You are on page 1of 42

 

   
W.G.
PEARSON
ELEMENTARY
P.B.I.S. HANDBOOK
 

“Home of the Mighty Tigers”


Table of Contents:
 

v Overview of PBIS

v Roles and responsibilities of the PBIS Team

v RTI/MTSS Pyramid of Interventions

v Guidelines for Teaching Positive Behavior Expectations

v Behavior Matrix

v Procedures to Practice for Smooth Transitions

v Sample Lessons for TEACHING appropriate behavior

v W.G. Pearson P.B.I.S. System

v Behavior Intervention Flow Chart

v System for Acknowledging Positive Behavior

v Class Rewards and Positive verbal praise for class and students

v Creating a Positive Environment with Praise

 
What is PBIS?
Positive Behavior Interventions (PBIS) focuses on creating and sustaining
school wide, classroom, and individual systems of support that improve the
learning environment for all our students. Our goal is to teach behavioral
expectations and then recognize positive behaviors demonstrated by our
students.

Our PBIS implementation plan includes clear outcomes, research based


practices, and information for problem solving behaviors. All staff members
at W.G. Pearson S.T.E.A.M Elementary will establish positive learning
environments. Each staff member will serve as positive role models to
students as they teach expected school behaviors. For PBIS to work for our
school we MUST have 100% participation. Please know that this is the
expectation.

Our school has a system in place for recognizing and rewarding expected
behaviors. By improving the school environment we hope to increase
learning time and promote academic and social success for every student.
The PBIS system includes interventions and strategies that are research-
based to support our students. A PowerPoint will be shown at beginning of
the year to kick off our PBIS program. The slideshow presents our school
rules and expectations. Students will be able to watch video examples of
students in our school modeling positive examples of behavior and non-
examples of positive behavior. In addition, developed lesson are included in
this handbook to target specific behaviors within our school throughout the
school year.
 

 
 
RTI/MTSS Pyramid of Behavioral Interventions

 
Guidelines for Teaching Positive Behavior Expectations
How long should it take to teach the behaviors on the matrix?

 
Plan to teach the expectations aggressively over the first three weeks of
school. Lessons will need to be repeated a few times initially and strongly
reinforced at the onset.
And then I’m done; right?
Not quite. Plan to teach “booster” lessons at least 2-3 times a week of the
school year (3 – 5 minutes), right before the Intervention Block on Tues.,
Wednesday, . If a lot of problems arise in a certain situation, re-teach the
expectations. Having a new student entering the class is also a perfect time
for a “refresher” course. What do you mean by “teach” the expectations? I
always go over the class rules.
This is a little different. By teach we mean show, as in model, demonstrate,
or role-play. Have the students get up and practice exactly what you have
shown them to do. Have fun with it! Give them feedback on how they did.
Lastly, praise them for their effort (and reward).
Team up with a colleague to plan and teach lessons. Repeat this process as
often as it takes for students to learn the behaviors. The idea is to teach
behavior the same way we teach academics. We know how important
practice is for mastery of academics.
How much time should I commit to this?
Keep the lessons brief: 5-15 minutes in the beginning during the first two
weeks of school. After the first couple of weeks the lessons should only take
2-5 minutes.

 
 
Practice  makes  perfect!!!!  Having  procedures  for  the  following  
will  ensure  effective  and  smooth  transitions  throughout  the  day,  
every  day.  

v Entering the classroom


v Getting to work right away
v What to bring to class
v How to ask a question
v How to give an answer
v What to do when you need supplies
v Finding directions to an assignment
v What to do if you need help
v What to do if the teacher is busy or speaking to someone
v What to do if you were absent
v How to work in a group
v How to give the teacher your attention
v What to do with homework
v How to pass in papers
v How to return student work
v Returning to work after an interruption
v What to do during a fire drill, lock down drill, tornado drill, etc.
v What to do during announcements
v Saying “Please,” “Thank you,” “Excuse me,” “I’m sorry / I
apologize for”
v End of the day procedures

 
W.G. Pearson Elementary School   Location: Assemblies  

PBIS Lesson Format   Implementation Date: August 2016  

Step 1: Identify the desired behavior and describe it in observable, measurable expectations.  

Personal Best Act Responsibly Work and Play Safely .Show Respect

*Sit criss-cross with your * Keep your eyes on your * Wait for your teacher to give * Enter and exit the area
hands in your lap teacher when leaving the directions to exit quietly.
assembly area.

 
* Enter and exit the area in a
line.

.
*Clap only at appropriate
  times.

*Sit quietly during a


performance.

*Listen to and watch the


person speaking.

Step 2: List a rationale for teaching the behavior (Why is it important?)  

