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Lamar University

Analysis and improvement in the process of repair on the collision


rectification of the vehicles at M/s Glen’s Paint and Body.

ENGR 4300-01
Quality Improvement
Course Project
Date: 11/29/2006

Submitted to:
Dr. Weihang Zhu
Department of Industrial Engineering
Lamar University

Sudarsan Raghavan Michael Holcomb Roshan Balasubramanian


Abstract

Glen’s Paint and Body shop provides full service for collision repair cars. Their

service covers anything from a small fender bender to a head on collision that nearly

destroys your vehicle. The primary step involved is that the vehicle goes through the

insurance adjuster and repair advisor who evaluates the damage and estimate the cost

involved to repair the vehicle. After the two parties makes an agreement on the estimate

the parts can be ordered and the vehicle will be assigned to a particular body technician.

After the estimation, the vehicle is assigned to one of the 3 body technician to

remove all the damaged parts form the vehicle. This work may range from taking a

fender off to as elaborate as cutting a vehicle in half and sectioning it back together.

After the removal of damaged parts all necessary parts are assembled back on the vehicle

it then goes to the next step.

The next step is where the paint is applied to the new parts and damaged areas of

the vehicle. This step is done by one of the two painters. The damaged areas will have a

coat of primer applied to them, to make the area smooth. While doing this process the

vehicle needs to be covered with tape and plastic to insure that the undamaged areas will

not accumulate paint overspray. After the primer has hade time to cure, it is then sanded

and cleaned to be painted. After the damaged areas and miscellaneous parts of the

vehicle are painted back to the original color, the paint is baked at 150 degrees for half

and hour.

After the initial Paint process the vehicle is returned to the assigned body

technician for reassembly. This is where all the removed parts are put back on the
vehicle, which includes door handles, windows, bumpers, headlights, moldings/decals,

etc. After the vehicle is completely reassembled as if were new again, it moves to the last

step.

Last, the vehicle undergoes a final quality inspection. The quality inspection

ensures is that all the functional and mechanical components that were damaged and

replaced are back to normal working condition. And after all these steps are complete the

vehicle is ready to be delivered to the customer.

The important objective involved in this project is that, time taken to repair and paint the

damaged car. When ever the car comes to repair shop, the estimator software gives the

estimated time to complete that particular task by the technician such that they get paid

for that much time. Since there is always a significant different between the software and

manual time (work time), it is good to use a statistical process tool to verify whether the

work is in control or not. Also it is possible to check the ability and skill of the technician

working on it.

The main focus of the project will be to study and analysis the standard time spent for

each repairs on weekly basis (6 weeks here) and to look the number of reworks occurring

on each observation. Also to compare the estimated time given by the software with that

of the manual work time to see out of control points. The recommendations and

conclusion are presented and discussed.


1. Introduction to Quality Control Chart

Control charting is one of the tools of Statistical Process Control (SPC). It is the most

technically sophisticated tool of SPC. It was developed in the 1920s by Dr. Walter A.

Shewhart of the Bell Telephone Labs. Dr. Shewhart developed the control charts as a

statistical approach to the study of manufacturing process variation for the purpose of

improving the economic effectiveness of the process. These methods are based on

continuous monitoring of process variation. Control charts can be said to be the graphical

display of the quality characteristics

According to Dr. Shewhart, even with the simplicity of the control chart many people

need a different view point for effectively manage and improve the quality, so he

suggested some simple but main principles for the statistical process control are:

1. Measured quality of manufactured product is always subjected to certain amount

of variation as the result of chance.

2. Some “constant system of chance causes” is inherent in any particular scheme of

production and inspection.

3. Variation within this stable pattern is inevitable.

4. The reasons for variation outside this stable pattern may be discovered and

corrected.

In general for all the processes we need to monitor the extent to which our products and

services meet standard specifications or the customer requirement for effective


management and improvement in the quality so as to be competitive in the industry. A

process has one or more outputs as shown in the figure 1.

Identify and correct


assignable causes

Attributes

Measure

Process
Outputs

Figure 1

Characteristics:

In the most general terms, there are two "enemies" or characteristics of quality in any

process are:

(1) Deviations from target specifications,

(2) Excessive variability around target specifications.

Control charts can be said to be the graphical display of the quality characteristics.

