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Thematic Unit Plan and Assessment Assignment

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Name: Michelle Karwowski


Dates of Implementation: February 5-16th (Feb 26th- March 2nd )
(Presentations will continue until every child has presented)
Host School: Cayuga Heights Elementary School
Grade Level: Fourth
Unit Title: Inventions!
Overview of the Unit: This unit develops students understanding of how inventions play a role
in our history. This will be shown through exploring where our “things” come from, how they
evolved, and how they made an impact throughout history and society today. Students will
gather information on inventors and their inventions, discuss the importance of inventions and
take charge of their learning through creative exploration and implementation of skills to create
their own invention. This unit is interdisciplinary, covering topics such as fractions, science,
history, and ELA. Throughout the course of the unit I will be assessing the students and giving
them multiple opportunities in a variety of ways to successfully complete the objectives.
Rationale for the Unit:
The overarching theme for the unit of exploring inventions is for the students to understand how
what we have today, has some historical significance. Understanding how everything came from
somewhere and was made or found by someone helps them understand history and
understanding the concept of evolving. The students know a lot about the technology and things
we have today, but the concept that I want them to understand is where it all came from and how
it came about. Therefore, I will explore the idea of transformative learning for them to take what
they know and find new meanings and discoveries in order to apply it to everyday life. Exploring
inventions and the history behind this unit helps the students see the world differently.
According to Allenman, Brophy & Knighton, “Transformative learning enables us to see some
aspect of the world in a new way, such that we find new meaning in it and value the experience”
(2009, p.58). The students will be able to look at an invention like the cell phone, and
understand what the first telephone was, how it evolved and how it changed the lives of many
people. The historic component of this lesson also overlaps with many other disciplinaries.
This classroom is very diverse in student abilities. I acknowledge these differences by following
both elements from Gardeners multiple intelligences, and Bloom’s taxonomy. I chose to vary
my pedagogy within my lessons in order to accommodate all students. Using Gardeners Multiple
Intelligences I use most of his nine identified intelligences within my teaching. Visually, I
incorporate a video, graphic organizers/checklists, as well as models of projects and directions
for activities. Verbally, I say directions, lead discussions, allow for students to have their own
discussions, work in groups or pairs and present oral presentations to explain their ideas.
Mathematically, I logically delivered sequential information as well as incorporated hands on

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interactive learning. Interpersonally, I created a space where the students could learn with
interaction with one another, varying of grouping and partners. Existentially, I explained how
this unit would fit into their daily lives and effected their school, community and classroom.
Intrapersonally, I differentiated my instruction to accommodate all needs and provided activities
that offered choice as well as varied independent work opportunities. Lastly, I naturalistically
provided graphic organizers and built portfolios on the students. Gardeners Multiple intelligences
is a main reasoning for my pedagogy and supports the theory that “children are smart in many
ways” (Morrison, 2015, p.140-145).
As well as following Gardener’s Multiple intelligences, I also followed Blooms taxonomy in
planning the activities in my lessons. For example, one of the highest proficiencies is to
challenge students to do their own research and create something. This is my rationale for the
creation of the multiple posters and the timeline project. For students to be able to create
something they apply what they know, connect to bigger ideas and present their findings. This is
also my reasoning for providing checklists to the students. The checklists provide a range for the
three levels of proficiency and allow the students to reach their target, while using self
assessment tools.
In the beginning of my lesson I wanted to impose a sense of curiosity over the students and get
them thinking about inventions and how they impact our lives. Starting out the unit with
questions and curiosity is based on Piaget’s theory that “children learn only when their curiosity
is not fully satisfied. He thought that children’s curiosity actually drives learning” (Mooney,
2000, p.62). Therefore, by showing students an empowering and engaging video as well as
getting them to think about the importance of inventions, allows their curiosity to help them want
to learn more throughout the unit.
Many of my lessons were based on discussion and allowing the students to talk with one another
to discuss important questions. I chose my questions wisely in order to allow students to think
about bigger ideas. My reasoning for this is that research shows, “Effective teachers plan good
sequences of questions that will help their students develop their understanding of big ideas and
provide opportunities to apply them (Allenman, Brophy & Knighton, 2009, p.58). Therefore by
facilitating discussions and allowing students to work with various partners, I am providing them
with opportunities to succeed. I allowed many different groupings that diversify who students
work with because, “Vygotsky believed that language presents the shared experience necessary
for building cognitive development. He believed that talking is necessary to clarify important
points but also that talking with others helps us to learn more about communication” (Mooney,
2000, p.90). Through this communication the students will be able to combine their ideas and
master the objectives. These open-ended projects embedded within the lesson have many choice
options in which students have to do their own research and apply what they know to be
successful. Therefore my reasoning for this type of pedagogy is explained through the research
of Piaget and his discovery that, “open-ended activities and questions support children’s
cognitive development because they ask children to think. They put them in the position of
inquiry, of finding out what the possibilities are…”(Mooney, 2000, p.77). When students are

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allowed to have the freedom to think outside the box and come up with solutions to problems,
this inquiry generates critical thinking skills.
As I planned these lessons, I tried to make them relatable to the students so that they would not
only be interested but understand key concepts. “According to Dewey, Children’s interests form
the basis for curriculum planning. The interests and background of each child and group must be
considered when teachers plan learning experiences” (Mooney, 2000, p.5). Therefore, by
provided students with examples and opportunities to research the things they are interested in,
and acknowledging their culture, sparks their curiosity and participation in the unit. “Dewey
believed that when people are engaged in learning something that interested them and is related
to their experience, the process of learning is enjoyable” (Mooney, 2000, p.15). I wanted this
unit to be fun. The pedagogy I chose above, allowed me to differentiate with my highly
proficient students as well as my very low in proficiency and IEP students. I gave multiple
opportunities in various forms for the students to achieve the set goals and objectives for this unit
and overall, by teaching this way, my unit should be successful.
References
Brophy, Jere E., et al. Inside the Social Studies Classroom. Routledge, 2009.

Mooney, Carol Garhart. Theories of childhood: an introduction to Dewey, Montessori, Erikson,


Piaget, and Vygotsky. Langara College, 2000.

Morrison, G. S. (2015). Early childhood education today. New York: Pearson.

Goals of the Unit: The students will be able to understand the following by the end of the unit:
-Can the students define an invention?
-Can the students do independent research to learn about an inventor?
-Can they display knowledge that an invention impacts or changes the way of life?
-Can they create their own invention and show their understanding of how an invention helps
make life easier or solves a problem?
- Can the students present their ideas and give positive feedback?
-Can the students facilitate their own discussions?
-Can the students justify their own opinions?
-Can the students show how inventions evolve?
-Can the students use multiple forms of literature to explain how inventions and inventors had an
impact in history and help people?