Since assemblies are attended by so many people- students, staff, parents, and other community members, it is
important to learn appropriate behavior to maintain an orderly environment and to ensure everyone’s enjoyment
and appreciation. Students need to learn to display proper etiquette and listening skills during a play, musical
concert, guest speaker, etc. Teachers will implement activities that will enable students to understand the
importance of being respectful, responsible, safe and ready during assemblies.

Step 3: Identify examples and non-examples of the desired behavior (What would the behavior
look/sound like? What would the behavior not look/sound like?)  

Examples Non-examples

 
Personal Best: Personal Best:

*Students sit errect with legs criss-cross and hands in *Students sit in various forms- out stretched legs, lying
their laps. down, backs to speaker, with heads turned, hands up to
ears, and sometimes waving to other students.

Act Responsibly:

Act Responsibly: *Students get up and begin to walk around as soon as the
program is over.
*Students should watch their classroom teacher and
follow the teacher’s directions when time to leave the
assembly area.
Work and Play Safely:

*Students run out of the assembly area as soon as the


Work and Play Safely: performance is over.

*Students wait for the classroom teacher to give


directions to exit the area.
Show Respect:

* Students enter assembly area talking to each other and


Show Respect: continue talking throughout the presentation or
performance.
* Students enter the assembly area quietly and ready to
listen.

* Students enter the area in a cluster and engaged in


conversation. When the program ends, the students exit,
* Students enter and exit the area in a line.
still engaged in conversation.

*Students clap only during appropriate times.


*Students clap loudly and jump up and down
inappropriately during the performance.

*Students sit quietly during the performance and exhibit


appreciation for the experience.
*During the program, students are engaged in
conversation and are facing the opposite direction.

*Students listen attentively and watch the person


speaking.
*Some students sit engaged in conversation, some
playing hand games and chatting while the program
continues.

 
Step 4: Practice/Role Play Activities

Model expected behavior (I do): Teacher will share assembly rules and expectations while in the classroom and
before the first assembly. Ask students to explain why they should act in a way that is respectful, responsible, safe
and ready during assemblies. Discuss and show what appropriate behavior is like with examples- (during guest
speakers, plays, concerts, etc.). Take students to an imaginary assembly in the cafetorium. Have students to role play
the different roles of presenters, staff members, and students during an assembly. Declare the principal or teachers to
be a super hero who is care-free, lackadaisical, and distracted. Have students verbalize what is wrong with that
person’s behavior. Then have third or fourth grade students exhibit positive assembly behaviors. have students in the
audience verbalize the positive behaviors.

Lead students through behavior (We do): Encourage students to be accountable to other students, as well as to
teachers, other staff members, the Linden community, and other adults. Stage a student presentation. Secretively
have a student to serve as the class guest speaker and the rest of the class serve as the audience, with some members
of the audience behaving positively and some negatively. When the student speaker is finished, ask the speaker:
“How did you feel speaking in front of this audience?” “What was wrong?” “What was right?” “How can we
improve?” Ask some members of the audience to share how they felt behaving inappropriately. “How did you feel,
behaving appropriately and trying to listen while others were misbehaving?” Then ask the speaker and the
members of the audience to verbalize why it is important to give their undivided attention to the speaker.

Test to ensure students understand behavior (You do): Teacher should ask questions prior to any assembly as to
what the behavior expectations are and how they should be followed. The teacher could also give various scenarios
and ask for students’ input on how to make the situation better.

Step 5: Provide opportunities for practice:

• Have several students share in repeating the rules as a class review and as others listen attentively.
• Create various scenarios as provided by the teacher. Have students verbalize or demonstrate positive and
negative behaviors.
• Reinforce behavior, reward and acknowledge students’ adherence to positive behaviors with “Catcher Cards”.
Implement the “Catcher Cards System” as teachers observe students. In addition, students can observe and
recognize another student and notify a teacher. The teacher will determine if a “Catcher Card” is warranted.
• Select “Conduct Cops” as classroom helpers. These students may wear badges to denote who they are and
repost students who are exhibiting negative or positive behaviors. In addition, every teacher may police
conduct. Then reward those students who are doing something “good”.
• With “Catcher Cards” and Conduct Cops” incentives, rewards may be a classroom reward and/or school-wide
reward in which students may be issued tickets that may be redeemed for prizes. For example, a “Principal’s
Both”, opened one day a week, where students can redeem tickets for small prizes- pencils, erasers, stickers,
posters, other school supplies, or local restaurants’ incentives (as donated). Teachers may enter a student’s
name into a monthly drawing for prizes at the “Principal’s Booth” or for a one- hour monthly “School-wide
Movie Day”. A Student must maintain good behavior for the entire month, or he/she will be disqualified from
the monthly drawing or the movie. Other prizes may include popcorn or ice cream parties. Ask staff, at their
own will, to donate one dollar toward store gift cards for an end-of-the-year reward. Teachers may enter
names of students who have exhibited good behavior into the end-of-the-year drawing. Students who have not

 
maintained “good behavior” throughout the year will be disqualified.
• Provide opportunities for purposeful listening. As follow up of any assembly, the teacher may ask students to
respond to the following questions: “What was the assembly about?” “Who was the speaker/main
character(s)?” “What did you learn?” “What did you enjoy/like most?” “What did you dislike about it?”
Teacher may determine how well students listened, and provide an opportunity for students to restate the rules.