During the earlier stages of developing the processes, designed experiments are often

used to optimize these two quality characteristics. There are two methods provided in

quality control: (1) on-line and (2) in-process quality control procedures to monitor an

on-going process.
Outputs affect on creating control chart:

The outputs from the processes have measurable attributes. SPC is based on the idea that

these attributes have two sources of variation: natural (also known as common) and

assignable (also known as special) causes. This is used to for the development of the

control charts by displaying the quality characteristic that has been measured or

computed from a sample versus the sample number or time. If the observed variability of

the attributes of a process is within the range of variability from natural causes, the

process is said to be under statistical control. It is our responsibility to track the

variability of the process to be controlled.

The chart contains a center line that represents the average value of the quality

characteristic corresponding to the in-control state. Two other horizontal lines, called the

upper control limit (UCL) and the lower control limit (LCL) are also drawn which is the

range to be expected from natural causes. These control limits are chosen so that if the

process is in control, nearly all of the sample points will fall between them. As long as the

points plot within the control limits, the process is assumed to be in control, and no action

is necessary. However, a point that plots outside of the control limits is interpreted as

evidence that the process is out of control, and investigation and corrective action is

required to find and eliminate the assignable causes responsible for this behavior. The

control points are connected with straight line segments for easy visualization. Even if all

the points plot inside the control limits, if they behave in a systematic or nonrandom

manner, then this is an indication that the process is out of control.


Implementing Statistical Process Control

The key steps for implementing Statistical Process Control are:

 Identify defined processes

 Identify measurable attributes of the process

 Characterize natural variation of attributes

 Track process variation

 If the process is in control, continue to track

 If the process is not in control:

 Identify assignable cause

 Remove assignable cause

 Return to “Track process variation”

This can be shown as in the figure 2 below.


Identify defined
processes

Identify measurable
Attributes of the process

Characterize natural
Variation of attributes

Track process variation

YES

NO
Is Process Identify assignable Remove
Controlle cause assignable cause
d

Interpreting the Control Charts:

The chart contains a center line that represents the average value of the quality

characteristic corresponding to the in-control state. Two other horizontal lines, called the

upper control limit (UCL) and the lower control limit (LCL), it can also be considered as

the range that can be expected from natural causes. These control limits are determined

using the standard specified for the process that is been considered. Normally the

individual points in the chart represent the samples and are connected by a line, or we can

say that the control points are connected with straight line segments for easy

visualization. Thus nearly all of the sample points should fall between the control limits.
As long as the points plotted falls within the control limits, the process is assumed to be

in control, and no action is necessary. However, a point that plots outside of the control

limits is interpreted as evidence that the process is out of control, and investigation and

corrective action is required to find and eliminate the assignable causes responsible for

this behavior. The control points are connected with straight line segments for easy

visualization. Even if all the points plot inside the control limits, if they behave in a

systematic or nonrandom manner, then this is an indication that the process is out of

control.

Uses of Control charts:

Control chart is a device for describing in a precise manner what is meant by statistical

control. Its uses are

1. It is a proven technique for improving productivity.

2. It is effective in defect prevention.

3. It prevents unnecessary process adjustments.

4. It provides diagnostic information.

5. It provides information about process capability.

Common types of chart:

The types of charts are often classified according to the type of quality characteristic that

they are supposed to monitor: there are quality control charts for variables and control

charts for attributes.

The following charts are commonly constructed for controlling variables:


 X-bar chart. In this chart the sample means are plotted in order to control the

mean value of a variable (e.g., size of piston rings, strength of materials, etc.).

 R chart. In this chart, the sample ranges are plotted in order to control the

variability of a variable.

 S chart. In this chart, the sample standard deviations are plotted in order to

control the variability of a variable.

 S**2 chart. In this chart, the sample variances are plotted in order to control the

variability of a variable.

For controlling quality characteristics that represent attributes of the product, the

following charts are commonly constructed:

 C chart. In this chart we plot the number of defectives (per batch, per day, per

machine, per 100 feet of pipe, etc.). This chart assumes that defects of the quality

attribute are rare, and the control limits in this chart are computed based on the

Poisson distribution (distribution of rare events).

 U chart. In this chart we plot the rate of defectives, that is, the number of

defectives divided by the number of units inspected (the n; e.g., feet of pipe,

number of batches). Unlike the C chart, this chart does not require a constant

number of units, and it can be used, for example, when the batches (samples) are

of different sizes.

 Np-chart. In this chart, we plot the number of defectives (per batch, per day, per

machine) as in the C chart. However, the control limits in this chart are not based

on the distribution of rare events, but rather on the binomial distribution.

