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Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

Table of Contents
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

Part I: Context & Process Part II: Utility Corridors Design


Chapter 1 - Introduction Chapter 4 - Utility Corridors Requirements
1.1 Introduction.......................................................................... 2 4.1 Introduction.......................................................................... 2
1.2 Purpose of the Manual......................................................... 2 4.2 Summary of Utility Corridor Location Rules and Widths...... 4
1.3 Geographical Jurisdiction..................................................... 4 4.3 Utility Corridors Requirements............................................. 6
1.4 Applicability.......................................................................... 4 4.4 Solid Waste Collection ........................................................36
1.5 Intended Users..................................................................... 5 4.5 Utility Depths of Cover....................................................... 37
1.6 Stakeholders......................................................................... 5 4.6 Integration of Utilities within Complete Streets ................. 37
1.7 Manual Overview................................................................. 6 4.7 Sikkak.
................................................................................ 40
1.8 Applying the Manual............................................................ 6 4.8 Considerations for Additional Lines.................................... 41
1.9 Integration with Other Manuals............................................ 7
1.10 Standards vs. Guidelines..................................................... 10
Chapter 5 - Utility Corridors Arrangements
1.11 Design Flexibility................................................................. 10 5.1 Introduction.......................................................................... 2
1.12 Manual Update................................................................... 10 5.2 Utility Corridors Arrangement Composition.......................... 2
5.3 Utility Corridors Arrangements............................................. 4
Chapter 2 - Goals and Benefits
2.1 Introduction.......................................................................... 2
Chapter 6 - Junctions, Transitions and
Special Arrangements
2.2 Manual Goals........................................................................ 2
6.1 Introduction.......................................................................... 2
2.3 Benefits of USDM/UCDM Implementation............................ 2
6.2 Junctions.............................................................................. 2
Chapter 3 - Utility Corridors Selection and 6.3 Transitions............................................................................ 6
Approval Routes 6.4 Special Arrangements........................................................... 8
3.1 Introduction.......................................................................... 2
3.2 New Streets.......................................................................... 2
3.3 Infrastructure Retrofitting..................................................... 4
3.4 Approval Routes.................................................................... 6
3.5 Preparation of Utility Corridors Plans and Cross Sections .... 7
3.6 UCDM Exception Solutions................................................... 7

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Page i
Part III: Supporting Material

Appendix A - Sample Project for New Streets


Appendix B - Sample Project for Infrastructure Retrofitting
Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangements
Appendix D - Minimum Utility Corridor Arrangements
Appendix E - Definitions
Appendix F - References
Acknowledgements

Page ii
List of Figures
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

Chapter 1 - Introduction
Chapter 4 - Utility Corridors Requirements
Figure 1.1: Utility corridors considered in the UCDM................... 2
Figure 1.2: 2030 Plans for Abu Dhabi Emirate............................. 4 Figure 4.1:  Schematic representation of a service and a
Figure 1.3: The UCDM and other manuals.................................... 7 chamber corridor........................................................ 3
Figure 1.4: Integration of UCDM, USDM and PRDM for a Figure 4.2:  Indicative comparison between applying and
Complete Street.......................................................... 8 not applying UCDM standards.................................... 3
Figure 4.3:  Chapter 4 user guide.................................................. 6
Chapter 2 - Goals and Benefits Figure 4.4:  Potable Water corridors locations............................... 8
Figure 4.5:  Combined vs. individual valve chambers.................... 9
Figure 2.1: Example of a Complete Street in a residential Figure 4.6:  Potable Water service and chamber
development in Abu Dhabi......................................... 3 corridor offsets........................................................... 9
Figure 4.7:  Fire hydrant locations............................................... 10
Figure 4.8:  Example of poor placement of fire hydrant
Chapter 3 - Utility Corridors Selection and
Approval Routes and signage causing obstructed
pedestrian movement............................................... 10
Figure 3.1:  Typical Access Lane cross sections for different Figure 4.9:  Wastewater collection corridors locations................ 12
Land Use Contexts..................................................... 2 Figure 4.10:  Wastewater service and chamber corridor offsets... 13
Figure 3.2:  Step-by-step guide for utility corridors Figure 4.11:  Irrigation water supply corridors locations............... 14
arrangements for new streets.................................... 3 Figure 4.12:  Example of an Irrigation chamber overlapping
Figure 3.3:  Step-by-step guide for the development of a Tree/Street Lighting corridor.................................. 15
infrastructure retrofitting of utility corridors Figure 4.13:  Irrigation water service and chamber
arrangements in existing streets................................ 5 corridor offsets......................................................... 15
Figure 3.4:  Approval routes for utility corridors planning............. 6 Figure 4.14:  Stormwater collection corridors locations................ 16
Figure 3.5:  Utility corridors allocation arrangement Figure 4.15:  Desired stormwater flow directions......................... 17
cross section.............................................................. 7

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Figure 4.16:  Stormwater service and chamber Figure 4.39:  Typical House Connection arrangements
corridor offsets......................................................... 17 near to different foundation types. .......................... 35
Figure 4.17:  Example of a stormwater chamber under Figure 4.40:  Example of a House Connection Corridor in a
construction............................................................. 18 residential development........................................... 35
Figure 4.18:  Example of a stormwater gully. .............................. 18 Figure 4.41:  Typical House Connection arrangements.................. 35
Figure 4.19:  Example of stormwater curb inlet............................ 18 Figure 4.42:  Solid waste collection locations. ............................. 36
Figure 4.20:  Recommended corridor location for Figure 4.43:  Solid waste disposal and collection system
shallow stormwater mains....................................... 18 within a residential context...................................... 36
Figure 4.21:  Corridor location for subsurface drainage................. 18 Figure 4.44:  Example of a chamber access cover within a
Figure 4.22:  District Cooling corridors locations........................... 20 vehicle wheel track. ................................................ 38
Figure 4.23:  District cooling supply and return Figure 4.45:  Recommended positioning of chamber access........ 38
pipes spacing arrangement....................................... 21 Figure 4.46:  Examples of surface finishes and chamber access
Figure 4.24:  District Cooling service and chamber integration................................................................ 38
corridor offsets......................................................... 21 Figure 4.47:  Example of a utility marker in Abu Dhabi................. 38
Figure 4.25:  HV Power Transmission corridors locations. ............ 22 Figure 4.48:  Examples of above-ground appurtenance
Figure 4.26:  MV/LV Power Distribution corridors locations.......... 22 obstructions............................................................. 39
Figure 4.27:  Street Lighting corridors locations............................ 22 Figure 4.49:  Example of utility corridors in sikkak........................ 40
Figure 4.28:  Typical electrical and fibre optic cable spacing Figure 4.50:  Examples of sikkak in Abu Dhabi.............................. 40
arrangement............................................................. 23 Figure 4.51:  Illustration of transmission lines in a Boulevard
Figure 4.29:  Shared Street Lighting/tree corridor......................... 24 for Power and Water................................................ 41
Figure 4.30:  Minimum utility corridor arrangement for
Access Lane adjacent to a primary substation......... 25 Chapter 5 - Utility Corridors Arrangements
Figure 4.31:  Telecommunication corridors locations.................... 26
Figure 5.1:  Utility corridors arrangement main components........ 2
Figure 4.32:  Telecommunication duct spacing requirements....... 27
Figure 4.33:  Telecommunication service and chamber
corridor offsets......................................................... 27
Chapter 6 - Junctions, Transitions and Special
Arrangements
Figure 4.34:  Shared Telecommunication corridor......................... 27
Figure 4.35:  Fibre Optic corridors locations. ................................ 28 Figure 6.1:  Example of utility corridors arrangements at an
Figure 4.36:  Typical fibre optic duct formations in Access Lane/Access Lane junction............................. 3
chambers and along corridors.................................. 30 Figure 6.2:  Example of electrical and signal cabinets at
Figure 4.37:  Gas supply corridors locations.................................. 32 an intersection........................................................... 4
Figure 4.38:  Tree corridor sharing with Street Lighting Figure 6.3:  Example of utility corridors arrangements at a
corridor and overlap with Irrigation Corridor............ 34 Boulevard/Boulevard junction.................................... 4

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Figure 6.4:  Example of utility corridors arrangements at a
Street/Avenue roundabout......................................... 5
Figure 6.5:  Example of a grade separated junction,
Sultan Bin Zayed the First Street, Abu Dhabi.............. 6
Figure 6.6:  Example of transitioning of utility corridors at
a T-junction............................................................... 6
Figure 6.7:  Example of transitioning of utility corridors at a
junction leg or longitudinal Street expansion.............. 7
Figure 6.8:  Typical utility arrangement within a utility tunnel...... 8
Figure 6.9:  Example of wet utilities in a utility tunnel.................. 9
Figure 6.10:  Example of dry utilities in a utility tunnel................... 9
Figure 6.11:  Typical examples of utilities at bridges..................... 10
Figure 6.12:  Example of pedestrian underpass in a
City Bouvelard.......................................................... 11
Figure 6.13:  Example of a dedicated transit corridor for an
LRT in a Town Avenue.............................................. 12

Page v
List of Tables
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

Chapter 1 - Introduction Table 4.13:  District Cooling Corridors Allocation......................... 20


Table 4.14:  HV, MV/LV and Street Lighting Power
Table 1.1:  Stakeholders, Roles and Responsibilities.................... 5 Corridors Allocation.................................................. 23
Table 1.2:  Manual Overview....................................................... 6 Table 4.15:  Telecommunication Corridors Allocation.................. 26
Table 1.3:  USDM Street Typology Examples ............................... 9 Table 4.16:  Fibre Optic Corridors Allocation................................ 28
Table 4.17:  Fibre Optic Corridors Categories............................... 29
Chapter 4 - Utility Corridors Requirements Table 4.18:  Gas Supply Corridors Allocation................................ 32
Table 4.1:  Summary of Utility Corridor Location Rules............... 4
Table 4.2:  Summary of Utility Corridor Widths........................... 5 Chapter 5 - Utility Corridors Arrangements
Table 4.3:  Potable Water Corridors Requirements....................... 8 Table 5.1:  Summary of RoW Widths for Typical and
Table 4.4:  Potable Water Corridors Allocation............................. 8 Minimum Streets........................................................ 5
Table 4.5:  Water Supply Appurtenance Installation..................... 9 Table 5.2:  Typical Service Corridor Allocations –
Table 4.6:  Wastewater Collection Corridors Requirements....... 12 City Context................................................................ 6
Table 4.7:  Wastewater Collection Corridors Allocation.............. 12 Table 5.3:  Typical Service Corridor Allocations –
Table 4.8:  Irrigation Water Corridors Requirements................... 14 Town Context............................................................. 8
Table 4.9:  Irrigation Water Corridors Allocation......................... 14 Table 5.4:  Typical Service Corridor Allocations –
Table 4.10:  Stormwater Drainage Collection Corridors Commercial Context................................................. 10
Requirements........................................................... 16 Table 5.5:  Typical Service Corridor Allocations –
Table 4.11:  Stormwater Drainage Collection Corridors Residential/Emirati Neighbourhood Context............. 12
Allocation................................................................. 16 Table 5.6:  Typical Service Corridor Allocations –
Table 4.12:  District Cooling Corridors Requirements................... 20 Industrial Context..................................................... 14

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Page iv
List of Acronyms
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

AADC FE LV TRANSCO
Al Ain Distribution Company Falcon Eye Low Voltage Power Lines Abu Dhabi Transmission and Despatch Company
- Water and Electricity
AAM FO PE
Al Ain City Municipality Fibre Optics Polyethylene TS
Traffic Surveillance Fibre Optics
G PD
ADCO Gas Supply Power Distribution
Abu Dhabi Company for Onshore Oil Operations UCDM
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
HC PRDM
ADDC House Connection Abu Dhabi Public Realm Design Manual
Abu Dhabi Distribution Company UPC
Abu Dhabi Urban Planning Council
HS PT
ADM High Security Fibre Optics Power Transmission
Abu Dhabi City Municipality USDM
Abu Dhabi Urban Street Design Manual
HV RoW
ADNOC High Voltage Power Lines Right of Way WRM
Abu Dhabi National Oil Company
Western Region Municipality
IRR SL
ADSSC Irrigation Water Supply Street Lighting
Abu Dhabi Sewerage Service Company WD
ITS ST Potable Water Distribution
ADWEA Intelligent Traffic Systems Stormwater Drainage Collection
Abu Dhabi Water and Electricity Authority WW
MCC TAKREER
Wastewater Collection
DCP Monitoring and Control Centre Abu Dhabi Oil Refining Company
District Cooling
MOP TCS
DMA Maximum Operating Pressure
Department of Municipal Affairs Traffic Control System

DoT MV TEL
Department of Transport Medium Voltage Power Lines Telecommunications

Page vii
MANDATE OF THE ABU DHABI URBAN PLANNING COUNCIL

The Abu Dhabi Urban Planning Council was The Abu Dhabi Urban Planning Council
created by Law no. 23 of 2007 and is the ensures best practice in planning for both
agency responsible for the future of Abu new and existing settlements.
Dhabi’s urban and regional environments,
and the expert authority behind the The Abu Dhabi Urban Planning Council’s
visionary Plan Capital 2030 Urban Structure primary purpose is to deliver upon the vision
Framework Plan published in September of His Highness Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed
2007. Al Nahyan, President of the United Arab
Emirates and Ruler of Abu Dhabi, for the
Chaired by His Highness Sheikh Mohamed continued fulfillment of the grand design
bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Crown Prince of Abu envisaged by the late Sheikh Zayed bin
Dhabi, Deputy Supreme Commander of the Sultan Al Nahyan, Father of the Nation, and
UAE Armed Forces and Chairman of the the ongoing evolution of the Emirate of Abu
Abu Dhabi Executive Council, the Abu Dhabi Dhabi.
Urban Planning Council defines the shape of
human settlements in the Emirate, ensuring By drawing on urban planning expertise from
factors such as sustainability, infrastructure local Emiratis, throughout the Arab States
capacity, community planning and quality of of the Gulf, and around the world, the Abu
life, by overseeing development in the cities Dhabi Urban Planning Council strives to be
and in the Emirate as a whole. a global authority on the future of urban
planning and design.

Page viii

Part I
Context & Process

Chapter 1: Chapter 2: Chapter 3:


Introduction Goals and Benefits Utility Corridors
Selection and
Approval Routes

Introduces the purpose Presents the Manual's Offers a step-by-


of the UCDM. goals and benefits. step guide to the
development of utility
corridors arrangements
for both new streets
and infrastructure
retrofitting, and outlines
the approval routes.
Page 1
Chapter 1 - Introduction

1.1 Introduction
1.2 Purpose of the Manual
1.3 Geographical Jurisdiction
1.4 Applicability
1.5 Intended Users
1.6 Stakeholders
1.7 Manual Overview
1.8 Applying the Manual
1.9 Integration with Other Manuals
1.10 Standards vs. Guidelines
1.11 Design Flexibility
1.12 Manual Update
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 1 - Introduction

1.1 Introduction Moreover, it incorporates the findings of the UPC's


benchmarking study which compared current local Utility Corridors Considered in the UCDM
The Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual requirements to international standards and best
(UCDM) provides standards and guidelines for practices. WD Potable Water Distribution Corridor
planning and allocation of utility corridors for new
urban streets and the retrofitting of existing urban The Manual is a living document and will evolve over WW Wastewater Collection Corridor
streets in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. The Manual time in response to changes and the unique pace of
ensures utility corridors are designed and arranged development within the region. This updated version, IRR Irrigation Water Supply Corridor
to maximise the efficient use of space within a given UCDM Version 1.1, entirely supersedes the previous
right-of-way (RoW) width. version and is referred as ‘the UCDM’ or ‘the Manual’ ST Stormwater Drainage Collection/Inlet Corridor
in this document.
It is one of a suite of planning manuals prepared
by the Abu Dhabi Urban Planning Council (UPC) to DCP District Cooling Corridor
address the needs of the growing population and a
desire to create 'Complete Streets' that ensure more
1.2 Purpose of the Manual PT Power Transmission (HV) Corridor
comfortable, liveable and sustainable communities. The UCDM is a planning document intended to:
PD Power Distribution (MV, LV) Corridor
The Manual contains a concentration of agreed • Specify the location and widths of the corridors
stakeholder requirements with respect to utility for the various utilities as listed in Figure 1.1; SL Street Lighting Corridor
corridors. It has been produced in coordination with • Optimise the placement and installation of utilities
various stakeholders including, utility providers, the within limited RoW; TEL Telecommunication Corridor
Department of Municipal Affairs (DMA), Abu Dhabi
City Municipality (ADM), Al Ain City Municipality • Facilitate coordination among stakeholders TS Traffic Surveillance Fibre Optic Corridor
(AAM), Western Region Municipality (WRM), the through a 'common language'; and
Department of Transport (DoT), and other Government • Offer a step-by-step approach to the development HS High Security Fibre Optic Corridor
agencies within the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. of utility corridors arrangements.
G Gas Supply Corridor

TREE Tree Corridor

HC House Connection Corridor

Solid waste collection is also addressed.

Figure 1.1:  Utility corridors considered in the UCDM

Chapter 1 Page 2
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 1 - Introduction

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION WW WASTEWATER IRR IRRIGATION ST STORMWATER DCP DISTRICT COOLING PT POWER TRANSMISSION
PD POWER DISTRIBUTION SL STREET LIGHTING TEL TELECOMMUNICATION TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE HS HIGH SECURITY G GAS

TREE TREE HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Chapter 1 Page 3
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual Urban Structure Fram
Plan

Chapter 1 - Introduction
Urban Structure Fra
4.3.1 lAnd USE FrAmEwork
commerce
Mixed Use - Retail Area
Mixed Use - Office Area
Mixed Use - Hotel / Reso
Mixed Use - Special Tou

1.3 Geographical Jurisdiction 1.4 Applicability


Mixed Use - Light Indus

employmeNt
Industrial
High Tech / Clean Indus

For the purposes of this Manual, utility corridors The utility corridor standards and guidelines in this
civic / iNstitutioNa
Government
Police / Post / Municipal

include all utilities within the new and existing Manual apply to:
Health Care
University / College / Hig
Special University Zone
Cultural

urban areas of the Emirate as defined in the maps commuNity


Religious

contained in Plan Capital 2030, Plan Al Ain 2030 • All streets as identified in the Abu Dhabi Urban School

resideNtial

and Plan Al Gharbia 2030 (referred to as the '2030 Street Design Manual (USDM) within new urban
High-Density Residentia
Medium-Density Reside
Low-Density Residential

developments; and
Palace / Dignitary Land

Plans'), as indicated in the extracts in Figure 1.2. opeN space / recrea


Parks / Improved Open

Where ambiguity arises regarding the jurisdiction of


Oasis / Heritage Open S

• Existing streets where retrofitting is required.


Cemetery
Recreation / Amenity / S

a particular street, for instance when highways run


Natural Open Space
Forest / Woodland / She
Farms / Agriculture
Archeological Site

through urban areas or when urban streets transition The Manual covers utility corridor selection. It does
Desert Reserve
Desert Reserve / Aquifer

onto rural roads, the UPC should be consulted for


other

not cover the design of utility networks (e.g. layout,


Utility / Infrastructure
Wadi

clarification on the application of this Manual.


Roads

sizing, depth, etc.).


Urban Growth Boundar
Dam Walls
International Border
Note: These plans represent themes to
further planning and design. Land use
and exact alignments in all areas are co
subjected to detailed evaluation and co
0 5 10 20km no circumstances should these plans b
1:50,000 @ 1.27 m x 0.9 m Paper size N directives for specific sites or areas.

Plan Al Ain City 2030 Land Use Framework

Knowing the UCDM Scope Limits


The UCDM:
33 Defines utility corridor arrangements (i.e.
locations and widths)
33 Provides design options
The UCDM does not:
´´ Apply to rural roads
´´ Apply to urban highways
´´ Cover utility network design or network design
approvals

Plan Capital 2030 Land Use Framework Plan Al Gharbia 2030 Main Settlements

Figure 1.2:  2030 Plans for Abu Dhabi Emirate

Chapter 1 Page 4
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 1 - Introduction
1.5 Intended Users Table 1.1:  Stakeholders, Roles and Responsibilities

The UCDM is applicable to all organisations and Regulatory Agencies


professionals involved in the planning, design, Regulate and approve
construction, maintenance and approval of utilities in Abu Dhabi Urban Planning Council (UPC) Department of Municipal Affairs (DMA)
new and existing urban streets.
Municipalities
Implement, review and approve
1.6 Stakeholders Abu Dhabi City Municipality (ADM) Western Region Municipality (WRM)
Al Ain City Municipality (AAM)
Table 1.1 identifies the various stakeholders and
describes their roles with regards to application of the Utility Providers
UCDM. Implement
Abu Dhabi Distribution Company (ADDC) Emirates Telecommunication Corporation (Etisalat)
Abu Dhabi National Oil Company Distribution (ADNOC Distribution) General Directorate of Civil Defense (ADCD)
Abu Dhabi Sewerage Services Company (ADSSC) General Headquarters of Abu Dhabi Police (GHQ)
Abu Dhabi Signal Corps Monitoring and Control Centre (MCC)
Abu Dhabi Transmission and Despatch Company (TRANSCO) National Emergency Crisis and Disasters Management Authority
(NCEMA)
Abu Dhabi Water and Electricity Authority (ADWEA)
Relevant departments within ADM, AAM and WRM
Al Ain Distribution Company (AADC)
District Cooling Providers (e.g. Tabreed)
Department of Transport (DoT)
Emirates Integrated Telecommunications Company PJSC (du)

Oil & Gas Companies


Implement
Abu Dhabi Company for Onshore Oil Operations (ADCO) Abu Dhabi Oil Refining Company (Takreer)
Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC)

Other Agencies
Enforce implementation
Center of Waste Management Abu Dhabi (TADWEER) Telecommunications Regulatory Agency (TRA)
Regulation and Supervision Bureau (RSB)

Others
Apply
Consultants Developers
Contractors

Chapter 1 Page 5
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 1 - Introduction

1.7 Manual Overview Table 1.2:  Manual Overview

The UCDM is organised into three parts: Part I: Context and Process
Chapter 1: Introduction
• Part I defines the context and utility corridor
Introduces the purpose of the UCDM, its jurisdiction limits, intended users and integration with other manuals.
selection;
• Part II provides the bulk of the Manual’s design Chapter 2: Goals and Benefits
standards and guidelines needed to develop Presents the UCDM's goals and highlights the cost savings and other benefits of using the Manual.
efficient utility corridor arrangements; and
Chapter 3: Utility Corridors Selection and Approval Routes
• Part III provides typical and minimum utility Offers a step-by-step guide to the development of utility corridors arrangements and outlines the approval routes.
corridors arrangement cross sections and plans
and supporting material.
Part II: Utility Corridors Design
Chapter 4: Utility Corridors Requirements
1.8 Applying the Manual Provides utility corridor width and location requirements for each utility and includes a summary of utility corridor
The development of utility corridors arrangements requirements, application rules and limits.
is achieved through the application of the step-by-
Chapter 5: Utility Corridors Arrangements
step guide for both new and existing urban streets
Provides the utility corridors cross section composition and presents various cross section arrangements for different
presented in Chapter 3. The step-by-step guides
Land Use Contexts and Street Families, as defined by the USDM.
consider the utility corridors width and location
requirements presented in Chapter 4 and the Chapter 6: Junctions, Transitions and Special Arrangements
preferred arrangements in Chapter 5. Sample projects Illustrates utility corridors arrangements at junctions and transitions, and special details including tunnels, bridges,
are provided in Appendices A and B. underpasses and dedicated transit corridors.