Delivery Method Re-Teaching Date:

Notes to Improve:

 
W.G. Pearson Elementary School Behavior Lesson Plan

Expectations: Personal Best, Act Responsibly, Show Respect, Work and Play Safely

Setting: HALLWAY

Step 1: Identify the desired behavior and describe if in observable, measurable terms.

Walking single file on the right hand side.

Keeping hands, body and objects to yourself.

Get to where you need to be in a timely manner.

Voice level (0-1)

Remove headgear while entering the building.

Travel hallways quietly so as to not interrupt others' learning.

Step 2: List a rationale for teaching the behavior (Why is it important?).

To make hallways safe and orderly for smooth traffic flow. To prevent disruptions to other classes so they
can learn.

Step 3: Identify examples and non-examples of the desired behavior (What would the behavior look/sound like? What
would the behavior not look/sound like?).

Examples Non-examples

Hands at sides with personal space. Talking in normal voice or loud voice.

Walk in straight line on the right side at an Walking in the middle of the hall or on the left side.
even pace.
Hands not at side, swinging or jumping.
Look to front of line.
Poking or crowding others.
Voices are silent or whisper.
Small detours or stopping.
Stop for those who are crossing.
Touching walls or objects.
Carry materials quietly.
Headgear on while in building.
Go straight to destination and back.

Step 4: Identify teaching strategies to practice/role play desired behaviors.

Model expected behavior (I do): Teacher(s) model or read the following scenarios. The teacher discusses
why/why not scenario is an example of HALLWAY behavior. Teacher can also demonstrate appropriate
behavior or have students demonstrate. Teacher (only) can demonstrate non-examples.

Lead students through behavior (We do): Teacher(s) presents following scenario. Students will discuss why/why
not scenario is an example of HALLWAY behavior. Teacher leads the students to practice the appropriate
behavior, prompting and giving feedback to support the students.

Assess to ensure students understand behavior (You do): With a peer, students are asked to come up with their own
scenario. Student groups will appropriately act out their scenario. Teacher and other students will provide feedback to
peer groups. Students demonstrate matrix behaviors without prompting from the teacher.

Step 5: Provide opportunities for practice and reinforcement for student/family.

When students follow guidelines give verbal praise.

When students forget guidelines: PROMPT – “We need to walk on the right side please.”

When there are students who tend to forget guidelines, before entering hallway: PRE-CORRECT: “What do
we need to remember when walking in the hallway?” “Who can tell me the hallway behaviors?” or prompt
for the hallway behavior that seems to be the most challenging: “Remember 0 voices in the hallway.”

Practice weekly scenarios; publically recognize students who display respectful behavior; teacher models
respectful behavior.

 
Lesson Plan for Restroom Behavior

Introduce:

Introduce the lesson by saying something like, “Today we are going to learn appropriate restroom
behavior. It is important to learn this so that you can understand what you can do to make and keep
our restrooms safe, you safe, and others safe.”

Tell:

Talk with students about why it is important to behave appropriately in the restroom and why these
particular skills are necessary. Make associations between the expected restroom behaviors and the
School-Wide Expectations (Personal Best, Act Responsibly, Show Respect, Work and Play Safely).
The expected behaviors to introduce are:

1. Use Level 1 (whisper) voice.


2. Follow directions of adults.
3. One person per stall.
4. Be considerate of other’s privacy.
5. Be patient.
6. Respect facilities -- Keep restroom clean.
7. Always wash hands before exiting.
8. Return to hallway/class promptly.

Show:

1. Ask students to specify the expectations for appropriate restroom behavior.


2. Model the behaviors.
3. Call on two or three students (who are likely to be successful) to model the behaviors
and instruct the rest of the class to watch carefully.
4. Call on other small groups to model.
5. Call on the whole class to model.
6. Repeat until all students demonstrate the behaviors correctly.
7. Acknowledge students who cooperate with the practice session, and follow the session
with a brief reinforcing activity (to acknowledge cooperation.)
8. Summarize what has been covered in the lesson, reiterating why appropriate bathroom
behavior is necessary and show high expectations in all students by acknowledging your
belief that they will behave appropriately in the restrooms.