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Objective/Desired Student Outcome/Guiding or Essential Questions of the Entire Unit:
- The students will be able to explain through their own research how inventions and
inventors have an impact on history.
- The students will be able to create their own invention that makes life easier or solves a
problem.
- The students will be able to present and explain their inventions to the class thoroughly
and with details.
- The students will be able to self-assess their overall work and be held accountable by
using a checklist to show completion of all assignments, therefore showing which goals
of the unit they have completed.

Assessments and Evaluations of the Entire Unit:


- The first two objectives of, “The students will be able to explain through their own
research how inventions and inventors have an impact on history”, and “The students
will be able to create their own invention that makes life easier or solves a problem”,
will be assessed through the completion and evaluation of their Timeline card, Inventor
poster projects, sneaker solution project and their own invention project. These are
formal assessments of student work, in which a checklist will be used to check for all the
required criteria. Student work samples are a form of authentic formal assessment
because “it demonstrates what the child knows and is able to do, and it is used as
evidence to assess a student’s abilities” (Morrison, 2015, p.80). Therefore, through the
collection of student work samples I will be able to see if they meet these first two
objectives. These four projects give the students multiple opportunities to meet these
objectives and will inform me to see their strengths and weaknesses.

- The Third objective of, “The students will be able to present and explain their
inventions to the class thoroughly and with details”, will be assessed through a rubric.
Through presentation and completion of their poster it will allow me to see if they can
explain their thinking thoroughly and with details. I chose to use a rubric because it
differentiates between levels of performance and will show me who is considered
beginning, developing or proficient. Rubrics, “Enable children to distinguish between
levels of performance and to strive to do their best” (Morrison, 2015, p.85). By allowing
student to see what proficient looks like and to see their goals clearly and it will make
my expectations clear. Using a rubric to assess will allow me to see children’s strengths
and weaknesses as well as how they met this objective.

- The last objective of, “The students will be able to self-assess their overall work and be
held accountable by using a checklist to show completion of all assignments, therefore
showing which goals of the unit they have completed”, will be assessed through the
formal assessments of both a checklist and a portfolio. The students will have their own
checklists to be used for a self-assessment to make sure all of their work is completed
and handed in. This type of checklist is an assessment tool for the students to assess their
work before they hand it in to me. Checklists “provide specific steps for competing
tasks to the highest level are similar to rubrics”(Morrison, 2015, p.84). The students will

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be held accountable for their work, shown through circling (yes or no) on their
checklists. I will then be using a formal assessment of a student portfolio to assess the
students’ abilities to meet each unit goal. I chose to use a portfolio as an assessment
because it, “reflects students’ cognitive, social, emotional, and physical development,
and provides a visual record of a student’s process of learning over time” (Morrison,
2015, p.81). This will also be used in the parent teacher conferences to show the level
of work and strengths their student has been accomplishing in the class.

- Morrison, G. S. (2015). Early childhood education today. New York: Pearson.

Resources for the Unit:


Scholastic news
Adams,J. (2014). Rock Star Robots. Science Spin, 3-6 March 2014; Scholastic.
Hindley, J., & Chamberlain, M. (1993). A Piece of String is a Wonderful Thing. US: Candlewick
Press
Caney, S. (1985). Steven Caneys invention book, "The Invention of Sneakers". New York:
Workman Pub.

Comprehension test and worksheets taken from Scholastic

Dalheim, Mary. (2002). National geographic for kids, “What do you do with Dirty Rotten
Sneakers?” National Geographic Society Vol.1 No.5

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=75okexRzWMk

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Lesson Plans
Title of Lesson: What is an invention and could we be inventors?
Date(s): Feb 5th
Overview: The students will define the word, invention. I will show, in multiple ways, how
anyone can be an inventor. Have the students create and discover the steps in planning an
invention.
Rationale: This lesson is important for the start of the sequences because it shows the students
prior knowledge, and gets them interested for the rest of the unit. This lesson shows how anyone
could be an inventor by showing a multicultural video. It starts a conversation about, is
everything an invention? What makes something an invention? Where do “things” come from?
Goals: Students will learn the definition of invention and patent. The students recognize that
anyone can be an inventor, get curious about where “things” come from, and ask other curious
questions.
Objective/Desired Student Outcome/Guiding or Essential Questions:
-Students will write their own definition of the word invention and incorporate ideas from
the class discussion.
- Students will recognize that anyone can be an inventor by answering oral questions from
class discussion.
Common Core/Next Generation Learning Standards:
Literacy standards:
4R4: Determine the meaning of words, phrases, figurative language, academic and content
specific words.
4W7: Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from multiple
sources
4SL7: Engage efficiently in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners,
expressing ideas clearly, and building on those of others.
4L6: Acquire and accurately use general academic and content specific words and phrases… and
that are basic to a particular topic.
Key Vocabulary and Definitions:
1. Invention (noun): is the creation of a new device, process or product
2. Patent: the exclusive right granted by a government to an inventor to manufacture, use, or sell
an invention for a certain number of years.
Materials/Resources:
1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=75okexRzWMk

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Learning Sequence: In this introductory lesson I will activate the students prior knowledge and
help them create their own definition of what an invention is. They will brainstorm as a class
and formulate ideas off of each other as I write some of their key ideas on the board. They will
then use those ideas to form their own individual definitions of the word “invention”. After 4 or
five students share their definitions I will show them the real definition and explain to them that
everything that they said is incorporated into this real definition. I will ask 10 students in the
class, whether they have their hands raised or not, to tell me an invention in this classroom. I will
ask them, “is everything in here an invention”? As they ponder that question I will set up a video
of an African American child dreaming to become an inventor. The video shows him touring and
speaking to engineers at GE Aviation and both him and the engineers give advice and explain
how he and anyone can become an inventor. I chose this video not only for it’s advice and
innovative ideas by this child, but because it shows multiple races in this role as an inventor to
prove to the students that someone that looks like them, can be an inventor too. I also do this
because a lot of “well known” inventors are white men, and it is important to clear this bias
before we get to further research. After the showing of this video, I will facilitate a class
discussion of if they think they can be inventors. Then through class discussion I will have
students create a list of the steps they think it takes to invent an invention and record it on the
board.. The list will include: have an idea, research, plan, get materials, build, test, re-plan, re-
test (until it works or you change your idea) and finalize (get a patent). I will then define and
explain what it means to have a patent.
After this, I will let the students know that at the end of the unit they will have a chance to plan
their own creation, but before they do that they need to learn what is already out there, how
inventors came up with their ideas etc. Then, I will have the students grab a book from the book
box that the librarians created for our class with inventors and inventions to have them read until
special to get their curiosity started.
Assessment: Informal, oral questions