The UCDM not only covers preferred arrangements


Part III: Supporting Materials
based on the most common requirements but also
allows flexibility for development of customised Appendices
solutions. A - Sample Project for New Streets
B - Sample Project for Infrastructure Retrofitting
Throughout the manual, important information related C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangements
to utility corridors is highlighted in a green box. D - Minimum Utility Corridor Arrangements
E - Definitions
Unless otherwise stated, all dimensions are illustrated F - References
in millimeters (mm).
Acknowledgements

Chapter 1 Page 6
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 1 - Introduction

1.9 Integration with Other


Manuals UPC
The UCDM and other UPC manuals, including the Manuals:
USDM & PRDM
USDM and the Abu Dhabi Public Realm Design
Manual (PRDM), are complementary documents used UPC
together for the development of Complete Streets, Development Estidama
which are designed and built to accommodate all Codes PRS
users in a safe and comfortable manner. Figure 1.4
illustrates the zones of a typical RoW (plot boundary
to plot boundary) that make up a Complete Street.

The UCDM shall be used in conjunction with relevant


manuals, engineering and environmental standards UCDM DMA
developed by other entities in the Emirate of Abu DoT
Dhabi, as illustrated in Figure 1.3. During the detailed Standards and
Engineering Manuals Guidelines
design of utilities, UCDM principles should not be
compromised.

The UCDM shall supersede and replace all portions


of utility providers’ standards and guidelines Utility Others
pertaining to utility corridors width and location, Providers International
which may be in conflict with the material Design Guidelines Best Practice
contained herein.

Note: This is for illustrative purposes only and is not an exhaustive list of all relevant manuals
in Abu Dhabi.

Figure 1.3:  The UCDM and other manuals

Chapter 1 Page 7
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 1 - Introduction

1.9.1 Integration with the USDM and PRDM PRDM PRDM USDM PRDM
To support the implementation of the 2030
framework plans for the three Municipalities in the
Emirate of Abu Dhabi, the USDM was developed
to guide the transition of the Emirate's streets

Development Code

Development Code
toward a more multi-modal, walkable, low carbon
future. The purpose of the USDM is to implement a
balanced approach to the design of all urban streets
in Abu Dhabi and to ensure a safe environment for
pedestrians, cyclists, transit riders, motor vehicle
drivers and passengers.

The USDM was created to design streets that respond


to adjacent land uses and anticipated travel demand.

Boundary

Boundary
Whereas the USDM defines suitable street cross
sections to respond to surrounding land uses, the

Plot

Plot
UCDM considers utility corridors within them.

The UCDM provides standards and guidelines for the UCDM


allocation (width and location) of utility corridors
within the Street Type described in the USDM and Figure 1.4:  Integration of UCDM, USDM and PRDM for a Complete Street
identified in Table 1.3. Urban streets are subdivided
into five Land Use Contexts and four Street Families to The public realm includes all external spaces and
then identify the Street Type (e.g. City Boulevard). linkages that are physically and/ or visually accessible
regardless of ownership. These elements include
The USDM indicates the various elements for each Streets, Pedestrian and Cyclist paths, Bridges, Transit
Street Type, along with their minimum width Hubs, Gateways, Parks, Gardens, Waterfronts, Natural
requirements and maximum allowable widths on features, View Corridors, Landmarks, Squares, Plazas
each cross section. Using these criteria and the street and Building Interfaces.
element dimensions, the RoW for each Street Type is
established in the USDM and adopted in the UCDM.

While the USDM provides the dimensions and


placement of street elements, the PRDM provides
design guidance and performance criteria for
landscaping and other streetscape finishings .

Chapter 1 Page 8
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 1 - Introduction

Table 1.3:  USDM Street Typology Examples

Land Use Context

Street
City Town Commercial Residential/Emirati Industrial
Family
(5 storeys +) (3–5 storeys) (1–3 storeys) Neighbourhood
(1–3 storeys)

Boulevard

Avenue

Street

Access Lane

Chapter 1 Page 9
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 1 - Introduction

1.11 Design Flexibility 1.12 Manual Update


The RoWs of the various streets illustrated in the Updates from version 1.0 to 1.1 includes:
1.10 Standards vs. Guidelines UCDM (Chapter 5) represent the preferred typical
The design standards presented throughout this arrangements for utility corridors allocation, in line • Graphical enhancements to align with the USDM
Manual are mandatory requirements for utility with the typical street element widths defined in the • Refinement of the step-by-step utility corridor
corridors design in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. USDM. selection process

• Standard: In addition, minimum cross sections are also provided • Description of retrofitting expanded
for each Street Type indicating absolute minimum • Provision of worked samples
Look for the words ‘shall’ or ‘shall not’, and required RoW to facilitate utility corridors allocation.
‘must’ or ‘must not’. Also look for the words The total RoW, as developed using the USDM, shall The UCDM is considered a living document and will be
‘is required’ or ‘are required’. not be less than these minimum sections. updated as new data, experience with its application
in Abu Dhabi and best practices from around the
• Guideline: Within these arrangements, utility corridors may world become available.
Look for the words ‘should’ or ‘should not‘. be adjusted (e.g. making use of spare corridors or
The words ‘preferred’, ‘encouraged’ or switching corridor location) in accordance with the Suggestions or comments may be sent to
‘recommended’ may also be used. limitations presented in the Manual. upc.ucdm@upc.gov.ae.

Prescribed options or optional treatments use Except for those conditions identified in the UCDM,
the words ‘may’ or ‘may not'. the RoW of the streets shall not be increased based
on increasing the utility corridor widths.

Except for those conditions identified in the UCDM, the RoW of the streets shall not
be increased based on increasing the utility corridor widths.

Chapter 1 Page 10
Chapter 2 - Goals and Benefits

2.1 Introduction
2.2 Manual Goals
2.3 Benefits of USDM/UCDM Implementation
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 2 - Goals and Benefits

2.1 Introduction 2.2 Manual Goals 2.3 Benefits of USDM/UCDM


This chapter introduces the goals and the benefits of With the forgoing principles as a basis, the following Implementation
the UCDM, which has been developed in response to UCDM goals aim to encourage efficient utility A cost-benefit analysis was undertaken by the UPC
the following overarching principles: corridors allocation as a part of Complete Streets: of the Al Saad Emirati Housing development in Al
Ain, which examined the impact of implementing
• Utilities are an integral part of the urban street; • Establish and standardise utility corridors
the standards and guidelines established in its
requirements within the RoW;
• Well-designed utility networks help create manuals. Some of the resulting benefits of successful
sustainable cities; • Help coordinate all stakeholders requirements and implementation of the USDM and UCDM standards
optimise approval time; and guidelines are highlighted in the following
• Land for urban RoWs is a limited resource and
paragraphs.
should be efficiently managed; • Provide consistency of design;
• Public streets are three-dimensional corridors; • Contribute to creating a more sustainable and safe
2.3.1 Improved Coordination
community;
• Utility corridors design should reflect the goals of
The UCDM stimulates and encourages coordination
the 2030 Plans for Abu Dhabi Emirate; and • Reduce land take and ease operation and
among stakeholders by integrating into one document
maintenance;
• Utility corridors design should support Estidama all utility corridor requirements within the RoW, as
principles. • Support the Emirate’s economic development; and defined by the USDM. These manuals also provide a
• Minimise the detrimental visual impact of utlities common, unifying terminology for all users.
on the Public Realm.

The utility corridors allocation within the UCDM


balances the above goals through an integrated design
approach.

A cost benefit analysis showed a strong correlation between application of


the standards and guidelines presented in these manuals and cost savings on
construction, replacement, repair and maintenance.

Chapter 2 Page 2
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 2 - Goals and Benefits

This improved coordination allows the following 2.3.2 Reduced Land Take The analysis also showed a strong correlation
benefits: between application of the standards and guidelines
Conventional approaches to utility corridors selection
presented in these manuals and cost savings on
• Improved understanding of roles and typically place less emphasis on the direct impact
construction, replacement, repair and maintenance.
responsibilities; on RoW land take and the resulting land costs. The
Manual encourages all stakeholders to adopt standard
• More efficient planning and development of utility corridor widths while still meeting all urban 2.3.3 More Liveable Communities
streets; street requirements. The reduction in land take and the focus on creating
• Expedited project delivery and reduced project Complete Streets result in a safer, more walkable
delays; The cost-benefit analysis for the development studied
community. The narrower RoWs allow for the
indicated a significant reduction (up to 26%) on
• Promotion of consistent policies to facilitate creation of inviting public spaces and an improved
RoW land take. This highlights the benefits that may
harmony among stakeholders; and Pedestrian Realm, as illustrated in Figure 2.1.
be achieved through applying these standards and
• Provision of cost-effective engineered solutions guidelines to new developments, through additional
which are suitable for the local conditions. land becoming available for investment.

Figure 2.1:  Example of a Complete Street in a residential development in Abu Dhabi

Chapter 2 Page 3
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 2 - Goals and Benefits

Chapter 2 Page 4
Chapter 3 - Utility Corridors Selection and Approval Routes

3.1 Introduction
3.2 New Streets
3.3 Infrastructure Retrofitting
3.4 Approval Routes
3.5 Preparation of Utility Corridors Plans and
Cross Sections
3.6 UCDM Exception Solutions
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 3 - Utility Corridors Selection and Approval Routes

3.1 Introduction 3.2 New Streets Select the closest applicable utility corridors cross
section for the identified street, which has been
This chapter presents step-by-step guides for the For the development of utility corridor arrangements developed using the USDM and contains street
development of utility corridors arrangements, in new streets, the following four steps may be elements which may include: Travel Lanes, Frontage
namely for: applied as shown in Figure 3.2: Lanes, Cycle Tracks, etc., as demonstrated in Figure
3.1. This selection is based on matching the Street
• New streets, which are those included in Master Step I: Understand the Master Plan/Project. Type and the configuration of these elements.
Plans and Projects as defined in the UPC's Urban
Development Review Process; and Develop a thorough understanding of the Master Step IV: Adjust and Finalise Utility Corridors
Plan/Project based on urban and transportation
• Infrastructure retrofitting, which may include
planning requirements. Finalise the utility corridors cross sections
upgrades, additions, replacement or other
modifications to utilities in existing streets, as arrangements, adjusting where necessary within
Step II: Confirm Utilities Requirements the RoWs in accordance with the location rules and
may be required.
corridor width requirements.
Develop utility network plans, in accordance with
An overview of the UCDM's integration with the utility providers’ specifications.
approval process is presented and the exception Utility corridor plans for a network of streets may be
process is outlined. developed by repeating Steps III and IV for each street.
Step III: Select Closest Applicable UCDM Cross Section A sample project demonstrating the use of these
Arrangement steps is included in Appendix A.

Land Use Context Street Family

TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL/EMIRATI NEIGHBOURHOOD ACCESS LANE TYPICAL CITY/TOWN/COMMERCIAL ACCESS LANE TYPICAL INDUSTRIAL ACCESS LANE

Street
Elements

Figure 3.1:  Typical Access Lane cross sections for different Land Use Contexts

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Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 3 - Utility Corridors Selection and Approval Routes

Master Plan and Utility Requirements Development of Utility Corridor Arrangements

Step I: Step II: Step III: Step IV:


Understand the Master Plan/ Confirm Utility Requirements Select Closest Applicable UCDM Adjust and Finalise Utility
Project • Develop utility network plans, Cross Section Arrangement Corridors
• Consider the following influences: considering: • Identify a particular street to be • Adjust selected UCDM cross section to
|| Land Use Context || Utilities required developed. suit street configuration.*
|| Plot use || Utility demand • Consider the street configuration and • Confirm that corridor widths satisfy the
External utility connections widths, for example: utility requirements from Step II.
|| Community facilities ||

Utility plot allocation || Overall RoW • Utility corridors may be adjusted in


|| Transport planning ||

|| Travel Lane accordance with:


|| Street family
|| Frontage Lane || Location rules (Table 4.1)
|| Cycle Track/Sidewalk || Corridor width table (Table 4.2)
|| Parking

References: References: References: References:


• USDM and other planning manuals • USDM and other planning manuals • UCDM Table 5.1 • UCDM Tables 4.1 and 4.2
• Utility providers' specifications

Utility corridor plans for a network of streets may be developed by repeating Steps III and IV
for each street.
Notes:
* If a USDM 'typical street' configuration is used, adjustment of utility corridors may not be required (refer to Chapter 5 for further details).
1. The development of utility corridor arrangements is most efficient when the street and Pedestrian Realm design follow the USDM and PRDM respectively.
2. Utility network design is subject to utility provider approval. For any given utility network design, larger utilities generally should be allocated to wider Street Families, in line with corridor widths provided in the Manual.

Figure 3.2:  Step-by-step guide for utility corridors arrangements for new streets

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Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 3 - Utility Corridors Selection and Approval Routes

3.3 Infrastructure Retrofitting • To promote efficiency and minimise disruption, Step III: Develop Cross Section of Existing Streets
multiple retrofit activities should be carried
In addtion to applying to new streets, the utility out together, where possible, including street Develop a cross section to include all existing
corridor standards and guidelines described in this retrofitting configuration as required; street elements (including street furniture), utilities
Manual shall be applied to infrastructure retrofitting. (including type, size and location) and existing surface
• Approval by all relevant stakeholders, including
finishes based on as-built and site survey data.
Retrofitting design solutions shall be developed on a utility providers, is required for infrastructure
case-by-case basis and are dependent on the specific retrofitting; and Step IV: Select Closest Applicable UCDM Cross Section
identified retrofitting objectives and the existing and • When installing new utilities as part of Arrangement
planned street configuration and utility requirements. infrastructure retrofitting, adherence to this
Manual should not be the primary cause of Select the closest applicable utility corridors cross
Infrastructure retrofitting objectives of utility relocating other existing utilities. section for the identified existing street, which may
upgrades, additions, replacement or other contain street elements, including Travel Lanes,
modifications may result from: Where installation of a new utility is not possible Frontage Lanes, Cycle Tracks, etc. This selection
without relocating existing utility, and all other is based on matching the Street Type and the
• A change in land use; solutions, including alternative routes, have been configuration of the street elements with the UCDM
• Additional utility demands; explored, full technical justification for the proposed cross sections.
relocation(s) is required.
• A need for new pipes, cables or ducts, etc.; or Step V: Adjust and Finalise Utility Corridor Retrofit in
• Retrofit of existing streets (to provide more Travel Optimal Location
3.3.2 Step-by-Step Guide to Infrastructure
Lanes or Parking, etc.) Retrofitting Finalise the utility corridors cross sections
For the development of infrastructure retrofitting arrangements, incorporating both existing utilities
3.3.1 Infrastructure Retrofitting Principles of utility corridors arrangements in existing streets, and proposed retrofitted utilities. Adjustments should
The following principles shall be applied, where the following five steps may be applied as shown in be made, where necessary, within the RoWs in
possible, when carrying out infrastructure retrofitting: Figure 3.3: accordance with the location rules and corridor width
requirements.
• Utility corridor widths and locations presented in Step I: Understand Land Use Context
this Manual should be followed; Utility corridor plans for a network of streets may be
Develop a thorough understanding of the existing and developed by repeating Steps III, IV and V for each
• New utilities shall be installed adjacent to existing change in cross section/street.
planned land uses.
utilities (in accordance with location rules) to
avoid compromising future spare corridors; Step II: Identify Infrastructure Retrofitting Objectives A sample project demonstrating the use of these
• Where space is available under the Pedestrian and Confirm Utility Requirements steps is included in Appendix B.
Realm, the placement of utilities under Travel
Lanes or Parking should be avoided, unless these Develop utility network plans for utilities to be
street elements are being reworked as part of a retrofitted, in accordance with retrofitting objectives
street retrofitting scheme; and utility providers’ specifications.

Chapter 3 Page 4
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 3 - Utility Corridors Selection and Approval Routes

Land Use and Utility Requirements Development of Utility Corridor Arrangements

Step I: Step II: Step III: Step IV: Step V:


Understand Land Use Identify Infrastructure Develop Cross Section of Select Closest Applicable Adjust and Finalise Utility
• Data collection and analysis Retrofitting Objectives Existing Streets UCDM Cross Section Corridors Retrofit in
(e.g. collection of as-builts, and Confirm Utility • Identify a particular street to be Arrangement Optimal Location
determination of utility
Requirements developed. • Consider the street configuration • Adjust selected UCDM
capacities and condition). and widths, including cross section to suit street
• One or more utilities may require • Draft cross section of existing
• Consider the following Overall RoW configuration.*
upgrade, addition, replacement or street, including: ||
influences: • Consider existing constraints,
other modification for a variety || Existing utilities || Travel Lane
|| Land Use Context of reasons, including: including:
|| Existing street elements || Frontage Lane
|| Plot use || A change in Land Use || Space available between
|| Proposed street elements, || Cycle Track/Sidewalk
|| Community facilities Additional utility demands any two utilities
||
as applicable and in || Parking
|| Transport planning || A need for more Travel accordance with the || Utility corridor allocation
|| Street Families Lanes or Parking USDM rules
|| A need for new pipes, || Existing surface finish
ducts or cables • Consider priority of placement
• Develop Utility Network Plans (e.g. space in Sidewalk).
for utilities to be retrofitted, • Utility corridors may be adjusted
considering: in accordance with:
|| Utility demand || Location rules (Table 4.1)
|| External utility connections || Corridor width table (Table
|| Utility plot allocation 4.2)

References: References: References: References: References:


• USDM and other planning manuals • USDM and other planning manuals • Output from Step I and Step II • UCDM Table 5.1 • UCDM Tables 4.1 and 4.2
• Utility providers' specifications

Utility corridor plans may be developed by repeating Steps III, IV and V for each change in cross section/street.
Notes:
* If a USDM 'typical street' configuration is used, no adjustment should be required (see Chapter 5 for further details).
1. To promote efficiency and minimise disruption, stakeholders installations likely to be impacted by retrofitting activities should be consulted and, where possible, multiple improvement works should be carried out as one
project.
2. The development of utility corridors arrangement is most efficient when the street and Pedestrian Realm design follow the USDM and PRDM respectively.
3. Utility network design is subject to utility provider approval. For any given utility network design, larger utilities should be allocated to wider Street Families, in line with corridor widths provided in the Manual.

Figure 3.3:  Step-by-step guide for the development of infrastructure retrofitting of utility corridors arrangements in existing streets

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Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 3 - Utility Corridors Selection and Approval Routes

3.4 Approval Routes which consists of two stages: Concept and Detailed 3.4.2 Existing Streets
submissions. The Urban Development Review Process
The UCDM is used for utility corridors allocation Utility corridors allocation within existing streets is
covers both Master Plan and Project developments:
during the planning stages of new streets as part of reviewed as part of Infrastructure Retrofitting (as
the UPC Urban Development Review Process, and also • Master Plans are developments that may consist described in Section 3.3), which follows NOI and NOC
for existing streets (infrastructure retrofitting) as part of multiple buildings with street networks and processes for the applicable Municipality (ADM, AAM
of the Municipalities’ Notice of Intent (NOI) and No community facilities. and WRM).
Objection Certificate (NOC) Processes.
• Projects consist of a single building, or multiple In developing the utility corridors allocation, every
The development type and approval process route for buildings with a connected podium, with no road effort shall be made to abide by the procedures
utility corridors allocation is highlighted in Figure 3.4. networks. A Project may, however, be bounded by and requirements as defined by the Town Planning
adjacent streets. departments of the applicable Municipality.
Utility corridors allocations must be submitted in line Submissions will be assessed against the
3.4.1 New Streets requirements and flexibility of the UCDM. Request
with the submission requirements of the Utilities
Utility corridors allocation for new streets is section of the Urban Development Review Stream. For for exceptions from the UCDM requirements may be
reviewed as part of the UPC Urban Development details, visit www.upc.gov.ae. passed by the applicable Municipality to the UPC for
Review Process (Urban Development Review Stream) approval.

Utility Corridors
Development Type Approval Route
Allocation Planning

Urban Planning
Master Plans and Council
New Streets Projects (Urban Development
Review Process)

Municipality
Town Planning
Infrastructure
Existing Streets Retrofitting (NOI and NOC
Processes)

Figure 3.4:  Approval routes for utility corridors planning

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Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 3 - Utility Corridors Selection and Approval Routes

3.5 Preparation of Utility RESIDENTIAL STREET - 20.0 m RoW


Corridors Plans and Cross
Sections
Preparation of output for utility corridors allocation, as
part of submissions for the approval routes identified
in Section 3.4, should include:

• Utility corridor allocation plans that adopt the


appropriate location, width and colour coding for
each utility corridor. These shall be provided in GIS
format in accordance with the UPC’s GIS section
‘Spatial Data Submission Specifications’ and the
Department of Municipal Affairs (DMA) ‘Utility
Corridor Mapping Specifications'; and
• Utility corridor cross sections that show the
location and width of the ‘service’ and ‘chamber’
corridors for each utility, including offset
dimensions, and identifying spare corridors.
Figure 3.5:  Utility corridors allocation arrangement cross section
An example utility corridors allocation arrangement
Manual, shall be adopted. There may however be Applications submitted through the approval routes
cross section is shown in Figure 3.5.
a limited number of instances where an alternative identified in Section 3.4 for Master Plans, Projects or
solution for the utility corridors or arrangements may Infrastructure Retrofitting that include an exception
be required. must be accompanied by technical justification for
3.6 UCDM Exception Solutions deviation from the Manual (e.g. demonstration of
The utility corridor requirements outlined in this These may include: specific hydraulic requirements and the calculation of
Manual are intended to cover all utilities being number of required cables)
• Smaller or larger utility corridor widths based on
installed in urban areas throughout the Emirate of
specific known pipe diameters/cable array; Wherever a particular corridor from the utility
Abu Dhabi. Using these requirements, a selection of
typical utility corridors allocation arrangements have • Where spare/unused corridors are required for corridors allocation arrangements provided in this
been developed to account for the majority of Street other utilities; or Manual is not required, the unused corridors shall be
Types encountered. Refer to Chapter 5 for further maintained as a ‘spare corridor’.
• A change in the overall RoW based on utility
details.
corridor needs.
In developing utility corridors allocation arrangements, Innovative solutions/exceptions, therefore, may be
the utility corridors requirements, as specified in this considered to address these special exceptions.

Chapter 3 Page 7
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 3 - Utility Corridors Selection and Approval Routes

Chapter 3 Page 8

Part II
Utility Corridors Design

Chapter 4: Chapter 5: Chapter 6:


Utility Corridors Utility Corridors Junctions, Transitions
Requirements Arrangements and Special
Arrangements

Provides a definition Defines and provides Offers design guidance


of the various utility utility corridors cross for corridors at specific
corridors. It also section compositions locations.
provides a summary and presents various
of utility providers' cross section
corridor requirements, arrangements for
location rules and different Land Use
widths. Contexts and Street
Page 3 Families.
Chapter 4 - Utility Corridors Requirements

4.1 Introduction
4.2 Summary of Utility Corridor Location Rules and Widths
4.3 Utility Corridors Requirements
4.4 Solid Waste Collection
4.5 Utility Depths of Cover
4.6 Integration of Utilities within Complete Streets
4.7 Sikkak
4.8 Considerations for Additional Lines
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 4 - Utility Corridors Requirement

4.1 Introduction 4.1.1 Utility Corridor Locations 5. Staggering of chambers: Where feasible,
staggering of chambers with adjacent utilities (refer
This chapter sets out the utility corridor requirements Factors governing the location of utility corridors
to Figure 4.2) should be adopted to optimise the
for each utility (refer to Figure 1.1). The two main within the RoW (plot boundary to plot boundary)
placement of utility corridors.
factors which influence the development of utility include:
corridors are:
1. Type of network: For example, some utilities, In the event that a wider RoW is required as a
1. Utility corridor location such as Power, require immediate access if damage result of the street design in accordance with
to a cable occurs. Consequently, these utilities are the USDM, utilities may be relocated away from
2. Utility corridor width. normally placed under sidewalks and/or block paved the Traveled Way to under the Pedestrian Realm
surfaces. using the following order of priority, based
A summary of location rules and widths (refer to on operations and maintenance requirements
Section 4.2) is provided together with a breakdown 2. Street composition: That is, Street Elements within (including frequency of access):
of requirements for each utility (refer to Section the Traveled Way, Frontage Lane or Pedestrian Realm.
4.3), including a description of integration of utilities For example, certain utilities may be installed under • Power Distribution
within Complete Streets (refer to Section 4.6). a Travel Lane, whereas other utilities may be better
• Telecommunication
placed under a Furnishing, Edge or Through Zone.
• District Cooling
Utility Plots: such as GSM towers, primary 3. Frequency of access: The impact that repeated
substations, pumping stations, wastewater • Stormwater
access may have to utility providers, motor vehicles
vacuum stations and district cooling plants shall and transit users should be minimised during • Wastewater
be located on dedicated plots away from the operation and maintenance activities;
RoW. • Fibre Optics
4. Horizontal clearance: • Gas

|| Minimum horizontal clearance between


certain utilities (e.g. to prevent cross -
contamination between wet utilities). Table 4.1 summarises the location of all utility
corridors and presents the associated location rules.
|| Minimum horizontal clearance from plot
boundary, (e.g. to maintain minimum
required safe distances from plots for the
main gas network).

