with the alcalde and a priest. The  alcalde was apparently afraid to meet the raider – a subtle friar criticism  of the civil officials – and ordered a subordinate to go in his place. The  latter and a visiting friar from Paniqui met with the Muslim and his escort  on a site by the river mouth.  A pact of friendship was agreed upon, and the Muslim led the pledging  ritual   as   follows:   he   asked   for   two   candles,   two   eggs,   some   salt,   and   a  length of rattan. The candles were lit, the Muslim extinguished his and the  Spaniards the other, and he said that his friendship was not to be as easily  extinguished   as   the   candle.   They   broke   the   eggs,   dissolved   the   salt   in 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
31

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. water, and cut the rattan, the Muslim saying that his friendship was firm  and lasting, not to be broken like the eggs, nor to be dissolved like the salt,  nor to be cut like the rattan. The ritual ended with an offer of trade by the  Muslim:   a   church   bell   and   vestments   from   him,   in   exchange   for   500  fanegas of rice. Despite the rituals of friendship, however, the friar and the  Spaniard were seized and taken by the raiders. A Spanish squadron visited Jolo in January 1774 to take steps towards  resolving concerns in view of the cession of Balambangan to the British.  The   expedition   commander   had   strict   instructions   to   proceed   prudently  and   peacefully,   but   instead   his   tactlessness   antagonized   the   Joloanos.  There were, at this time, some 4,000 Chinese in Jolo; they settled there as  a result of the expulsion of the pro­British Chinese during the previous  war. There were also some Britishers, one of them the factor of the East  India Company. All were ready to fight together against the Spaniards, the  Sultan tearing to pieces a message from the Spanish commander in front  of the latter's emissary. The Spaniards had to withdraw, and returned to  Zamboanga.  The   Joloanos,   however,   were   not   subservient   to   the   British.   Datu  Teteng, a royal datu, felt mistreated by them. In revenge he led an attack  against the British settlement in Balambangan on the night of 5 March  1775; every man in the settlement was slain except the English governor  and five others who managed to escape. The prize captured by Teteng on  this raid is reported to have been worth more than 925,000 Mexican pesos.  The anxiety and consternation in Jolo over this rash adventure dissolved  after Teteng lavishly distributed rich gifts to the Sultan and datus. It is  reported that Datu Teteng also meant to attack the presidio of Zamboanga  after   his   success   in   Balambangan.   However,   the   fort   was   prepared   for  defense and Teteng proceeded to attack Cebu instead.12 The Spanish governor­general's death in 1776 was followed by another  burst   of   Muslim   raids.   His   successor   declared   another   war   against   the  raiders.   There   was   no   notable   result   except   that   an   expedition   in   1778  again   attacked   Mindoro,   dislodged   the   Muslims,   and   dismantled   their  camps. In 1785 a raiding group attacked the Calamianes islands and Iloilo; 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
32

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. then   it   proceeded   to   Negros   and   levelled   the   two   large   pueblos   of  Himamaylan and Binalbagan. The raiders joined forces with other groups  to form a large fleet of ninety­five sail and went as far north as the Bataan  coast. The governor­general helplessly wrote the Spanish king in 1789 that  the Muslim wars were “an evil without a remedy.”  In   1790   serious   discussions   were   held   in   Manila   on   how   the   anti­ Muslim   capabilities   of  Iloilo   might   be   strengthened.   It   was   proposed   to  cover   costs   by   allocating   specific   funds   including:   the   revenue   from   the  plow   share   monopoly;   proceeds   from   the   sale   of   the   cockfighting  concession; and the profits from managing the stores of wax, wine, and  meat. These, plus allotments from the caja de comunidad and a modest  contribution from the royal treasury, were deemed sufficient to maintain a  small squadron of light boats.  But   the   discussions   were   inutile.   At   that   very   moment   the   Muslims  were   attacking   IIoilo.   From   the   neighboring   village   of   Mandurriao   the  curate reported that the raiders had taken away more than 400 captives;  they threw babies into the sea; the rest of the population and the priests  fled   to   the   hills.   Upon   receipt   of   the   news   the   regime   approved   the  financing proposals, but the attack was over and the raiders were away  and gone.  A council of war in Manila in 1794 established that the Muslims took  more than 500 captives every year. Over the period from 1778 when the  regime had inaugurated the fleet of vintas or light craft until 1793, the  wars had cost the colonial government 1,519,209 pesos in money alone. The  junta made the following decisions: 
l. the war against the Muslims by letters of marque and reprisal (that is, by  privateers) was to be permanent;  2. the fleet was to be organized into six divisions, each of six gunboats and one  panco,   with   well   paid   crews   who   would   be   entitled   to   the   prize   taken   and   to  awards for outstanding service;  3. all other types of vessels were to be excluded. from the fleet due to their  worthlessness against the Muslim craft;  CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
33