Therefore, this chart should be used if the occurrence of defectives is not rare
(e.g., they occur in more than 5% of the units inspected). For example, we may

use this chart to control the number of units produced with minor flaws.

 P chart. In this chart, we plot the percent of defectives (per batch, per day, per

machine, etc.) as in the U chart. However, the control limits in this chart are not

based on the distribution of rare events but rather on the binomial distribution (of

proportions). Therefore, this chart is most applicable to situations where the

occurrence of defectives is not rare (e.g., we expect the percent of defectives to be

more than 5% of the total number of units produced).

Advantages of Variable control chart and Attribute control chart:

Advantages of variable control charts: Variable control charts are more sensitive than

attribute control charts. Therefore, variable control charts may alert us to quality

problems before any actual "unacceptable" (as detected by the attribute chart) will occur.

Montgomery (1985) calls the variable control charts leading indicators of trouble that

will sound an alarm before the number of rejects (scrap) increases in the production

process.

Advantages of attribute control charts: Attribute control charts have the advantage of

allowing for quick summaries of various aspects of the quality of a product, that is, the

engineer may simply classify products as acceptable or unacceptable, based on various

quality criteria. Thus, attribute charts sometimes bypass the need for expensive, precise

devices and time-consuming measurement procedures. Also, this type of chart tends to be
more easily understood by managers unfamiliar with quality control procedures;

therefore, it may provide more persuasive (to management) evidence of quality problems.

Analysis of the patterns on control chart:

A control chart may indicate an out-of-control condition either when one or more points

fall beyond the control limits, or when the plotted points exhibit some nonrandom pattern

of behavior. The test used to check the variation is called as the run test.

Normally to define a run test the area above the center line is divided into three zones (A,

B, C). It is assumed that Zone A is defined as the area between 2 and 3 times sigma above

and below the center line; Zone B is defined as the area between 1 and 2 times sigma, and

Zone C is defined as the area between the center line and 1 times sigma.

The process is out of control if any one or more of the criteria is met.

1. One or more points outside of the control limits. This pattern may indicate:

 A special cause of variance from a material, equipment, method, or

measurement system change.

 Mismeasurement of a part or parts.

 Miscalculated or misplotted data points.

 Miscalculated or misplotted control limits.

2. A run of eight points on one side of the center line. This pattern indicates a shift in

the process output from changes in the equipment, methods, or materials or a shift

in the measurement system.


3. Two of three consecutive points outside the Zone B the warning limits but still

inside the control limits. This may be the result of a large shift in the process in

the equipment, methods, materials, or operator or a shift in the measurement

system.

4. Four of five consecutive points beyond the Zone C (1- sigma) limits.

5. An unusual or nonrandom pattern in the data.

1. A trend of seven points in a row upward or downward. This may show

 Gradual deterioration or wear in equipment.

 Improvement or deterioration in technique.

2. Cycling of data can indicate

 Temperature or other recurring changes in the environment.

 Differences between operators or operator techniques.

 Regular rotation of machines.

 Differences in measuring or testing devices that are being used in

order.

2. Several points near a warning or control limit.

To have a further understanding of our approach towards how to analyze the data during

or after a run test we use the following information mentioned below:

9 points in Zone C or beyond (on one side of central line). If this test is positive (i.e., if

this pattern is detected), then the process average has probably changed. Note that it is

assumed that the distribution of the respective quality characteristic in the plot is

symmetrical around the mean. This is, for example, not the case for R charts, S charts, or
most attribute charts. However, this is still a useful test to alert the quality control

engineer to potential shifts in the process. For example, successive samples with less-

than-average variability may be worth investigating, since they may provide hints on how

to decrease the variation in the process.

6 points in a row steadily increasing or decreasing. This test signals a drift in the

process average. Often, such drift can be the result of tool wear, deteriorating

maintenance, improvement in skill, etc.

14 points in a row alternating up and down. If this test is positive, it indicates that two

systematically alternating causes are producing different results. For example, one may

be using two alternating suppliers, or monitor the quality for two different (alternating)

shifts.

2 out of 3 points in a row in Zone A or beyond. This test provides an "early warning" of

a process shift. Note that the probability of a false-positive (test is positive but process is

in control) for this test in X-bar charts is approximately 2%.

4 out of 5 points in a row in Zone B or beyond. Like the previous test, this test may be

considered to be an "early warning indicator" of a potential process shift. The false-

positive error rate for this test is also about 2%.

15 points in a row in Zone C (above and below the center line). This test indicates a

smaller variability than is expected (based on the current control limits).