Two factors influence the development of utility


corridors arrangements: namely location and width.

Chapter 4 Page 2
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Chapter 4 - Utility Corridors Requirement

4.1.2 Utility Corridor Widths • The service corridor is dedicated for the installation Figure 4.2 illustrates the efficient development of utility
of the utility, (e.g. pipes, cable and duct arrays). The corridors when UCDM standards are applied. Table 4.2
Each utility corridor comprises both a service corridor
service corridor width is based on the size of a utility summarises the service corridor and chamber corridor
and a chamber corridor, as illustrated schematically in
for a given Street Family and the horizontal clearance widths for each utility.
Figure 4.1.
required from the utility to the edge of service
corridor. Utility corridors with UCDM standards not applied
Service
• The chamber corridor is dedicated for the installation
of chambers (e.g. manholes and inspection pits for
the respective utility). The chamber corridor width is
based on the size of the respective chamber width,
which can vary according to utility size and purpose
of the chamber.
• 'dmin' represents the minimum offset permitted
between the edges of a service corridor and the
Chamber edges of its corresponding chamber corridor. dmin No shared space between Utility Corridor Utility Corridor
is based on the chamber standard details for each chamber corridors
utility.
Wherever possible, the chamber corridors of any two Utility corridors with UCDM standards applied
adjacent utilities shall overlap to share a common space
Space
facilitated by staggering the chambers. The chamber Saved
corridor of one utility must not protrude into the adjacent
service corridor. To retain flexibility in design, the width
of the shared space is limited to the smaller of the two
dmin dmin.

As mentioned in Chapter 2, an appreciable reduction


Service Corridor in land take within the RoW may be achieved when
applying the UCDM in conjunction with the USDM, as
Chamber Corridor
Chamber Corridor compared with previous practice in the Emirate of Abu Shared space between
Chamber Corridor
chamber corridors
Dhabi. This results from: S.Corridor S.Corridor
Figure 4.1:  Schematic representation of a service
and a chamber corridor • Defining utility corridor widths specific to each Street
Family; and Figure 4.2:  Indicative comparison between
All corridor widths and offsets (dmin) have been applying and not applying UCDM standards
• Sharing of space within the RoW due to staggering of
developed in conjunction with the respective utility chambers for different utilities.
providers and are based on their requirements.

Chapter 4 Page 3
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 4 - Utility Corridors Requirement

4.2 Summary of Utility Corridor Location Rules and Widths


Table 4.1:  Summary of
Utility Corridor Location
Rules
Desirable location
Alternative location

Side 1 Middle Side 2

Utilities Frontage Lane Traveled Way Frontage Lane


Pedestrian
Pedestrian Realm Travel Travel
Parking
Side/
Median Curb/Travel Lane(s) Median Curb/Travel Lane(s)
Side/
Median
Parking Realm
Lane Lane
House Connection (1)
Potable Water (2)
Wastewater (3,4)
Irrigation (5)
Stormwater (3, 4)
Stormwater Inlet (6)
District Cooling (7)
Power - HV (8)
Power - LV / MV (9)
Street Lighting / Trees (10)
Telecommunication (11)
High Security /
Traffic Surveillance (12)
Combined Fibre Optics [12]
Gas (13)
(1) A 1000 mm unobstructed corridor shall be retained for House Connection chambers only (no longitudinal services (6) Stormwater Inlet shall be located either on Parking/Travel Lane at edge of curb and preferably integrated within the
are permitted in this corridor). curb as part of Sidewalk or Side Median.
(2) Potable Water corridors shall be located on either side of the RoW. Potable Water shall always be the first corridor (7) District cooling corridors are typically located under Travel Lanes. They may also be located under the Pedestrian
after the House Connection corridor. Realm, if space permits.
A minimum of 1000 mm horizontal clearance shall be maintained from Wastewater or Irrigation to the Potable (8) Power transmission corridors shall only be located in Medians along Avenues and Boulevards.
Water service corridors. This clearance may be reduced to 800 mm if another utility corridor separates the two (9) Where Power Distribution corridors are located under Parking or Frontage Travel Lanes, interlocking pavers shall be
service corridors. used.
Potable Water pipelines shall be installed at a higher level than Wastewater and Irrigation pipelines with a minimum (10) Street Lighting shall share corridor with trees, where required.
vertical clearance of 300 mm. (11) Telecommunication corridors shall be shared by the Telecommunications providers and be located under the
(3) Wastewater and Stormwater mains are typically located under Travel or Frontage Lanes. They may also be located Pedestrian Realm or under Parking, if interlocking pavers are used.
under the Pedestrian Realm, if space permits. (12) High Security (HS) and Traffic Surveillance (TS) fibre optic lines shall be located under Medians (or close to them)
(4) Where pressurised Wastewater or Stormwater mains are required, they shall be installed within separate corridors along Avenues and Boulevards.
under the Pedestrian Realm, or parking if interlocked pavers are used. (13) Gas corridors shall be located under Travel Lanes or Medians to satisfy the minimum horizontal clearance from
(5) Irrigation corridors shall preferably be located adjacent to the tree corridor, where applicable. building edges.
Chapter 4 Page 4
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 4 - Utility Corridors Requirement
Table 4.2:  Summary of Utility Corridor Widths

Page Boulevard Avenue Street Access Lane


Utilities Corridors
no.
Side 1 Middle Side 2 Side 1 Middle Side 2 Side 1 Side 2 Side 1 Side 2
Service 1000 - 1000 1000 - 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000
House Connection 35
Chamber 1000 - 1000 1000 - 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000

Service 1000 - 1800 (1300) 1000 - 1300 (1000) 1000 1000 1000 1000
Potable Water 8
Chamber 1500 - 2700 (2200) 1500 - 2200 (1500) 1500 1500 1500 1500
2300 2300
Service 1050 - 1050 - 1050 (0) 1050 1050 -
[1800/1550/1050]) (1800/1550)
Wastewater 12
4000 4000
Chamber 2000/2800 - 2000 - 2000 (0) 2000 2000 -
(3200/2800/2000) (3200/2800)
Service 1300 (900) 700 700 700 1100 (700) 700 700 700 - 700
Irrigation 14
Chamber 2200 (1900) 700 700 700 2000 (700) 700 700 700 - 700

Service 3000 (1500) - 1500 2500 (1050) - - 1500 (1050) - 1050 (750) -
Stormwater 16
Chamber 3000 (2300) - 2300 2500 (2000) - - 2300 (2000) - 2000 (750) -

Service - 3100 (2600) - - 2000 - - 1500 - 1500


District Cooling 20
Chamber - 4100 (3500) - - 3100 - - 2300 - 2300

Service - 2 x 2000 - - 2000 (0) - - - - -


Power - HV 22
Chamber - 2 x 2000 - - 2000 (0) - - - - -

Service 6000 4000 3000 2000


Power - LV / MV 22
Chamber 6000 4000 3000 2000

Service 1500 (1000) 1500 (1000) 1500 (1000) 1500 (0) 1500 (1000) 1500 (0) 1500 (700) 1500 (0) 1500 (500) -
Street Lighting / Trees 22+34
Chamber 1500 (1000) 1500 (1000) 1500 (1000) 1500 (0) 1500 (1000) 1500 (0) 1500 (700) 1500 (0) 1500 (500) -

Service 1200 (800) - 1200 (800) 800 - 800 800 800 (0) 800 (500) 800 (0)
Telecommunications 26
Chamber 2000 (1500) - 2000 (1500) 1500 - 1500 1500 1500 (0) 1500 (1200) 1500 (0)

High Security / Service - 700/500 - - 700/500 - - - - -


28
Traffic Surveillance Chamber - 1200/1000 - - 1200/1000 - - - - -

Combined Fibre Service - 700 - - 700 - - - - -


28
Optics Chamber - 1200 - - 1200 - - - - -

Service - 1500 - - 1500 - 1000 - 1000 -


Gas 32
Chamber - 1500 - - 1500 - 1000 - 1000 -

Notes: All widths shown in the above summary table are in mm and shall be read in conjunction with the respective utility requirements presented in Section 4.3.
All new street RoWs shall be developed in conjunction with this Manual and Table 5.2 of the USDM.
The values light grey in brackets [ ] are absolute minimum corridor widths and are to be used only where the standard corridor dimensions cannot be met. Technical justification will be require should any of these absolute minimum
corridor widths be adopted.

Chapter 4 Page 5
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 4 - Utility Corridors Requirement

4.3 Utility Corridors Requirements


The summaries of utility corridor location rules and
widths, as shown in Tables 4.1 and 4.2 respectively,
are further expanded in the following subsections.
These provide requirements for each utility to assist
with effective utility corridor selection.

The user guide presented in Figure 4.3 illustrates the


various components considered within each utility
subsection.

Corridor Location Diagrams


Provides guidance on the desirable location for each relevant utility
corridor.

Utility Providers' Requirements Table


Provides dimensions based on utility providers' requirements. These
are for reference information only to demonstrate the source of
information used to develop utility corridor allocation tables.
Figure 4.3:  Chapter 4 user guide

Corridor Allocation Table


Provides the required service and chamber corridor widths for
each Street Family, including the absolute minimum widths
which are to be used only in specific situations where RoW
width restrictions exist.

All corridors are shown as being under Side 1, Middle or Side 2


to define the number and side of utility corridors required within
each Street Family.
Side 1 Middle Side 2

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Service Corridor and Chamber Corridor Widths


Provides a description on the required service and chamber corridors
widths in relation to each respective utility provider's requirements.

Service Corridor and Chamber Corridor Offsets (dmin)


Illustrates the minimum offsets between the edges of service and chamber
corridors for each corridor combination.

Special Arrangements
Provides a description of any special arrangements, which may be
considered during the development of utility corridors cross sections
and plans.

Corridor Location
Provides a description of the utility corridor location requirements
based on the type of network, street composition, horizontal clearance,
etc.

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4.3.1 Potable Water Distribution Corridor

Required horizontal separation


Under the Pedestrian Realm, adjacent Under a Travel Lane with WW not maintained
to House Connection Corridor
Not the first utility after HC

HC WD WD HC WW WD WD WW HC

Figure 4.4:  Potable Water corridors locations

Table 4.3:  Potable Water Corridors Requirements Table 4.4:  Potable Water Corridor Allocation

Utility Providers' Street Family


Requirements* Service Chamber Corridor Type Boulevard Avenue Street Access Lane
Corridor Corridor
Pipe Trench width width Side 1 Middle Side 2 Side 1 Middle Side 2 Side 1 Side 2 Side 1 Side 2
Diameter Width (mm) (mm)
(mm) (mm)
150 700 Service Corridor (mm) 1000 - 1800 1000 - 1300 1000 1000 1000 1000
200 800 1000 1500 [1300] [1000]
300 900
400 1000
500 1200 1300 2200
Chamber Corridor (mm) 1500 - 2700 1500 - 2200 1500 1500 1500 1500
600 1300
[2200] [1500]
700 1400
800 1500 Note: Values shown in brackets [ ] denote the minimum required corridor widths where the RoW is limited.
1800 2700
900 1600 A summary of utility corridor widths for each utility is provided in Table 4.2.
1000 1800
*For reference information only.

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Potable Water Corridor Locations Potable Water Corridor Widths


1500
The first utility corridor after the House Connection Potable water pipe diameter depends on potable 1000
corridor shall always be reserved for potable water, water demands, Land Use, Street Family, proximity
on both sides of the street. As such potable water to pumping stations, reservoirs, etc. Potable water S. Corridor
chambers may overlap with the House Connection service corridors are generally based on the pipe
corridor. Potable water may not be installed under diameters required to satisfy the demand. In general, Chamber Corridor

Travel Lanes. larger pipes and the resulting corridors are expected
to run within the larger streets.
To reduce the risk of contamination, a minimum 2200
horizontal clearance of 1000 mm shall be maintained Potable water chambers shall be located within the 450 1300
between the potable water and any wastewater or chamber corridors and be in accordance with ADWEA/
irrigation service corridors. This clearance can be TRANSCO/ADDC/AADC requirements. Service Corridor
reduced to 800 mm if another utility separates the
two service corridors. It is recommended that individual valve chambers Chamber Corridor
be used for each branch of intersecting pipes or
Potable water corridor location requirements are T-Connections, as shown in Figure 4.5 to avoid large
illustrated in Figure 4.4. chambers obstructing other utility corridors.

Potable water corridor requirements and width 2700

allocations are presented in Tables 4.3 and 4.4. 450 1800

Service corridor and chamber corridor offsets (dmin) Service Corridor


Combined valve chamber for each of the Potable Water Corridor combinations
are illustrated in Figure 4.6. Chamber Corridor

Figure 4.6:  Potable Water service and chamber


Table 4.5:  Water Supply Appurtenance Installation
corridor offsets
Individual valve chambers
Chamber Type Chamber Location
Potable Water Special Arrangements
District Meters Open areas *

Washout Chambers Parks/open areas The majority of potable water chambers can be
located within the allocated chamber corridor. Where
Figure 4.5:  Combined vs. individual valve Plot Bulk Connections Within plot boundary**
this is not possible and special arrangements are
chambers Plot Flow Meters Within plot boundary
required, they shall be located as indicated in Table
* Where the district meters need to be installed within the street 4.5.
RoW, a localised widening of the street RoW may be considered.
** While providing access for ADWEA/ADDC/AADC maintenance. For TRANSCO potable water lines, refer to Section 4.8.

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4.3.2 Fire Fighting Water Corridor

Within tree corridors Too close to curb edge


without protection

WD WD

Figure 4.7:  Fire hydrant locations

Fire Fighting Water Corridor Widths and Locations Fire Hydrants

In general, the Fire Fighting Water network is Fire hydrants shall be located within the Pedestrian
combined with the potable water network. In Realm, for example within the tree/street lighting
instances where a separate dedicated fire fighting corridor, and positioned such that pedestrian
water main is required by the relevant authorities, movement is not obstructed. Figure 4.8, illustrates an
service and chamber corridor widths shall be based example of such obstruction.
on potable water corridor allocations, and be placed
adjacent to the potable water supply corridor within Fire hydrants shall be clearly visible, marked with
the Pedestrian Realm, as illustrated in Figure 4.7. In approved signage and their positioning shall not block
certain cases, this may require increasing the overall emergency access routes. The number, location and
Pedestrian Realm width. specification of external fire hydrants shall be in
accordance with the requirements of the General
In certain situations, the Fire Fighting Network may Directorate of Civil Defense of Abu Dhabi.
be combined with the Irrigation network. In this case,
the Irrigation corridor allocations shall be followed. Fire Fighting Water Special Arrangements

The majority of Fire Fighting water chambers can be Figure 4.8:  Example of poor placement of fire
located within the allocated chamber corridor. Where hydrant and signage causing obstructed pedestrian
this is not possible and special arrangements are movement
required, they shall be located as indicated in Table
4.5.

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4.3.3 Wastewater Corridor

May be permitted within Permissible under Under the Pedestrian Realm in


Directly next to
Pedestrian Realm if space Travel Lanes preference to Power Distribution
Potable Water
is not allocated to other
utilities

WW WW WD WW PD WW WD

Figure 4.9:  Wastewater collection corridors locations

Table 4.6:  Wastewater Collection Corridors Requirements Table 4.7:  Wastewater Collection Corridors Allocation

Utility Providers' Street Families


Requirements* Service Chamber Corridor Type Boulevard Avenue Street* Access Lane
Corridor Corridor
Pipe Trench width width Side 1 Middle Side 2 Side 1 Middle Side 2 Side 1 Side 2 Side 1 Side 2
Diameter Width (mm) (mm)
(mm) (mm)
200 500
300 600 1050 - 1050 - 2300 1050 1050 1050 -
Service Corridor (mm) 2300
[1800/ [0]
400 800 1050 2000 [1800/
1550]
500 930 1550]
600 1050
700 1180
2000 - 4000 2000 2000 2000 -
800 1300 2000 - 4000/
1550 2800 Chamber Corridor (mm) [3200/ [0]
900 1400 [3200/
2800]
2800]
1000 1550
1200 1800 1800 3200 Note: Values shown in brackets [ ] denote the minimum required corridor widths where the RoW is limited.
1400 2050 A summary of utility corridor widths for each utility is provided in Table 4.2.
2300 4000 * Wastewater corridors may be combined to form a larger single wastewater corridor if required.
1600 2300
*For reference information only.

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Wastewater Corridor Locations expected discharges from the specific building usage Wastewater Special Arrangements
along the streets, the service and chamber corridor
Wherever placement of a wastewater corridor under widths on one side only may suffice (i.e. merging Wastewater corridor allocations presented in this
the Pedestrian Realm or Parking is not feasible, it may two wastewater pipelines into one single pipeline Manual are based on gravity pipelines. Where
be placed under Travel Lanes, as illustrated in Figure within one corridor may be considered). pressurised pipes are required, they should be located
4.9. When placed under Travel Lanes, wastewater in the larger streets as additional corridors and placed
chamber access covers shall be placed close to the Wastewater corridor requirements and width away from the Travel Lanes.
centre of the Travel Lane for the reasons explained allocations are presented in Tables 4.6 and 4.7.
under Section 4.6.2. The resultant corridor widths may have an implication
Service and chamber corridor offsets (dmin) for each of on the overall RoW, which may require adjusting,
A minimum horizontal clearance of 1000 mm shall be the wastewater corridor combinations are illustrated depending on the type of system (e.g.pressure or
maintained between the wastewater service corridor in Figure 4.10. vacuum system).
and any potable water service corridor. This clearance 2000

can be reduced to 800 mm if a third utility separates 400 1050 In certain cases, the allocated corridor for gravity
the two service corridors. wastewater pipelines may be used for pressurised
S. Corridor
pipelines.
Similar to stormwater and district cooling networks, Chamber Corridor

the wastewater network shall be installed during the For developments where a wastewater vacuum
early stages of construction of infrastructure works 2800
system is adopted, the vacuum pipelines in
to avoid disruption to the Travel Lane surface finish. 400 1550
normal circumstances would take the place of the
allocated wastewater corridor.
Wastewater Corridor Widths Service Corridor

Chamber Corridor
The associated pumping/vacuum station shall be
The wastewater pipe diameter depends on the
installed on a dedicated plot away from the RoW
wastewater flow, which in turn depends on the
3200 and according to ADSSC requirements.
Land Use Context as well as the Street Family and
proximity to pumping stations. Wastewater service 400 1800

corridor width requirements are generally based on Service Corridor


pipe diameters, where larger pipes and their resulting
Chamber Corridor
corridors are expected to run within larger streets.

Wastewater chambers shall be located within the


4000
chamber corridors and be in accordance with ADSSC
2300
requirements. 600

Service Corridor
In some instances where the RoW is limited, and
Chamber Corridor
taking into consideration the Land Use Context and
Figure 4.10:  Wastewater service and chamber
corridor offsets.

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4.3.4 Irrigation Corridor

Directly next to Potable Water Under Travel Lanes


Away from Potable Water Adjacent to tree corridor

WD IRR IRR WD WD IRR IRR

Figure 4.11:  Irrigation water supply corridors locations

Table 4.8:  Irrigation Water Corridors Requirements Table 4.9:  Irrigation Water Corridors Allocation

Utility Providers' Street Families


Requirements* Service Chamber Corridor Type Boulevard Avenue Street Access Lane
Corridor Corridor
Pipe Trench width width Side 1 Middle Side 2 Side 1 Middle Side 2 Side 1 Side 2 Side 1 Side 2
Diameter Width (mm) (mm)
(mm) (mm)
150 500 Service Corridor (mm) 1300 700 700 700 1100 700 700 700 - 700
200 550 700/900 700/1900 [900] [700]
300 680
400 1000 1100 2000
500 1200
1300 2200 Chamber Corridor (mm) 2200 700 700 700 2000 700 700 700 - 700
600 1300
[1900] [700]
700 1400
800 1500 Note: Values shown in brackets [ ] denote the minimum required corridor widths where the RoW is limited.
Exceptional cases
900 1600 A summary of utility corridor widths for each utility is provided in Table 4.2.
1000 1800

*For reference information only.

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Irrigation Corridor Locations Irrigation service corridor Tree/Street Lighting corridor 700

The number of irrigation corridors depends on the


S. Corridor
Street Family and the number of landscape strip/tree
corridors required. C. Corridor

A minimum horizontal clearance of 1000 mm shall 1900

be maintained between the irrigation service corridor 250 900


and any potable water service corridor. This clearance Figure 4.12:  Example of an Irrigation chamber
can be reduced to 800 mm if a third utility separates overlapping a Tree/Street Lighting corridor S. Corridor
the two service corridors.
Chamber Corridor

Irrigation corridors include: Irrigation Corridor Widths

• Primary corridors: provided either in the Irrigation pipe diameters depend on the landscape 2000

Pedestrian Realm or within the Median; scheme, which may vary from one Land Use Context 250 1100

• Secondary corridors: generally provided next to to another. Since irrigation systems within urban
landscaping strip/tree corridors areas are generally based on a localised area network, Service Corridor
the maximum pipe diameter of these systems
A separate corridor is not required for tertiary typically does not exceed 600 mm. Chamber Corridor

irrigation pipelines (e.g. shallow or at surface drip/


sprinkler networks that are installed within the tree Irrigation chambers shall be located within the
corridor and landscape areas, as required). chamber corridors and be in accordance with local
2200

Municipality requirements. 250 1300


Potable water corridor location requirements are
illustrated in Figure 4.11. It is recommended that individual valve chambers be Service Corridor

used for each branch of intersecting irrigation pipes Chamber Corridor


In certain cases, the irrigation chamber corridor may or T-Connections to avoid large chambers obstructing
overlap with the tree/street lighting chamber corridor other utility corridors. Figure 4.13:  Irrigation water service and chamber
or the stormwater inlet chamber corridor. Figure 4.12 corridor offsets
illustrates an irrigation chamber overlapping with Irrigation corridor requirements and width allocations
an adjacent tree/street lighting corridor, away from are presented in Tables 4.8 and 4.9. Service and Irrigation Special Arrangements
street lighting cables. chamber corridor offsets (dmin) for each of the
irrigation corridor combinations are illustrated in Wherever chambers require special arrangements,
Figure 4.13. such as washout chambers, they should be located
within parks, landscaped areas or open spaces, where
possible.