Follow the Show phase with a summarization of what has been covered in the lesson, reiterating the
importance of applying the learned behaviors to other settings.

Do:
Frequently praise students who successfully demonstrate the desired behaviors. Reinforce using the
school-wide reinforcement system. Provide reminders or prompts to students who fail to
demonstrate the desired behaviors (ex: “Clinton, remember to always wash your hands before
exiting.”) Monitor daily until no prompts are needed. Determine if and what procedures need to be
taught.

Conclude:

Conduct a brief discussion daily after the routine has been established. Watch staff made video of
appropriate and inappropriate restroom behaviors. If there have been any problems in demonstrating
the expected behaviors, conduct another practice session, monitor behavior more closely, and
provide more frequent feedback. Do not take the routine for granted. Remember that appropriate
restroom behavior is a concept being taught. Many students do not know what appropriate and
inappropriate behavior looks like. Reward students when appropriate behavior has been maintained
for an extended period of time

 
W.G. Pearson Elementary School Behavior Lesson Plan

Expectations: Personal Best, Act Responsibly, Work and Play Safely, Show Respect

Setting: CAFETERIA

Step 1: Identify the desired behavior and describe if in observable, measurable terms.

Walking to the line. Making room for others at table.

Keeping hands, body and objects to yourself. Saying please and thank you to the servers.

Lining up quickly and quietly when dismissed. Positive supportive conversations.

Cleaning your own tables. Make healthy food choices.

Sitting at tables and eating. Practice positive food choices.

Voice level (0-1) Staying at tables until dismissed by an adult.

Use appropriate language at all times.

Step 2: List a rationale for teaching the behavior (Why is it important?).

To make the cafeteria safe, orderly and enjoyable for ALL people.

Step 3: Identify examples and non-examples of the desired behavior (What would the behavior look/sound like? What
would the behavior not look/sound like?).

Examples Non-examples

Entering the cafeteria through the correct door, Entering the cafeteria through the wrong door, running
walking, staying off of the gym floor and using and being loud.
voice level 1.
Poking and punching other students while in line.
Saying please and thankful to all severs and
adults helping students. Juggling your milk carton.

Holding tray level and keeping milk on tray. Talking using voice level 2 or above.

Sitting down and eating your lunch. Moving from table to table.

Having positive conversations using voice level Leaving your garbage and food on the table and not
wiping up your mess.
Cleaning your table and throwing your garbage
in the garbage can. Running to the restroom and stepping on the coats.

Lining up quietly when an adult gives Leaving your seat without permission.
permission.

 
Step 4: Identify teaching strategies to practice/role play desired behaviors.

Model expected behavior (I do): Teacher(s) model or read the following scenarios. The teacher discusses
why/why not scenario is an example of CAFETERIA behavior. Teacher can also demonstrate appropriate
behavior or have students demonstrate. Teacher (only) can demonstrate non-examples.

Lead students through behavior (We do): Teacher(s) presents following scenario. Students will discuss
why/why not scenario is an example of CAFETERIA behavior. Teacher leads the students to practice the
appropriate behavior, prompting and giving feedback to support the students.

Assess to ensure students understand behavior (You do): With a peer, students are asked to come up
with their own scenario. Student groups will appropriately act out their scenario. Teacher and other
students will provide feedback to peer groups. Students demonstrate matrix behaviors without prompting
from the teacher.

Step 5: Provide opportunities for practice and reinforcement for student/family.

When students follow guidelines give verbal praise.

When students forget guidelines: PROMPT – “We need to walk in the cafeteria, please.”

When there are students who tend to forget guidelines, before entering the cafeteria, PRE-CORRECT:
“What do we need to remember when going to the cafeteria or in the cafeteria?” “Who can tell me the
cafeteria behaviors?” or prompt for the cafeteria behavior that seems to be the most challenging:
“Remember to use voice level 1 in the cafeteria.”

Practice weekly scenarios; publically recognize students who display respectful behavior; teacher models
respectful behavior.