Title of Lesson: Top Ten and Invention timeline; How do Inventions Evolve?
Date(s): Feb 5th
Overview: Students will brainstorm what it means to evolve. Students will list what inventions
they consider to be the “most important” to “least important” and share their perspectives to
participate in a facilitated class discussion/debate. This is an example of multiple perspectives,
debates as well as respecting and justifying one’s opinion. Students will, as a group of two,
research an invention and reflect how it benefits or impacts our lives today. They will create a
jumbo index card of information and place it in the correct order on the timeline, that is created
for all three fourth grade classrooms.
Goals: The students will be able to work cooperatively in order to learn about an invention and
how it evolved over time. The students will learn about other inventions and when they were
first created. The students will reflect on why these inventions will have an impact or change the
way we live today. Students will grasp how inventions evolved over time though visual
representation and class completion of the timeline.

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Objective/Desired Student Outcome/Guiding or Essential Questions:
-Students will be able to place inventions chronologically in order.
-Students will use research to learn about an invention and explain, through completion of the
project, how the invention has changed the way people live.
Common Core/Next Generation Learning Standards:
Literacy standards
4W6: conduct research to answer questions including self generated questions, and to build
knowledge through investigating multiple aspects of a topic.
4W7: Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from multiple
sources
4SL7: Engage efficiently in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners,
expressing ideas clearly, and building on those of others.
Social studies practices

B. Chronological Reasoning and Causation

2. Employ mathematical skills to measure time in years and centuries. Understand the difference
between B.C.E. and C.E. Identify the chronological significance of data presented in time lines,
with teacher support.

6. Use periods of time such, as decades and centuries to put events into chronological order.

F. Civic Participation

1. Demonstrate respect for the rights of others in discussions and classroom debates, regardless of
whether one agrees with the other viewpoints.

Common core math practice

MP.4 Model with mathematics. (Time line)

Key Vocabulary and Definitions:


Evolve (verb): develop gradually [over time] especially from a simple to a more complex form
Century- a period of one hundred years
Time line- a graphic representation of the passage of time
BCE-before common era
(AD) CE-common era

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Materials/Resources: Jumbo Index card, pictures of inventions, chrome books, projector to
show my example, paper. Multiple resources for each invention, includes books, web pages etc.
Learning Sequence:
I will place ten pictures of inventions on the board (engine, compass, paper, the wheel, the
computer, the light bulb, nails, airplane, iPhone, fidget spinner). I will give all the students a
piece of paper and will ask them to look at the board and each individually rank these 10
inventions by what they think the most important invention is to the least. I will give them 3
minuets to do so. Then I will ask some students to share their top 3 and bottom 2 choices. I will
ask them why they chose that invention to be at the top and bottom. I will facilitate a discussion
after I get a few more examples. The students will have to justify their reasoning for placing
these inventions in the order they put them in. I will play devils advocate and try to get them to
think about things like; can that invention exist with out something else?, why is the invention
you put on the bottom or top important?, and comparing children’s perspectives etc. Then I will
explain how there is no right or wrong answer and that the entire class is entitled to their own
opinions in which it is appropriate to respect these multiple perspectives. Through the facilitation
of discussion I will hopefully get the students to see how some of the most simple inventions
actually play a crucial role in history. This leads me into the invention timeline activity.
I will lead into this activity by asking the students what it means to evolve. I will then ask, what
does it mean for technology to evolve? I will then explain how people didn’t just come up with
the Iphone, it took many years over time to figure out the resources and advancements in
discoveries to create the iPhone. I will explain that the technology and inventions we have today
evolved over time. The students will be assigned partners in groups of two, as well as an
invention. They will research and record information about there assigned invention on a jumbo
index card. They will follow a checklist of criteria to include on their card such as; a picture of
the invention, the name of the inventor(s), the year it was patented, where it was created, and
answer the question of “how do you think this invention changed the way people lived?” The
students will then place their invention, in the correct order on the timeline outside the
classroom. I will show them an example I created and go over how to place the cards. I will
explain what the word “century” means as well as explain the dates that are incorporated in
“BCE” and “BC”. Then the students will work together to complete this assignment.
Differentiation: On the handout I provided a graphic as an example of the way the project is
suggested to look. I also allow the students an option to type or write on their index card.
Assessment: informal; discussion questions
formal assessment, rubric/checklist
My assessment will be based on their completion of the activity. I will be assessing for the
completion of all requirements, a completed answer of “how do you think this invention changed
the way people lived?”, and placing their card in the right spot of the timeline.
I will then keep track of their progress in a checklist.

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Here is the assessment/criteria I will be using:

_____Include a Picture/Drawing of the first invention

_____ Include the first name of the Invention

_____ Include the year that it was patented

_____ Include the name of the Inventor(s)

_____ Include where the invention was created

_____ Answer question #4 (how do you think this invention changed the way people lived?)

_____ Create a neat project (feel free to decorate the outside of the card with a BORDER)

_____Put you/your partner’s names on the card

_____ Place your index card on the timeline in the correct order

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Title of Lesson: Science Spin, Rock Star Robots (citing evidence literacy based lesson)
Date(s): Feb 6th
Overview: I will read a scholastic article and model how to highlight information or evidence
from the article to answer a question. Then the students will use that information and their text as
a resource to answer a question and use examples from the text to support their answer. Then
they will answer a second question, prompting them to use a new vocabulary word.
Goals: The students will be able to find and use information from the text to support their
answer to a question.
Objective/Desired Student Outcome/Guiding or Essential Questions:
-Students will use evidence from the text to support their answer to a question logically by
completion of a handout.
Common Core/Next Generation Learning Standards:
Literacy standard
4R1: locate and refer to relevant details and evidence when explaining what a text says
explicitly/implicitly and make logical inferences (RI &RL)
4R4: Determine the meaning of words, phrases, figurative language, academic and content
specific words.