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4.3.5 Stormwater Drainage Collection & Inlet Corridors

Under Pedestrian Realm Inlet away from curb


Under Travel Lanes Inlet next to the curb
in preference to Power
Distribution

ST inlet ST inlet ST inlet


WD ST ST WD WD ST PD

Figure 4.14:  Stormwater collection corridors locations


Table 4.10:  Stormwater Drainage Collection
Corridors Requirements Table 4.11:  Stormwater Drainage Collection Corridors Allocation

Utility Providers' Street Families


Requirements* Service Chamber Corridor Type Boulevard Avenue Street Access Lane*
Corridor Corridor
Pipe Trench width width Side 1 Middle Side 2 Side 1 Middle Side 2 Side 1 Side 2 Side 1 Side 2
Diameter Width (mm) (mm)
(mm) (mm)
200 500 Service Corridor (mm) 3000 - 1500 2500 - - 1500 - 1050 -
300 600 [1500] [1050] [1050] [750]
400 800 1050 2000
500 930
600 1050
Chamber Corridor (mm) 3000 - 2300 2500 - - 2300 - 2000 -
700 1180
[2300] [2000] [2000] [750]
800 1300 1500 2300
900 1400 Note: Values shown in brackets [ ] denote the minimum required corridor widths where the RoW is limited.
1000 1550 A summary of utility corridor widths for each utility is provided in Table 4.2.
1200 1800 *For Access Lanes the Stormwater Inlet Corridor may be used as the Stormwater Drainage Collection Corridor
2500 2500
1400 2050
1600 2300
1800 2550
3000 3000
2000 2800
*For reference information only

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Stormwater Corridor Location Stormwater Service and Chamber Corridor Width 2000

400 1050
Stormwater collection corridors include: Stormwater inlet corridors shall have a width of
1000 mm, except on Access Lanes where the width S. Corridor

• Stormwater inlets; and may be reduced to 750 mm. Chamber Corridor

• Stormwater carrier pipelines.


Pipe diameters depend on the Street Family and the
2300
Stormwater inlet corridors shall be located at the edge RoW width. It is encouraged to adopt stormwater
of the Pedestrian Realm curb edge to catch surface drainage from smaller to larger streets, where 400 1500

water drainage. Stormwater inlets include: topography and grading permit and as illustrated in
Service Corridor
Figure 4.15, in order to optimise the stormwater
• Gullies : grating installed flush with the pipeline design. Chamber Corridor

Travel Lane surfacing, with grating openings


perpendicular to the curb; and
• Curb inlets : integrated with the curb in the Stormwater flow direction: 2500

Median/Pedestrian Realm. Access Lane/


Street Service Corridor
Wherever placement of a stormwater carrier pipeline Avenue
Chamber Corridor
under the Pedestrian Realm or Parking is not feasible, Boulevard
it may be placed under Travel Lanes. When placed
under Travel Lanes, stormwater chamber access
3000
covers shall be placed close to the centre of the Travel
Lane for the reasons explained under Section 4.6.2.
Service Corridor

Similar to wastewater and district cooling networks, Chamber Corridor


the stormwater network shall be installed during the Figure 4.16:  Stormwater service and chamber
Figure 4.15:  Desired stormwater flow directions
early stages of construction of infrastructure works corridor offsets
to avoid disruption to the Travel Lane surface finish. Stormwater chambers shall be located within the
chamber corridors and be in accordance with local Service and chamber corridor offsets (dmin) for each of
Stormwater corridor locations are illustrated in Figure Municipality requirements. the stormwater corridor combinations are illustrated
4.14. in Figure 4.16.
Stormwater corridor requirements and width
allocations are presented in Tables 4.10 and 4.11.

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Figures 4.17, 4.18 and 4.19 illustrate typical Special Arrangements Where Pedestrian Realm design and RoW permit,
examples of a stormwater main chamber under the use of open channels (swales) for stormwater
construction, a stormwater gully and a stormwater A combined utility corridor for the stormwater carrier drainage within the Pedestrian Realm may be
curb inlet respectively. pipeline and inlet may be used for Access Lanes, if considered. In such instances, the swale location shall
required, due to space restrictions, not obstruct pedestrian and/or cyclist movements.
The swale may be located above utilities, in
Where technically viable, surface water flows from coordination with the applicable Municipality and
Access Lanes may drain into larger intersecting relevant utility providers.
streets and eliminate or reduce the need for lateral
stormwater carrier pipelines and inlets. In instances where a subsurface drainage system
is required to lower the groundwater, such
In instances where a shallow stormwater collection arrangements may be located within the stormwater
system is dictated by topography/gradients, the inlet corridor or soft landscaped areas, as illustrated in
stormwater corridor may be placed under the Figure 4.21. Connection of subsurface drainage to the
Pedestrian Realm along the curb edge, with the stormwater carrier pipeline may be made at regular
Figure 4.17:  Example of a stormwater chamber stormwater inlet corridor as illustrated in Figure 4.20. intervals and as required by the design.
under construction This is a common practice for areas with wadis.

Figure 4.18:  Example of a stormwater gully

Figure 4.20:  Recommended corridor location for Figure 4.21:  Corridor location for subsurface
shallow stormwater mains drainage

Figure 4.19:  Example of a stormwater curb inlet

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4.3.6 District Cooling Corridor

Under Pedestrian Realm


Under Travel Lanes in preference to Power
Distribution

PD
DCP DCP

Figure 4.22:  District Cooling corridors locations

Table 4.12:  District Cooling Corridors


Requirements Table 4.13:  District Cooling Corridors Allocation

Utility Providers' Street Families


Requirements* Service Chamber Corridor Type Boulevard Avenue Street Access Lane
Corridor Corridor
Pipe Trench width width Side 1 Middle Side 2 Side 1 Middle Side 2 Side 1 Side 2 Side 1 Side 2
Diameter Width (mm) (mm)
(mm) (mm)
up to 10" Service Corridor (mm) 3100 - - 2000 - - 1500 - 1500 -
(up to 1500 1500 2300 [2600]
250 mm)
12" - 18"
(300 mm - 2000 2000 3100
450 mm)
Chamber Corridor (mm) 4100 - - 3100 - - 2300 - 2300 -
20" - 30"
[3500]
(500 mm - 2600 2600 3500
750 mm)
Note: Values shown in brackets [ ] denote the minimum required corridor widths where the RoW is limited.
32" - 36"
(800 mm- A summary of utility corridor widths for each utility is provided in Table 4.2.
3100 3100 4100
900 mm)

*For reference information only.

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District Cooling Corridor Locations Similar to stormwater and wastewater networks, Service and chamber corridor offsets (dmin) for each
district cooling networks shall be installed during the of the district cooling corridor combinations are
District cooling corridors include two types of pipes early stages of construction of infrastructure works illustrated in Figure 4.24.
and their spacing requirements are illustrated in to avoid disruption to the Travel Lane surface finish.
Figure 4.23:
District cooling supply pipes require an insulation 2300
• Supply pipe; and to avoid temperature losses. The typical insulation 300 1500

• Return pipe thicknesses are :


S. Corridor
Wherever placement of a district cooling corridor • 50 mm for pipes with diameters less than 16"
Chamber Corridor
under the Pedestrian Realm or Parking is not feasible, (400 mm); and
it may be placed under Travel Lanes since the
• 75 mm for pipes with diameters equal or greater
frequency of maintaining district cooling pipelines is 3100
than 16" (400 mm).
lower than most of the other utilities. When placed 400 2000
under Travel Lanes, district cooling chamber access
District Cooling Corridor Widths
covers shall be placed close to the centre of the Travel Service Corridor
Lane for the reasons explained under Section 4.6.2. District cooling corridors are not typically allocated Chamber Corridor
for residential/Emirati neighbourhoods as it is not
generally economically and environmentally viable
due to lower density populations and buildings, as
3500
300 300 300
found in these areas.
400 2600

District cooling chambers shall be located within the


Service Corridor
chamber corridors and be in accordance with the
Supply Return relevant utility providers’ requirements. Chamber Corridor

District cooling corridor requirements and width


allocations are presented in Tables 4.12 and 4.13. 4100

400 3100

Figure 4.23:  District cooling supply and return Service Corridor

pipes spacing arrangement Chamber Corridor

Figure 4.24:  District Cooling service and chamber


corridor offsets

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4.3.7 Power Supply Corridors

Under Medians Under Travel Lanes Under The Pedestrian Realm

PT PT PT PT

Figure 4.25:  HV Power Transmission corridors locations

Under the Pedestrian Under interlocking


Realm in preference to pavers, including Under Travel Lanes Under Medians
gravity pipelines Parking

PD PD PD PD
WW

Figure 4.26:  MV/LV Power Distribution corridors locations

Under the Pedestrian


Realm or combined Under the Median Away from street Under Travel Lanes
with tree corridors lighting poles

SL SL SL SL SL

Figure 4.27:  Street Lighting corridors locations

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Power Corridor Locations these chambers to share with other utility chamber Medium and Low Voltage Power Distribution Corridor
corridors. Widths
The power supply corridors considered in this Manual
are: High Voltage Power Transmission Corridor Width MV/LV power distribution corridors shall be used for
33kV, 22 kV, 11 kV and 0.4 kV and should preferably
• High Voltage (HV) Power Transmission corridor HV power transmission corridors shall be used for 400 be located under the Pedestrian Realm if space is
[PT]: in Avenue or Boulevard Medians only; kV, 220 kV and 132 kV and shall be located under the available. Alternatively, they shall be located under
Median in Avenues and Boulevards only. Frontage Lanes or Parking bays, if interlocking pavers
• Medium and Low Voltage (MV/LV) Power
Distribution corridors [PD]: under the Pedestrian are used, to facilitate inspections and repair during
HV power transmission corridor widths shall maintenance operations.
Realm and Frontage Lanes or Parking bays, only if
accommodate the cables, joint pit, link box and joint-
interlocking pavers are provided; and
and-route markers. MV/LV power distribution cables and chambers
• Street Lighting corridor (SL): under the Pedestrian shall be located within a combined corridor and be
Realm or Medians, usually combined with tree HV power transmission chambers shall be located in accordance with ADWEA, ADDC, and/or AADC
corridors. within the chamber corridors and be in accordance requirements.
with TRANSCO requirements.
Power supply corridor locations are illustrated in Fibre optic cables shall be installed in separate ducts
Figures 4.25 to 4.27. Power corridor width allocations are presented in Table alongside power cables within the same corridor,
4.14. together with associated fibre optic chambers as
Chambers associated with power transmission and illustrated in Figure 4.28.
power distribution are located within the service The HV corridors may be used for 33 kV/MV in
corridor width and therefore it is not possible for instances where the 132 kV HV lines are not used.
Table 4.14:  HV, MV/LV and Street Lighting Power Corridors Allocation
Fibre optic cables Fibre optic junction box
Street Families
Corridor Width Boulevard Avenue Street Access Lane
(mm)
Side 1 Middle Side 2 Side 1 Middle Side 2 Side 1 Side 2 Side 1 Side 2
Power Transmission (HV)
Service/Chamber Corridor - 2 x 2000 - - 1 x 2000 - - - - -

Power Distribution (MV/


LV ) Service/Chamber 6000 4000 3000 2000
Corridor
Street Lighting/Tree
Service/Chamber Corridor 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 -
[1000/700] [1000) [1000/700] [1000/0] [1000] [1000/0] [1000/700] [1000/700) [1000/500]
Where feasible, electrical ducts
Note: Values shown in brackets [ ] denote the minimum required corridor widths where the RoW is limited. may alternatively be routed Electrical cables
A summary of utility corridor widths for each utility is provided in Table 4.2. through the junction box
For each Street Family, the power distribution corridor width is equal to the sum of all distribution corridors (i.e. may be split to several parts Figure 4.28:  Typical electrical and fibre optic cable
within the RoW).
spacing arrangement

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The number of cables and the resulting corridor width Street Lighting/Tree Corridors
for both MV and LV power distribution corridors
depends on Land Use Context and Street Family, Street lighting cables and chambers shall be located
electrical loads and the number of storeys per within the corridor allocated for trees. Street lighting
building, as outlined below: corridors shall be provided on one or both sides
of the street and in the Median, depending on the
• In City Contexts, most high-rise buildings are RoW width and the required street lighting design
expected to have their own substation and a high requirements.
proportion of the power distribution corridors are
expected to be for the MV type (i.e. 33 kV, 22 kV, At the root barrier/tree pit, street lighting cables shall
11 kV or 0.4 kV); be installed in ducts and arranged at the corridor edge
as illustrated in Figure 4.29. In general, root barriers
• In Town Contexts, while some buildings will
shall be provided on all trees adjacent to power
have their own substations, others will rely on
cables.
an off-site substation for their power supply
and consequently require an LV supply cable. Street lighting design is based on safety and security
street
Therefore, the power distribution corridors are root lighting
requirements and their location shall take precedence barrier cable
expected to be of both the MV and LV types; and over tree locations, should trees conflict with street
• In Residential/Emirati Neighbourhood Contexts, lighting poles.
1500
since most buildings/villas are limited in height, LV
power distribution is therefore primarily required. Street lighting cables and poles shall be installed in
accordance with the local Municipality requirements Figure 4.29:  Shared Street Lighting/Tree corridor
The spacing between MV power distribution cables and shall follow the LV power distribution
shall be 400 mm. Where necessary in specific requirements.
circumstances, the spacing may be reduced to
300 mm over short distances, subject to the relevant
utility providers' approval. Where 33kV cables are
used, the spacing shall be 500mm.

Similarly, the spacing between LV power distribution


cables shall be 300 mm and the spacing may be
reduced to 200 mm over short distances, where
necessary in specific circumstances, subject to the
relevant utility providers' approval.

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Special Arrangements for Substations Primary substation plots shall be equipped with Cross section A-A for Access Lane adjacent to Primary
Substation
separate inlets/sides for both power distribution and
Where possible, distribution substations shall be located transmission cables and include a setback for the
centrally to a development block along a sikka or an installation of distribution and transmission cables.
Access Lane, so as to distribute the loads to more than
one Street, Avenue or Boulevard and thus reduce the Whenever a grid station is required within or near
width of LV power distribution corridors. to a development, a HV power transmission corridor
shall be allocated to connect the grid station to
As illustrated in Figure 4.30, primary substations are other substations. Whenever more than one primary
typically located on Avenues or Boulevards, and shall substation is required within a development, they
include a service Access Lane or a sikka/mushtarak should be located on different Boulevards.
located on one or more of the other sides to facilitate
distribution of the multiple cable arrays.

Power Transmission Corridor Power Distribution Corridor

Access Lane

Street
Primary
Substation

Boulevard Sikka
Pedestrian

Travel Lane
Realm

Pedestrian
Median

Travel Lane

Realm

Note:
Figure 4.30:  Minimum utility corridor arrangement for Access Lane adjacent to a primary substation 1. For specific context, street elements shall be in accordance with
USDM minimum requirements.
2. District Cooling is not required for Residential/Emirati
Neighbourhood Contexts.
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4.3.8 Telecommunication Corridor

Under Parking if
Under the Median Under Travel Lanes when there is available
Under the Pedestrian Realm interlocking pavers
space under the Pedestrain Realm
are used

Tel Tel Tel Tel

Figure 4.31:  Telecommunication corridors locations

Table 4.15:  Telecommunication Corridors Allocation


Street Families
Corridor Type Boulevard Avenue Street Access Lane

Side 1 Middle Side 2 Side 1 Middle Side 2 Side 1 Side 2 Side 1 Side 2

Service Corridor (mm) 1200 - 1200 800 - 800 800 800 800 800
[800] [800] [0] [500] [0]

Chamber Corridor (mm) 2000 - 2000 1500 - 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500
[1500] [1500] [0] [1200] [0]

Note: Values shown in brackets [ ] denote the minimum required corridor widths where the RoW is limited.
A summary of utility corridor widths for each utility is provided in Table 4.2.

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Telecommunication Corridor Location Telecommunication Corridor Widths Special Arrangements

A common telecommunication corridor shall be The width of telecommunication service corridors Where more than one utility provider shares the same
provided for the telecommunications utility providers, are based on the number and size of ducts, the service corridor, separate chambers may be installed
of which there are currently two utility providers array arrangement, chamber sizes, duct spacing in accordance with the relevant utility providers'
operating in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. requirements, etc. as illustrated in Figure 4.32. requirements and as illustrated in Figure 4.34.

Telecommunication corridors are preferred to be Telecommunication corridor width allocations are Adequate facilities within the chambers, such as
located within the Pedestrian Realm. When space presented in Table 4.15. stepping arrangements or the provision of spare
does not permit, they may be located under Frontage ducts, etc. should be made to facilitate inspection
Lanes, Parking, or Travel lanes as illustrated in Figure Telecommunication chambers shall be located within during maintenance operations and if required, allow
4.31. the chamber corridors and be in accordance with the future telecommunication providers to share the
relevant utility providers’ requirements. same corridor.

Service and chamber corridor offsets (dmin) for each Chamber and
of the telecommunication corridor combinations are duct opening
Ducts provider B
illustrated in Figure 4.33. for provider B
100 mm 50 mm 100 mm

1500

250 800

Service Corridor

Chamber Corridor

Figure 4.32:  Telecommunication duct spacing


2000
requirements
250 1200

Service Corridor
Chamber and
Ducts provider A
Chamber Corridor duct opening
for provider A
Figure 4.33:  Telecommunication service and chamber
corridor offsets
Figure 4.34:  Shared Telecommunication corridor

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4.3.9 Fibre Optic Corridors

Under the Pedestrian


Under the Pedestrian Realm in preference to
Under Travel Lanes Under the Median
Realm in preference to Telecommunication and
near to the Median
pressure pipelines Power Distribution

HS TS HS WD Tel PD TS

Figure 4.35:  Fibre Optic corridors locations

Table 4.16:  Fibre Optic Corridors Allocation

Street Families

Corridor Type Boulevard Avenue Street Access Lane

Side 1 Middle Side 2 Side 1 Middle Side 2 Side 1 Side 2 Side 1 Side 2

HS Service Corridor - 500 - - 500 - - - - -

HS Chamber Corridor - 1000 - - 1000 - - - - -

TS Service Corridor - 700 - - 700 - - - - -

TS Chamber Corridor - 1200 - - 1200 - - - - -

HS/TS Service Corridor - 700 - - 700 - - - - -

HS/TS Chamber Corridor - 1200 - - 1200 - - - - -

A summary of utility corridor widths for each utility is provided in Table 4.2.

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Fibre Optic Corridor Locations Table 4.17:  Fibre Optic Corridors Categories Combined Fibre Optic Corridors

Two separate dedicated fibre optic corridors are Fibre Optic Line Types Separate chambers along the combined fibre optic
Purpose Key
considered: TCS ITS ADP SC FE corridor shall be provided for each utility provider. In
High order to limit access within the HS and/or combined
HS
• High Security (HS); and Security HS/TS chambers, HS fibre optic ducts passing
• Traffic Surveillance (TS). through a chamber maintained and operated by
Traffic TS a TS provider shall be encased in concrete, thus
Surveillance
The fibre optic networks within these two corridors preventing accidental damage to nearby HS fibre optic
include, but are not limited to: Combined HS/TS
ducts. However, concrete encasement for TS fibre
optic ducts is not required when installed in HS/TS
• TCS (Department of Transport – Traffic Control chambers.
System);
Figure 4.36 illustrates three typical duct formations
• ITS (Department of Transport – Intelligent Fibre Optic Corridor Widths
within HS,TS and HS/TS chambers and trenches.
Telecommunication System);
The width of fibre optic service corridors are based
• ADP (Abu Dhabi Police – CCTV system); Special Arrangements
on the number and size of ducts, array arrangement,
• SC (Signal Corps); and chamber sizes and duct spacing requirements, etc. Where a HS and/or TS corridor is required on a Street
Fibre optic corridor width allocations are presented or Access Lane, in particular where a police station
• FE (Monitoring and Controlling Centre or MCC– in Table 4.16. Fibre optic chambers shall be located
Falcon Eye system). or the Government of Abu Dhabi Civil Defense facility
within the chamber corridors and be in accordance is located/planned, the Street or Access Lane RoW
with the Department of Transport's and the relevant may be increased to accommodate the HS and/or TS
Table 4.17 illustrates to which corridor category these
utility providers’ requirements. corridor, if required. The ADP, Signal Corps and MCC
fibre optic networks belong (i.e. HS or TS corridor).
shall be approached during the early planning stages
HS and TS fibre optic cables shall be installed in to incorporate their requirements within the smaller
Avenues and Boulevards. In instances where the RoW streets.
of the Avenue and/or Boulevard is limited, whereby
two independent corridors cannot be accommodated, Where poles are required to carry HS or TS equipment,
HS and TS fibre optic cables may be combined into these shall be located along the corridor dedicated for
one single corridor, designated as 'HS/TS'. street lighting/trees and take precedence over trees.
When located within the street lighting/tree corridor,
Fibre optic corridor locations for HS and TS are a minimum of two encased spare ducts shall be
illustrated in Figure 4.35. provided within the HS,TS or HSTS chambers as well
as within pole foundations to secure passage for the
street lighting cables.

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Concrete encasement

Concrete encasement

Concrete encasement
Typical ADP/DoT/Municipality Typical ADP/DoT chamber
Typical ADP chamber
chamber (plan view)
(plan view)
(plan view)

Typical HS fibre optic chamber Typical TS fibre optic chamber Typical HS/TS fibre optic chamber

dian dian
dian Me

e
Me

Lan
Me
e

e
an

an
lL

vel
lL
ve

ve

Tra
Tra

Trench Trench

Tra
Trench

Typical HS fibre optic duct formation in corridor Typical TS fibre optic duct formation in corridor Typical HS/TS fibre optic duct formation in corridor

Figure 4.36:  Typical fibre optic duct formations in chambers and along corridors ADP SC Concrete encasement

TCS/ITS FE

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4.3.10 Gas Corridor

Under the Pedestrian


Realm in preference to
Under Travel Lanes Within the Median other utilities Too close to buildings

Maintaining horizontal clearance


from buildings G PT G G PD G
Maintaining horizontal clearance from HV cables

Figure 4.37:  Gas supply corridors locations

Table 4.18:  Gas Supply Corridors Allocation


Street Families
Corridor Width Boulevard Avenue Street Access Lane
(mm)
Side 1 Middle Side 2 Side 1 Middle Side 2 Side 1 Side 2 Side 1 Side 2

Service/Chamber Corridor 1500 1500 1000 - 1000 -

A summary of utility corridor widths for each utility is provided in Table 4.2.

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Gas Corridor Locations Gas Corridors Widths Special Arrangements

For safety reasons, the following minimum proximity Gas service and chamber corridor width requirements For gas corridors, the following guidance should be
distances should be maintained from building edge to are generally based on pipe diameters. The required followed:
gas service corridor, where possible, and as illustrated pipe diameter depends on the gas demand, which in
in Figure 4.37: turn depends on the land use context as well as the • Where a steel gas pipeline is required in a
Street Family. Larger gas pipelines are generally found development, a separate gas corridor should be
• For Polyethylene (PE) gas mains (Maximum in Boulevards and Avenues. considered, in addition to the PE gas corridor;
operating pressure (MOP) 4 bars):
• Where a gas pressure reducing station is required
Gas corridor width allocations are presented in Table
|| 5000 mm for pipe diameters up to 315 mm; in a development, a dedicated utility plot should
4.18.
be allocated at the connecting point between the
|| 8000 mm for pipe diameters more than
high pressure gas pipeline and the selected gas
315 mm; and Chambers associated with gas pipelines are located
distribution network tie-in; and
within the service corridor width and therefore it is
• For steel gas mains (MOP 16 bars): 13000 mm for
not possible for these chambers to share with other • During the installation of gas pipelines, spare duct
all pipe diameters.
utility chamber corridors. sleeves shall be provided transverse to the street
A minimum clear distance of 2000 mm shall be to facilitate the installation of future gas house
Gas chambers shall be located in accordance with connection crossings.
maintained between gas service corridor and HV
ADNOC Distribution’s requirements.
power transmission or MV power distribution
corridors. Where LV power distribution cables are
used, this may be reduced to 400 mm.