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989.
4. the alcaldes were to have no participation in the war, in order to prevent  them from using government vessels for their private trading; and  5. the forts in the Visayas, Mindoro, Tayabas, Batangas, and Zamboanga  were to be repaired. 

In Manila the next year a line of watchtowers from Cavite to Corregidor  was   constructed.   The   completion   of   the   project   was   celebrated   in  November. On the 29th December three Muslim boats suddenly appeared  by the beach opposite the San Antonio Abad bastion of the city walls. The  troops of this bastion were able to prevent the raiders from landing. But  the latter had slipped through the alarm system because the men of the  naval   station   in   Cavite   had   gone   to   Mariveles   to   spend   the   Christmas  holidays. A Spanish account of this era says: “What is certain is that the  Muslims continued to enter and leave Manila Bay as Pedro would enter  and leave his house.”13  For almost a century by now privateers had been involved in the wars  with the Muslims, but with little success. The alcaldes would impress the  vessels   for   their   private   trading.   They   would   sell   the   provisions   and  sometimes   even   the   weapons,   at   times   to   the   Muslims   themselves.  Gobernadorcillos were ruined because they could not account for material  in their charge, material which were sold by the alcaldes. The crews of the  privateers were cheated by their commanders; they would be paid their  wages in kind, of inferior quality and at short measure; they would then be  required to resell these to their paymasters at cheap prices, which they  could   not   avoid   because   they   needed   the   money   for   their   necessities.  Corregidor Island was a crooks' haven: because of the profit opportunities  in nearby Manila, the commanders of the corso would occupy their crews in  livestock raising or in cortes de madera on the island, to the neglect of the  war.  The   Spaniards'   interest   in   the   extension   of   Christianity   and   the  Muslims' interest in aggressive raids were at times blurred by a common  interest in trade. In the last decade of the eighteenth century the regime  pursued   a   diplomatic   approach   with   the   sultans,   with   some   success.  Trading   boats   from   Sulu,   Maguindanao,   and   Borneo   called   at   Manila 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
34

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. frequently. Jolo abated its  raids; the Sulu traders did business  under a  passport issued by the then Sultan Sharaf ud­Din. A Spanish rendering of  the licenses issued by the Sultan is translated as follows: 
I,   the   Sultan   Muhamat   Sarpudin,   son   and   grandson   of  innumerable sultans of Jolo and its subject territories:  Concede my permission and authority to [name], that he may carry  merchandise to Manila for commerce and trade, and I request my most  esteemed the Governor­General of Filipinas and such officials as they  shall meet by land or sea, to grant access to his vessel, which is My  desire, in proof of which I affix my seal .... 

Independent   raiders,   nevertheless,   were   active.   In   1798   some   500  Muslims in a fleet of twenty­five vessels with 800 slaves manning the oars  invaded   Baler,   Casiguran,   and   Palanan   in   the   province   of   Tayabas.  Churches,   houses,   and   orchards   were   burned.   They   took   450   captives  including three friars. The friar of Casiguran was returned for a ransom of  2,500 pesos. The raiders had established themselves in Burias Island four  years earlier, and the following pueblos were repeatedly attacked from this  camp:   Bondoc,   Abac,   Taragua,   Calolbong,   Catanduanes,   Capalonga,  Mamburao, Capiz, Sibuyan, Baler, Casiguran, Palanan, and Santor.  The   eighteenth   century   ended,   for   the   Spanish   regime,   on   a   note   of  helplessness. An Instrucción was issued in 1799 to the alcaldes, who were  to provide a copy to each pueblo. Under this new order the defense against  Muslim raids was assigned to the pueblos. Central direction of the effort  was retained in Manila, but how this was to be effected was not clarified.  Each   gobernadorcillo   was   to   be   responsible   for   the   cannon,   guns,   and  material for the pueblo garrison, with the inventory of these placed under  the   control   of   the   curate;   the   order   also   did   not   state   whether   these  weapons were actually available, and who was to pay for them. Every four  months the gobernadorcillo was to submit a report on the state of the arms  and   material,  attested   by witnesses   and   certified   to  by  the curate.  The  latter was to send these reports directly to Manila because, “as the sole  person   of   zeal   and   character,   he   is   charged   with   this   responsibility   so  essential to the common good of the islands.”14 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
35