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Key Vocabulary and Definitions:
Program: to give a machine a set of instruction
Robot: a machine that is controlled by a computer and can do work on its own
Industrial: used in factories
Humanoid: shaped like a person
Versatile: able to do many different things
Mobile: able to move easily
Materials/Resources:
Highlighter
Adams,J. (2014). Rock Star Robots. Science Spin, 3-6 March 2014; Scholastic.
Learning Sequence: The students will be given a Scholastic article. I will read the question that
will be answered independently at the end of the article. Next, I will read this article aloud. I will
put the article on the projector and show through a mini think-aloud, how I navigate the text and
highlight specific evidence I think could support my answer to the question I just read to them. I
will stop and show how every time I reach an example that answers the question, I stop and show
my reasoning for highlighting this specific information. I will also go over certain vocabulary
words, by using the glossary and showing how I can figure out the meaning of a word through
context clues. Also, how doing so helps me comprehend the text. Then, at the end of the
reading, I will re-read the question and ask the students to answer the question using supporting
details and assessing the students by collecting samples of their work and recording if they met
the objective.
Differentiation: The story will be read aloud for students to be able to listen to a fluent reader.
The strategy will be modeled for all students. Groups of students will be placed at tables with
appropriate supportive help.
Assessment: Formal; checklist/rubric for worksheet
The criteria in the checklist/rubric will assess if the students used the appropriate amount of
evidence to support their answer to the question.
Checklist:

Understands fully Almost there Not there yet


Restate the question?
Used examples from
the text?

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Answered logically
Answer is explained
with detail

I will then create a checklist to see who needs further development of this strategy and feedback
will be given to all students.

Title of Lesson: Stinky Sneakers


Date(s): Feb 6th-Feb 9
Overview: This lesson will incorporate multiple ways to look at resources and how inventions
can solve problems. The students will first gain general knowledge of sneakers and how they
were invented, as well as the many materials used to improve the quality and efficiency of
sneakers. Then they will complete multiple literacy based assignments according to that reading.
Then they will read about “stinky sneakers”. The students will then create a poster to invent a
solution to stinky sneakers. They will discuss how their invention will solve the problem and
what resources they could use to help.
Goals: Students will be able to recognize that different resources can be used to improve an
invention, inventions help solve problems and other inventions can help create or improve a
different invention. Students will have practice with multiple literary concepts, while learning
about the inventions topic.
Objective/Desired Student Outcome/Guiding or Essential Questions:
-Students will be able to answer questions based on the text, figure out the main idea, use
strategies to find word meaning and explain the sequence of events through completion of a
comprehension test.
-Students will be able to select details form the text to support the main idea shown through
completion of the worksheet
-Students will be able to explain events, ideas and concepts shown through the completion of the
worksheet.
-Students will apply their knowledge of the word resources by labeling their invention
-Students will be able to show how inventions can solve problems by completion and written
explanation of their own invention.
Next Generation Learning Standards:
Literacy standards
4R1: locate and refer to relevant details and evidence when explaining what a text says
explicitly/implicitly and make logical inferences (RI &RL)

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4R4: Determine the meaning of words, phrases, figurative language, academic and content
specific words.
4L4: determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases,
choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
4L4a: use context (e.g., Definitions, examples, or restatements in text) as a clue to the
meaning of a word or phrase.
4R2: Determine a theme or central idea of text and explain how it is supported by key details;
summarize a text. (RI & RL)
4R3: In informational texts, explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts, including what
happened and why, based on specific evidence from the text (RI).
Key Vocabulary and Definitions:
Resource: a place or thing that provides something useful
Vulcanization: Treated with heat and sulfur to make stronger and more elastic
Croquet: a game in which players use wooden mallets to hit balls through a series of curved
wires that are stuck into the ground

Intrigued (verb): to make (someone) want to know more about something : to cause (someone)
to become interested
Substance: the physical matter that a thing consists of

Materials/Resources:
Caney, S. (1985). Steven Caneys invention book, "The Invention of Sneakers". New York:
Workman Pub.

Comprehension test and worksheet taken from Scholastic

Dalheim, Mary. (2002). National geographic for kids, “What do you do with Dirty Rotten
Sneakers?” National Geographic Society Vol.1 No.5

Learning Sequence:
First, I will read aloud the story of The Invention of Sneakers from Steven Caney’s Invention
book. The reading talks about how throughout history how people tried to make things to protect
their feet. Then It talks about Charles Goodyear and the invention of rubber as well as Henry
McKinney and materials he used to produce the sneaker. After the reading, the students will be
given a comprehension assessment, in which they can go back into the text, if needed, to help
figure out the answers. Then the students will be given a checklist with the order of things to

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accomplish throughout this lesson. This will take a few days to accomplish so I organized it for
them in a checklist to allow for students to work at different paces.
The next assignment is a packet that contains other literary practice according to this story, such
as vocabulary, answering questions with evidence, comprehension questions, and problem
solution practice.
The next assignment is to read What do you do with Dirty Rotten Sneakers? This reading will set
up the student for the activity. The students will create a poster in which they have to come up
with an invention to solve the problem of stinky sneakers. The students will draw and label the
resources used in their inventions and then describe how it works and solves the problem of dirty
stinky sneakers. This integrates creativity and resourcefulness with underlying learning how
inventions can be improved to solve everyday problems.
Differentiation:
The text was read aloud for the students who struggle with readings, as well as being able to hear
a fluent reader. The checklist of activities allows for students to work at their own pace. The
students can choose to use speech to text as a typing tool for their write up of their invention.
Assessment:
Formal, Comprehension test
Informal, checklist of completion of packet, which includes a variety of literacy strategy
practices
Formal, Rubric for completion of sneaker solution activity. (shown below)

Needs to Include Yes/No


How their invention works
How their invention solves this problem
Neat and creative drawing
Labels drawing with multiple resources/ other
inventions they can use

Title of Lesson: “A Piece of String is a Wonderful Thing”


Date(s): Feb 13
Overview: The students will be read aloud a poem about the many uses of string and how such a
simple thing we all know of is crucial to everyone’s daily life. This story goes through history
and how there are many uses for string. The students will take a comprehension test, using their