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4.3.11 Tree Corridors

Tree Corridor Location Service Corridor Width Requirements


Tree/SL Corridor separate from Irrigation Corridor
A Tree Corridor consists of an irrigable landscape strip For tree corridor widths, the following requirements
and may include trees or other types of landscaping. should be followed:
General guidance on the types of landscaping used
in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi and the impact that Tree • Trees (excluding palm trees), not sharing with
Corridors may have on street design are provided in street lighting equipment: 1000 mm
the PRDM and USDM respectively. In all cases, Tree • Trees (including palm trees), sharing with street
Corridors shall be placed either in the Pedestrian lighting equipment: 1500 mm
Realm or/and the Median as required.
Tree/SL IRR Tree/SL IRR The relationship between the street lighting and tree
Trees may be installed in their own corridor or share corridor is illustrated in Figure 4.38. Where space is
with the street lighting corridor as illustrated in 1500 700 1000 700 limited, the tree/street lighting corridor may overlap
Figure 4.38, in which case the street lighting corridor 2200 1700 with the irrigation corridor as shown.
requirements shall be followed. Similarly, tree
corridors may share with the Irrigation Corridor. Tree/SL Corridor overlapping with Irrigation Corridor

Above-ground appurtenances such as street lighting


poles, fire hydrants, utility cabinets etc. may be
installed within the Tree Corridors.

Tree/SL Corridor overlapping with Irrigation Corridor 4.3.12


Tree/SL IRR Tree/SL IRR 4.3.13 House Connection Corridor
1500 1000
700 700
2000 1500

Figure 4.38:  Tree corridor sharing with street lighting corridor and overlap with Irrigation corridor

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4.3.12 House Connection Corridor
electrical cabinets, telecommunication cabinets, etc.
provided they are aligned with the Pedestrian Realm
An unobstructed horizontal clearance of 1000 mm shall design and do not obstruct plot access or movement
be maintained as a house connection corridor between within the Pedestrian Realm.
each plot boundary (or edge of RoW) and the first utility
Plan
adjacent to it. Chambers located within this corridor shall View
be limited to those relating to house connections only
(e.g. inspection, valve, meter chambers, etc.).

Figure 4.39 illustrates examples of two unobstructed


House Connection Corridor scenarios, in relation to plot
boundary wall foundations and the edge of the RoW.
House Connection
Corridor

Plot Boundary
RoW Figure 4.40:  Example of a House Connection
Plot Boundary

Corridor in a residential development Section A-A


Connection
Connection

Corridor
Corridor

House connection corridors shall not be used for laying


House
House

utilities longitudinally (i.e. along the corridor alignment,


as this limits placement of house connection chambers
for other utilities and may result in an increase of the Plot HC Pedestrain Realm Travel Way
total RoW width).
HC WD WD HC
For utility crossings, priority shall be given to gravity
networks as their installation is limited by gradient
requirements and invert levels. Where required, Section B-B
adequately sized sleeves (e.g. ducts) shall be installed
transverse to the main network to facilitate future
house connections.
Figure 4.39:  Typical House Connection
arrangements near to different foundation types Figure 4.41 illustrates typical house connection
arrangements in plan and cross section. As shown, it
The House Connection Corridor shall extend to the plot may be possible for a single house connection chamber
boundary, regardless of the plot wall configuration. In to serve two plots. The placement of house connection
accordance with UPC's Development Codes, foundations chambers within plot boundaries is encouraged,
of walls/buildings should not obstruct utility corridors, subject to utility providers’ acceptance, and
including the House Connection Corridor unobstructed maintenance access must be provided. Figure 4.41:  Typical House Connection
House connection corridors may also be used to locate arrangements
Figure 4.40 illustrates an example of house connections
above-ground appurtenances, such as feeder pillars,
in a residential development

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4.4 Solid Waste Collection

In the Pedestrian Realm,


Beyond the edge of the RoW Within plot boundaries Close to motor vehicles
obstructing pedestrian movement

Bin Bin Bin Bin

Figure 4.42:  Solid waste collection locations

Dedicated space for solid waste collection bins shall


be allocated outside of the RoW, as illustrated in
Figure 4.43 (i.e. within plot boundaries for villas or in For developments where a solid waste vacuum collection system
setbacks at the rear of buildings for all other building is considered, the RoW may be increased to accommodate a
types). The allocated street RoW or utility corridors corridor for vacuum pipes. All vacuum stations shall be installed
do not allow for placement of these bins within the outside of the RoW.
Pedestrian Realm or lay-bys.

Above-ground and/or underground solid waste


collection systems may be used within allocated plots Waste bin
to serve communities/sectors. These plots should storage out side
aesthetically integrate with the surrounding area and of the RoW
shall include access for waste collection trucks.

Figure 4.43 shows a schematic configuration of

Edge of RoW
above-ground solid waste bins within a residential
area. Solid waste collection bins shall be located such
that dedicated access is provided, independently from
the villa/building access.

Figure 4.43:  Solid waste disposal and collection system


within a residential context

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4.5 Utility Depths of Cover 4.6 Integration of Utilities within Coordination between relevant agencies shall take
place to ensure that all necessary utilities that are to
This Manual deals with horizontal requirements for Complete Streets be placed under asphalt surfaces will be installed prior
utility corridors. The depth and minimum vertical to the completion of the street construction.
clearances of utilities shall be in accordance with the 4.6.1 Introduction
respective utility providers’ requirements. Gravity As discussed in Chapter 1, this Manual provides Utilities shall be installed prior to the final street
pipelines should, in general, take precedence when guidance for the integration of utilities within a finishing (e.g. surface course on Travel Lanes,
developing vertical alignments due to gradient Complete Street. A Complete Street enables greater interlocking pavers on Parking, etc.) in order to avoid
constraints. Two specific requirements are listed mobility and safety for non-vehicular traffic, as well breaking up of newly finished surfaces.
below: as providing a pleasant environment to walk/cycle. It
is therefore important to consider during the planning 4.6.2 Locating Chamber Access Covers
• Potable water should be installed at a higher level
and construction stages, how utilities may impact
than wastewater and irrigation pipelines with a Wherever utility chambers are located under the
the street finishes in the Pedestrian Realm, Frontage
minimum 300 mm vertical clearance. In cases Frontage Lane or the Traveled Way, chamber cover
Lane and Traveled Way, with regards to safety and
where a wastewater or irrigation pipeline crosses slabs shall be installed beneath the street pavement
aesthetics.
over a potable water pipeline, all pipes shall either structure, in order to limit hard spots and the impact
be installed in a concrete encasement or within a The PRDM shall be used as the primary reference of differential settlements.
sealed sleeve; and when considering the visual identity and composition
of the Pedestrian Realm. This section complements It is also desirable to locate a chamber access away
• Cables and/or pressurised pipelines should be
the PRDM with regards to the following utility from motor vehicle wheel paths (i.e. as close as
installed above gravity pipelines. These may
specific aspects. possible to the centre of a Travel Lane) to minimise
only be installed below gravity pipelines if the
the impact that motor vehicles running over a
necessary pipeline protection are provided.
Installation of all utilities shall be carried out in chamber access may have on:
  accordance with the relevant utility providers’
requirements. • Chambers: structural fatigue;
• Motor vehicles: driver comfort; and
• Members of the public: noise pollution and
aesthetics.

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Figure 4.44 illustrates an example of a chamber access 4.6.3 Finishing of chamber covers 4.6.4 Utility Markers
cover positioned within a vehicle wheel track
The type, location and surface finish of chamber covers Utility markers consist of engraved plates installed flush
should be considered. Figure 4.46 presents an example with the surface finish to indicate the presence of a utility.
of well integrated and poorly integrated surface finishes
for chamber access covers in the City of Abu Dhabi. These are typically made of a durable metal plate with
identification lettering in both Arabic and English, as
illustrated in Figure 4.47.

Figure 4.44: Example of a chamber access cover


within a vehicle wheel track

Figure 4.45 illustrates a typical chamber arrangement Figure 4.46: Examples of surface finishes and
under a Travel Lane and the desirable chamber access chamber access integration
positioning.

In general, protruding chamber elements should be


avoided as these can obstruct pedestrian or vehicular
movements. The following guidance may be followed in
conjunction with PRDM requirements:

Travel Lane • Chamber cover slabs should not protrude above


1/2 Travel Lane 1/2 Travel Lane finished surface, and preferably be located below the
surface;
Pavement surface Chamber access Figure 4.47: Example of a utility marker in Abu
• Chamber access covers (e.g. for inspection,
Dhabi
underground hydrants, stormwater inlets, etc.) must
be installed flush with the finished surface; Above-ground utility markers, such as bollards or raised
• No elements should protrude above the finished domes, are not permitted in urban streets.
surface (e.g. ventilation pipes); and
• The use of recessed access covers may be used in
areas of high pedestrian movements and high-end
Chamber
developments, with the integrated pavers matching the
surrounding surface finish.
Figure 4.45: Recommended positioning of chamber
access

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4.6.5 Above Ground Utility Appurtenances


The positioning of above-ground features shall be placed
in such a way that they do not obstruct public circulation
as illustrated in Figure 4.48. These include electrical
cabinets, fire hydrants, feeder pillars, junction boxes, etc.
Their positioning should consider inspection access during
maintenance and the impact from other utilities (e.g.
electrical cabinet door opening should not be located near
to irrigation sprinklers). The following provides general
guidance:

• Telecommunication fibre distribution hubs, joint boxes


and exchange buildings should be placed in open spaces;
• Electrical cabinets should be placed in house connection
corridors;
• LV feeder pillars should be placed in street lighting or
house connection corridors; and
• Fire hydrants may be placed in Tree Corridors at a
reasonable distance from Parking bays.
Utility facilities such as substations and pumping stations
shall be placed in designated utility plots.

In general, locating above-ground appurtenances within the


House Connection Corridor is recommended provided they
do not obstruct plot access or pedestrian movement.

Figure 4.48:  Examples of above-ground


appurtenance obstructions

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4.7 Sikkak
A sikka is a pedestrian path between plots, which is
part of a wider pedestrian network, that connects plots,
public open spaces and/or community facilities and
amenities within a neighbourhood. Refer to Figures 4.49
and 4.50.

In instances where a sikka is located between plots and


connected to the street network, the space may be
used to relocate certain utilities (street lighting, power
distribution etc.) to avoid increasing the adjacent street's
RoW, if the sikka has the capacity to accommodate
the utilities. Utility appurtanances, structures and
infrastructure elements that are above-ground shall
not be placed in the (Pedestrian) through zone of the
sikka. Utility installations in a sikka shal be appropriately
screened from view using landscaping, fixed screens
or other urban design features that complement the
existing architectural styles and urban design features of
the sikka and its surroundings. Utility pipelines, cables
and ducts shall be placed within an appropriate corridor.

The order of priority for placing utilities in the sikka shall


be given as follows:

• Power Distribution;
Pedestrian Plaza
• Irrigation;
• Telecommunication; Sikka

• District Cooling; Power Distribution

• Gas; and Irrigation

• Wastewater. Figure 4.49: Example of utility corridors in sikkak Figure 4.50: Examples of sikkak in Abu Dhabi
Subject to the previously stated conditions, a localised
stormwater corridor may also be provided in a sikka.

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4.8 Considerations for Additional and distribution power MV/LV cables, which A similar approach may be adopted for irrigation transmission lines.
connect the primary substation to secondary
Lines substations. Power transmission cables shall only Additional lines for wastewater and stormwater include pressurised
Utility corridors arrangements presented in Chapters 4 be installed in the Median within Avenues or rising mains. Where these are required, they shall be installed in
and 5 of this Manual primarily cover the utility corridors Boulevards. Avenues or Boulevards under the Pedestrian Realm, or parking if
location and width requirements for distribution and interlocking pavers are used.
collection of services to plots within clearly defined urban The potable water transmission line feeds a water
Land Use Contexts. storage reservoir and pumping station site, from
where the distribution lines will feed the various
The relationship between transmission and distribution demand zones. TRANSCO water lines shall be in
networks, which often occurs at a development boundary accordance with TRANSCO requirements.
or along larger street families, is briefly considered here, as,
except for the power transmission corridor requirements,
which are described in Section 4.3.7, other transmission

Access Lane

Access Lane
corridor requirements are not specially covered in this WT Water Transmission Pipeline Corridor
Manual. WD Water Distribution Pipeline Corridor

Water Storage Reservoir and Pumping Station


Allocation of corridors for additional lines, including PT Power Transmission Line Corridor
TRANSCO water lines, shall be based on the following PD Power Distribution Line Corridor
hierarchy:
Power Primary Substation
Primary Substation Water Storage Reservoir and
• within spare space in the provided RoW; Pumping Station

• increase the RoW of the street to provide additional


space;
• introduce a dedicated standalone corridor within the
development. (e.g. a sikka)
Boulevard
Transmission mains typically connect to distribution
mains via headworks such as a pumping station, primary
substation, elevated reservoir etc.

Figure 4.51 illustrates an example relationship between


power, water distribution and transmission lines and
how the respective utility corridors may fit within a RoW
section. Dedicated corridors are typically allocated within
Avenues or Boulevards due to the larger RoW width.

A typical relationship between power transmission HV Figure 4.51: Illustration of transmission lines in a Boulevard for Power and Water
cables, connecting a grid station to a primary substation,

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Chapter 4 Page 42
Chapter 5 - Utility Corridors Arrangements

5.1 Introduction
5.2 Utility Corridors Arrangement Composition
5.3 Utility Corridors Arrangements
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 5 - Utility Corridors Arrangement

5.1 Introduction
This chapter presents utility corridors arrangements for the most common streets,
as developed using the USDM. These arrangements consist of:

• Typical utility corridors arrangements which align with USDM typical street
sections; and
• Minimum utility corridors arrangements for cases where the RoW is limited.
These fully developed utility corridor arrangements are provided in Appendices C
and D.

5.2 Utility Corridors Arrangement Composition


The utility corridors arrangements consist of a utility corridors cross section and
plan, as shown in Figure 5.1. The size and depths of utilities are indicative only. House Connection Corridor
The chambers, (shown in plan) represent the extent of the chamber corridors and An unobstructed horizontal clearance required between the plot boundary and the nearest service
not necessarily actual chamber sizes to be adopted. corridor, which contains only those chambers associated with the plot connections or above-ground
appurtenances, such as feeder pillars, electrical cabinets, telecommunication cabinets, etc.
No services are permitted to be installed longitudinally within the House Connection corridor.

Service Corridor
Corridor within the RoW allocated for installing pipes, cables or ducts for a specific utility.

Figure 5.1.  Utility corridors arrangement main components

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Shared Space Service and Chamber Corridors of Equal Width


Space where chamber corridors of two adjacent utilities overlap, achieved by staggering of their For certain utilities the service corridor has the same width as the chamber corridor. Therefore sharing
chambers. The width of the shared space is a function of the offset between service and chamber space with an adjacent chamber corridor is not possible. For Power Distribution/Transmission and Gas
corridors (dmin) of each utility. Space within service corridors cannot be shared. corridors, this is always the case, whereas for other utilities, such as Stormwater, it may only apply to
certain Service/Chamber corridor combinations.

Chamber Corridor Spare Corridor


Corridor within the RoW for allocation of chambers for a specific utility. For certain utilities, the chamber An unused space within the RoW maintained for future development. Allocation of spare corridors may
corridors extend beyond the service corridor limits. be optimised by minimising the space between adjacent utility corridors.

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5.3 Utility Corridors each Land Use Context. A summary of the RoW for A summary of the RoW for these streets is provided in
these typical streets is provided in Table 5.1. Fully Table 5.1. Fully developed minimum utility corridors
Arrangements developed typical utility corridors arrangements are arrangements are provided in Appendix D.
This section provides the typical and minimum utility provided in Appendix C.
corridors arrangements. The typical and minimum utility corridors
arrangements are examples for the most common
5.3.2 Minimum Utility Corridor
street designs. In the majority of situations, it is
5.3.1 Typical Utility Corridor Arrangements Arrangements expected that the utility corridor arrangements
The USDM provides a set of typical street cross In addition to the typical streets identified above, a presented may be used without modification as they
sections comprised of various street elements street may comprise of differing combinations of align with the corresponding USDM street design.
(Travel Lanes, Frontage Lanes, Cycle Tracks, etc.) and street elements. The USDM defines minimum and Where the street design differs, the development
their dimensions, which reflect the most common maximum widths for each street element to cater of the utility corridors arrangement should begin
streets under typical conditions. The UCDM provides for transportation and urban design requirements, with the closest applicable UCDM arrangement as
a corresponding set of typical utility corridors which when applied in combination may lead to a discussed in the step-by-step guides in Chapter
arrangements. narrower RoW than is needed to allocate the required 3. Any required adjustments shall be performed in
utility corridors. To avoid this situation, the UCDM, accordance with the utility corridors locations rules
The following pages provide the service corridor therefore, provides a set of minimum utility corridors and width requirements detailed in Chapter 4. Worked
width requirements and illustrate the typical utility arrangements, which indicate the minimum RoW for a samples are also available for guidance in Appendices
corridors arrangement for each Street Family within given street. A and B.

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Table 5.1:  Summary of RoW Widths for Typical and Minimum Streets

Land Use Context RoW Width (m)


Street Family Type Residential/
City Town Commercial Emirati Industrial
Neighbourhood
Typical Utility Corridors Arrangement
Without Frontage Lane 45 45
Boulevard With Frontage Lane 55 54 56
Without Frontage Lane with On-Street Parking and
Avenue Cycle Track on both sides
43 42 41 40 41

Street With On-Street Parking on both sides 22 21 * 21 20 24

With On-Street Parking on one side 16


Access Lane Typical Access Lane 12 12 12 13.5 13

Minimum Utility Corridors Arrangement


Without Frontage Lane with Utility Tunnel 34
Without Frontage Lane 41
Boulevard Without Frontage Lane with Cycle Track on both sides 45
With Frontage Lane 50

Without Frontage Lane 28 26 28

Without Frontage Lane with On-street Parking on


35 33 35
both sides
Avenue Without Frontage Lane with On-street Parking and
38
Cycle Track on both sides
With Frontage Lane 40

With On-street Parking on both sides 22


Street With On-street Parking and Cycle Track on both sides 25
With On-street Parking on one side 18 18

Access Lane ‡ With On-street Parking on both sides 18.5


Adjacent to Primary Substations 11

Notes:
Wherever possible, new streets should be designed using the typical corridor arrangements, as found in Appendix C. Where RoW is limited, minimum utility corridor arrangements as found in Appendix D may be used.
When using the USDM to develop a street, the total RoW shall not be less than the RoW presented for the minimum utility corridors arrangement.
*Two sections are provided in the Manual: showing a tree on one side; and showing a tree on both sides.
‡The utility corridor arrangement for Access Lanes adjacent to substations is found in Section 4.3.7.
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5.3.3 City Context


The City Context includes mixed-use central
business districts, urban core areas and high-density
neighbourhoods with high levels of pedestrian
activity, where buildings are typically five storeys and
higher.

The typical utility corridors arrangement cross


sections are illustrated on the following page. Full
arrangements are provided in Appendix C.

Table 5.2:  Typical Service Corridor Allocations – City Context


Side 1 Middle Side 2
Public Realm Traveled Way Median Traveled Way Public Realm
Street Family
Power Power SL./
Dist. SL./ ST. Dist. Power ST. SL./ Power
HC WD. SL. Tree IRR. Tel. WW. ST. DCP. IRR. IRR. TS. HS Gas ST. WW. Tel. IRR. Tree WD. HC
Tree Inlet Trans. Inlet Tree Dist.
** Tree

2300
Boulevard ‡ 1000 1000 3000 1500 1300 1200 1000 1050 3000 3100 4000 2000 700 500 1500 1500
1050 *
1000 1200 700 1500 3000 1800 1000

Avenue ‡‡ 1000 1000 2000 1500 1000 700 800 1000 1050 2500 2000 2000 1500 1100 700 500 1500 2300 1000 800 700 1000 1500 2000 1300 1000

Street ‡‡‡ 1000 1000 1500 1500 700 800 1000 1050 1500 1000 1500 1000 700 1500 1500 1000 1000

Access Lane 1000 1000 500 500 500 1500 1000 1050 750 500 1000 1000 1000

‡ With Frontage Lane. ‡‡ With parking and cycle tracks on both sides. ‡‡‡ With parking on both sides.
* Wastewater on Side 2 may alternatively be located within the Frontage Lane.
** Where Power Distribution is located under a Travel Lane, block paving shall be adopted.

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TYPICAL CITY BOULEVARD WITH FRONTAGE LANE TYPICAL CITY ACCESS LANE

TYPICAL CITY AVENUE WITH PARKING AND CYCLE TRACK ON BOTH SIDES TYPICAL CITY STREET WITH PARKING BOTH SIDES

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION WW WASTEWATER IRR IRRIGATION ST STORMWATER DCP DISTRICT COOLING PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION SL STREET LIGHTING TEL TELECOMMUNICATION TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE HS HIGH SECURITY G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

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5.3.4 Town Context


The Town Context includes mixed-use areas with
medium levels of pedestrian activity, where buildings
are typically three to five storeys.

The typical utility corridors arrangement cross


sections are illustrated on the following page. Full
arrangements are provided in Appendix C.

Table 5.3:  Typical Service Corridor Allocations – Town Context


Side 1 Middle Side 2
Public Realm Traveled Way Median Traveled Way Public Realm
Street Family
Power Power SL./
Dist. SL./ ST. Dist. Power ST. SL./ Power
HC WD. Tree IRR. Tel. WW. ST. DCP. IRR. IRR. TS. HS. Gas ST. WW. Tel. IRR. Tree WD. HC
Tree Inlet Trans. Inlet Tree Dist.
* Tree

Boulevard ‡ 1000 1000 3000 1500 1000 700 1200 1000 1550 3000 2600 4000 2000 700 500 1500 1500 1050 1000 1200 1300 1000 1500 3000 1800 1000

Avenue ‡‡ 1000 1000 2000 1500 1000 700 800 1000 1050 2500 2000 2000 1500 1100 700 500 1500 2300 1000 800 700 1000 1500 2000 1300 1000

Street ‡‡‡ 1000 1000 1000 1500 700 800 1000 1050 1500 1000 1500 1000 700 1500 2000 1000 1000

Street ‡‡‡‡ 1000 1000 1000 1500 700 800 1000 1050 1500 1000 1500 1000 1000 2000 1000 1000

Access Lane 1000 1000 500 500 500 1500 1000 1050 750 500 1000 1000 1000

‡ Without Frontage Lane. ‡‡ With parking and cycle tracks on both sides. ‡‡‡ With parking and trees on both sides. ‡‡‡‡ With parking on both sides and a tree on one side (refer to Appendix C).
* Where Power Distribution is located under a Travel Lane, block paving shall be adopted.

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TYPICAL TOWN BOULEVARD WITHOUT FRONTAGE LANE TYPICAL TOWN ACCESS LANE

TYPICAL TOWN AVENUE WITH PARKING AND CYCLE TRACK ON BOTH SIDES TYPICAL TOWN STREET WITH PARKING AND TREES ON BOTH SIDES

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION WW WASTEWATER IRR IRRIGATION ST STORMWATER DCP DISTRICT COOLING PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION SL STREET LIGHTING TEL TELECOMMUNICATION TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE HS HIGH SECURITY G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

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5.3.5 Commercial Context


The Commercial Context includes areas throughout
the city intended to provide a variety of working,
shopping and service options.

The typical utility corridors arrangement cross


sections are illustrated on the following page. Full
arrangements are provided in Appendix C.