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. Sharaf ud­Din (popular name, Sarpuddin), a brother of Israel who had  also stayed with their father in Manila, became Sultan in 1791. He was to  lead Sulu into the new century, dying in 1808. The eighteenth century saw  the height of Muslim Filipino power against the regime. The ebb tide was  to begin in the nineteenth. The Sulu and Maguindanao sultanates would  continue to develop. This was partly a natural result of time and partly of  necessity, the latter as a result of the need to cope with the new pressures  and   eventually   crushing   challenges   posed   by   Western   imperialism   and  trade.  Britain decided to reoccupy Balambangan in 1803, although the project  was given up the next year.  In 1842 a United States government expedition visited Jolo; its primary  mission   was   to   conduct   scientific   studies,   but   the   Americans   took   the  opportunity to obtain the Sultan's agreement to enter into a trade treaty.  The next year the French appeared, latecomers to the region, looking for a  commercial   and   military   base.   They   unsuccessfully   offered   to   buy   the  island   of   Basilan.   The   Dutch   persisted   in   their   efforts   to   expand   their  interests in Borneo.  We   will   cite   from   the   account   of   the   1842   expedition   for   descriptive  material   and   observations   about   Jolo   and   the   Sulus   of   this   era.   The  Americans   took   coastal   surveys   of   the   island   of   Panay   before   reaching  Sulu.   Raids   on   the   Visayas   had   slackened.   In   Panay   a   line   of   simple  telegraph communications had been set up “on all the hills” to warn of the  approach   of   a   raiding   group.   “Of   late   years   they   have   ceased   these  depredations, for the Spaniards have resorted to a new mode of warfare.  Instead of pursuing and punishing the offenders, they now intercept all  their supplies, both of necessaries and luxuries; and the fear of this has  had the effect to deter the pirates from their usual attacks.” The expedition's first impressions of Sulu were generally favorable, the  American commander concluding: 
that in our many wanderings we had seen nothing to be compared to  this enchanting spot. It appeared to be well cultivated, with gentle  CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
36

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989.
slopes rising here and there into eminences from one to two thousand  feet high. One or two of these might be dignified with the name of  mountains, and were sufficiently high to arrest passing clouds ....  Although much of the island was under cultivation, yet it had all  the freshness of a forest region. The many smokes on the hills,  buildings of large size, cottages and cultivated spots, together with the  moving crowds on the land, the prahus, canoes, and fishing­boats on  the water, gave the whole a civilized appearance. Our own vessel lay,  almost without a ripple on her side, on the glassy surface of the sea,  carried onwards to our destined anchorage by the flowing tide....  The effect of this was destroyed in part by the knowledge that this  beautiful archipelago was the abode of a cruel and barbarous race of  pirates. 

Our previous descriptions by the Spaniards of protocol and ceremonial  in Jolo are rather dampened by the Americans' account of their audience  with the Sultan. The Americans did not call the latter's residence a palace.  It was just a house on piles, which meant, then as now, that it would be  over water at high tide. 
His house is constructed in the same manner as that of the Datu,  but is of larger dimensions, and the piles are rather higher. Instead of  steps,   we   found   a   ladder,   rudely   constructed   of   bamboo,   and   very  crazy.  This  was  so steep  that  it  was  necessary to  use  the  hands   in  mounting it. I understood that the ladder was always removed in the  night, for the sake of security. We entered at once into the presence­ chamber, where the whole divan [.e.i. council], if such it may be called,  sat in arm chairs, occupying the half of a large round table, covered  with a white cotton cloth. On the opposite side of the table, seats were  placed for us. On our approach, the Sultan and all his council rose,  and motioned us to our seats. When we had taken them, the part of  the room behind us was literally crammed with well­armed men.  A few minutes were passed in silence during which time we had an  opportunity of looking at each other, and around the hall in which we  were   seated.   The   latter   was   of   very   common   workmanship,   and  exhibited no signs of oriental magnificence. Overhead hung a printed  cotton cloth, forming a kind of tester, which covered about half of the  CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
37

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989.
apartment. In other places the roof and rafters were visible. A part of  the house was roughly partitioned off, to the height of nine or ten feet,  enclosing, as I was afterward told, the Sultan's sleeping apartment,  and that appropriated to his wife and her attendants. 