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books as a reference. Then they will work on a packet that if not finished could be worked on
when there is a “study hall” It will be checked when I collect their folders at the end.
Goals: The students will be able to read a different type of text; poem. The students will be able
to reference their text to answer questions about main idea, meaning of vocabulary, sequence of
events and supporting details through assessment of a comprehension test and selected
supplemental worksheet.
Objective/Desired Student Outcome/Guiding or Essential Questions:
-Students will be able to answer questions based on the text, figure out the main idea, use
strategies to find word meaning and explain the sequence of events through completion of a
comprehension test.
-Students will be able to select details form the text to support the main idea shown through
completion of the worksheet
-Students will be able to explain events, ideas and concepts shown through the completion of the
worksheet.
Next Generation Learning Standards:
4R1: locate and refer to relevant details and evidence when explaining what a text says
explicitly/implicitly and make logical inferences (RI &RL)
4R4: Determine the meaning of words, phrases, figurative language, academic and content
specific words.
4L4: determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases,
choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
4L4a: use context (e.g., Definitions, examples, or restatements in text) as a clue to the
meaning of a word or phrase.
4R2: Determine a theme or central idea of text and explain how it is supported by key details;
summarize a text. (RI & RL)
Key Vocabulary and Definitions:
Populous: large population
Materials/Resources:
Hindley, J., & Chamberlain, M. (1993). A Piece of String is a Wonderful Thing. US: Candlewick
Press

Comprehension test and worksheet taken from Scholastic

Learning Sequence: A teacher will read this poem aloud, calling on multiple students
sporadically to read a section of the poem. The students will then take a comprehension test and

15
complete a packet that contains practice for the state test as well as literacy skills. This lesson is
a comprehension lesson that ties into inventions because of the content.
Differentiation: The story will be read aloud with helps the students who are at a lower
proficiency in reading. The questions can be read to the students. Appropriate assistance can be
used to support.
Assessment:
Formal; comprehension test
Informal; checklist for completion of packet at the end of the unit with collection of their folders.

Title of Lesson: Math integration lesson- Inventors of food


Date(s): Feb 12th
Overview: In this lesson I will tell the students that I have invented my own cookie recipe and
that they need to increase my recipe so I have enough cookies to bring in for the whole class.
Then they will complete a supplemental fraction worksheet that has to do with using operations
to solve fractional word problems that have to do with food. Then I will give them a fun “search
and find” worksheet, where they will read about different food inventors, such as pizza, fast food
restaurants, chocolate chip cookies and potato chips.
Goals: Students will be able to use repeated addition or multiplication to increase the fractional
real-life cookie recipe.
Objective/Desired Student Outcome/Guiding or Essential Questions:
-Students will be able to use multiplication or repeated addition to increase cookie recipe.
-Students will be able to solve word problems involving multiplication of a whole number by a
fraction.
-Students will be able to solve word problems using addition or subtraction.
-Students will learn about various food inventors by completing grade-level reading and fill-in
“search and find”.
Next Generation Learning Standards:
Mathematics standards
Build fractions from unit fractions by applying and extending previous understandings of
operations on whole numbers.
a.Understand addition and subtraction of fractions as joining and separating parts referring to the
same whole.
d.Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions referring to the same
whole and having like denominators.

16
c. Solve word problems involving multiplication of a whole number by a fraction.
4. Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication to multiply a whole number by a
fraction.
Literacy standards
4RF4: Read grade-level text with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension
Key Vocabulary and Definitions: n/a
“prior knowledge”- adding, subtracting, and multiplying fractions.
Materials/Resources:
Self-made worksheets
Here are the websites these readings came from:
Who invented pizza?-wonderopolis.com
Who invented potato chips?-wonderopolis.com
Who invented the first fast food restaurant?- wonderopolis.com
Fannie Farmer: Cookbook Author who instituted exact measuring –Americacomesalive.com
Chocolate chip Cookie Inventor: Ruth Wakefield –Americacomesalive.com
Learning Sequence:
I will begin this lesson by expressing my need for the students help. I will then tell them why I
need their help and say something like this:
“Friends, one day I was at a party and the guests at the party brought dessert. It turns out 5
people brought the same dessert, Chocolate chip cookies. So I thought it would be fun to try all
5 to see which one was the best. So I tried all 5 and I was just really disappointed, because some
were to hard, one tasted burnt, one was too salty, and one had too many chocolate chips it was
like a chocolate bar. Ever since then I decided to try and INVENT my own chocolate chip
cookie recipe. So, I had to try many different batches. I didn’t want to waste any of my
ingredients so I only made a batter that made 4 cookies. And Friends, I have finally
accomplished my goal, I have invented my own perfect chocolate chip cookie recipe. So
remember I said I need your help? Well I only made my batter big enough for 4 cookies, and
with all of you plus all of our teachers I think I should make 24 cookies. If you all increase my
cookie recipe to make 24 cookies, I will bring in my invented recipe for you all to taste!”
Then I will ask how we can figure out how many times we need to increase my recipe by. Then
once they all know that it has to be increased 6 times, I will give them the sheet with my recipe
on it and they can work in groups or individually to complete the sheet and hand it in to me. This
will also be the assessment of multiplying fractions by whole numbers or using repeated
addition.

17
Then there will be a supplemental fraction worksheet, and a fun “search and find” worksheet
where they need to read various of informational articles and complete the fill-ins and crossword
for a fun little treat.
Assessment:
Informal, checklist. Formal, student sample
My recipe worksheet will be the assessment and will assess whether they can or cannot multiply
fractions by a whole number, or use repeated addition. (I will also write a note, thanking them
for their help in determining the correct amount of ingredients, and actually bring them in).
Checklist after collection of sample and checking their work:

Objective Meet objective?


Multiply whole number by fraction Yes/no
Solve word problems using addition or Yes/no
subtraction
Used repeated addition? Yes/no

Title of Lesson: Research of inventors


Date(s): Feb8th-feb 16th
Overview: The students will do their own research on an inventor and present their knowledge
in the form of a poster or Google slide.
Goals: Students will do their own research on an inventor.
Objective/Desired Student Outcome/Guiding or Essential Questions:
-Students will provide research and write a coherent report in which includes paraphrasing
information, facts and other details on their inventor in the form of a poster or Google slide.
Common Core/Next Generation Learning Standards:
Literacy standards:
4W2: Write informative, explanatory texts to explore a topic and convey ideas and information
relevant to a subject
4W2b: develop ideas on a topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, or other relevant
information
4w2c: use precise language and domain specific vocabulary
4SL2: paraphrase portions of information presented in diverse formats

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4W6: conduct research to answer questions including self generated questions, and to build
knowledge through investigating multiple aspects of a topic.
Social studies standards

4.6e Entrepreneurs and inventors associated with New York State have made important
contributions to business and technology.

 Students will research several people who made important contributions to business,
technology, and New York State communities. Some people to consider include Thomas
Jennings, Thomas Edison, Henry Steinway, John Jacob Bausch, Henry Lomb, Cornelius
Vanderbilt, Lewis H. Latimer, Jacob Schoellkopf, Nikola Tesla, George Westinghouse, George
Eastman, Amory Houghton, Willis Carrier, John D. Rockefeller, Edward H. Harriman, J.P.
Morgan, Hetty Green, Emily Roebling, and Elisha Otis, and others, as locally appropriate.