 
Lesson Plan to Teach Behavioral Expectations

Location: Recess/Playground

School-Wide Rules

Personal Best, Act Responsibly, Work and Play Safely, Show Respect

Rules and Behavioral Expectation Matrix

Be Safe Be Respectful Be Responsible

• Keep hands, feet and objects to yourself. • Follow adult directions. • Dispose of trash in appropriate
• Use games, equipment and materials • Use appropriate language. receptacles.
properly. • Use equipment correctly.
• Enter and exit in orderly lines. • Report any incidents to a staff
member.
Examples (What to do) Non-examples (What NOT to do)
Rule 1: Be Safe Rule 1: Be Safe

• Keep hands to your side and feet on the ground. • Hitting or kicking other students.
• Use games, equipment and materials appropriately. • Inappropriate/incorrect use of items.
• Stand in a straight quiet line. • Not staying with your class or standing to the side of
the line.
Rule 2: Be Respectful
Rule 2: Be Respectful
• Do what the adult asks you to do.
• Use nice words. • Not following directions given by an adult.
• Saying mean things or using profanity.
Rule 3: Be Responsible
Rule 3: Be Responsible
• Put any trash in the garbage cans.
• Use games, equipment and materials correctly. • Throwing trash on the ground.
• Inappropriate/incorrect use of items.
Activities to Enhance Skill Development

• Review behavioral expectations, examples and non-examples with students.


• Have the students role-play the examples of expected behaviors and the non-examples.
• Discuss the importance of following the rules at recess and on the playground.
Activities to Check for Understanding

• Observe students during recess and on the playground.


• Play a Quiz-Quiz-Trade game (each student is provided with a card that has a question on it, either prepared by the students
or the instructor. With cards in hand, students pair up and quiz each other. After a designated time, partners trade cards, seek
a new partner, and repeat quizzing with their new cards).
Activities to Extend Skill Development

• Have students give examples from the book of good recess and playground behavior.
• Have students so a writing activity about the importance of following the rules for recess and the playground.
• Create a chant or cheer about expected recess and playground behaviors.

 
Acknowledgements to Maintain Positive Behaviors

• Giving Tiger Paws to individual students when they follow the rules in the office.

 
PBIS-Bus Lesson Plan

Objective: By the end of class students will be able to define, give examples and reflect on the
consequences of bus misbehavior

Materials:

o Print Outs – Artist, Musician, Writer, Actor


o Envelopes – unlabeled, but contain scenarios for buses
o White Board- for writing descriptions of bus behaviors
Lesson Content

• Hang the Artist, Musician, Writer and Actor print outs in 4 different locations in
the room. Ask students to stand next to the one that they would most like to be
when they grow up.
Activator • Students should take the envelope that is hanging with the sign and sit with their
group. They should not open the envelope.
• If there is a large number at one sign and only one student at another, ask the
student to join the large group and split the group in 2 (give one envelope to each
group).
• Lead a class discussion on bus misbehavior by having students do a group word
splash using the whiteboard. Give each student the opportunity to give an example
Discussion
of bus misbehavior and write it on the board.
• Next, lead a discussion on the consequences of bus misbehavior especially how
“playing” can lead to bigger problems or even an accident.
Inform students that each group has received a scenario in their envelope. In their
groups they are going to need to change the scenario so that it is reflecting the
appropriate behavior in the situation. Based on their group will determine how they
will do this:

Group Work Actor- perform a skit

Writer- write a poem or short story

Artist- create a poster or picture

Musician- write a song or rap

Sharing Give students the opportunity to share what they did in their groups.

• Review Bus Rules


• Let students know that they can report bus problems to appropriate
personnel: drivers, teachers, counselors, administrators.
Discussion • Discuss the concept of privileges = responsibility. Ask them to discuss what
responsibilities go along with bus privileges. Ask for a volunteer to record
their ideas. This can be followed with a discussion of the concept of
unwillingness to accept responsibility = loss of privilege. Invite their ideas
about the consequences of not following the guidelines of responsibility.
 

 
 

   

 
 

   

 
 

   

 
 

 
Bus Rules  

RESPECTFUL Follow directions

Wait in line

Listen to the bus driver

Share seats

Use appropriate language

Stay in your seat


 

Working and Stay seated while the bus is moving

Playing Safely Keep your body and belongings inside the


bus

Enter and exit in an orderly fashion

Stay in your seat

 
 

Role Plays for Envelopes:

1. Every morning on the bus the person that sits


beside you stands up and throws paper wads
at the other students. This morning one hit
the bus driver.

2. The person beside you won’t scoot over so


you have room on the bus. They also talk
badly about other people on the bus.

3. You are in sixth grade when you get on the


bus each morning an 8th grader trips you and
everyone laughs.

4. One of your friends uses foul language on the


bus every day. The bus driver is unable to
hear them because you are at the back of the
bus.

 
W.G. Pearson P.B.I.S System
Where do we start?
During the first week of school, each class with go through the PBIS Matrix Stations where
an assign staff leader will teacher each class the rules and procedures for each location. A
schedule will be sent before the first week of school. Classroom, Resource, and Special Area
Teachers ae also expected to review rules and procedures with students during the first week
and frequently throughout the year. Students will then attend a P.B.I.S Kick-Off assembly
where students will learn about our School’s Rules and Expectations. They will also learn
about the great things the can earn for being a Super Tiger.