The government of the sultanate, the account continues: 
is a kind of oligarchy, and the supreme authority is vested in the  Sultan   and   the   Ruma   Bechara   or   trading   council.   This   consists   of  about twenty chiefs, either datus, or their next in rank, called orangs,  who are governors of towns or detached provinces. The influence of the  individual chiefs depends chiefly upon the number of their retainers or  slaves,   and   the   force   they   can   bring   into   their   service   when   they  require it. These are purchased from the pirates, who bring them to  Sooloo and its dependencies for sale.

The old Chinese business quarter remained an important part of Jolo.  The population of the island was estimated at some 30,000; the town of  Jolo had six or seven thousand, of which the Chinese constituted about  one­eighth.  Jolo was “the grand depot for all piratical goods,” and several Chinese  junks, mostly from Amoy, regularly called and traded between March or  April until August. 
Although I have described the trade with Sooloo as limited, yet it is  capable   of   greater   extension;   and   had   it   not   been   for   the   piratical  habits   of   the   people,   the   evil   report   of   which   has   been   so   widely  spread, Sooloo would now have been one of the principal marts of the  East.   The   most   fertile   parts   of   Borneo   are   subject   to   its   authority.  There   all   the   richest   productions   of   these   Eastern   seas   grow   in  immense quantities,  but  are  now  left  ungarnered in consequence  of  there   being   no   buyers.   The   cost   of   their   cultivation   would   be  exceedingly low, and I am disposed to believe that these articles could  be produced here at a lower cost than any where else.  Besides the trade with China, there is a very considerable one with  Manilla in small articles, and I found one of our countrymen engaged  in this traffic, under the Spanish flag. 

CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 

38

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. The account also provides a description of the Sulu raiding craft and an  estimate of the fighting force. The Sulus and Illanons had a strength of  some 200 prahus. Each prahu (or prao) carried forty to fifty fighting men,  for a total raiding force of 10,000 fighters. A raiding prahu was not a small  boat – it was of twenty to thirty tons, powered by both sail and rowers. The  warriors   were   armed   with   muskets,   blunderbusses,   the   Muslim   kris,  hatchets, and spears, and “at times the vessels have one or two large guns  mounted.”   The   prahus   “draw   but   little   water,   are   fast   sailers,   and   well  adapted for navigating through these dangerous seas.” This 1842 account  is specially useful: it is evidence of Muslim raiding activity just before the  fateful 1850s:15 
They infest the Straits of Macassar, the Sea of Celebes, and the  Sooloo Sea. Soung [the old name of Jolo] is the only place where they  can dispose of their plunder to advantage, and obtain the necessary  outfits. It may be called the principal resort of these pirates, where 

well directed measures would result in effectually suppressing the crime.  The   year   1848   marked   the   threshold   of   a   new   era   in   the   relations  between Spanish Filipinas and the sultanates. The wars with the Muslim  Filipinos   had   been  fought   for  almost   300   years.  The  Muslims   remained  warriors of the sea, and no power during this time had the strength to  change  their   way   of  life.   But   their   boats,   narrow   and   swift   against   the  lumbering Spanish ships, had also remained the same ­ powered by sail  and oar. Now the Spaniards suddenly obtained new technology. The regime  had just acquired new powerful steam­driven gunboats, recently arrived  from Britain. The Spaniards decided to test the new craft and firepower in  a strike against the Samals.  The Samals inhabited the Balanguingui island group east of Sulu and  south   of   Basilan.   They   were   subjects   of   the   Sultan   of   Sulu.   They   were  among the most active of Muslim raiders. However, they often conducted  their   raids   independently,   like   the   Tiruns,   without   the   knowledge   or  sanction of the Sultan. 

CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 

39

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. Saleeby provides a perspective of the main island: 
The Island of Balanguingui is scarcely 6 square miles in area, low,  flat, surrounded by shoals, and covered to a great extent by mangrove  swamps. Most of its settlements had their houses built over the water  and little dry land could be seen in the vicinity. Part of this land was  covered with coconut trees. A labyrinth of small, narrow channels led  to  the   various   settlements   and   divided   the   island   into   four   distinct  parts.  Four   strong   forts   were   built   by   the   Moros   at   points   difficult   of  access   and   surrounded   by   swamps.   These   forts   were   constructed   of  thick trunks of trees driven into the soil as piles and set close to each  other and in 3 rows of varying heights, to afford suitable positions for  the artillery, part of which was set in covered inclosures commanding  the channel leading to the fort. The walls of these forts were 20 feet  high and could not be scaled without ladders. The immediate vicinity  of the fort was set with sharpened bamboo sticks and pits to hinder  and trap the attacking forces. The fort of Sipak, the strongest of the  four, was provided with redoubts and towers and showed considerable  skill in its construction. 

In  1848  the Spaniards  annihilated  the Samals;  Sipak  and  the lesser  cottas on the big island were totally razed. The captured survivors were  brought to Luzon and resettled as far away from their old homes as may be  imagined: in Cagayan in northern Luzon. The Samals were never again a  problem to the regime.  The   strike   against   the   Samals   was   merely   the   rehearsal   for   a  confrontation with Jolo itself. This confrontation was hastened by a trip to  Jolo   of   the   British   consul­general   in   Borneo;   here   he   had   succeeded   in  getting the Sultan to sign a treaty on 29 May 1849 wherein, among others,  the   Sulus   undertook   not   to   cede   any   territory   nor   to   acknowledge  vassalage or submission to any other power without Britain's consent.  In 1851 the Spaniards' steam gunboats powered an expedition of more  than 4,000 men, exclusive of rowers for the older craft, and won a decisive  victory against Jolo.  The completeness of this victory is reflected in the ensuing treaty, of 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
40

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. which there were a Spanish and a Sulu text. The two texts have subtle as  well   as   material   differences,   but   that   the   Spaniards   had   attained  preponderance   is   evident.   Saleeby's   translation   of   the   Sulu   text   says:  “Article   2.   The   Sultan   and   Datus   promise   with   firm   intention   and  brotherhood not to revoke their agreement to the occupation of Sulu and  its   dependencies,   regarding   them   as   dependencies   of   Spain.”   Article   3  provided in part: “Sulu and her dependencies alike use the Spanish flag;  the people of Sulu and her dependencies are one with the people of Spain,  and ally themselves to the Philippine Islands.......”  The regime's version, presented in English translation also by Saleeby,  has a heading that is missing from the Sulu text: “Act of Incorporation into  the Spanish Monarchy, April 30, 1851.” Article 2 of this text provided: “The  Sultan   and   Datus   solemnly   promise   to   maintain   the   integrity   of   the  territory   of   Sulu   and   all   its   dependencies   as   a   part   of   the   Archipelago  belonging   to   the   Spanish   Government.”   Article   3   had   the   following  passage:   “The   island   of   Sulu   and   all   its   dependencies   having   been  incorporated with the crown of Spain, and the inhabitants thereof being  part   of   the   great   Spanish   family   which   lives   in   the   vast   Philippine  Archipelago.....” That the two texts should differ was to be expected. The Spanish text  incorporated   the   Sulu   territory   into   the   Spanish   crown;   the   Sulu   text  admitted   defeat   but   was   silent   on   incorporation.   To   the   Spaniards  incorporation  was  the realization  of all  the claims  they  could  not  fulfill  since the sixteenth century; but to the Taosugs it was just another treaty  after one lost battle.16  The military  strength  of  the Spanish regime during this  era  did  not  come   only   from   the   superior   new   gunboats.   Spain   was   now   free   of   the  encumbrance of looking after her once great empire in America. The only  important possessions left to the Spanish crown were Filipinas and Cuba.  It   was   imperative   for   Spain's   status   as   a   power   to   keep   these   last  remaining   jewels   in   the   Spanish   crown   so   that   Madrid–when   it   could–  gave solicitous attention and support to the Manila regime. The Jesuits  were   also   still   under   expulsion;   this   meant   that   the   governors   general 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
41