8 points in a row in Zone B, A, or beyond, on either side of the center line (without

points in Zone C). This test indicates that different samples are affected by different

factors, resulting in a bimodal distribution of means. This may happen, for example, if

different samples in an X-bar chart where produced by one of two different machines,

where one produces above average parts, and the other below average parts.

Other specialized forms of control chart:

The types of control charts mentioned so far are by far the most widely used quality

control methods. But with the growing trend of the use of computers in the industrial

environment procedures requiring more computational effort have become increasingly

popular.

Some of the types are:

1. X-bar Charts For Non-Normal Data

2. Hotelling T**2 Chart.

3. Cumulative Sum (CUSUM) Chart.

4. Moving Average (MA) Chart.

5. Exponentially-weighted Moving Average (EWMA) Chart.

6. Regression Control Charts.

7. Pareto Chart Analysis.


3. About Glen’s Paint and Body

Here at Glen’s Paint and Body we offer a full line of collision repair services.

This covers anything from a small fender bender to a head on collision that nearly

destroys your vehicle. Services cover personal / company vehicle as well as any

commercial vehicles you may have

. About 25% of business is form customer pay, where the owner will pay out-of-

pocket for the repairs to their vehicle that has been in a collision or the vehicle that they

had a collision with. And, the other 75% of our business comes from major automobile

insurance companies like, Progressive Insurance, Geico Insurance, Farmers, Allstate, and

many others. These insurance vehicles come to the shop and undergo an extensive 4 step

process from start to finish.

The first step the vehicle goes through is when the insurance adjuster and our

repair advisor evaluates the damage and wrights the estimate on the vehicle. After the

two parties agree on the estimate the parts can be ordered and the vehicle will be assigned

to a particular body technician. The estimate is nothing but the document that shows

what needs to be repaired on the vehicle, how long it should take the technicians to finish

the repairs, and how much it will cost to repair the vehicle.

The second step is when the vehicle is assigned to one of the 3 body technician to

remove all the damaged parts form the vehicle so that the necessary repairs can be

completed. This may range from taking a fender off to as elaborate as cutting a vehicle in
half and sectioning it back together. After the repairs are complete and all necessary parts

are assembled back on the vehicle it then goes to the next step.

The next step is where the paint is applied to the new parts and damaged areas of

the vehicle. This step is done by one of the two painters. The damaged areas will have a

coat of primer applied to them, to make the area smooth. In doing this process the vehicle

will needs to be covered with tape and plastic to insure that the undamaged areas will not

accumulate paint overspray. After the primer has hade time to cure, it is then sanded and

cleaned to be painted. After the damaged areas and miscellaneous parts of the vehicle are

painted back to the original color, the paint is baked at 150 degrees for half and hour.

The forth step it the process is where the vehicle is returned to the assigned body

technician to be reassembled. This is where all the removed parts are put back on the

vehicle, which includes door handles, windows, bumpers, headlights, moldings/decals,

etc. After the vehicle is completely reassembled as if were new again, it moves to the last

step.

Last, the vehicle undergoes a final quality inspection. This first ensures that all

parts are painted to match and fitted correctly. It also makes sure that the paint finish is

up to quality standard or it will be sent back to the paint shop. The last thing the quality

inspection ensures is that all the functional and mechanical components that were

damaged and replaced are back to normal working condition. And after all these steps

are complete the vehicle is ready to be delivered to the customer.

4. Problem Definition
At Glen’s Paint and Body there are three main issues that lead to rework. Which

start from, wrong parts were ordered or sent for a vehicle, work being sent back to the

body shop because certain repairs were not completed properly, and also have an issue

with some vehicles getting paint overspray on them. These issues lead to the majority of

the time lost that is needed to finish the vehicle on time.

Part Issue:

First is the parts issue. Sometimes it may be that our parts ordering department ordered

the wrong parts. Maybe they gave the parts dealer the wrong VIN number or they might

have ordered the parts for the left side and not the right side. Other times the parts were

correctly ordered but the distributor sends the wrong part. It also may be boxed or

labeled wrong from the distributor, in this case the distributor will pay the extra cost that

we accrued during time lost and our labor hours lost.

Work sent back:

Second is when work is sent back from the paint shop to the body shop because the body

technician didn’t repair something properly, or they missed a repair completely. This

may be when the body tech. improperly repaired an area to be painted. Maybe the area is

too rough for the prime to make smooth enough for the final paint finish, or if the area

repaired is too high or low to meet quality standards. The technicians can also miss a

repair completely; do to not evaluating the estimate correctly. They might fail to see a

dent on the other side of a vehicle that is being fixed.