Each month, grade levels will attend and P.B.I.S assembly during the Special’s/ Electives
time. During this time students will be reminded of the school wide rules and expectations
through videos, lessons, and/or role play.

Positive Behavior and Intervention System

W.G Pearson Behavior System is designed to promote appropriate behavior by celebrating


the positive.

v Students begin each day on green. Green “Good Tiger”. This behavior means
students have followed all class rules, P.A.W.S and the behavior matrix rules.
Students earn 3 points in class for a green day.
v Students may earn the chance to move to Orange “Better Tiger” (4 points), Blue
“Great Tiger” (5 points), and Purple “Super Tiger” as they continue to demonstrate
excellent behavior. If a student has demonstrated good behavior or better, by the end
of the day (without moving down) they can move to “Purple”. A “Purple-Super
Tiger” is worth 6 points.
v If a student is warned for not following directions, the student or teacher will move
their clip to “Yellow”. A yellow earns 2 points in class for the day.
v If a student receives another warning for the same behavior or an additional rule
violation, he/she will move to “Pink”. The consequence for “Pink” is a minimum of
10 minutes away from the group in Time Out and completion of the Reflection
Sheet. “Pink” behavior earns 1 point in class. Other consequences can be Lunch
Detention and/or teacher conference.
v A student moves to “Red” if there is another rule violation or a major behavior
infraction that may warrant an office referral. The consequence for “Red” behavior is
reflection time away from the group (buddy teacher), a telephone call to a parent or
guardian and a possible office referral. No points are earned in class for a red day.
v Once a student moves down, they do have a chance to move back up, but can only go
as high as green.
v Daily colors are documented on the calendar that each student will receive and
sent home each day.

 
W.G. Pearson Elementary School
‘Time to Think Sheet’

I was feeling…

SAD SILLY MAD EMBARRASSED AFRAID/ BOSSY


WORRIED
I wanted…

___attention ___to have fun ___to get my own way ___to be left alone

___someone to listen to me ___I was already mad ___other

I hurt _________________________’s ___body ___feelings

___friendships/reputation ___property when I __________________

___________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________.

I could have _____________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________.

Student Signature ___________________________________________________

Parent Signature________________________________ Date________________


Problem  Solving  Process  for  Student  Behavior  

W.G.  Pearson  S.T.E.A.M  Elementary  School  2016-­‐2017    

Is
Use Tiger Color Chart and
No   Behavior Yes  
corresponding consequences
Office Write referral to office
Managed?

Does student have a


minimum of 3 or more
   No   prior minor offenses Yes   Administrator
Classroom                                    vs.                                    Office  
of the same behavior
Determines
within the period of a
     Managed     vs.                            Managed  
week? *Minor Disruption *Fighting Consequence  
*Not   prepared for *profanity
class
Re-­‐teach  expected                 *Weapons Administrator
behavior   *Minor disrespect Follows Through
                                                                                          *Drug/Alcohol with Consequence
*Not complying with possession
teacher directions
*Major Threats
(Minor defiance)
Begin  documenting  
*Harassment/Bullying Administrator
behavior  using   *Disrespecting
Provides Teacher
minor  incident   property (minor) *Theft Feedback
report  
*Toys: Stuff from *Vandalism
Hold  individual   home that causes
conference  with   distraction *Major Disruption
Teacher will develop and
student  and  contact   *sleeping *Major disrespect   implement individual
parent   (swearing  at  or   interventions to prevent
*Negative  attitude  
threatening  adult)   future occurrences for 3
*Cheating  (first  time)   weeks. Contact parent to
If behavior continues, create a behavior *Physically  aggressive  
discuss interventions.
PEP for student and implement for a contact  with  an  adult  or  
*tardiness/  
minimum of 3 wks. Meet with parent to staff  member.  
attendance  
explain PEP and obtain their signature.
*minor  student    
conflicts  
 

***    After  reviewing  


evidence,  students  who  
Process for referring
students in need of intense
behavioral interventions

Continue using
interventions. For students
that can handle it, No   Yes  
gradually transition Inappropriate Complete PBIS referral
individuals back onto Behavior form for student
school-wide behavior continues after
system 3 weeks of
classroom
interventions?  

PBIS Team will schedule a


meeting with teacher to discuss
observed behaviors

(Bring all documentation: i.e. minor


incident reports, referral forms,  
No   Does inappropriate behavior
continue? documentation  of  interventions  

Members of the PBIS Team will


Continue using new observe the student.
interventions.
Yes  
Afterwards, the team will meet with teacher
to create or make changes to the student’s
Psychologist or EC teacher existing PEP.
will complete an FBA. (If the student has an existing IEP, a meeting
Intense interventions will will be schedule with their EC teacher to add
be implemented based on behavior goals. New interventions will  be  
data from FBA. implemented  for  2-­‐3  wks.  