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. could   pursue   military   objectives   that   were   largely   free   and  uncontaminated by the old distractions from the religious lobby.  It would be also at this time that the Maguindanao sultanate lost much  of   its   former   status   and   power.   Minor   sultans   and   independent   datus  emerged with varying degrees of importance and independence, some of  them ready to submit to or cooperate with the regime in view of the latter's  new   strength.   During   the   1860s   the   regime   had   eighteen   English­built  steam­powered ships. These ensured its supremacy in the waters of the  southern archipelago.  In 1860 a royal order created a politico­military province in the south.  This   newest   province   of   Filipinas   was   the   entire   island   of   Mindanao  organized into five districts; a sixth district of the province included: “the  district   of   Basilan,   comprising   the   Spanish   possessions   in   the  archipelagoes   of   Sulu   and   Basilan.”   The   Tawi­Tawi   islands   were   still  treated as part of the Sulu archipelago. The post of governor of the new  province was assigned to officers of the rank of brigadier general. Thus, at  least   according   to   the   decree,   the   entire   archipelago   finally   came   to   be  under the Spanish regime.  Germany   was   also   probing   in   Borneo   and   Sulu.   In   1877   Germany,  Britain, and Spain signed a protocol which gave free trading rights to the  first two in Sulu, but Spain's occupation of various sites in the sultanate  and her 1851 treaty with Sulu were recognized by the two other signatories  as   entitling   her   to   primacy.   Europeans   were   defining   their   rights   in  Muslim   territory   independently   of   the   sultans.   In   1886,   in   a   move   to  undermine the duly proclaimed Sultan of Sulu (Jamal ul­Kiram II), the  Spaniards   had   a   rival   sultan   (Harun   ar­Rashid)   proclaimed   in   Manila  under the regime's sponsorship.17  The Spanish successes would not last. Just thirteen years after 1886 a  truly historic letter will be sent to the Sultan of Sulu. It will address him  as “Great and Powerful Brother” and it will be sent not by the Spanish  king, or governor­general, but by the president of the new­born Filipino  Republic. 
CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 
42

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989. The era of the Revolution and the Republic would be the time for the  people   of   the   archipelago,   both   Christian   and   Muslim,   to   review   and  redefine   their   relationships,   perhaps   rediscover   their   brotherhood.  Children of the same race and land, they had been divided by war and  faith for more than three centuries. When we resume this story we will  discover that it would be the survival of the legacy from the long Spanish  era in the Christian Filipino psyche that would be the principal obstacle to  the reunification of the long divided nation. 

§

NOTES

CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 

43

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989.
Chapter 9.  AZIM UD­DIN I: THE APOGEE OF THE MUSLIM WARS  The quotation is from the excerpt of Casimiro Diaz, Conquistas dc las Islas Filipinas,  in “Moro Pirates and Their Raids in the Seventeenth Century,” BR, XLI, 320.  1 Many of the events and data recorded in this Chapter are from the extensive  accounts in Concepcion, X­XII and XIV; and Jose Montero y Vidal, Historia de la pirateria   Malayo mahometana en Mindanao, Joló y Borneo (1888), I, Chaps. 14­24, and II, with the  Appendix to the latter volume. Citations to these two main sources will be entered in  these Notes selectively. The regnal names of the sultans are from Majul, 14­24, 27­31; the  more informal popular names are generally used in this Chapter. The letter from the  Spanish king is also in Montero y Vidal, Historia de la pirateria, II, Appendix, 6­11.  2 Re the Jesuits and Zamboanga, the Recollects and Labo: Concepción, IX, 217­222;  "Government of Bustamante;' BR, XLIV, 162.  3 Re Alimudin's mother, his attending a madrasah: Concepción, XII, 52; Majul, 21.  4 Re Nasar ud­Din: Majul, 20­21. Re the governor­general's view of the Tiruns and his  account of the Muslim wars of this era: Juan de Arechederra, Pvntval relacion de lo   acaecido en las expediciones contra Moros Tirones, Malanaos, y Camucones ... en los de   746, y 47; and Juan de Arechederra, Continuacion de los progresos de las expediciones   contra Moros ... en esteano de 1748. These pamphlets are of five and fourteen leaves  respectively, and are in wonderfully intemperate language.  Re views on Alimudin's actions: Saleeby, History of Sulu, 71; Majul, 238­239. Majul's  interpretation is similar to that of H. de la Costa, "Muhammad Alimuddin I of Sulu: The  Early Years," Asian Studies (1964), II, 201. Re testimony on wounding of Alimudin: ibid.,  206; Majul, 215­216.  5 Re Alimudin's baptism, reception in Manila: Concepción, XII, 146149, 152­173.  6 Re instructions to squadron commander: “Obando's Report on the Preparations to be  Undertaken to Return Alimud Din to Sulu, July 15, 1751;' in Saleeby, History of Sulu,  Appendix VII, 195­196.  Re incriminating letter: A translation into Spanish of the Muslim text is in Montero y  Vidal, Historia de la piratería, I, 297, Note 2; an English translation is in Saleeby, History   of Sulu, 73.  • Re Muslims imprisoned: Montero y Vidal,  Historia de la piratería, I, 297­298. Sec  also “Obando's Report on the Circumstances Attending the Attempt to Return Alimud 

CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 

44

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989.
Din  to Sulu, June 18,  1752,” in  Salecby,  History  of Sulu, Appendix VIII, 197­200; this  material, a translation from the Spanish, says that Alimudin arrived in Zamboanga on 22  June; it has to be an error.  7  The text of the order re the corso is in Montero y Vidal, Historia de la piratería, 11,  Appendix, 29­31; and Concepción, XII, 333­335. Re red tape and results: ibid., I, 302.  8 Re Fatima: Majul, 241­242. Dela Costa, “Muhammad Alimuddin I of Sulu: The Early  Years,” Asian Studies, II, 212, says that Fatima was Alimudin's sister. Majul says she was  his daughter – Majul has to be adjudged more reliable on this matter.  Re the Muslim undertakings and signatories: Montero y Vidal, Historia de la   piratería, II, Appendix, 31­33; Vicente Barrantes, Guerras piraticas de Filipinas  (1878), 30­33.  9 Re project to resettle Bohol families: AGI, Nueva Espana, 141 and 147.  10 Re cottas: Martinet de Zuniga, Estadismo, I, 108­111.  Re population and tribute losses: Concepción, XIV, 325­326.  11 Re agreement with Alimudin: “Rojo's Narrative,” BR, XLIX, 185­186. Re plan to  bring Alimudin to Pampanga: "Anda to Carlos III," ibid., 306.  Re Alimudin's achievements as sultan: Saleeby, History of Sulu, 70­78.  Re cession of Balambangan and Dalrymple's plans: Fry, 61.  12 Re panic on rumors of a raid: Montero y Vidal, Historia de la piratería, I, 332.  Re the 1770 raid and the Mindoro base in general: Vicente Barrantes, Guerras   piraticas, 46­50. The details on the Mindoro base are from Martinez de Zuniga,  Estadismo, I, 118­119.  Re use of profits from galleon for Muslim wars: Barrantes, Guerras piraticas,  57­58.  Re raider in Aparri: Ferrando and Fonseca, V, 86­89. Re Datu Teteng, and his  change of plan: Montero y Vidal, Historia de la pirateria, I, 347­351; Majul, 262.  13 Re 1790 discussions in Manila, the raid in Iloilo: Barrantes, Guerras piraticas, 135­ 138.  Re junta decisions: ibis., 153­158; and also Montero y Vidal, Historia de la   pirateria, I, 359. 

CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 

45

THE ROOTS OF THE FILIPINO NATION by Onofre D. Corpuz © 1989.
Re Muslims entering Manila Bay at will: Barrantes, Guerras piraticas, 174­ 175.  14 Re irregularities in the corso: ibid., 177, 258­259.  Re trading licenses: Montero y Vidal, Historia de la pirateria, I, 356.  The terms of the 1799 Instrucción are in ibid., I, 366­367, Note.  15 The material on the 1842 expedition is from Charles Wilkes, Narrative of the   United States Exploring Expedition (1844), V, 343­390, appearing in lengthy excerpts as  “Jolo and the Sulus” in BR, XLIII, 128­192. The Wilkes narrative is also in Filipiniana  Book Guild, Travel Accounts of the Islands, 1832­1858 (1974), 7­122.  16 Re Balanguingui: Saleeby, History of Sulu, 95­96.  Re resettlement of Samals: ibid., 96.  Re the agreement with the British: ibid., 102­103, and Appendices XVI and  XVII.  Re the 1851 victory over Jolo: ibid., Chap. 4, where the terms of the treaty are  in pp. 107­111.  17 The text of the royal order on Mindanao Province is in ibid., 113­116. A summary is  in Montero y Vidal, Historia General, III, 308­310.  Re two sultans of Sulu: Majul, 23­24, 306. 

CHAP. 9: AZIM UD­DIN I : The Apogee of the Muslim Wars 

46