Key Vocabulary and Definitions: n/a


Materials/Resources:
Ducksters.com (for biographies)
Learning Sequence: Mostly based on student interest, I have selected inventors for the students
to research. I have given some students the same inventor, and expressed the option of working
with the person that has the same inventor or not. The students will create a poster, or a Google
slide that incorporates the criteria listed on the direction. They need to include the inventors
name, a picture of the inventor and their inventions, a biography of that inventor, the use of the
inventions created, an explanation of how they came up with the idea (if known), 2 or more fun
facts, and most importantly “how you think their inventions have made an impact on our lives
today”. There is a grading scale located at the bottom of their sheet, in which will be used for
the assessment.
Differentiation: Students can use speech to text for write up. Has the choice of Google slide, or
poster.
Assessment:
Formal, poster/Google slide
The grading scale includes “a check plus” for 7-8 of the criteria, a check- for 5-6 of the criteria
and a check minus for 5 or less of the criteria.

Criteria

________ The inventor’s name

_________A picture of the inventor, and the invention(s).


(try to find a picture of one of the first inventions)

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________ The inventor’s biography (where they are from, born-died, etc.)

________The invention or inventions this person has created and their


use.

________ An explanation of how they came up with the idea (if known)

________ How you think their inventions have made an impact on our
lives today?

________2 or more fun facts about the inventor

________Neat and organized well

Title of Lesson: Your own Invention


Date(s): Feb 12th- March 2nd
Overview: The students will have the opportunity to invent their own invention. They will write
up their idea and present it to the class in the form of a poster, to provide a visual, the use and
how it helps solve a problem or make life easier.
Goals: The students will use what they know about inventions and create their own invention
that makes life easier or solves a problem. They will write up this and present it to the class to
demonstrate their ability to verbally explain what their invention is and does. Through their
creativity it will show if they understand what an invention is and if they understand the concept
that an invention makes life easier or solves a problem.
Objective/Desired Student Outcome/Guiding or Essential Questions:
-Students will invent their own invention to show their understanding of what an invention is and
show through their creativity that it solves a problem or makes life easier.
-Students will present their ideas to the class using a clear and loud voice.
Common Core/Next Generation Learning Standards:
Literacy standards
4W4: Create a poem, story, play ARTWORK, or other response to a text, author, theme or
personal experience
4SL4: report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and
relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly and an understandable place.
4SL5: include digital media and or visual displays un presentations to emphasize main ideas or
themes

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4SL6: distinguish between contexts that call for formal English verses or informal discourse; use
formal English when appropriate to task and situation
Learning Sequence: The students will create a final project of their own invention. I will give
them the direction sheet and explain how they can brainstorm and use the planning page to write
down their thoughts. Then they can create their own invention and follow the criteria. They are
to draw and label their invention as well as explain how it works, include a creative name for
their invention, state who can use their invention or who it was made for, if there was a reason
for them inventing it or how they came up with the idea, how does it solve a problem or make
life easier, and what materials might they use to create it. Then they will get the rubric for
presentation and will present to the class. While the class listens to the presenter they will fill
out a card with the student’s name, name of their invention and a positive comment or question
they have about their invention to provide peer support and feedback.
Assessment: Rubric for final presentations/poster
Presentation Rubric
Name:

Category 4 3 2 1
Content* Includes all 8 Includes 6 or Includes 4 or Includes less
criteria more criteria more than 4 criteria
see checklist
below
Poster Neat, organized, Neat, organized, Neat, organized, Poster
colored in and colored in and colored in and incomplete
their name is on their name is on their name is on
it. it. Missing one it. Missing two
of these items of these items
Volume Volume is loud Volume is loud Volume is loud Volume often too
enough to be enough to be enough to be soft to be heard
heard by all hear by all hear by all by all audience
audience audience audience members
members members at least members at least
throughout the 90% of the time 80% of the time
presentation
Speaks Clearly Speaks clearly Speaks clearly Speaks clearly Often mumbles
and distinctly all and distinctly all and distinctly all or can not be
(100-95%) of the (100-95%) of the (94-85%) of the understood OR
time, and time, and time, and mispronounces
mispronounces mispronounces mispronounces more than one
no words. one word. no more than one word.

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word.
Preparedness Student is Student seems Student seems Student does not
completely pretty prepared pretty prepared seem at all
prepared and has but might have but it was clear prepared to
obviously needed a couple that rehearsal present or
rehearsed more rehearsals was lacking doesn’t say more
(forgot to say (forgot to say than two of the
one of the two of the content criteria
content criteria content criteria located on their
located in their located in their poster.
written poster) written poster)
Enthusiasm Facial Facial Facial Very little use of
expressions and expressions and expressions and facial
body language body language body language expressions or
generate a strong sometimes are used to try to body language.
interest and generate a strong generate interest Did not generate
enthusiasm about interest and enthusiasm but much interest in
the topic in enthusiasm about seem somewhat topic being
others. the topic in faked. presented
others.

Content criteria
___________ A creative name for your invention

___________A drawing of your invention

__________ Label the parts of your invention

__________ Who can use your invention, is it made for a specific group of people, or animals?

__________How does your invention work?

__________ How did you come up with this idea?

__________How does it solve a problem or make life easier?

__________ What materials, resources, or other inventions would you use to


create your invention?

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Analysis of Assessment- Pre and Post Assessment of Unit:
Pre-assessment
This pre-assessment is in the form of an exit ticket to record student understandings of
some of the goals/objectives for the overall unit. This pre-assessment covers content
based objectives/goals in which I could analyze through the completion of their work
throughout the unit.
Content based-Pre assessment questions:
1. What is an invention? (your own definition)
2. Name and invention and explain why it is an invention?
3. Why are inventions important and how does it affect our history?
4. Make a list of inventions from the earliest to the lasts (what came first?)
Question one assesses their prior knowledge of goal 1, question two assesses their prior
knowledge on goal 3, question 3 assesses their prior knowledge of objective 1, and lastly,
question 4 assesses their prior knowledge of goal 8. These Content based objectives/goals are
measurable from the beginning to end of the unit and should be answered throughout multiple
lessons. The table below provides the results of the pre assessment.