Overspray:

Last is when vehicles obtain paint overspray on the undamaged areas. This can be

caused when someone parks the vehicle unknowingly next to a job that is being primed
without covering it first with tape and paper. The excess primer floating in the air lands

on the uncovered vehicle, which leaves paint overspray. The processes to remove the

paint overspray my take several hours. It can also be caused when the paint technician

forgets to cover the car before they apply the primer.

Above issues leads to work delay, which lead to not completing the work at right time.

5. Data Collection

The data collection process at Glen’s Paint and Body was a rather complex

process. It starts when the insurance adjuster and our estimator evaluates the vehicle that

has been in the collision. They take mental and hand written notes on what damage they

see physically wrong with the vehicle as well as put marking on the vehicle. The

markings remind them and the technicians working on the vehicle not to overlook

anything or even forget to repair a certain problem. After the notes are taken by both

parties, the information is entered into the estimating software. The software is

sophisticated enough to tell the estimators how much time it should take to repair the

vehicle and how much the total job will cost, of course the software requires you to enter

the year, make, model, and vin number of the vehicle to accurately estimate the damage.

We evaluated a total of 5 technicians, 2 from the paint shop and 3 from the body

shop. We also refer to them as paint technicians and body technicians. We tracked this

process for a 6 week period.

The second part of our data collection started when the estimates were finished

and handed to the assigned technicians. The total hours estimated for each technician to

finish the job were collected. This information was pulled right from the work estimates

from each tech. and for each vehicle they repaired. We then observed the actual time it
took the technicians to complete the job. The rework times were also observed for each

tech. so we could also analyze the nonconformities in the process.

In our data collection process we found that a large percentage of the time the

body and paint technicians would finish the repairs in less time than the estimates

allowed for. This is quite good for the technicians because they get paid for estimated

hours worked not actual hours worked. But on the other hand this can be a problem in

the quality control department. This is where reworks come into play, when the

technicians rush to finish a job to fast and forgets to repair something or even

unknowingly causes a problem.

6. Statistical Analysis:

After the data collection, control charts are plotted for the actual time with the help of

estimated time. At first control limits for estimated time are calculated and using that as a

specification limits control charts are plotted for actual time. Some of the samples of our

data collection are presented below

(Due to confidential reasons, names of the technician are not relieved directly instead

they are named as technician 1, technician 2 ...).

Technician 1: (Paint Shop)


Estimate Actual
Week 1 Week 1
11.2 6.5
16.2 8.0
20.0 26.5
10.7 5.0
7.1 4.2
7.1 10.0
3.4 1.0
4.0 2.0
11.2 13.5
10.7 4.0
Estimate Actual
week4 week4
6.6 10.5
6.6 4.0
1.2 3.5
7.8 4.5
12.5 6.5
7.6 10.0
6.8 6.0
11.4 17.3
8.9 5.0
8.4 15.6
Estimate Actual
week3 week3
4.8 2.0
5.5 10.0
8.6 4.5
9.6 4.5
8.1 4.5
6.7 3.5
4.4 2.0
8.4 3.5
10.0 4.5
Estimate Actual
week2 week2
14.2 14.2
10.9 10.0
6.1 4.5
5.6 13.5
3.7 1.0
5.0 2.5
28.5 36.5
4.0 2.5
7.6 3.5
6.6 8.2
Estimate Actual
week5 week5
37.5 20.0
8.2 2.5
11.1 4.5
10.2 4.5
6.5 2.5
15.3 9.5
14.3 10.0
6.0 4.0
12.6 6.5
9.8 5.0

Estimate Actual
week6 week6
3.7 5.2
21.2 15.0
6.7 10.0
12.6 10.5
7.2 15.0
2.6 1.0
11.3 16.5
2.8 1.8
7.7 4.5
10.1 10.0

Technician 2: (Paint Shop)

Estimate Actual
week2 week2
0.5 1.0
4.0 5.5
16.9 15.0
3.5 3.5

Estimate Actual
week4 week4
2.8 2.5
0.5 0.5
1.0 1.5
0.9 1.0
1.8 1.5
1.0 1.0
Estimate Actual 25.9 25.0
week3 week3
0.5 0.5
2.8 2.5
0.7 1.0
9.9 12.5
3.6 3.5
1.5 1.5
18.7 18.0
Estimate Actual
week5 week5
3.2 2.0
1.5 1.0
4.8 3.5
24.0 20.0