Table 5.4:  Typical Service Corridor Allocations – Commercial Context


Side 1 Middle Side 2
Public Realm Traveled Way Median Traveled Way Public Realm
Street Family
Power Power SL./
Dist. SL./ ST. Dist. Power ST. SL./ Power
HC WD. SL. Tree IRR. Tel. WW. ST. DCP. IRR. IRR. TS. HS. Gas ST. WW. Tel. IRR. Tree WD. HC
Tree Inlet Trans. Inlet Tree Dist.
** Tree

2300
Boulevard ‡ 1000 1000 3000 1500 1300 1200 1000 1050 3000 3100 4000 2000 700 500 1500 1500
1050*
1000 1200 700 1500 3000 1800 1000

Avenue ‡‡ 1000 1000 2000 1500 1000 700 800 1000 1050 2500 2000 2000 1500 1100 700 500 1500 2300 1000 800 700 1000 1500 2000 1300 1000

Street ‡‡‡ 1000 1000 1000 1500 700 800 1000 1050 1500 1000 1500 1000 700 1000 2000 1000 1000

Access Lane 1000 1000 500 500 500 1500 1000 1050 750 500 1000 1000 1000

‡ With Frontage Lane. ‡‡ With parking and cycle tracks on both sides. ‡‡‡ With parking on both sides.
* Wastewater on Side 2 may alternatively be located within the Frontage Lane.
** Where Power Distribution is located under a Travel Lane, block paving shall be adopted.

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TYPICAL COMMERCIAL BOULEVARD WITH FRONTAGE LANE TYPICAL COMMERCIAL ACCESS LANE

TYPICAL COMMERCIAL AVENUE WITH PARKING AND CYCLE TRACK ON BOTH SIDES TYPICAL COMMERCIAL STREET WITH PARKING ON BOTH SIDES

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION WW WASTEWATER IRR IRRIGATION ST STORMWATER DCP DISTRICT COOLING PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION SL STREET LIGHTING TEL TELECOMMUNICATION TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE HS HIGH SECURITY G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

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5.3.6 Residential/Emirati Neighbourhood TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL/EMIRATI NEIGHBOURHOOD BOULEVARD WITHOUT FRONTAGE LANE
Context
The Residential/Emirati Neighbourhood Context
provides a variety of housing opportunities, allowing
for densities varying from villa to multi-dwelling
residential buildings. Emirati neighbourhoods are
primarily designed as very low density residential,
comprising villas only. The major share of utility
demand is of a domestic nature.

District cooling is not provided as standard for this


context as it is generally not economically viable due
to the low density of buildings.

The typical utility corridors arrangement cross


sections are illustrated on the following page. Full
arrangements are provided in Appendix C.

Table 5.5:  Typical Service Corridor Allocations – Residential/Emirati Neighbourhood Context

Side 1 Middle Side 2


Traveled
Street Family Public Realm Median Traveled Way Public Realm
Way
SL./
Power SL./ ST. Power ST. SL./ Power
HC WD. SL Tree IRR. Tel. WW. ST. IRR. IRR. TS. HS. Gas ST. WW. Tel. IRR. Tree SL. WD. HC
Dist. Tree Inlet Trans. Inlet Tree Dist.
Tree

Boulevard ‡ 1000 1000 3000 1500 1000 700 1200 1000 2300 3000 4000 2000 700 500 1500 1500 1050 1000 1200 1300 1000 1500 3000 1800 1000

Avenue ‡‡ 1000 1000 2000 1500 1000 700 800 1000 2300 2500 2000 1500 1100 700 500 1500 1550 1000 800 700 1000 1500 2000 1300 1000

Street ‡‡‡ 1000 1000 1500 1500 700 800 1000 1050 1000 1500 1000 800 1000 1500 1000 1000

Access Lane 1000 1000 1000 1000 1050 1050 1000 800 700 1500 1000 1000 1000
‡‡‡‡
Access Lane 1000 1000 1000 750 1050 1000 1000 800 1000 1000 1000

‡ Without Frontage Lane. ‡‡ With parking and cycle tracks on both sides. ‡‡‡ With parking on both sides. ‡‡‡‡ With parking on one side.

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TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL/EMIRATI NEIGHBOURHOOD AVENUE WITH PARKING AND CYCLE TRACK ON BOTH SIDES

TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL/EMIRATI NEIGHBOURHOOD STREET WITH TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL/EMIRATI NEIGHBOURHOOD ACCESS TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL/EMIRATI NEIGHBOURHOOD
PARKING ON BOTH SIDES LANE WITH PARKING ON ONE SIDE ACCESS LANE

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION WW WASTEWATER IRR IRRIGATION ST STORMWATER DCP DISTRICT COOLING PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION SL STREET LIGHTING TEL TELECOMMUNICATION TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE HS HIGH SECURITY G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

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5.3.7 Industrial Context For heavy industry zones, any special utility corridor
arrangements shall be dealt with on a case-by-case
The Industrial Context includes the areas for
basis. Any increase in the width of Travel Lanes shall
businesses that have the potential to create adverse
be based on the USDM and the expected vehicle
visual, noise or other impacts on adjacent properties.
types.
Uses include warehousing and distribution centres
with supporting commercial services, ancillary office The typical utility corridors arrangement cross
space and guest worker accommodation. sections are illustrated on the following page. Full
arrangements are provided in Appendix C.
These areas often have higher demands for certain
utilities, mainly power and district cooling, which
in turn may necessitate larger corridors than those
required for the other contexts.

Table 5.6:  Typical Service Corridor Allocations – Industrial Context

Side 1 Middle Side 2


Public Realm Traveled Way Median Traveled Way Public Realm
Street Family
Power Power SL./
Dist. SL./ ST. Dist. Power ST. SL./ Power
HC WD. Tree IRR. Tel. WW. ST. DCP. IRR. IRR. TS. HS. Gas ST. WW. Tel. IRR. WD. HC
Tree Inlet Trans. Inlet Tree Dist.
** Tree

2300
Boulevard ‡ 1000 1000 3000 1500 1300 1200 1000 1050 3000 3100 4000 1000 700 500 1500 1500
1050*
1000 1200 700 1500 3000 1800 1000

Avenue ‡‡ 1000 1000 2000 1000 800 1000 1050 2500 2000 2000 1500 1100 700 500 1500 2300 1000 800 700 1500 2000 1300 1000

Street ‡‡‡ 1000 1000 2000 1000 800 1000 1050 1500 1000 1500 1050 1000 800 700 1500 1000 1000 1000

Access Lane 1000 1000 500 500 500 1500 1000 1050 1000 800 1000 1000 1000

‡ With Frontage Lane. ‡‡ With Parking and Cycle Tracks on both sides. ‡‡‡ With Parking on both sides.
* Wastewater on Side 2 may alternatively be located within the Frontage Lane.
** Where Power Distribution is located under a Travel Lane, block paving shall be adopted.

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TYPICAL INDUSTRIAL BOULEVARD WITH FRONTAGE LANE TYPICAL INDUSTRIAL ACCESS LANE

TYPICAL INDUSTRIAL AVENUE WITH PARKING AND CYCLE TRACK ON BOTH SIDES TYPICAL INDUSTRIAL STREET WITH PARKING ON BOTH SIDES

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION WW WASTEWATER IRR IRRIGATION ST STORMWATER DCP DISTRICT COOLING PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION SL STREET LIGHTING TEL TELECOMMUNICATION TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE HS HIGH SECURITY G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

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Chapter 5 Page 16
Chapter 6 - Junctions, Transitions and Special Arrangements

6.1 Introduction
6.2 Junctions
6.3 Transitions
6.4 Special Arrangements
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Chapter 6 - Junctions, Transitions and Special Arrangements

6.1 Introduction G Chamfering of plots at junctions may be required


to accommodate the particular street design or
This Chapter provides guidance for the arrangement of
utility corridors at junctions within urban areas, and A Where possible, chambers should be located the space needed for utilities to change direction
addresses transitions of utility corridors from new to away from junctions to limit disruption. (e.g. to avoid sharp bends for a gravity network
existing streets. Special details for tunnels, bridges, or to accommodate minimum bend radii for
B Where a utility corridor is located under the cables).
underpasses and dedicated transit corridors, with Pedestrian Realm on one street and changes
respect to utility corridors are also provided. Lateral connections for gravity networks generally
direction when intersecting with another street,
its location should remain under the Pedestrian connect to the mains at junctions with larger streets,
Realm as far as practical. however, where possible, low points of the gravity
6.2 Junctions mains should be avoided at junctions to prevent the
Where a utility corridor is located under the need for lifting stations at these locations.
As defined in the USDM, junctions are intersections of C
Pedestrian Realm of two opposite junction legs,
streets where through moving and turning pedestrians,
its alignment shall divert around the junction (as Interdisciplinary coordination should be undertaken
cyclists, transit vehicles and motor vehicles all share
opposed to crossing straight through it); or when resolving utility conflicts, including ensuring the
the same space. Types of junctions include rectilinear
required vertical clearances are maintained.
junctions, T-junctions, roundabouts, etc.
D Where a utility corridor is located under the
Traveled Way of two opposite junction legs, its The above guidance shall be followed in conjunction
The development of utility corridor arrangements
alignment shall be a straight line through the with the requirements of the local Municipality, DoT,
within junctions considers utility corridors intersecting
junction (as opposed to diverting around it). UPC and relevant utility providers.
or changing direction within intersecting streets, and
shall be treated on a case-by-case basis, considering Surface grading is generally designed such that surface
street type, street composition, plot chamfering, etc. E Where a utility corridor crosses a street, the
crossing should be perpendicular to the street. water flows away from junctions to avoid the risk of
collecting as ponds. This in turn influences the location
The guidance below should be followed when
Where a chamber is required within a junction, of stormwater inlets and reduces the need for gravity
developing utility corridor arrangements at junctions. F
access to the chamber should be positioned to mains to pass through intersecting Access Lanes.
Figure 6.1 illustrates an example of utility corridors
arrangement at an Access Lane/Access Lane junction. avoid closure of more than one travel lane during
maintenance.

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LEGEND:
WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER
A Chambers located away from junctions
DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION
Chamfering of plots G B Utility corridors remaining under same street
PD POWER DISTRIBUTION element (e.g. Pedestrian Realm), where practical

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION
ACCESS LANE
STREET LIGHT

TREE

C Utility corridors under Pedestrian Realm,


diverting around junction rather than through

ACCESS LANE
D Utility corridors under Traveled Way passing through the junction
rather than diverting around

E Utility corridors crossing perpendicularGto street

Figure 6.1.  Example of utility corridors arrangements at an Access Lane/Access Lane junction

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6.2.1 Signalised Junctions


In addition to the general guidance provided, utility LEGEND:
corridors arrangements at signalised junctions must WD WATER DISTRIBUTION
also consider location and space requirements for WW WASTEWATER
A
equipment associated with traffic signals, including IRR IRRIGATION
signal poles, above ground cabinets, ducts, etc. G ST STORMWATER
B
DCP DISTRICT COOLING
Figure 6.2 shows an example of utility cabinets at an
PT POWER TRANSMISSION
intersection
PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

STREET LIGHT
BOULEVARD
TREE

TRAFFIC SIGNAL POLE


TRAFFIC SIGNAL DUCTS
TRAFFIC SIGNAL BOX
STORMWATER INLET
Figure 6.2.  Example of electrical and signal
cabinets at an intersection.
C
F D
Figure 6.3 illustrates an example of utility corridors
arrangement at a Boulevard/Boulevard signalised
junction.
Traffic signal control box to be

BOULEVARD
located to avoid obstruction
within Pedestrian Ream

Figure 6.3.  Example of utility corridors arrangements at a Boulevard/Boulevard junction

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6.2.2 Roundabouts
In general, gravity pipelines and those other utilities
installed under or close to the Median are permitted A
to cross through a roundabout.
Placement of utility corridors within
In order to limit the number of utilities crossing
roundabout circulating lanes avoided
roundabouts/large junctions, multiple gravity
pipelines for a given utility should be combined prior
B
to the crossing, where feasible. G
Gravity pipelines of the same utility
Placing utility corridors within circulating lanes should combined prior to crossing the roundabout
be avoided.

Figure 6.4 illustrates an example of utility corridors


arrangement at a Street/Avenue roundabout.

STREET

Utility corridors within/close to Median


crossing through the roundabout

AVENUE
E
Figure 6.4.  Example of utility corridors arrangements at a Street/Avenue roundabout

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6.2.3 Grade Separated Junctions 6.3 Transitions || One or more of the existing utility corridor
positions may be maintained within the
In accordance with the USDM, motor vehicle grade Where new streets connect to existing streets, new street, provided the allocation rules
separation, as illustrated in Figure 6.5 should not be configuration and/or RoW width may differ. and utility corridor widths are respected, as
used in urban streets, other than with an exception Consequently, a transition from new to existing illustrated in Figure 6.7;
from the UPC, concerned Municipality and DoT. Where streets is required for both the street elements and
grade-separated junctions are considered, allocation the utility corridors. || Crossover of utilities may be required to
of utility corridors shall follow the guidelines provided bring the utility corridors into the correct
for bridges within this Chapter. The following guidance is provided for developing the position. Where possible the number of
transitioning of utility corridors: crossovers should be minimised; and
|| Where multiple crossovers cannot be
• Tie-in locations (i.e. points of connection) for a avoided, the length of the transition zone
given utility should be identified. Not all utilities may be extended to facilitate crossovers
require tie-in at each transition, for instance, taking place at different locations over a
a potable water tie-in may be required on one longer distance.
street, whereas power tie-in may be required on
another street; All transitions from new to existing streets should be
• Minimum required vertical clearances maintained; developed in conjunction with the requirements of
the relevant utility providers. Figure 6.6 illustrates an
• Gravity networks should be prioritised because example of the transitioning of utility corridors at a
of gradient constraints in addition to limiting the T-junction, with selected utility tie-ins.
number of chambers;
• Relocation of utilities, as a result of tie-in for a
given utility, should be limited;
• Where space permits, utility corridor alignments

Existing Avenue
may be locally adjusted to cater for infrastructure
works associated with the tie-in (e.g. space for
thrust restraints, etc.);
• Where only one or several utility tie-ins are
required at a particular transition, full utility
corridor arrangements should still be provided
in the new street, inclusive of all utility corridor Full utility
Transition only
allocations presented in Table 4.2. This facilitates corridor
for utilities which
future upgrades; arrangement
require tie-in
allocated in
Figure 6.5.  Example of a grade separated junction, • Where a new street connects to an existing street new Street
longitudinally or to a junction leg: New Street
Sultan Bin Zayed the First Street, Abu Dhabi
Figure 6.6.  Example of transitioning of utility
corridors at a T-junction
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Adjustment of utility corridors arrangement to


provide improved transition.

Existing RoW

Existing
utility
corridors
All UCDM utility
corridors to be
Utility Corridor provided in the
new Street, even
Transition

positions adjusted
Varies
Zone

Multiple in line with location if certain utilities


crossovers rules, in new Street are not required to
to avoid crossovers. immediately tie-in.
Rearrangement to
desired posotion
Utility corridors may take place Utility Corridors
in accordance at next suitable provided in
with UCDM junction accordance
with the UCDM,
however,
adjusted in line
with location
rules.

New RoW

Figure 6.7.  Example of transitioning of utility corridors at a junction leg or longitudinal Street expansion

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6.4 Special Arrangements • Minimal disruption during maintenance activities:

In addition to the utility corridors arrangements || to traffic (e.g. pedestrian and motor
discussed in Chapter 5, guidance for special vehicles);
arrangements for utility tunnels, bridges, pedestrian || to other utilities; and
underpasses and dedicated transit corridors are
|| to the environment (e.g. through noise, air
presented below.
and dust pollution).

6.4.1 Utility Tunnels Notwithstanding the above, the following


considerations should also be taken into account:
Utility tunnels are underground enclosed structures
used to carry multiple utilities. They are adopted over
• A high initial construction cost, as compared to
short distances where it is not possible to allocate the
traditional open cut trenches for utility corridors; 3 1
required utilities within a street due to limited RoW, 2
and are generally restricted to Boulevards. • The effective management of controlled access
is required due to multiple stakeholders being
There are also a limited number of other instances in involved;
the Emirate of Abu Dhabi where utility tunnels are 4
• A limited number of access points in case of fire;
used: to cross waterways, to carry several utilities
across larger street families/highways and as an • The impact of a fire or explosion (e.g, due to heat 7
8
alternative solution to utilities within bridges. generated from electrical cables); and 6 5
10 11 12
• A defect in one system may adversely affect other
The development of utility tunnels through all phases 4
systems due to their close proximity. 4
requires approval from the local Municipality, UPC, 9
General Directorate of the Abu Dhabi Civil Defense Certain utilities are generally avoided in tunnels:
and relevant utility providers.
• Gas, due to safety restrictions; and
In all situations, consideration of using utility tunnels 1 Street Lighting 7 Ventilation fan
shall be dealt with on a case-by-case basis. Adopting • Those dependant on gravity flow, due to gradient 2 Gas 8 Potable Water
a utility tunnel may carry the following advantages: constraints.
3 Access manhole 9 District Cooling
4 Access ladder 10 Irrigation
• Reduction of land take facilitated through Power cable joints are not permitted in tunnels.
5 Light 11 Power cables
narrower RoWs;
Figure 6.8 illustrates a typical utility arrangement 6 CCTV camera 12 Fibre optic ducts
• Ease of access to multiple utilities for maintenance within a utility tunnel.
and future upgrade; Figure 6.8.  Typical utility arrangement within a utility
tunnel
• Improved leakage detection; and

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When developing the design of utility tunnels, the • Secure access for inspection and maintenance • Emergency escape route;
following provisions shall be made: including lifting equipment for replacement or
• Lighting at walk-through level; and
removal of utility components;
• Separate compartments for wet and dry utilities • CCTV system.
• Floor drainage with sumps and access for sump
(as illustrated in Figures 6.9 and 6.10);
pumps;
• Supports for installation of pipes, cables and ducts
• Systems for providing ventilation;
including shelves, brackets, cable trays, etc.;
• Fire detection and alarm systems, including
• Minimum 1000 mm wide x 2200 mm high
firewalls where required;
unobstructed walk-through;

Figure 6.9.  Example of wet utilities in a utility tunnel Figure 6.10.  Example of dry utilities in a utility tunnel

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6.4.2 Bridges
Bridges are encountered at grade-separated streets
or crossings over waterways, etc. Utilities may be
installed at bridges (above, within, between or below
bridge decks) as illustrated in Figure 6.11. These
utilities generally include pressure pipelines, cables
and ducts.

Due to hydraulic and gradient constraints, it is often


not possible to install gravity pipelines at bridges. In
such situations, alternative solutions may include
gravity pipelines installation at-grade or diversion to
Utilities within the bridge deck
a suitable alternative crossing location. In exceptional Utilities above the bridge deck
situations, a tunnel and/or lifting station may be
required.

Positioning of utilities at bridges must consider


operation and maintenance access requirements.
Visual impact should be minimised, particularly where
utilities are positioned above or below the bridge
deck.

The development of utility arrangements for bridges


shall be considered on a case-by-case basis and
in conjunction with the requirements of the local
Municipality, DoT and the relevant utility providers.
Utilities between bridge decks
Utilities below the bridge deck
Figure 6.11.  Typical examples of utilities at bridges

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6.4.3 Pedestrian Underpasses


Pedestrian underpasses, for which guidance is
provided in the USDM, are underground structures
to traverse a major obstacle such as a street, a
waterway or a dedicated transit corridor.

Pedestrian underpasses form vertical and horizontal


obstructions. As a result, the development of a utility Pedestrian underpass access
corridors arrangement near pedestrian underpasses
should consider:

• Diverting utility corridors around the underpass


access, as illustrated in Figure 6.12;
• Where possible, installing utilities above the Street view of underpass
underpass crossing and maintaining minimum
utility cover. When minimum utility cover is
compromised, protection should be provided in
accordance with utility providers’ requirements;
• Where gravity pipelines cannot be installed above
the underpass crossing, they may be diverted
around the underpass access. Priority should
be given to gravity pipelines due to gradient Pedestrian underpass access
constraints; and
Pedestrian underpass crossing under the street
• The road surface levels should be graded away
from the underpass crossing to avoid the need for
localised storm water inlet corridors.

The above considerations may also be followed Utility corridors superimposed on aerial view of underpass
where utility corridors cross other underground
structures (e.g. utility tunnels or transit tunnels) Figure 6.12.  Example of pedestrian underpass in a
City Bouvelard

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6.4.4 Dedicated Transit Corridors In addition to the location rules and widths for the The width of a dedicated transit corridor within
development of utility corridor arrangements for the RoW shall be in accordance with the DoT
Transit corridors include bus lanes, Bus Rapid Transit
streets, the following shall be considered: requirements.
(BRT), Light Rail Transit (LRT) and the Metro. This
section provides guidance for utility corridors • Utility corridors may not run longitudinally within Figure 6.13 illustrates an example of a dedicated
arrangements where a dedicated transit corridor the dedicated transit corridors except for those transit corridor for an LRT in a Town Avenue.
occurs at grade level. utilities associated with the transit (e.g. power
supply and fibre optics); and The development of utility corridors associated with a
Where a dedicated transit corridor occurs below grade dedicated transit corridor shall be in accordance with
(e.g. a Metro tunnel) utility installation within the • Utility corridors may traverse the dedicated transit
the DoT and UPC requirements.
transit tunnel should comply with the guidance for corridors. Where possible, such crossings should
utility tunnels. be grouped and limited to junction locations.

Only those utilities associated with


UCDM requirements LRT within dedicated transit corridors UCDM requirements

Pedestrian Realm Traveled Way Dedicated Transit Corridor Traveled Way Pedestrian Realm

Power Distribution for Tram

Figure 6.13.  Example of a dedicated transit corridor for an LRT in a Town Avenue

Chapter 6 Page 12

Part III
Supporting Materials

Appendices Acknowledgements

A - Sample Project for New Streets Recognition of the people


B - Sample Project for who contributed to this
Infrastructure Retrofitting Manual.
C - Typical Utility Corridor
Arrangements
D - Minimum Utility Corridor
Arrangements
E - Definitions
Page 5 F - References
Appendix A - Sample Project for New Streets
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Appendix A - Sample Project for New Streets

A.1 Introduction A.2 Sila'a Development The proposed Sila'a Emirati Neighbourhood
development is approximately 137 hectares in total
Chapters 1 to 6 present the standards and guidelines Sila'a Emirati Neighbourhood is a new master planned developable area and comprises 448 residential
necessary to develop utility corridors arrangements development located to the west of Al Gharbia plots. The typical size of the each residential plot is
in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. This Section presents and is planned to respond to the fast 2,025 m2.
how this Manual may be applied to a real life selected growing Emirati population.
sample project located in Sila'a. This example In addition to the residential facilities, the
demonstrates how utility corridors arrangements are The Sila'a Master Plan layout is development will have educational, religious, retail,
developed based on the UCDM principles by adopting based on a grid system and community facilities and associated utilities to serve
the step-by-step guide outlined in Chapter 3 of this consists of mixed land uses the population. Based on the land use plan of the
Manual. presenting the merits of development, the contributing population at full
a complete sustainable development is estimated at 4,000 people.
community.
The following presents an example of the step-by-
step guide applied to the Sila'a Neighbourhood.