This table shows the results of the pre assessment. Students highlighted in yellow are ENL
students. There is a consistent pattern that shows these students lack of prior knowledge and
ability to express clear thoughts on the material in questions 1,3 &4. The least amount of
knowledge comes from question three and how inventions pay a role in history, which is one of
the main objectives for the overall unit. The lack of prior information allows me to think about
what area to focus on the most and to make sure to expand on this content in order for success.
Also, I can use this data to plan my lessons around their cultural backgrounds and interests. The
students marked in purple are classified as IEP students or students with challenging behaviors.
These students participate rarely, and have trouble writing and reading in which shows the
illegible and unclear thoughts. These students have no prior knowledge on question 3 or could
not form their thoughts logically to express their ideas. Lastly, the students in orange are the

23
gifted students in the class in which two of these students already understand two concepts fully.
According to these results, I think I should have multiple ways of representing the
material and approaching these concepts. These content-based goals/objectives should be
covered more than once in a variety of ways as well as for the students to have feedback on
them. Looking at the ENL students and the lack of prior knowledge most of them have, I think
having multiple opportunities to learn and accomplish question 3 should be present in multiple
lessons. Due to the variance in student ability, I would like to follow Blooms taxonomy to craft
lessons that are engaging and will be successful at every level. The growth target for all of the
students is to show an example of all four of these objectives throughout the lessons and
assessments at least one time. However, to differentiate, I would like to see my ENL group be
successful at three out of the four overall objectives/goals. Their target goal is a little lower to
differentiate and take into account the difficulty of expressing their ideas. I would like to see
my gifted group at 100% proficiency with extension work and other extra opportunities to
express these objectives. Also, I would like my IEP/lower in proficiency group to be successful
in at least 2 out of the 4 objectives. Due to the lack of understanding shown by this pre-
assessment and the lack of participation in other lessons, their target goal is lower in order to
focus on at least two objectives more intently with support by one-on-one aides.

FINAL ASSESSMENT OVERALL UNIT/GOALS/OBJECTIVES:

For the final assessment I looked at all of the completed work and lesson assessments to see if
they met the overall unit assessment. Each question I assessed is based on whether they
completed this in the individual lesson assessments. The chart is based on the goals below, and
the identified activities I looked at to determine success.
Q1.Can the students define an invention? (definitions on day 1)
Q2. Can the students do independent research to learn about an inventor? (Inventor poster
grades/checklist if they got a check or check plus)
Q3. Can they display knowledge that an invention impacts or changes the way of life?
(answering question about inventions, answering the questions on the inventor poster, states that
a invention has an impact)
Q4. Can they create their own invention and show their understanding of how an invention helps
make life easier or solves a problem? (sneaker, sci spin, own invention)
Q5.Can the students present their ideas and give positive feedback? (presentation/feedback card)
Q6. Can the students facilitate their own discussions? (intro, top ten)
Q7.Can the students justify their own opinion? (sci-spin 2nd q, top ten discussion)
Q8.Can the students show how inventions evolve? (Timeline placement)

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Q9.Can the students use multiple forms of literature to explain how inventions and inventors had
an impact in history and help people? (food, inventors, videos, poem, story comprehension,
packet completion)
I highlighted the group of students performing at a lower level and with special needs in purple.
I highlighted the higher proficient students in orange. ENL students are highlighted in yellow.
Checklist:Yes or No (EACH QUESTION IS A GOAL FOR THE UNIT)
Student Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q5 Q6 Q7 Q8 Q9
A.a Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y
B.b Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
C.b Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
V.c N N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
C.d Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
J*IEP Y N Y Y Y N Y N N
F Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
M N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
S Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
D.l. Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
D.m Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
A.p Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
C.r Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y
E.s Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
D.s.sIEP N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
D.s Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
N.s N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
NZ Y- N- Y Y Y N- Y Y Y
verbal copied participated,
from
disorganized
internet
Ythoughts
C.k Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

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This table shows the results of the goals met by each student in the class. Each question is
linked to one or more lessons and the evaluation of each lesson’s assessments. The results based
on multiple assessments and the success of the goal is listed in the above chart. The above goals
were based on the grades by multiple projects, activities and assessments to determine the
success for the goals.
This chart shows how the two IEP students identified in yellow have been successful
throughout this unit. Student J, showed success in 5/9 goals for the unit. This tells me that my
differentiation between materials gave him multiple opportunities to be able to explain or show
his understanding in the above information. The goals he did not make were due to lack of
participation in activities. He did not do his own research on an inventor, he was not able to
facilitate appropriate conversations and he didn’t participate in using the readings to explain how
inventions have an impact on the world. However, the overall goals he did meet are above
expectations and verbal presentation helped him explain his knowledge and ideas. Student D.s.s.
shows success in all areas and was able to use the multiple ways of presenting his information to
be successful in all goals. The assessments showed his understanding of these nine goals.
Overall, as a class, the students showed 100% success in goals 3,4 and 7. These goals
had the most variance in presentation, pedagogy, and type of activity. There were the most
opportunities to meet these goals, which shows how the more I cover and overlap
objectives/goals/content, the better my students will do and succeed. It also shows how relying
on both Blooms taxonomy and Multiple intelligences is an effective strategy for planning a unit.
After analyzing this data, I can see that the goals regularly not met by students are ENL students
and have similar problems within their work samples. Within these students, there is a lack of
being able to justify opinions, getting ideas across logically and the quality of information picked
to put in their research. Although, many of them successfully can understand the objectives,
some of the assessments show that they are still weak in these areas.
Unit Objectives Met Not met
The students will be able to explain through their own 18/19 1/19
research how inventions and inventors have an impact on
history. Student J

The students will be able to create their own invention ALL --


that makes life easier or solves a problem.

The students will be able to present and explain their 18/19 1/19
inventions to the class thoroughly and with details.
Student C.r

The students will be able to self-assess their overall work 18/19 1/19
and be held accountable by using a checklist to show

26
completion of all assignments, therefore showing which Student J
goals of the unit they have completed.