 
W.G. Pearson Elementary System for Acknowledging Positive
Behavior

Individual Rewards

I. Each teacher will decide the total number of points students will need to earn at the
end of a two week period to receive a prize. For example:

Class points are earned daily for the colors that students earn: Purple= 6 points; Blue= 5
points; Orange = 4 points; Yellow= 2 points; Pink = 1; Red= 0 points;

*Parent Signature on calendar = 2 points

Examples individual rewards for a specific number of points that the teacher designates:

v Class Treasure Box


v Computer Time
v Homework Pass,
v Lunch with the teacher,
v Read a book with a younger student.
v See more examples of rewards in the back of the handbook

II. Student of the Month: The DPS Monthly Character Trait descriptions will be used
to determine the Student of the Month for each class. The teacher will identify a
student for each character trait monthly. The reward for the Student of the Month is a
picture taken with a certificate.

III. A monthly school-wide reward will be given to students who have green, orange,
blue, or purple. These students are recognized as Purple “Super Tigers” because they
have remained on green, orange, blue, and moved to purple, daily for the whole
month. The names of the Purple Super Tigers will be requested by the Assistant
Principal. These students will receive a “Super Tiger” Certificate and have their
picture taken. All “Super Tiger Pictures” will be displayed on the large bulletin board
near the office each month.

Class Rewards

I. Tiger Bucks will be earned in the hallway, Specials and in the Cafeteria and in the
classroom. Each day classes will have an opportunity to earn bucks in these areas.
Administrators, Instructional Assistants, Specials and Resource Teachers will
distribute Tiger Bucks to classes that are following the school and classroom rules
and expectations. Examples of behavior in which a class can earn a Tiger Buck are
below:

v Students are walking in a Super straight line and they are quiet while in the
hallway
v Students are following directions in the cafeteria as outlined by the matrix
v All students came in to the gym quietly for an assembly.
v All students are attentive to the teacher while he/she is teaching and are
participating.
v Students followed all the rules during Specials and demonstrated the
appropriate behavior

II. Cafeteria and Specials: If a class remained on green or higher as a class in lunch or
Specials they can receive 5 Tiger Bucks for that day.

III. Each class will count the total number of Tiger Bucks for their class. The Assistant
Principal or designee will go to each class to record the total number of bucks. The
buck will be turned in, so that they can be redistributed.

IV. Rewards: The class (1 per grade level) with the most Tiger Bucks for the month will
have a banner displayed outside their classroom. Their class will also be announced
over the intercom. Classes receive this recognition can earn a Dance Party, Extra play
time, Lunch w/ Administrators (in café or classroom), Fruit Freeze Pops, Pajama Day,
Game Day, or Bring a Toy (permitted toy) to school.

School Rewards

Students that remained on Purple-Super Tiger for the entire quarter (and did not move down)
will have the opportunity to attend the quarterly “Super Tiger Celebration”. During this time
students will have a chance to play games, dance, and select items from the treasure box. Their
name will also be entered in a drawing for toys, prizes, and coupons.