Delma Island
Abu Dhabi
City
Sir Bani Yas Island

Sila'a Ruwais
Mirfa Al Ain

Ghayathi

Madinat Zayed

Al Gharbia Liwa

Abu Dhabi Emirate

Appendix A Page 2
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Appendix A - Sample Project for New Streets

The influences in the Sila'a Neighbourhood are: Once the Master Plan requirements and all influences
Step I: Understand the Master Plan are fully understood, the development of utility
• Land Use Context: Residential/Emirati networks may commence, as discussed in Step II.
Step I consists of understanding the key influences Neighbourhood (Figure A.1)
forming part of the Sila'a Neighbourhood in 40 m wide Residential Avenue
• Plot use: residential, community facilities, utilities,
accordance with the five Land Use Contexts etc.
presented in the UCDM and the USDM.
• Community facilities: educational, religious retail,
The Sila'a Master Plan is presented in Figure A.1. The etc.
driving land use (dominating colour in the legend) • Transport planning: various street hierarchies
illustrates that the project primarily comprises (Figure A.2)
individual housing unit plots (e.g. villas).
• Street Families: four different street types
(Figure A.3)
25 m wide Residential Street

40 m wide Residential Avenue


Housing Unit Plot
Commercial/Retail 25 m wide Residential Street
Civic/Institutional
20 m wide Residential Street
Community Facilities
15 m wide Residential Access Lane
Institutional

20 m wide Residential Street

15 m wide Residential
Access Lane

Figure A.1.  Sila'a Neighbourhood Master Plan Figure A.2.  Sila'a street hierarchy plan Figure A.3.  Sila'a Neighbourhood street types

Appendix A Page 3
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Appendix A - Sample Project for New Streets

Step II: Confirm Utility Requirements External Connection Points:

Step II consists of identifying and confirming which A Potable Water/Telecommunication/Irrigation lines


utilities are required for the Sila'a Neighbourhood and
B Power (HV) lines
developing utility network designs based on utility
demands, GFA, population, catchment areas, external C Wastewater lines
utility connections, utility plot allocations, etc. Based
on the Master Plan, the utility requirements for the D Stormwater lines

Sila'a Neighbourhood include:


C B
• Potable Water Supply;
• Wastewater Collection;
• Stormwater Drainage;
• Irrigation Water Supply;
• Power Transmission (HV);
• Power Distribution (MV/LV);
• Telecommunication;
• Street Lighting and Trees, and
• Solid Waste

The Sila'a Neighbourhood does not require district D


cooling. A gas network may be required in the future, A
therefore, a gas corridor has been allowed for. Primary substation

Proposed distribution substation


External connection points (as provided in the master
plan) and utility plot locations are illustrated in Figure Sapce for future distribution substation
A.4. An extract of the required utility network design
output is illustrated in Figure A.5. Telecommunication GSM tower

This step forms part of the utility providers's


requirements and is required prior to proceeding to
Step III. Figure A.4.  Sila'a Neighbourhood utility plots Figure A.5.  Sila'a Neighbourhood utility network
and external connection points plan

Appendix A Page 4
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Appendix A - Sample Project for New Streets

25.0
Step III: Select Closest Applicable UCDM
Cross Section Arrangement
This step consists of selecting the closest applicable
cross section from the typical or minimum cross
sections provided in Appendices C and D of this
Manual.

Each street type as highlighted in Figures A.2 and A.3


requires a corresponding utility corridor arrangement.

The selected street typology for this example is a


25 m Residential Street, as developed by the transport
and urban planners, and is illustrated in Figure A.6.

In order to select the closest applicable utility cross


section arrangement, the following key points from
the street design are observed: Source: USDM online design tool

Figure A.6.  Sila'a 25 m wide Street (as developed by transport and urban planners)
• The overall RoW width is 25 m: This value serves
to ensure the closest applicable cross section
width selected from the UCDM does not exceed
25 m;
• The number of Travel Lanes is two: This is
required to confirm that the correct street
typology is selected;
• Cycle Tracks exist on both sides; and
• On-street Parking exist on both sides;
Based on the above observations and understanding
of the street composition, the cross section illustrated
in Figure A.7 was selected from the UCDM as the
closest applicable cross section.

It is observed that the width of the Pedestrian Realm


and number of tree corridors are different, and hence
adjustment will be required in Step IV. Figure A.7.  UCDM typical Residential Street (20 m wide)

Appendix A Page 5
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Appendix A - Sample Project for New Streets

Step IV: Adjust and Finalise Utility Corridors


This step consists of adjusting and finalising the utility
corridors to fit the given cross section/RoW presented in
Figure A.6 of Step III.
Pedestrian
Realm width Additional
Utility corridor locations and widths are identified increased and tree corridor
according to the UCDM location rules and utility cycle track required.
reservation widths, as presented in Chapter 4. In this introduced in
both sides.
example, utility corridors should be developed for a
25 m wide Residential Street and with On-street Parking
and Cycle Tracks on both sides.

Figure A.8 illustrates the adjustment of the RoW:

• Using Figure A.7 extracted from the UCDM, adjust


the RoW to 25 m to widen the Pedestrian Realm; and
Additional space for additional
Priority for relocation for Power Distribution and
• Provide Cycle Tracks and accomodate an additional utilities under the Pedestrian Realm.
then Telecommunications.
row of trees.
Figure A.8.  Adjustments to the UCDM typical Residential Street - RoW increased to 25 m
The additional space created as a result of the widened
RoW can therefore be used to enhance the utility
corridor arrangements as described below. Note that
the house connection and the potable water corridors
remain the first two corridors after the plot boundary.

Figure A.9 illustrates the finalised utility corridor Power Distribution and
Telecommunication
arrangement after implementing the adjustments below: moved to Pedestrian
Realm in preference Gas retained in the
• Power distribution moved to the Pedetrian Realm
to e.g. Wastewater middle of the street to
and two power distribution corridors combined; or Stormwater, in maintain the required
accordance with utility offset distances from
• Telecommuncation corridors moved to the Pedestrian corridor location rules. buildings.
Realm on both sides;
• Wastewater and stormwater corridors moved away
from the Travel Lanes to the Parking; and
• Street lighting corridor increased to one side to
accommodate one more row of trees.
Figure A.9.  Finalised utility corridor arrangement for 25 m Residential Street

Appendix A Page 6
Appendix B - Sample Project for Infrastructure Retrofitting
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Appendix B - Sample Project for Infrastructure Retrofitti

B.1 Introduction B.2 Shakhbout City Development Shakhbout City currently has limited public amenities
and parts of the infrastructure are not sufficient
Infrastructure retrofitting is presented in Section 3.3, Shakhbout City is an Emirati Neighbourhood located to meet future needs. As a result, it is intended to
and provides the principles necessary to retrofit in the greater Abu Dhabi City, some 30 km south east enhance the infrastructure network to respond to
utilities into existing streets in the Emirate of Abu of Abu Dhabi Island, initially developed to respond to demand. All streets are already built and a number of
Dhabi. the Emirate's rapid population growth. The Shakhbout utilities exist.
City layout was based on a grid system and mainly
This sample project demonstrates how the consists of residential plots. The following presents an infrastructure retrofitting
overarching infrastructure retrofitting principles may example, by applying the step-by-step guide to
be applied to a real life project on existing streets and Around 45% of the allocated 3,000 plus villa plots Shakhbout City.
the utility corridors arrangement developed based on are currently built. Shakhbout City's population will
the step-by-step guide. continue to expand until it reaches the projected
175,000 figure. Step I: Understand the Land Use
The selected project is located on Abu Dhabi
Mainland, south east of Abu Dhabi Island, and is an
existing residential development initially planned and Step I consists of collecting all the data necessary to
built for the Emirati population. understand the existing and proposed land uses and
constraints.These may include the following:

• Land Use Context: Residential/Emirati


Neighbourhood;
• Existing plot use: Primarily Residential;
• Existing community facilities: Primarily religious
with no other public amenities; and
• Existing Street Families: Various street types,
Abu Dhabi Island for which the terminology has been translated to
USDM street typology.
Once the existing situation and constraints are
understood (the aerial view indicates Shakhbout City
Shakhbout City as it is today), infrastructure retrofitting objectives
may be established based on the intended new land
uses as indicated in Figure B.1.

In this sample project, infrastructure retrofitting will


be applied to the identified existing Access Lane.

Abu Dhabi Mainland


Appendix B Page 2
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Appendix B - Sample Project for Infrastructure Retrofitti
Existing land uses 7.7km (approx.)

Existing street hierarchy

Aerial view

Land Use Legend Road Hierarchy


Residential villa Residential Boulevard
Access lane to be retrofitted Residential Mixed-use Residential Avenue
(See Figure B.2)
Residential apartment Residential Street
Park Residential Access Lane
School
Figure B.1.  Shakhbout City Master Plan

Appendix B Page 3
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Appendix B - Sample Project for Infrastructure Retrofitti

Step II: Identify Infrastructure Retrofitting Objectives


As a result, the following utility corridors are to be The development of utility network designs for the
Figure B.2 illustrates the existing Access Lane selected for
retrofitted to the existing selected Shakhbout City selected three utilities to be retrofitted is then required
this sample project, which presents the characteristics of
Access Lane: based on demands, GFA, population, catchment areas,
typical street in Shakhbout City, including:
• A new wastewater corridor; existing utility connections, utility plot allocations etc.
1 No landscaping; • A new gas corridor; and
2 Narrow Pedestrian Realm; and • Irrigation corridors for new trees.
3 Wide Travel Lanes.

Based on the existing situation, retrofitting objectives


for Shakhbout City are identified as a result of land use
changes:

• Plan or allocate land for new public amenities;


• New public amenities are required; 1 1
• Improve the Pedestrian Realm; 2 3 3 2
• Utilise street improvement strategies (resurfacing
works); and
• Narrow Travel lanes to USDM standard. Figure B.2.  Typical Access Lane in Shakhbout City

Step III: Develop Cross Section of Existing Streets

This step consists of making use of data collected during 6 27.4 m


Step I and developing a cross section to establish the 1 2 3 4 2 1
location of all existing street elements and utilities. Figure 6.9 m 2.0 m 3.6 m 3.6 m 2.5 m 2.0 m 6.8 m
B.3 illustrates the salient as-built utility locations for the
selected Access Lane:

1
No landscape/shading for pedestrians;
2 2 m wide Pedestrian Realm;
3 4 m wide Travel Lanes;
4 On-street parallel parking on one side; 5

5 Scattered utilities corridor widths undefined; and


6 Wide RoW width for a Access Lane. Figure B.3.  As-Built Utility Cross Section for the selected Access Lanes in Shakhbout City

Appendix B Page 4
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Appendix B - Sample Project for Infrastructure Retrofitti
Step IV: Select Closest Applicable UCDM Cross Section
Arrangement

The street typology for the selected street is a Residential Access Lane. In
order to select the most applicable utility cross section arrangement from
the Manual, the following attributes must be understood:
• The number of existing Travel Lanes;

Match line
• The configuration of existing parking; and
• The width and composition of the Pedestrian Realm.

The cross section illustrated in Figure B.4 is therefore selected from the
Manual as the closest applicable cross section. It is noted that the overall
RoW is narrower than the existing Access Lane, however the configuration
of street elements match. The Pedestrian Realm widths on the UCDM
typical arrangement may therefore be stretched to match the existing.

Figure B.4.  UCDM typical Residential Access Lane (16 m wide)


Step V: Adjust and Finalise Utility Corridors Retrofit in Optimal In this example, curbs are not being
realigned as part of a street retrofit
Location
Existing RoW = 27.4 m

Wider Pedestrian Realm Travel Lanes Parking Wider Pedestrian Realm


Based on the available space, the utilities identified during Step III may
8.9 m 3.6 m 3.6 m 2.5 m 8.8 m
be located in the most optimal locations based on the UCDM location
rules and reservation widths. As illustrated in Figure B.5, the following
infrastructure retrofitting is achieved:

A The Pedestrian Realm is widened (previously just a sidewalk);


B Shade through landscape is provided and irrigation pipelines are
added adjacent to the tree corridor;
C A additional row of street lighting columns is added to light the
widened Pedestrian Realm;
A B C D E B A
Since resurfacing is taking place, it is possible to place new utilities under
the Travel Lanes. Space would otherwise be sought within the Pedestrian
Realm:

D A gas pipeline is added under the Travel Lane, away from existing
buildings; and Figure B.5.  Adjusted utility corridors in most optimal location
E A wastewater pipeline is added under the Travel Lane.
Appendix B Page 5
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Appendix B - Sample Project for Infrastructure Retrofitti

Appendix B Page 6
Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangements

C.1 City Context


C.2 Town Context
C.3 Commercial Context
C.4 Residential/Emirati Neighbourhood Context
C.5 Industrial Context
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Typical

Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement

TYPICAL CITY BOULEVARD WITH FRONTAGE LANE


City
Town

*
Commercial

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER
Neighbourhood
Res./Emirati

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY
Industrial

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

*Wastewater on Side 2 may alternatively be located within Frontage Lane.


Appendix C Page 2
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

Typical
Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement

TYPICAL CITY AVENUE WITHOUT FRONTAGE LANE WITH ON-STREET PARKING AND CYCLE TRACK ON BOTH SIDES

City
Town
Commercial
WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER

Neighbourhood
Res./Emirati
DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY

Industrial
G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix C Page 3
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Typical

Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement

TYPICAL CITY STREET WITH ON-STREET PARKING ON BOTH SIDES


City
Town
Commercial

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER
Neighbourhood
Res./Emirati

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY
Industrial

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix C Page 4
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

Typical
Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement

TYPICAL CITY ACCESS LANE

City
Town
*

Commercial
WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

Neighbourhood
ST STORMWATER

Res./Emirati
DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY

Industrial
G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

* Where Power Distribution is located under a Travel Lane, block paving


shall be adopted.
Appendix C Page 5
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Typical

Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement

TYPICAL TOWN BOULEVARD WITHOUT FRONTAGE LANE


City
Town
Commercial

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER
Neighbourhood
Res./Emirati

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY
Industrial

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix C Page 6
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

Typical
Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement

TYPICAL TOWN AVENUE WITHOUT FRONTAGE LANE WITH ON-STREET PARKING AND CYCLE TRACK ON BOTH SIDES

City
Town
Commercial
WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER

Neighbourhood
Res./Emirati
DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY

Industrial
G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix C Page 7
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Typical

Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement

TYPICAL TOWN STREET WITH ON-STREET PARKING ON BOTH SIDES


City
Town

*
Commercial

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER
Neighbourhood
Res./Emirati

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY
Industrial

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

* Where District Cooling is not required, an additional


Telecommunications corridor may be provided.
Appendix C Page 8
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

Typical
Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement

TYPICAL TOWN STREET WITH ON-STREET PARKING AND TREES ON BOTH SIDES

City
Town
*

Commercial
WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER

Neighbourhood
Res./Emirati
DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY

Industrial
G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

* Where District Cooling is not required, an additional


Telecommunications corridor may be provided.
Appendix C Page 9
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Typical

Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement

TYPICAL TOWN ACCESS LANE


City
Town

*
Commercial

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER
Neighbourhood
Res./Emirati

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY
Industrial

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

* Where Power Distribution is located under a Travel Lane, block paving shall
be adopted.
Appendix C Page 10
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

Typical
Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement

TYPICAL COMMERCIAL BOULEVARD WITH FRONTAGE LANE

City
Town
*

Commercial
WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER

Neighbourhood
Res./Emirati
DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY

Industrial
G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

* Wastewater on Side 2 may alternatively be located within Frontage Lane.

Appendix C Page 11
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Typical

Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement

TYPICAL COMMERCIAL AVENUE WITHOUT FRONTAGE LANE WITH ON-STREET PARKING AND CYCLE TRACK ON BOTH SIDES
City
Town
Commercial

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER
Neighbourhood
Res./Emirati

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY
Industrial

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix C Page 12
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

Typical
Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement

TYPICAL COMMERCIAL STREET WITH ON-STREET PARKING ON BOTH SIDES

City
Town
*

Commercial
WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER

Neighbourhood
Res./Emirati
DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY

Industrial
G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

* Where District Cooling is not required, an additional


Telecommunications corridor may be provided.
Appendix C Page 13
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Typical

Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement


TYPICAL COMMERCIAL ACCESS LANE
City
Town
Commercial

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER
Neighbourhood
Res./Emirati

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY
Industrial

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

* Where Power Distribution is located under a Travel Lane, block paving shall
be adopted.

Appendix C Page 14
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

Typical
Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement

TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL/EMIRATI NEIGHBOURHOOD BOULEVARD WITHOUT FRONTAGE LANE

City
Town
Commercial
WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER

Neighbourhood
Res./Emirati
DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY

Industrial
G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix C Page 15
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Typical

Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement

TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL/EMIRATI NEIGHBOURHOOD AVENUE WITHOUT FRONTAGE LANE WITH ON-STREET PARKING AND CYCLE TRACK ON BOTH SIDES
City
Town
Commercial

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER
Neighbourhood
Res./Emirati

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY
Industrial

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix C Page 16
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

Typical
Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement

TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL/EMIRATI NEIGHBOURHOOD STREET WITH ON-STREET PARKING ON BOTH SIDES

City
Town
Commercial
WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER

Neighbourhood
Res./Emirati
DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY

Industrial
G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix C Page 17
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Typical

Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement

TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL/EMIRATI NEIGHBOURHOOD ACCESS LANE WITH ON-STREET PARKING ON ONE SIDE
City
Town
Commercial

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER
Neighbourhood
Res./Emirati

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY
Industrial

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix C Page 18
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

Typical
Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement

TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL/EMIRATI NEIGHBOURHOOD ACCESS LANE

City
Town
Commercial
WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER

Neighbourhood
Res./Emirati
DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY

Industrial
G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix C Page 19
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Typical

Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement

TYPICAL INDUSTRIAL BOULEVARD WITH FRONTAGE LANE


City
Town

*
Commercial

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION
Neighbourhood

ST STORMWATER
Res./Emirati

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY
Industrial

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

* Wastewater on Side 2 may alternatively be located within Frontage Lane.

Appendix C Page 20
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

Typical
Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement

TYPICAL INDUSTRIAL AVENUE WITHOUT FRONTAGE LANE WITH ON-STREET PARKING AND CYCLE TRACK ON BOTH SIDES

City
Town
Commercial
WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER

Neighbourhood
Res./Emirati
DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY

Industrial
G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix C Page 21
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Typical

Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement

TYPICAL INDUSTRIAL STREET WITH ON-STREET PARKING ON BOTH SIDES


City
Town
Commercial

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER
Neighbourhood
Res./Emirati

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY
Industrial

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix C Page 22
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

Typical
Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement

TYPICAL INDUSTRIAL ACCESS LANE

City
Town
*

Commercial
WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER

Neighbourhood
Res./Emirati
DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY

Industrial
G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

* Where Power Distribution is located under a Travel Lane, block paving


shall be adopted.
Appendix C Page 23
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Appendix C - Typical Utility Corridor Arrangement

Appendix C Page 24
Appendix D - Minimum Utility Corridor Arrangements
D.1 Boulevards
D.2 Avenues
D.3 Streets
D.4 Access Lanes
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Minimum

Appendix D - Minimum Utility Corridor Arrangement

MINIMUM BOULEVARD WITHOUT FRONTAGE LANE WITH UTILITY TUNNEL (FOR ALL CONTEXTS)
Note:
1. For specific context
(e.g. Industrial), street
elements shall be
in accordance with
USDM minimum
requirements.
Boulevards

2. District Cooling is
not required for
Residential/Emirati
Neighborhood
contexts.
Avenues

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION
Streets

ST STORMWATER

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE
Access Lanes

HS HIGH SECURITY

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix D Page 2
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

Minimum
Appendix D - Minimum Utility Corridor Arrangement

MINIMUM BOULEVARD WITHOUT FRONTAGE LANE (FOR ALL CONTEXTS)


Note:
1. For specific context
(e.g. Industrial), street
elements shall be
in accordance with
USDM minimum
requirements.

Boulevards
2. District Cooling is
not required for
Residential/Emirati
Neighborhood
contexts.

Avenues
WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

Streets
ST STORMWATER

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

Access Lanes
HS HIGH SECURITY

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix D Page 3
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Minimum

Appendix D - Minimum Utility Corridor Arrangement

MINIMUM BOULEVARD WITHOUT FRONTAGE LANE WITH CYCLE TRACK ON BOTH SIDES (FOR ALL CONTEXTS)
Note:
1. For specific context
(e.g. Industrial), street
elements shall be
in accordance with
USDM minimum
requirements.
Boulevards

2. District Cooling is
not required for
Residential/Emirati
Neighborhood
contexts.
Avenues

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION
Streets

ST STORMWATER

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE
Access Lanes

HS HIGH SECURITY

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix D Page 4
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

Minimum
Appendix D - Minimum Utility Corridor Arrangement

MINIMUM BOULEVARD WITH FRONTAGE LANE (FOR ALL CONTEXTS)

Boulevards
Avenues
WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER

Streets
DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY

Access Lanes
G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Note:
1. For specific context (e.g. Industrial), street elements shall be in accordance with USDM minimum requirements.
2. District Cooling is not required for Residential/Emirati neighborhood contexts.

Appendix D Page 5
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Minimum

Appendix D - Minimum Utility Corridor Arrangement

MINIMUM AVENUE WITHOUT FRONTAGE LANE (FOR CITY, TOWN, COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL CONTEXTS)
Note:
1. For specific context (e.g.
Industrial), street elements shall
be in accordance with USDM
minimum requirements.
Boulevards
Avenues

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION
Streets

ST STORMWATER

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE
Access Lanes

HS HIGH SECURITY

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix D Page 6
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

Minimum
Appendix D - Minimum Utility Corridor Arrangement

MINIMUM AVENUE WITHOUT FRONTAGE LANE (FOR RESIDENTIAL/EMIRATI NEIGHBOURHOOD CONTEXT)

Boulevards
Avenues
WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

Streets
ST STORMWATER

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

Access Lanes
HS HIGH SECURITY

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix D Page 7
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Minimum

Appendix D - Minimum Utility Corridor Arrangement

MINIMUM AVENUE WITHOUT FRONTAGE LANE WITH ON-STREET PARKING ON BOTH SIDES (FOR CITY, TOWN, COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL CONTEXTS)
Note:
1. For specific
context (e.g.
Industrial), street
elements shall be
in accordance with
USDM minimum
Boulevards

requirements.
Avenues

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION
Streets

ST STORMWATER

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE
Access Lanes

HS HIGH SECURITY

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix D Page 8
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

Minimum
Appendix D - Minimum Utility Corridor Arrangement

MINIMUM AVENUE WITHOUT FRONTAGE LANE WITH ON-STREET PARKING ON BOTH SIDES (FOR RESIDENTIAL/EMIRATI NEIGHBOURHOOD CONTEXT)

Boulevards
Avenues
WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

Streets
ST STORMWATER

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

Access Lanes
HS HIGH SECURITY

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix D Page 9
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Minimum

Appendix D - Minimum Utility Corridor Arrangement

MINIMUM AVENUE WITHOUT FRONTAGE LANE WITH ON-STREET PARKING AND CYCLE TRACK ON BOTH SIDES (FOR ALL CONTEXTS)
Note:
1. For specific context,
street elements shall be
in accordance with USDM
minimum requirements.
2. District Cooling is not
required for Residential/
Boulevards

Emirati Neighborhood
contexts.
Avenues

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION
Streets

ST STORMWATER

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE
Access Lanes

HS HIGH SECURITY

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix D Page 10
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

Minimum
Appendix D - Minimum Utility Corridor Arrangement

MINIMUM AVENUE WITH FRONTAGE LANE (FOR ALL CONTEXTS)


Note:
1. For specific context
(e.g. Industrial), street
elements shall be in
accordance with USDM
minimum requirements.
2. District Cooling is not

Boulevards
required for Residential/
Emirati Neighborhood
contexts.

Avenues
WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

Streets
ST STORMWATER

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

Access Lanes
HS HIGH SECURITY

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix D Page 11
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Minimum

Appendix D - Minimum Utility Corridor Arrangement

MINIMUM STREET WITH ON-STREET PARKING ON BOTH SIDES (FOR INDUSTRIAL CONTEXT)
Boulevards
Avenues

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION
Streets

ST STORMWATER

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE
Access Lanes

HS HIGH SECURITY

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix D Page 12
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

Minimum
Appendix D - Minimum Utility Corridor Arrangement

MINIMUM STREET WITH ON-STREET PARKING AND CYCLE TRACK ON BOTH SIDES (FOR ALL CONTEXTS)
Note:
1. For specific context (e.g. Industrial), street
elements shall be in accordance with USDM
minimum requirements.
2. District Cooling is not required for
Residential/Emirati Neighborhood contexts.