This above chart shows the success of the class for the 4 overall unit objectives. Student J
has a mental illness and is a classified IEP student as discussed above. And student C.r is an ENL
student that had trouble organizing her thoughts, in which gave her trouble when she tried to
present her ideas orally. Overall, the majority of the class met these goals. The results in the
above chart were based on the grades given to the students on their inventor poster (work
sample), their presentation on their own invention poster (rubric/work sample), and their end of
the unit checklist, in which they used to be held accountable before they turned in their work at
the end of the week. The achievement of these objectives show the success of my teaching
throughout this unit and the ability of all my students to succeed in various ways. The lower
performing students did exceptionally well and these assessments show me their weaknesses and
strengths so that if I were to plan this lesson again, or another unit I would be able to use these
findings to improve my pedagogy of my lessons.
POST ASSESSMENT RESULTS /ANALYZATION

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These tables show the pre and post assessments side by side. The post assessment results are in
bold. The target goals were met by all groups of students. For question number one and goal 3,
most ENL students showed improvement from no understanding to some understanding. Two
students showed full understanding. In the lower proficiency group, 2/3 students showed full
understanding of this goal. Overall, all students improved shown by the post/pre assessment.
For question two, goal 3, there was full understanding amongst the entire class. I feel very
accomplished in teaching as well as proud of the students for showing such improvement and
success in this goal. This shows that all students are able to understand what an invention is and
how it impacts society to make life easier or to solve a problem.
For question 3, objective 1, all students progressed successfully. This objective had the most lack
of knowledge form the beginning and had the most improvement throughout the entire unit. My
lower proficiency students were able to show some understanding as well as one ENL student.
For question 4, goal 8, 18/19 students were able to show full understanding of the objective.
Student J did not participate in the lessons regarding evolution and therefore could not meet the
standard.
The gifted students met the target goal of meeting all the objectives with full understanding. The
ENL students progressed to some/full understanding with 3 or more successful understandings of
the objectives. My IEP students have been successful. Student J, accomplished 3 out of the 4
objectives successfully and has passed the target goal I set. Student NZ and D.s.s have
accomplished success in 3 or more objectives and also passed the target goals I set.
This post assessment showed great improvement in all student’s growth especially in the lower
proficient and the ENL groups in which, excelled expectations. Analyzing these results shows
me how differentiated instruction increases student success. Following Gardener’s multiple

28
intelligences and recognizing all students ability to learn differently, has proven successful in my
pedagogy. The questions I picked were measureable and the results guide the students overall
understanding of the measurable content areas I chose to assess before and after the unit.

Reflection of the Unit:


After the unit has been taught, student teachers are asked to answer the following:
1. To what extent were the students productively engaged in the learning process? The
students were very interested throughout the whole unit. They were excited to see where
things came from and who invented them. There were opportunities to work with one
another and they enjoy splitting up into groups and partners. They were engaged with all
of the projects. The lack of engagement came with the supplemental work packets to
practice literacy concepts. Some of the students find it hard to write short and long
responses and are reluctant to practice. However, I tried to find reading that were
interesting for the students to enjoy what they were reading about and therefore be
motivated to answer the corresponding questions.
2. Were students interested and motivated to learn during these lessons? Why or why
not? Did you make changes during the lessons to enhance interest or motivation?
The students were motivated to learn throughout the lessons. They like working in groups
and learning about things they are curious about. I tried to set up this unit with questions
and curiosity. I think the lack of motivation came from when the students had to read
information. I tried to make this unit as engaging as possible but when there is writing or
reading involved certain students find it difficult to complete or focus on the material.
There are a lot of students that can benefit from one-on-one assistance, mostly due to
issues with focusing, and those who are lower in reading performance level. I did change
the read and search for the food inventor lesson to an optional fun activity after the
selected time ended and students did not finish. Some thought it was uninteresting and
boring and others enjoyed learning about where the foods we all love came from.
3. Did the lesson allow for students to achieve mastery of the objective(s); and engage
in activities and learning situations that were aligned with district, state, or national
standards? The lessons allowed for multiple opportunities to meet the objectives. The
lessons covered each unit objective more than once and had opportunities for students to
represent their knowledge of the objectives in many different ways such as, visually,
orally and by writing. There were also multiple opportunities to excel at the same
objectives or skills. Written and oral feedback was giving after each lesson so that the
students can have an opportunity learn from their work and apply it further in the
following lessons. All lessons were aligned with multiple and integrated learning
standards. They were also differentiated in the way that all students could meet these
objectives effectively.
4. Did you adjust your teaching strategies and activities as you taught each lesson?
How did you adjust throughout the unit? If so, why and how?
Yes, I adjusted the way I taught the directions for the projects. I found it hard for some
students to follow my instructions so I changed the sheets to have a more visually or
graphic representation of the expectations along with a checklist for students to follow.
Once the students got to the sneakers poster, the inventors and their own creation

29
activities, the students were working on these projects at different paces. Therefore, I
found it hard to keep track of their progress. I formulated a mass checklist to keep on top
of those who were falling behind and also to plan for when to introduce the next lesson. I
also found that a lot of the students had directional questions and instead of resaying it
every day, I projected all of the possible projects on the board in order so the students
could keep organized and come up to me with these type of questions, which allowed me
to help more students with content than directions.
5. What kind of feedback did you provide to your students? In what way did it impact
student learning? I provided multiple types of feedback to my students. Written, oral,
and peer feedback. Since many of the unit objectives overlapped, with multiple activities
throughout different lessons providing such feedback allowed the students to grasp the
content and apply the feedback to another activity or project. Also, this feedback helps
the students recognize their mistakes and ask questions to further their learning.
6. What feedback did you receive from the students indicating they had achieved
understanding and that the objective(s) were met for the lessons? The feedback I
received was their results from each lessons’ assessment. I then transferred these results
over to a checklist to see overall how my students were doing. By evaluating the students
and their work samples I could see who was meeting the objectives and who needed more
experience with the materials to grasp certain concepts. This allowed me to understand
who was on track and who needed extra support to meet the objectives.
7. If you had the opportunity to teach these lessons again to this same group of
students, what would you do differently? Why? I think I would take out the stinky
sneaker solution lesson and substitute it for an engineering type lesson where I give the
students a problem and ask them to make something to either solve the problem or make
the task easier. That way the lesson becomes more hands on and realistic. They can also
see exactly how resources and inventions can be used to solve a problem or make life
easier by creating and experimenting.
8. What suggestions from the students, cooperating teacher or supervisor you did
incorporate in the lessons or that you would incorporate if you taught the lessons
again? My Cooperating teacher gave me support and a lot of materials to add to this
unit, that she wanted covered. I would take some of these materials out and add new ones
of my own if I could re-teach this. There were a lot of boring readings that I could make
more interesting and still have the same lesson objectives to go along with them. After
teaching with some of her materials I felt as if there was no value to these materials and if
I could change some of the materials for new ones I think some lessons would be more
engaging and motivating. I received feedback from my students by giving them an
evaluation for the unit. I asked them what they liked or didn’t like about the lesson. I
asked them what they thought I should change and what they would like to learn more
about. Therefore I would use these results to form some new activities/lessons as well as
slightly change some lessons. If I had more time and resources I would try to have an
engineering station so that the students can craft/built their inventions. I would have
loved to give them a task and ask them to complete/solve the problem by building
something.

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