 
Free or Inexpensive Rewards for Individual Students

Elementary Level
1. Assist  the  custodian    
2. Assist  with  morning  announcements  over  the  PA  system  
3. Be  a  helper  in  another  classroom    
4. Be  featured  on  a  photo  recognition  board    
5. Be  recognized  during  announcements    
6. Be  the  first  one  in  the  lunch  line    
7. Be  the  leader  of  a  class  game    
8. Be  the  line  leader  or  the  caboose  
9. Be  the  scout  (Person  who  goes  ahead  of  class  to  tell  the  special  teacher  they  are  on  the  way)  
10. Be  the  teacher's  helper  for  the  day    
11. Borrow  the  principal’s  chair  for  the  day  
12. Buzz  cut  a  design  in  an  agreeable  male’s  head  
13. Choose  a  book  for  the  teacher  to  read  aloud  to  the  class  
14. Choose  any  class  job  for  the  week    
15. Choose  music  for  the  class  to  hear    
16. Choose  the  game  during  physical  education  
17. Choose  which  homework  problem  the  teacher  will  give  the  answer  to  for  a  freebie  
18. Dance  to  favorite  music  in  the  classroom    
19. Design  and  make  a  bulletin  board    
20. Draw  on  a  small  white  board  at  desk  
21. Draw  pictures  on  the  chalkboard  while  the  teacher  reads  to  the  class  (illustrating  the  story  being  
read)  
22. Earn  a  gift  certificate  to  the  school  store  or  book  fair    
23. Earn  an  item  such  as  a  Frisbee,  hula  hoop,  jump  rope,  paddleball  or  sidewalk  chalk,  which  
promote  physical  activity    
24. Earn  extra  computer  time    
25. Earn  free  tutoring  time  from  the  teacher  (spelling  secrets,  math  secrets,  writing  secrets)  
26. Earn  play  money  to  be  used  for  privileges    
27. Earn  points  for  good  behavior  to  “buy”  unique  rewards  (e.g.  Autographed  items  with  special  
meaning  or  lunch  with  the  teacher)    
28. Earn  the  privilege  of  emailing  a  parent  at  work  telling  of  accomplishments  
29. Eat  lunch  outdoors  with  the  class    
30. Eat  lunch  with  a  teacher  or  principal    
31. Eat  lunch  with  an  invited  adult  (grandparent,  aunt,  uncle)  
32. Eat  with  a  friend  in  the  classroom  (with  the  teacher)    
33. Enjoy  a  positive  visit  with  the  principal    
34. Enjoy  class  outdoors  for  the  whole  class  
35. Enter  a  drawing  for  donated  prizes  among  students  who  meet  certain  grade  standards    
36. Get  “free  choice”  time  at  the  end  of  the  day    
37. Get  a  “no  homework”  pass    
38. Get  a  flash  cards  set  printed  from  a  computer    
39. Get  a  video  store  or  movie  theatre  coupon    
40. Get  extra  art  time    
41. Go  on  a  walking  field  trip  (earn  privilege  for  whole  class)  
42. Go  to  the  library  to  select  a  book  to  read    
43. Have  a  drawing  lesson  
44. Have  a  teacher  read  a  special  book  to  the  entire  class    

 
45. Have  teacher  share  a  special  skill  (e.g.  Sing)    
46. Have  the  teacher  make  a  positive  phone  call  home    
47. Help  in  a  lower  level  class    
48. Keep  a  stuffed  animal  at  desk    
49. Learn  how  to  do  something  special  on  the  computer-­‐  like  graphics  or  adding  sound  
50. Learn  how  to  draw  something  that  looks  hard,  but  with  help  is  easy  
51. Listen  to  music  while  working    
52. Listen  with  a  headset  to  a  book  on  audiotape    
53. Make  deliveries  to  the  office    
54. Name  put  on  scrolling  marquee  with  a  specific  message  “Emily  Jones  says  smile  and  eat  your  
veggies.”  
55. Operate  the  remote  for  a  PowerPoint  lesson    
56. Pick  a  game  at  recess  that  everyone  plays  including  the  teacher  
57. Play  a  computer  game    
58. Play  a  favorite  game  or  puzzle    
59. Read  a  book  to  the  class    
60. Read  morning  announcements    
61. Read  outdoors    
62. Read  to  a  younger  class    
63. Receive  a  “mystery  pack”  (gift-­‐wrapped  items  such  as  a  notepad,  folder,  puzzle,  sports  cards,  
etc.)    
64. Receive  a  5-­‐minute  chat  break  at  the  end  of  the  class  or  at  the  end  of  the  day    
65. Receive  a  note  of  recognition  from  the  teacher  or  principal    
66. Receive  a  plant,  seeds  and  a  pot  for  growing    
67. Receive  art  supplies,  coloring  books,  glitter,  bookmarks,  rulers,  stencils,  stamps,  pens,  pencils,  
erasers  and  other  school  supplies    
68. Receive  verbal  praise    
69. Select  a  paper  back  book  to  take  home  to  read  from  the  teacher’s  personal  library  
70. Sit  at  the  teacher's  desk  for  the  day  or  a  set  amount  of  time    
71. Sit  next  to  the  teacher  during  story  time    
72. Sit  with  a  friend  at  lunch,  assembly,  etc.  
73. Take  a  free  homework  pass    
74. Take  a  trip  to  the  treasure  box  (non-­‐food  items  such  as  water  bottles,  stickers,  key  chains,  
temporary  tattoos,  yo-­‐yo’s,  bubbles,  spider  rings,  charms  and  pencil  toppers)    
75. Take  care  of  the  class  animal    
76. Take  class  animal  home  for  school  vacation  time  
77. Take  home  a  class  game  for  a  night    
78. Teach  the  class  a  favorite  game    
79. Use  the  teacher's  chair    
80. Walk  with  a  teacher  during  lunch    
81. Watch  a  video  instead  of  recess  
82. Work  in  the  lunchroom    
83. Write  with  a  marker  for  the  day  
84. Write  with  a  special  pen  for  the  day    
85. Write  with  a  special  pencil  for  the  day  
 

 
 

   

 
 
 
 
 
Creating a Positive Classroom Environment with Verbal
Praise