Estimate Actual
week6 week6
1.3 1.0
3.1 4.0
1.2 1.2
1.0 1.0

Technician 1 :( Body Shop)


Estimate Actual
week4 week4
18.1 10.0
21.8 25.0
7.7 4.0
4.8 2.5
Estimate Actual
Week 1 Week 1
40.3 15.0
10.0 12.2
7.2 10.5
4.7 3.5
1.7 5.0
6.2 5.5
27.7 31.5
9.2 5.0
Estimate Actual
week2 week2
20.5 10.0
16.8 7.0
10.0 3.5
1.9 0.5
10.0 13.5
4.0 2.0
Estimate Actual
week3 week3
15.1 17.2
14.8 10.0
2.0 3.5
12.6 12.0
8.2 12.5
15.3 15.0

Estimate Actual
week5 week5
14.7 7.5
3.0 1.5
7.7 5.5
3.8 4.0
27.1 15.5
2.6 10.0
11.2 6.5
12.2 15.5
Estimate Actual
week6 week6
7.9 10.2
20.0 15.5
4.9 8.0
Technician 2 :( Body Shop):
Estimate Actual
Estimate Actual week3 week3
Week 1 Week 1 19.6 5.5
13.6 6.5 7.0 6.0
5.8 10.5 15.9 12.0
10.0 5.5 20.2 8.5
8.7 14.2 9.1 5.0
10.0 13.4 16.5 8.0
Estimate Actual 17.3 1.0
week2 week2
23.9 25.5 9.4 5.5
13.9 9.5
5.5 4.0
2.0 1.0
5.1 4.0

Estimate Actual
week4 week4
21.5 35.6
30.0 14.0
16.4 25.0
22.0 8.0
13.1 22.5
Estimate Actual
week5 week5
3.3 7.2
25.5 15.5
16.2 18.5
10.0 12.5

Estimate Actual
week6 week6
5.5 2.5
12.6 10.0
19.8 15.5
3.1 1.0
16.9 12.0
10.6 5.5
12.3 6.5
6.1 3.0
14.6 9.5
Technician 3:

Estimate Actual
Week 1 Week 1
11.5 9.0
5.5 10.5
10.0 5.5
10.0 5.0
10.0 20.0

Estimate Actual
week3 week3
5.9 2.0
42.8 20.0
15.8 8.5
52.6 22.0
20.0 8.5
1.0 4.5

Estimate Actual
week2 week2
17.1 5.0
27.3 15.0
12.3 5.0
5.7 10.0
45.9 19.0
20.0 10.0
15.6 9.0
Estimate Actual
week4 week4
18.0 15.0
38.4 22.5
36.3 22.0
4.2 1.0
6.2 3.5
19.8 22.5

Estimate Actual
week5 week5 Estimate Actual
13.0 20.2 week6 week6
15.5 9.5 5.9 2.5
10.8 25.8 42.8 22.5
5.8 3.0 15.8 10.0
27.2 19.5 52.6 40.0
4.8 2.0 20.0 9.5
20.0 24.5 1.0 5.5
19.7 12.0
\
7. Recommendation and Conclusion:

In evaluating the situation at Glen’s Paint and Body some recommendations to

help resolve the three main rework issues have been reached. If you recall they start from

the wrong parts being ordered or sent for a vehicle, work being sent back to the body

shop because certain repairs were not completed properly, and some vehicles getting

paint overspray on them. The recommendations are as fallows.

If the wrong parts are being ordered or sent, we need to implement a parts check

in procedure to reduce the time the part sits until someone realizes the problem. This can

be done by someone using a simple check list with the correct part numbers to compare
to the parts being received. As well as the person checking in the parts physically to the

old or damaged existing parts to ensure they are correct.

Also if work is being sent back to the body shop because certain repairs were not

completed properly, we need to have the quality control person checking the vehicles at

this stage in the process not just at the final delivery of the vehicle. Another good idea

would be to make sure the technician is taking time to read the estimate properly so

nothing is missed during busy times.

Last is the problem with vehicles getting paint overspray on them. To eliminate

this problem, every vehicle that enters the paint shop must at all time be immediately

covered with tape and paper to the areas that are not being repaired. This will eliminate

the wet paint particles that are floating in the air to be able to adhere to the undamaged

areas. These recommendations should reduce the rework times significantly.