Boulevards
Avenues
WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

IRR IRRIGATION

Streets
ST STORMWATER

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

Access Lanes
HS HIGH SECURITY

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix D Page 13
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Minimum

Appendix D - Minimum Utility Corridor Arrangement

MINIMUM ACCESS LANE WITH ON-STREET PARKING ON ONE SIDE (FOR CITY, TOWN, COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL CONTEXTS)
Note:
1. For specific context (e.g. Industrial), street elements
shall be in accordance with USDM minimum
requirements.
Boulevards
Avenues

WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER
Streets

IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION
Access Lanes

TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix D Page 14
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual

Minimum
Appendix D - Minimum Utility Corridor Arrangement

MINIMUM ACCESS LANE WITH ON-STREET PARKING ON BOTH SIDES (FOR RESIDENTIAL/EMIRATI NEIGHBOURHOOD CONTEXT)

Boulevards
Avenues
WD WATER DISTRIBUTION

WW WASTEWATER

Streets
IRR IRRIGATION

ST STORMWATER

DCP DISTRICT COOLING

PT POWER TRANSMISSION

PD POWER DISTRIBUTION

SL STREET LIGHTING

TEL TELECOMMUNICATION

Access Lanes
TS TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE

HS HIGH SECURITY

G GAS

HC HOUSE CONNECTION

Appendix D Page 15
Appendix D Page 16
Appendix E - Definitions
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Appendix E - Definition

Access Lane Community Curb


A very low vehicle capacity 1+1 street (one lane in A group of people living within a defined geographic A vertical separation between the motor vehicle
each direction). Anticipated very low traffic volumes area or political boundary such as a neighbourhood, Travelled Way and the Pedestrian Realm.
and very low speeds. district, town, city or region.
Cycle
Avenue Complete Streets A non-motorised, human-powered wheeled vehicle.
A medium vehicle priority 2+2 street (two lanes in Streets that are designed and built to accommodate Can include 2-wheel cycles, tandem cycles, 3-wheel
each direction). Avenues may have Frontage Lanes. all users, including cyclists, transit riders, private tricycles, bikes with trailers, etc.
motor vehicle drivers and pedestrians of all ages and
Boulevard abilities, in a safe and comfortable manner. Cycle Lane
A high vehicle capacity 3+3 street (three lanes in An exclusive lane for cycle travel located at the outer
each direction). Boulevards may have Frontage Lanes. Conduit edges of the travelled way. Cycle lanes can be one
Existing streets with 3+3 or more lanes are also An enclosed tubular casing, singular or multiple, way or two ways.
classified as Boulevards. for the protection of wires, cables, or pipe lines,
usually jacketed and often extended from manhole to Design
Casing manhole.
The 'design' refers to the selection of utility corridor
A larger pipe, conduit or duct enclosing a utility pipe/ locations and widths only and not the design of the
cable. Casings are installed in open cuts or by boring Context utilities.
or driving. The nature of the natural or built environment created
by the land, topography, natural features, buildings Designer
Chamber Corridor and associated features, land use types and activities
A registered professional engaged by utility
on property adjacent to streets and on sidewalks,
Corridor within the RoW for allocation of chambers providers, developers or consultants to develop plans,
and a broader area created by the surrounding
for a specific utility. For certain utilities, the chamber specifications and designs of utility/infrastructure
neighbourhood, district or community. Context also
corridors extend beyond the service corridor limits. systems.
refers to the diversity of users of the environment.

Clearance Developer
Cost Benefit Analysis
Clear distance between utility corridors to plot/ Entity engaged in the preparation/development of a
A systematic process for calculating and comparing
building boundary line or between adjacent utilities. site.
benefits and costs of a project.

Commercial Uses Urban Development Review Process


Cross section
Areas throughout the city intended to provide a A UPC review process to ensure individual
A graphic presentation of the interior of an object as
variety of working, shopping and service options and developments complement each other to advance
it is sliced along a plane, usually at right angles to an
convenience. Vision 2030.
axis.

Appendix E Page 2
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Appendix E - Definition

Deviation Fibre Optic Network Goal


Any digression from standards and guidelines. A cable system for transmitting information from one An ideal future outcome, condition or state related to
place to another by sending pulses of light through an the public health, safety or general welfare toward
Directly Buried optical fibre. which planning, design and implementation measures
are directed.
Installing a utility underground without encasement.
Fill
Backfill alongside a pipe, duct line, conduits, cables, Grade Separation/Grade-separated Crossing
District Cooling Network
etc. A facility that allows movement over or under a
A pipeline system consisting of centralised production
barrier, such as a street or waterway.
and distribution of cooling energy within a district.
Fire Fighting Water Supply Network
A system of pipelines and fire hydrants for providing Grate
Drainage Inlet
water to assist in extinguishing a fire. A framework of lattice, grid or bars that prevents
See Stormwater Drainage Inlet.
large objects from falling into a drainage inlet.
Fire Hydrant
Duct
A source of water provided to enable firefighters Gravity Main
An enclosed tubular casing for protecting wires, lines,
to tap into the municipal water supply to assist in A pipe through which a fluid flows due to the forces
or cables, often flexible or semi-rigid.
extinguishing fires. of gravity alone and not to an applied pressure head.

Encasement
Frontage Lane Guideline
A structural element that surrounds a carrier or
Additional access lane usually parallel to a main Guidelines are not mandatory but are considered the
casing.
high vehicle capacity street carriageway, usually preferred practice in typical situations.
associated with lower speeds and multiple access
Environment points. High Security Networks
The natural and built places within or surrounding a
The Fibre Optic Systems for high security networks.
community. Furnishings Zone
The area of the Pedestrian Realm that provides a Highway
Estidama buffer between pedestrians and the Edge zone, Cycle
A limited access roadway designed largely for use by
‘Estidama’, which means sustainability in Arabic, Track, parking lane and/or vehicle Travel Lanes.
automobiles. The utility corridors design requirements
is a UPC initiative to create more sustainable
for highways are different from those of urban streets
developments and communities. It is tailored to Abu Gas Supply Network and are not covered by this Manual.
Dhabi and Vision 2030 and aims to balance four
A pipeline system (gas lines) for the transport of gas
pillars: environmental, economic, cultural, and social.
fuels and their distribution among consumers.

Appendix E Page 3
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Appendix E - Definition

House Connection Corridor Irrigation Water Manhole


An unobstructed horizontal clearance required Typically recycled water is the main source of An opening in an underground system which workers
between the plot boundary and the nearest service irrigation water. However, in some cases, potable may enter for the purpose of making installations,
corridor, which contains only those chambers water is used. removals, inspections, repairs, connections and tests.
associated with the plot connections or above-ground
appurtenances, such as feeder pillars, electrical Junction Median
cabinets, telecommunication cabinets, etc.
Where two or more public streets meet. They are The portion of a divided road/street separating the
No services are permitted to be installed longitudinally characterised by a high level of activity and shared travelled way for traffic in opposite directions.
within the House Connection corridor. use, multi-modal conflicts, complex movements and
special design treatments. Mixed Use
Horizontal Clearance An area that includes more than one major class of
Landscape uses.
The horizontal width that is maintained free of
obstacles. The planting, configuration and maintenance of
trees, ground cover, shrubbery and other plant Network
material, decorative natural and structural features,
Implementation A system of interconnecting elements.
earth patterning and bedding materials and other
An action, procedure, programme or technique that similar site improvements that serves an aesthetic or
ensures that policies are followed and goals and functional purpose. Objective
objectives are achieved. A specific outcome, condition or state that is an
Land Use Context intermediate step towards attaining a general goal.
Industrial Use
The nature of the natural or built environment created
An area for businesses that have the potential to by the land, topography, natural features, buildings On-Street Parking
create adverse visual, noise or other impacts to and associated features, land use types, and activities A parking area and parking space that is located
adjoining public and residential properties. This on property adjacent to streets and on sidewalks, on the street and/or in areas adjacent to the street
use allows for heavy and light industrial uses, and a broader area created by the surrounding within a right-of-way.
warehousing and distribution, with supporting neighbourhood, district or community. Context also
commercial services and ancillary office space. refers to the diversity of users of the environment. Option
A non-mandatory choice available to the designer.
Irrigation Lane Transition
The application of water to the land or soil that is A lane transition is the section of varying lane width Parking Lane
used to assist in the maintenance of landscapes, and between two different lane width sections.
revegetation of disturbed soils in dry areas and during The portion of the roadway for the parking of
periods of inadequate rainfall. vehicles.
Local Street
Streets with lower levels of traffic mobility and
higher levels of land access, serving residential and
commercial.

Appendix E Page 4
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Appendix E - Definition

Pearl Rating System Pressure Main Right-of-Way (RoW)


The Estidama Pearl Rating System (PRS) provides A pipe through which a fluid flows due to an applied Publicly operated corridor (between plot boundaries)
design guidance and detailed requirements for rating pressure head. for transport of all modes and utilities; acquired,
a project’s potential performance throughout its dedicated or reserved for the construction, operation
lifecycle, from design and construction through to Public Realm and maintenance of a road or street.
operation.
Publicly used/owned land or right-of-way.
Road
Pedestrian A street serving undeveloped, agricultural and very
Recycled Water
A person travelling on foot or in a wheelchair. low density areas where few, if any, pedestrians
The end product of wastewater reclamation that
would be expected. A road by this definition is not
meets water quality requirements for biodegradable
Pedestrian Realm an urban street and therefore not covered by this
materials, suspended matter and pathogens and in
Manual.
The area between the curb and the property or general is given to uses such as irrigation and district
building line. Pedestrian areas are also included at cooling.
junctions and crossings, as well as bus stops, waiting Rural
platforms and taxi lay-bys. Regulatory Authority A place characterised by undeveloped lands,
agriculture and very low population density, and for
A public authority or government agency responsible
Potable Water Supply (Potable water) the purpose of this Manual, as defined in the maps
for exercising autonomous authority over some area
contained in Plan Capital 2030, Plan Al Ain 2030 and
Water that meets established drinking water of human activity in a regulatory or supervisory
Plan Al Gharbia 2030.
standards. capacity.

Service Corridor
Potable Water Network Residential Uses
Corridor within the RoW allocated for installing pipes,
A system of engineered hydrologic and hydraulic Areas that provide a variety of housing opportunities,
cables or ducts for a specific utility.
components which provide a potable water supply to allowing for densities varying from villas to multi-
consumers. dwelling residential buildings.
Shared Space
Power Distribution Retrofit Space where chamber corridors of two adjacent
utilities overlap, achieved by the staggering of
Final stage in the delivery of electricity to end users. Install or fit for use in or on an existing structure or
their chambers. The width of the shared space is a
facility.
function of the offset between service and chamber
Power Transmission corridors (dmin) of each utility. Space within service
The bulk transfer of electrical energy from primary Reviewing Agency corridors cannot be shared.
stations to substations located near demand centres. Relevant authority responsible for the review and
approval of street/network plans and designs, as Sidewalk
directed by the Abu Dhabi Government.
All areas not carrying vehicular traffic.

Appendix E Page 5
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Appendix E - Definition

Sikka Street Tram


A narrow pedestrian path between plots, which is A low vehicle priority 1+1 street (one lane in each A type of lightweight, street-running passenger train.
part of a wider pedestrian network, that connects direction).
plots, public open spaces and/or community facilities Transit
and amenities within a neighbourhood (Plural: Street Lighting Any type of transport shared by the public in large
sikkak).
A lighting system illuminating a street and typically numbers, including bus, light rail, tram or Metro.
mounted on a tall post.
Solid Waste
Transit Median
Commonly known as trash or garbage, refuse or Street Type A portion of median reserved for the exclusive use of
rubbish is a waste type consisting of everyday items
A system of categorising streets by contextual land public transit vehicles.
that are discarded by the public.
use and travel demand for the purpose of description,
design and management. Transition
Spare Corridor
(1) A change in street type, context, right-of-way
An unused space within the RoW maintained for Streetscape width, number of lanes, underground utilities, Public
future development. Allocation of spare corridors
The elements of a street including the sidewalk, Realm or neighbourhood or district. (2) The provision
may be optimised by minimising the space between
Median, street furniture, trees and open spaces that of a smooth taper where utility corridors widths
adjacent utility corridors.
combine to form the street’s character. diverge or merge, or others have been added or
dropped.
Stakeholders
Sustainability
Groups or individuals that have an interest (stake) in Transmission Main
Providing the best for people and the environment
the outcome of a planning or project development
both now and in the indefinite future. Pipelines (mains) installed for the purpose of
process.
transmitting a fluid between sources of supply, from
Telecommunications Network a source to one or more distribution centres, or to one
Standard or more large-volume customers.
The exchange of information over significant
A requirement or mandate.
distances by electronic means.
Transport Corridor
Stormwater Drainage Inlet A transport pathway that provides for the movement
Traffic Surveillance
Site where water run-off from the street or sidewalk of people and goods between and within activity
The fibre optics systems for monitoring of the
enters the stormwater drain system. centres.
behaviour, activities or other changing information
of vehicular traffic for the purpose of influencing,
Stormwater Network managing, directing or protecting. Travel Lane
A system of pipes and manholes to collect The portion of the roadway for the movement of
stormwater after a rainfall event for eventual disposal. vehicles, exclusive of shoulders and auxiliary lanes.

Appendix E Page 6
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Appendix E - Definition

Traveled Way Utility Provider


The public right-of-way between curbs, including An organisation, subject to governmental regulation,
Parking Lanes and Travel Lanes for private vehicles, that provides an essential commodity or service, such
goods movement, transit vehicles and Cycle Lanes. as water, electricity, transportation or communication
The Medians, turn lanes, exclusive transit lanes, curbs to the public.
and gutters and loading/unloading zones are included
in the Travelled Way. Utility Tunnel
A structure built aboveground or underground
Tree containing public utilities, with its own facilities
A plant having a permanently woody main stem or including drainage, ventilation, lighting,
trunk, ordinarily growing to a considerable height and communication, electricity and relevant systems of
usually developing branches at some distance from surveillance and detection.
the ground.
Wastewater
Trench The water-borne waste generated by any domestic,
A narrow open excavation. commercial or industrial activity.

Urban Wastewater Network


A comparative term, distinct from ‘rural’, A collection system that includes sewerage pipes
characterised by density, development intensity and pumping stations, used for the transportation of
and activity, and for the purpose of this Manual, as wastewater from plots to a wastewater treatment
defined in the maps contained in Plan Capital 2030, system.
Plan Al Ain 2030 and Plan Al Gharbia 2030.

Utility
A commodity or service, such as electricity, water or
public transportation, provided by a utility provider.

Utility Corridor
Space within the RoW allocated for a specific service
installation including pipe, cable and ducts.

Utility Network
A system of utility pipe lines or cables that
interconnects to serve some specific purposes.

Appendix E Page 7
Appendix E Page 8
Appendix F - References
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Appendix F - References

Overall Corridor Designs Abu Dhabi Urban Planning Council. (2013). Plan Abu Dhabi Water & Electricity Authority. (2009).
Al Gharbia 2030. http://www.upc.gov.ae/abu- Standard Specifications for Water Works-Rev3
Abu Dhabi City Municipality. (2011). Quality
dhabi-2030/al-gharbia-2030.aspx?lang=en-US
Control & Quality Assurance Procedure. http:// Regulation & Supervision Bureau. (2009). Guide to
www.adm.gov.ae/en/DocumentCentre/ Abu Dhabi Urban Planning Council. (2010). Estidama Water Supply Regulations–Rev 2. http://www.rsb.
PDF/112220111633438102500_ADM%20LR.PDF Pearl Rating System. http://estidama.org/pearl- gov.ae/uploads/WaterSupplyRegs2009Guide.pdf
rating-system-v10.aspx?lang=en-US
Abu Dhabi City Municipality. (2002). Requirements TRANSCO. (2012). The Water Transmission Code (Rev
and Recommendations for Nondisruptive Road Abu Dhabi Urban Planning Council. (2011). Online Tool 4). http://www.transco.ae/media/pdf/WTC%20
Crossings - 2002 Edition / Version 1.0 . http:// USDM. Version%204%20January%202012.pdf
www.adm.gov.ae/en/DocumentCentre/
PDF/9220121603426488750_NDRC%20 Abu Dhabi Urban Planning Council. (2010). GIS
Manual-2002_draft_070812.pdf Wastewater Corridors
Section Spatial Data Submission Specifications.
Abu Dhabi Sewerage Services Company. (2013).
Abu Dhabi City Municipality. (2011). Roadway Design Abu Dhabi Urban Planning Council. (2009). Plan Al Design Guidelines-Rev 02.
Manual-Roads and Bridges. Ain 2030- Urban Structure Framework Plan. http://
www.upc.gov.ae/abu-dhabi-2030/al-ain-2030. Abu Dhabi Sewerage Services Company. (2013). New
Abu Dhabi City Municipality. (2012). Spatial Data aspx?lang=en-US ADSSC Guidelines -13-1033–ATT-ADSSC Standard
Division Mapping Section (PRSM)-Standards & Specifications & Drawings-March 2013.
Guidelines for Roads and Utility Service Corridors Abu Dhabi Urban Planning Council. (2007). Plan
Planning, Creation and Editing. Capital 2030: Urban Structure Framework Plan. ASTM Practice Standard D 2321–08 for Underground
http://www.upc.gov.ae/abu-dhabi-2030/ Installation of Thermoplastic Pipe for Sewers and Other
Abu Dhabi City Municipality. (1998). Standard capital-2030.aspx?lang=en-US Gravity-Flow Applications.
Drawings.

Abu Dhabi City Municipality. (2009). Town Potable Water Corridors Irrigation Corridors
Planning Sector, Spatial Data Directorate-Provisional Abu Dhabi Distribution Company / Al Ain Distribution Abu Dhabi City Municipality–Municipalities
Specifications for Geo-Spatial Data Submission (Set of Company / Abu Dhabi Company for Servicing Remote Infrastructure Sector - Parks and Recreational
Documents)-Version 0.3. Areas. (2010). The Water Distribution Code. http:// Facilities Directorate.Design Standards Manual for
www.aadc.ae/img/394bc1b2-e24c-475d-9a01- Irrigation & Treated Sewage Effluent System.
Abu Dhabi Urban Planning Council. (2011). Abu Dhabi
c4d31ee122cc.pdf
Public Realm Design Manual. http://www.upc.gov.ae/ Abu Dhabi City Municipality (2009) - Infrastructure
prdm/index.asp Abu Dhabi Distribution Company–Water Distribution and Municipal Assets Sector, Parks and Recreational
Division–Field Customer Services Section. General Facilities Division – Landscape Design Guidelines.
Abu Dhabi Urban Planning Council. (2010). Abu Dhabi
Guidelines.
Urban Street Design Manual, version 1.1.http://www. Abu Dhabi City Municipality–Infrastructure and
upc.gov.ae/template/upc/pdf/USDM-Manual-English- Abu Dhabi Water & Electricity Authority. (2001). Municipal Assets Sector, Parks and Recreational
v1.1.pdf Standard Drawings for Water Works. Facilities Directorate - Standard Drawings.

Appendix F Page 2
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Appendix F - References

Municipality Abu Dhabi City, Public Gardens Subsurface Corridors Telecommunication Corridors
Directorate. (2005). General Specifications for
Department of Municipal Affairs. (2011). Subsurface Du (telecom infrastructure standards for buildings)
Landscape Works – Section 02850-Irrigation Systems
Irrigation System-Contract Specifications.
Ongoing Operations and Maintenance.
Etisalat. (2013). Design Guide For Fibre-To-The-
Department of Municipal Affairs / Environmental Home (FTTH) Requirements in New Buildings. http://
Municipality Abu Dhabi City, Public Gardens
Agency Abu Dhabi. (2011). Subsurface Irrigation www.etisalat.ae/en/personal/support/download/
Directorate. (2005). General Specifications for
System Guidelines Manual (Design / Installation / downloads/usermanual.jsp
Landscape Works– Section 02800-Irrigation Systems.
Operation & Maintenance.
Gas Corridors
Stormwater Corridors
Power Corridors
Institution of Gas Engineers & Managers (IGEM).
Abu Dhabi City Municipality, (1998). Road Section-
Abu Dhabi Distribution Company / Al Ain Distribution (2013). IGEM Standards. http://www.igem.org.uk/
Standard Drawings-Surface Drainage Details.
Company / Abu Dhabi Company for Servicing Remote media/227989/igem%20standards%20list%20
Abu Dhabi City Municipality Sewerage Projects Areas. (2005). The Electricity Distribution Code- august%202013.pdf
Committee. (2004). Design Standards Manual. Version 3. http://www.aadc.ae/img/a1a36130-
94d4-4420-9b2d-36245fa72975.pdf
Municipality Abu Dhabi City. Road Design Manual-
Drainage. Abu Dhabi Water & Electricity Authority. (2011).
ADWEA / ADDC / AADC Standard Technical
Specifications for Electric Works - Rev 0.
District Cooling Corridors
Fittons. Typical Details. TRANSCO. (2012). The Electricity Transmission Code
(Rev 4 – Version 1). http://www.transco.ae/media/
TABREED. Typical Details. pdf/Electricity%20Transmission%20Code%20
Version%20.1_Revision.4.pdf

Appendix F Page 3
Appendix F Page 4
Acknowledgements
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Acknowledgements

Abu Dhabi Urban Planning Council Contributing Stakeholders Regulation and Supervision Bureau - RSB
Telecommunication Regulatory Agency - TRA
H.E. Falah Mohamed Al Ahbabi Abu Dhabi City Municipality - ADM
Western Region Municipality - WRM
Director General, Abu Dhabi Urban Planning Council Abu Dhabi Company for Onshore Oil Operations - ADCO
Abdulla Al Sahi, Executive Director, Planning and Abu Dhabi Distribution Company - ADDC Consultant Team
Infrastructure Sector Abu Dhabi National Oil Company - ADNOC Distribution Version 1.0 Dar Al Handasa
Amer Al Hammadi, Executive Director, Corporate Services Abu Dhabi Oil Refining Company - TAKREER Version 1.1 KEO International Consultants
Sector
Abu Dhabi Sewerage Services Company - ADSSC
Bill Lashbrook, Senior Planning Manager, Infrastructure
Abu Dhabi Signal Corps
Planning Department
Abu Dhabi Transmission and Despatch Company - TRANSCO
Yousif Al Fahim, Planning Manager, Infrastructure Planning
Section Abu Dhabi Water and Electricity Authority - ADWEA
Salim Harika, Design Manager, Infrastructure Design Section Al Ain City Municipality - AAM
Khulood Al Marzouqi, Planning Manager, Transport Planning Al Ain Distribution Company - AADC
Section
Center of Waste Management Abu Dhabi - TADWEER
Hassan Al Hassani, Planning Manager, Safety and Security
Department of Municipal Affairs - DMA
Section
Department of Transport - DoT
Ahmed Al Zaabi, Project Manager
Dolphin Energy
Angus McIlmoyle, Project Manager
Emirates Integrated Telecommunications Company PJSC - du
Mutasem Abu Sada, Senior Associate Planner
Emirates Telecommunication Corporation - Etisalat
Mohamed Shehab, Senior Associate Planner
Etihad Rail
Geraldine Hurley, Senior Associate Planner
General Directorate of Civil Defense - Abu Dhabi - ADCD
Carla Milane, Senior Associate Planner
General Headquarters of Abu Dhabi Police - GHQ
Mai Al Halabi, Senior Associate Planner
Monitoring and Control Centre - MCC
Euclide Malagrino, Senior Associate Planner
National Central Cooling Company PJSC - Tabreed
Fawaz Al Memari, Associate Planner
National Emergency Crisis and Disasters Management
Adam Treloar, Associate Urban Designer Authority - NCEMA

Acknowledgements Page 2
Abu Dhabi Utility Corridors Design Manual
Version 1.1 © 2016

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